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Featured · Queen’s Park ·
November
27
2022

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Northumberland Avenue, WC2N
Northumberland Avenue runs from Trafalgar Square in the west to the Thames Embankment in the east. In 1608–09, Henry Howard, 1st Earl of Northampton built a house on the eastern side of the former Chapel and Hospital of St. Mary Rounceval, at Charing Cross, including gardens running to the River Thames and adjoining Scotland Yard to the west. The estate became the property of Algernon Percy, 10th Earl of Northumberland when he married Howard’s great-great niece, Lady Elizabeth, in 1642, whereupon it was known as Northumberland House.

In June 1874, the whole of Northumberland House was purchased by the Metropolitan Board of Works and demolished to form Northumberland Avenue, which would accommodate hotels. The road was part built on the parallel Northumberland Street.

Contemporary planning permissions forbade hotels to be taller than the width of the road they were on; consequently Northumberland Avenue was built with a wide carriageway. Part of the parallel Northumberland Street was demolished in order to make way for the avenue’s eastern...

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JULY
26
2022

 

Houghton Street (1906)
A greengrocer’s on the corner of Houghton Street and Clare Market (behind The Strand) in 1906 just before demolition The thoroughfare known as Clare Market, leading eastwards into Lincoln’s Inn Fields, was so called in honour of the Earl of Clare, who lived "in a princely mansion" adjacent. His name is inscribed as a parishioner of St. Clement Danes in the ratebooks of 1617. In Howell’s "Londinopolis" of 1657 we read: "Then is there, towards Drury Lane, a new market, called Clare Market; then is there a street and palace of the same name, built by the Earl of Clare, who lived there in a princely mansion, having a house, a street, and a market both for flesh and fish, all bearing his name." It is also mentioned by Strype:- "Clare Market, very considerable and well served with provisions, both flesh and fish; for, besides the butchers in the shambles, it is much resorted unto by the country butchers and higglers. The market-days are Wednesdays and Saturdays."

"This market," says Nightingale, in the tenth volume of the Beauties of England and Wales, "stands on what was...
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JULY
25
2022

 

The Hare
The Hare is situated at 505 Cambridge Heath Road The Hare has existed on this site since the 1770s. The current building dates from around 1860.
»read full article


JUNE
24
2022

 

Goldhawk Road, W6
Goldhawk Road is a main road in West London, which starts at Shepherd’s Bush and runs west Goldhawk Road’s name derives from one John Goldhawk, who in the late 14th century held extensive estates in Fulham.

Goldhawk Road was of little note until the mid-seventeenth century, when a cottage on the street became the home of one Miles Sindercombe, a disgruntled Roundhead who in 1657 made several attempts to assassinate Oliver Cromwell. Sindercombe planned to ambush the Lord Protector using a specially built machine with muskets fixed to a frame. His plan failed, Sindercombe was sentenced to death, and his cottage was eventually demolished in the 1760s.

A map of London dated 1841 shows Goldhawk Road forming the southern boundary of Shepherd’s Bush Green. At that time Shepherd’s Bush was still largely undeveloped and chiefly rural in character, with much open farmland compared to fast-developing Hammersmith, and several ponds or small lakes. Scattered buildings are shown, mostly lining the main thoroughfares of Wood Lane, Cumberland...
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JUNE
23
2022

 

Pentonville Road, N1
Pentonville Road connects Kings Cross and the Angel, Islington Pentonville Road, renamed in 1857 after the new town of Pentonville, was originally built in the mid-18th century as part of the New Road, a bypass of Central London designed for coach traffic. Numerous factories and commercial premises were established on the road in the 19th and 20th centuries, particularly after the arrival of railways in the 1840s.

The road was designed as an integral part of Pentonville, a new suburb named after landowner Henry Penton. It was situated away from the city and became a local hub for manufacturing. There was a debate over the final route of the road - the original plan running through and owned by the Skinners Company and the New River Company was rejected in favour of the route further north via Battle Bridge.

After completion in 1756, the route now covered by Pentonville Road was largely fields, with Battle Bridge occupying the space where King’s Cross now is. The road’s route included a tavern known as Bu...
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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Born here
   
Added: 16 Nov 2022 12:39 GMT   

The Pearce family lived in Gardnor Road
The Pearce family moved into Gardnor Road around 1900 after living in Fairfax walk, my Great grandfather, wife and there children are recorded living in number 4 Gardnor road in the 1911 census, yet I have been told my grand father was born in number 4 in 1902, generations of the Pearce continue living in number 4 as well other houses in the road up until the 1980’s

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Born here
   
Added: 16 Nov 2022 12:38 GMT   

The Pearce family lived in Gardnor Road
The Pearce family moved into Gardnor Road around 1900 after living in Fairfax walk, my Great grandfather, wife and there children are recorded living in number 4 Gardnor road in the 1911 census, yet I have been told my grand father was born in number 4 in 1902, generations of the Pearce continue living in number 4 as well other houses in the road up until the 1980’s

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Lived here
Phil Stubbington   
Added: 14 Nov 2022 16:28 GMT   

Numbers 60 to 70 (1901 - 1939)
A builder, Robert Maeers (1842-1919), applied to build six houses on plots 134 to 139 on the Lincoln House Estate on 5 October 1901. He received approval on 8 October 1901. These would become numbers 60 to 70 Rodenhurst Road (60 is plot 139). Robert Maeers was born in Northleigh, Devon. In 1901 he was living in 118 Elms Road with his wife Georgina, nee Bagwell. They had four children, Allan, Edwin, Alice, and Harriet, born between 1863 and 1873.
Alice Maeers was married to John Rawlins. Harriet Maeers was married to William Street.
Three of the six houses first appear on the electoral register in 1904:
Daniel Mescal “Ferncroft”
William Francis Street “Hillsboro”
Henry Elkin “Montrose”

By the 1905 electoral register all six are occupied:

Daniel Mescal “St Senans”
Henry Robert Honeywood “Grasmere”
John Rawlins “Iveydene”
William Francis Street “Hillsboro”
Walter Ernest Manning “St Hilda”
Henry Elkin “Montrose”

By 1906 house numbers replace names:

Daniel Mescal 70
Henry Robert Honeywood 68
John Rawlins 66
William Francis Street 64
Walter Ernest Manning 62
Henry Elkin 60

It’s not clear whether number 70 changed from “Ferncroft” to “St Senans” or possibly Daniel Mescal moved houses.

In any event, it can be seen that Robert Maeers’ two daughters are living in numbers 64 and 66, with, according to local information, an interconnecting door. In the 1911 census William Street is shown as a banker’s clerk. John Rawlins is a chartering clerk in shipping. Robert Maeers and his wife are also living at this address, Robert being shown as a retired builder.

By 1939 all the houses are in different ownership except number 60, where the Elkins are still in residence.


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Comment
stephen garraway   
Added: 13 Nov 2022 13:56 GMT   

Martin Street, Latimer Road
I was born at St Charlottes and lived at 14, Martin Street, Latimer Road W10 until I was 4 years old when we moved to the east end. It was my Nan Grant’s House and she was the widow of George Frederick Grant. She had two sons, George and Frederick, and one daughter, my mother Margaret Patricia.
The downstairs flat where we lived had two floors, the basement and the ground floor. The upper two floors were rented to a Scot and his family, the Smiths. He had red hair. The lights and cooker were gas and there was one cold tap over a Belfast sink. A tin bath hung on the wall. The toilet was outside in the yard. This was concreted over and faced the the rear of the opposite terraces. All the yards were segregated by high brick walls. The basement had the a "best" room with a large , dark fireplace with two painted metal Alsation ornaments and it was very dark, cold and little used.
The street lights were gas and a man came round twice daily to turn them on and off using a large pole with a hook and a lighted torch on the end. I remember men coming round the streets with carts selling hot chestnuts and muffins and also the hurdy gurdy man with his instrument and a monkey in a red jacket. I also remember the first time I saw a black man and my mother pulling me away from him. He had a Trilby and pale Mackintosh so he must of been one of the first of the Windrush people. I seem to recall he had a thin moustache.
Uncle George had a small delivery lorry but mum lost touch with him and his family. Uncle Fred went to Peabody Buildings near ST.Pauls.
My Nan was moved to a maisonette in White City around 1966, and couldn’t cope with electric lights, cookers and heating and she lost all of her neighbourhood friends. Within six months she had extreme dementia and died in a horrible ward in Tooting Bec hospital a year or so later. An awful way to end her life, being moved out of her lifelong neighbourhood even though it was slums.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 31 Oct 2022 18:47 GMT   

Memories
I lived at 7 Conder Street in a prefab from roughly 1965 to 1971 approx - happy memories- sad to see it is no more ?

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Eve Glover   
Added: 22 Oct 2022 09:28 GMT   

Shenley Road
Shenley Road is the main street in Borehamwood where the Job Centre and Blue Arrow were located

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Comment
Richard Lake   
Added: 28 Sep 2022 09:37 GMT   

Trade Union Official
John William Lake snr moved with his family to 22 De Laune Street in 1936. He was the London Branch Secretary for the Street Masons, Paviours and Road Makers Union. He had previously lived in Orange St now Copperfield St Southwark but had been forced to move because the landlord didn’t like him working from home and said it broke his lease.
John William snr died in 1940. His son John William Lake jnr also became a stone mason and at the end of World War two he was responsible for the engraving of the dates of WW2 onto the Cenotaph in Whitehall.

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Lived here
Julie   
Added: 22 Sep 2022 18:30 GMT   

Well Walk, NW3 (1817 - 1818)
The home of Benthy, the Postman, with whom poet John Keats and his brother Tom lodged from early 1817 to Dec., 1818. They occupied the first floor up. Here Tom died Dec. 1, 1818. It was next door to the Welles Tavern then called ’The Green Man’."

From collected papers and photos re: No. 1 Well Walk at the library of Harvard University.

Source: No. 1, Well Walk, Hampstead. | HOLLIS for

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Click here to explore another London street
We now have 521 completed street histories and 46979 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS

JUNE
30
2021

 

Snaresbrook
Snaresbrook’s name derives from a corruption of Sayers Brook, a tributary of the River Roding that flows through Wanstead to the east. Snaresbrook was a coaching halt on the road to Epping - horses were changed at the Eagle Hotel.

Snaresbrook’s most notable building is Snaresbrook Crown Court. It was opened in 1843 as an Infant Orphan Asylum by King Leopold II of Belgium, and later became a school. It was designed by Gilbert Scott and William Bonython Moffatt. The Merchant Seamen’s Orphan Asylum was built in 1862 and later served as a convent and then a hospital.

Despite being on today’s London Underground, Snaresbrook station actually predates it. The station was opened by the Eastern Counties Railway on 22 August 1856 as part of the Eastern Counties Railway branch to Loughton, which was eventually extended to Epping and Ongar in 1865.

The New Wanstead estate was laid out south of the station and the remainder of the area filled out during the remainder of the nineteenth century, culminating with the Drive estate, which was begun in 1896.

The stati...
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JUNE
29
2021

 

Shepherds Bush
Shepherd’s Bush is an area of west London in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham. Although it is primarily residential in character, its focus is the shopping area of Shepherd’s Bush Green, with the Westfield shopping centre lying a short distance to the north. The main thoroughfares are Uxbridge Road, Goldhawk Road and Askew Road, all containing a large number of small and mostly independent shops, pubs and restaurants. The Loftus Road football stadium in Shepherd’s Bush is home to Queens Park Rangers F.C.. In 2011, the population of the area was 39,724.

The district is bounded by Hammersmith to the south, Holland Park and Notting Hill to the east, Harlesden to the north and by Acton and Chiswick to the west. White City forms the northern part of Shepherd’s Bush. Shepherd’s Bush comprises the Shepherd’s Bush Green, Askew, and White City wards.
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JUNE
28
2021

 

Seven Sisters
Seven Sisters’s name is derived from seven elms which were planted in a circle with a walnut tree at their centre on an area of common land known as Page Green. In his early seventeenth-century work, Brief Description of Tottenham, local vicar and historian William Bedwell singled out the [[42066|Page Green]] walnut tree for particular mention. He wrote of it as a local ’arboreal wonder’ which ’flourished without growing bigger’. He described it as popularly associated with the burning of an unknown Protestant. There is also speculation that the tree was ancient, possibly going back as far as Roman times, perhaps standing in a sacred grove or pagan place of worship.

The walnut vanished at some point, leaving the circle of elms. These were first recorded as the Seven Sisters in 1732.

The location of the seven trees can be tracked through a series of maps from 1619 on. From 1619 they are shown in a position which today corresponds with the western tip of Page Green at the junction of Broad Lane and the High Road. With urbanisation radically changing the area, the ’Seven Sisters’ had been replanted by 1...
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JUNE
27
2021

 

Russell Square
Russell Square station, now on London’s Piccadilly Line, was opened by the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway on 15 December 1906. Russell Square itself is named after the surname of the Earls and Dukes of Bedford, who developed the family’s London landholdings in the 17th and 18th centuries, beginning with Covent Garden (Bedford Street). Russell Square was formed when new streets were laid out by the Duke on the site of the gardens of his former home Bedford House, their London house. Other local street names relating to the Duke of Bedford include Bedford Square, Bedford Place, Bedford Avenue, Bedford Row and Bedford Way; Woburn Square and Woburn Place (from Woburn Abbey); Tavistock Square, Tavistock Place and Tavistock Street (Marquess of Tavistock), and Thornhaugh Street (after a subsidiary title Baron of Thornhaugh). The street lamps around this area carry the Bedford Arms.

The station is situated on Bernard Street. It is a small but busy station, used by office workers and tourists staying in Bloomsbury’s numerous hotels. The building was designed by Leslie Green and is a Grade II listed ...
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JUNE
26
2021

 

Ruislip Manor
The construction of a halt on the Metropolitan Railway in the area in 1912 led to the development of Ruislip Manor on what was rural land. A developer called George Ball purchased 186 acres to the south of the railway line from the owners, King’s College, with construction of a new estate taking place between 1933 and 1939.

Ball hoped the new housing would be available to the working man who wished to purchase his own home. The original plan under the Manor Homes name had been for 2,322 homes which Ball agreed would not number more than 14 per acre.

The total number of houses was gradually reduced by 50 in 1934, then a further 35 in 1935, to allow the inclusion of Lady Bankes Primary School, St. Paul’s Church and the Black Bull public house.

The Metropolitan Railway (Harrow and Uxbridge Railway) had constructed the line through Ruislip Manor between Harrow on the Hill and Uxbridge and commenced services in 1904 with, initially, the only intermediate stop being at Ruislip. At first, services were operated by steam trains, but track electrification was completed in ...
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JUNE
25
2021

 

Sloane Square
Sloane Square station was opened on 24 December 1868 by the Metropolitan District Railway when the company opened the first section of its line. The construction of the station was complicated by the crossing of the site by the River Westbourne which ran through Hyde Park as the Serpentine Lake, and was originally crossed by the Knight’s Bridge at Knightsbridge. The river was carried above the platform in a large iron pipe suspended from girders. It remains in place today

Meanwhile, Sloane Square itself lies at the east end of the trendy King’s Road and at the south end of Sloane Street.
In the early 1980s, it lent its name to the Sloane Rangers, the young underemployed and ostentatiously well-off members of the upper classes. Lady Diana Spencer, before she become Princess of Wales was considered the epitome of a Sloane Ranger.

The Square has two notable buildings: Peter Jones department store and the Royal Court Theatre.
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JUNE
24
2021

 

Ruislip Gardens
Ruislip Gardens is on the Central Line, situated between West Ruislip and South Ruislip. The tracks through the station were laid by part of the Great Western and Great Central Joint Railway with services starting on 2 April 1906 although there was no station at Ruislip Gardens at that time. The station opened on 9 July 1934 at the point where West End Road crossed Yeading Brook.

As part of the 1935-40 New Works Programme, Central line services were projected westwards from a new junction, west of North Acton on the line to Ealing Broadway. The original intention was to extend the service as far as Denham, but work was delayed by World War II and the formation of the Metropolitan Green Belt after the war and so the terminus of the extension was cut back to West Ruislip, with services starting on 21 November 1948.

The main line services stopping at Ruislip Gardens ceased on 21 July 1958 and their station closed, leaving only the Central line services in place.

The station achieved poetic immortality in John Betjeman’s poem ’...
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JUNE
23
2021

 

Camden Town
Camden Town tube station is a major junction on the Northern Line and one of the busiest stations on the London Underground network. It is particularly busy at weekends with tourists visiting Camden Market and Camden High Street. Camden is well-known for Camden Market which is a major tourist attraction, particularly busy at weekends, selling variety of fashion, antiques, lifestyle and bizarre goods; they (and the surrounding shops) are popular with young people, in particular those searching for alternative clothing.

It is an area popular with overseas students who come to Camden to learn English and find a job in one of the local bars or restaurants. The oldest established language school is Camden College of English, which is located at the Chalk Farm side of the market.

The Regent’s Canal runs through the north end of Camden Town and is a popular walk in summer.

Camdem Town tube station began life as part of the original route of the Charing Cross, Euston and Hampstead Railway (CCE&HR) (now part of the Northern Line). As the line here branched into two routes, to Hampstead and to Highgate, the design of the station was rather unusual, shaped like a V. ...
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JUNE
22
2021

 

Yorkshire Grey Yard, WC1V
Yorkshire Grey Yard lies off of Eagle Street, WC1 Yorkshire Grey Yard is not quite the picture we would expect to find if purely relying on the illusion conjured up by its haughty sounding name. This dejected cul-de-sac which once sported one of the most fashionable taverns in town is now private and just a little grubby.

The Yorkshire Grey Tavern, named after the horses popularly used by many of the stage-coach companies, was probably built here around the beginning of the 18th century and demolished about the mid to late 19th century. Despite its standing among the upper crust of society there remains only a fragment in reference to its history.
»read full article


JUNE
21
2021

 

Hall Place Crescent, DA5
Hall Place Crescent was built between 1951 and 1953. In the late 1930s Bexley Urban District Council acquired part of the Halcot and Hall Place Estates for house building to the north of Bourne Road. Bexley Borough Council was then in the country of Kent, put up the "Halcot No.2 Estate" after the Second World War.
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JUNE
20
2021

 

St James’s Place, EC3A
St James’s Place was an open square, formerly Broad Court, which held a daily market that sold fruits of various kinds. The fruit of the orange tree was the most predominant and therefore the locals gave this market the name of ’Orange Market’.

In the middle of St James Place stood a manned Fire Station. Made of wood, it was around 1888 that this structure was converted to brick. It had 3 men on duty over the evening period and outside was a cart with ladders. Next to this station was a free standing gas lamp. Another lamp was situated right above the covered entrance of St James passage that led to Mitre Square. Apart from St James Passage, access to the Place could be obtained via Little Duke Street (which crossed the top of Duke Street from Houndsditch to St James Place) in the east, or King Street in the west.

St. James’s Place was later renamed Creechurch Place.
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JUNE
19
2021

 

Huxley Street, W10
Huxley Street is the only street beginning with an H on the Queen’s Park Estate. Before construction started in 1874, the Queen’s Park Estate was proving very popular - 1500 applications from prospective tenants had been received.

By 1881 there were five classes of property, the rents varying according to the size and number of rooms. Queen’s Park was a success The Queen’s Park Estate was sold to Paddington Council in 1964 and it is the only Estate of its type within Westminster.
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JUNE
18
2021

 

Royal Society
The Royal Society is a self-governing Fellowship of many of the world’s most distinguished scientists drawn from all areas of science, engineering and medicine. The Society has played a part in some of the most fundamental, significant, and life-changing discoveries in scientific history and Royal Society scientists continue to make outstanding contributions to science in many research areas.

The origins of the Royal Society lie in an ’invisible college’ of natural philosophers who began meeting in the mid-1640s to discuss the new philosophy of promoting knowledge of the natural world through observation and experiment, which we now call science.

Its official foundation date is 28 November 1660, when a group of 12 met at Gresham College after a lecture by Christopher Wren, then the Gresham Professor of Astronomy, and decided to found ’a Colledge for the Promoting of Physico-Mathematicall Experimentall Learning’. This group included Wren himself, Robert Boyle, John Wilkins, Sir Robert Moray, and William, Viscount Brouncker.

The Royal Society’s motto ’Nullius in verba’ roughly transla...
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JUNE
17
2021

 

Juniper Street, E1
Juniper Street is now simply a cul-de-sac It was formerly known as Juniper Row and originally ran east as far as Glamis Road and west to Shadwell Street. It was laid out in the 1820s over an area of rope walks called Sun Tavern Fields. Sun Tavern Fields were described in The Environs of London (published in 1795) as "The only land not occupied by buildings consists of a few acres, ..., in which are several rope-walks, 400 yards in length, where cables are made from six to 23 inches in girth."

Sun Tavern Fields had laid open partly due to the ’Shadwell Spa’, a mineral water "of a very powerful nature" discovered in the eighteenth century by Walter Berry who sank a well in the fields. It is said to be "impregnated with sulphur, vitriol, steel and antimony".

Once built following the line of a rope walk, Juniper Street became mostly a densely-urbanised residential working class street. There was a fire station on the corner of Glamis Road and a police station on the corner of King David Lane. Al...
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JUNE
16
2021

 

St Martin’s Le Grand, EC2V
St Martin’s Le Grand is a street north of Newgate Street and a former liberty within the City of London St Martin’s Le Grand was west of an ancient college of secular canons. The institution was situated in the parish of St Leonard, Foster Lane. According to a tradition, the college and church dedicated to St Martin of Tours dated to the 7th or 8th century and was founded by King Wihtred of Kent. It was associated about 1056 during the reign of Edward the Confessor with two brothers, Ingelric and Girard.

The St Martin college was taken over by Westminster Abbey in 1503 as part of the endowment granted to upkeep the Henry VII Chapel. The college was dissolved by King Henry VIII and demolished in 1548.

St Martin’s Le Grand church was responsible for the sounding of the curfew bell in the evenings, which announced the closing of the city’s gates. Until 1697, it had certain rights of sanctuary. The link with Westminster Abbey meant that the precinct was subsequently regarded as part of Westminster and was a liberty - outside the legal jurisdiction of the ...
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JUNE
15
2021

 

Trafalgar Square, WC2N
Trafalgar Square commemorates Horatio Nelson’s 1805 victory at the Battle of Trafalgar. Trafalgar Square was built around the area formerly known as Charing Cross.

The site of Trafalgar Square had been a significant landmark since the 13th century and originally contained the King’s Mews. After George IV moved the mews to Buckingham Palace, the area was redeveloped by John Nash, but progress was slow after his death, and the square did not open until 1844. The 52-metre Nelson’s Column at its centre is guarded by four lion statues. A number of commemorative statues and sculptures occupy the square, but the Fourth Plinth, left empty since 1840, has been host to contemporary art since 1999.

The square has been used for community gatherings and political demonstrations, including Bloody Sunday, the first Aldermaston March, anti-war protests, and campaigns against climate change. A Christmas tree has been donated to the square by Norway since 1947 and is erected for twelve days before and after Christmas Day.

The square is a ...
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JUNE
14
2021

 

Blackhorse Road
Blackhorse Road station is a London Overground and London Underground station, which is located on the junction of Blackhorse Road with Forest Road in Walthamstow. The station below ground is on the Victoria Line of the London Underground and it is the penultimate station on the eastern end of that line. Above ground, the station is located approximately at the midpoint of the Gospel Oak to Barking Line of the London Overground.

The station was opened on 19 July 1894 by the Tottenham and Forest Gate Railway, and was originally situated east of Blackhorse Lane. The station was resited in 1968 and expanded by the addition of the underground platforms. The tube station opened on 1 September 1968.
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JUNE
13
2021

 

Walthamstow Central
Walthamstow Central is the northern terminus of the Victoria line and one of five stations on the Chingford branch of the Lea Valley lines operated by London Overground since 2015. The station was opened on 26 April 1870 by the Great Eastern Railway as ’Hoe Street’.

The station became an interchange station and the eastern terminus of the Victoria line with London Underground services starting on 1 September 1968 when station’s present name was adopted.

On 31 May 2015, London Overground serves also began serving the station.
»read full article


JUNE
12
2021

 

Gillespie Road, N5
Gillespie Road runs east–west along the north side of Arsenal Stadium. Gillespie Road dates from the 1870 as a spate of building transformed the area.

Part of the course of Hackney Brook ran along Gillespie Road. The stream rises near Mercers Road, running south to cross Holloway Road and then continuing to Lowman Road, where it turns north-east and runs along Gillespie Road to Mountgrove Road.

Gillespie Road station was opened in 1906, granting access to St John`s Divinity College, Highbury Hill, as well as serving the surrounding streets of St Thomas’ Road, Avenell Road and Blackstock Road. Rows of terraced houses were just beginning to appear in this part of London, justifying the station.

Gillespie Road station was renamed to ’Arsenal’ in 1932 after pressure from the football club. The Gillespie Road name is still displayed on the original Edwardian platform tiling.

Many small works and businesses appeared in Gillespie Road during the 1930s.
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JUNE
11
2021

 

Alsen Road, N7
Alsen Road, which existed between 1851 and 1972 crossed the still-extant Andover Road. The location of Alsen Road was part of the local Long Lands estate. This was bought by the St Pancras, Marylebone and Paddington Freehold Land Society which sold off in plots in 1851.

The provisional street name for Alsen Road was Reform Road, the name approved in 1864 and reflecting the Society’s aim to create more voters. Other local street names were Franchise Road (Andover Road), Liberty Road (later Victor Road) and Freehold Road (which became Durham Road). The Franchise public house was about halfway along the street on the corner of Franchise Road/Andover Road.

The northern half of the street was Reform Road and the southern half Alsen Road. In 1877, the whole street became Alsen Road.

Alsen is the German form of Als, an island the chief town of which is Sonderburg in German (hence Sonderburg Road) but Sønderborg in Danish. The First Schleswig War took place between 1848 and 1851, some of the action taking place around Als. In 1864...
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JUNE
10
2021

 

Two Puddings
The Two Puddings was situated at 27 Stratford Broadway. The first mention of the Two Puddings as a Stratford pub seem to date from the 1890s.

During the twentieth century, the Two Puddings became a notorious pub, known locally as the Butcher’s Shop on account of the amount of blood spilt.

From 1962 until its closure in 2000, Eddie Johnson was landlord of the Two Puddings in Stratford and he started to change its reputation.

Eddie and wife Shirley were rock’n’roll fans and already from 1958 onwards had organised gig nights known as The Big Beat Club and The Devil’s Kitchen where in time The Who and The Kinks performed

The Puddings became a prime venue with the UK’s first disco. Coming along to the pub in the 1960s and beyond were television personalities, actors, writers, champion boxers, musicians, gangsters and footballers. Harry Redknapp met his wife there and David Essex made his performing debut at the Puddings.

At the end of the...
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JUNE
9
2021

 

Lombard Street, EC3V
Lombard Street has a history stretching back to medieval times. Lombard Street has its origins in one of the main Roman roads of London. It was so-named as it formed a plot of land granted by King Edward I (1272–1307) to goldsmiths from Lombardy.

In his diary of the 1660s, Samuel Pepys mentions "Lumbard street" many times.

The Royal Exchange was built in the street by Thomas Gresham. Lloyd’s Coffee House, which eventually became Lloyd’s of London, moved to Lombard Street from Tower Street in 1691.

From 1678 to 1829, the General Post Office had its headquarters on Lombard Street. The continuously expanding the post office site in the middle of the financial district eventually necessitated a move to St Martins-le-Grand.

Until the 1980s, most UK-based banks had their head offices in Lombard Street.

The street has a number of colourful signs hanging from the buildings, depicting historic organisations and buildings once located there. The signs were erected for the coronation of Edward VII in 1902.
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JUNE
8
2021

 

Oxhey Lane, WD19
Oxhey Lane is the oldest road in Carpenders Park. The road connected Oxhey and Hatch End. Midway along, Carpenders Park Farm was formerly the location of Braziers Dairy. Oxhey Lane was a narrow winding lane until widened in 1937.

Little Carpenders, along the lane, dates from around the 1860s and may have been the Estate Agent’s house for the ’Carpenders Estate’.

Before the South Oxhey (Carpenders Park) estate was built, the Oxhey Hall Estate was built in the 1930s in the lands to the west of Oxhey Lane as an example of "Metroland" architecture.

In the mid 1930s, Carpenders Park station was simply a halt for golfers using Oxhey Hall Golf Course. Bungalows and a few houses were built around it and Carpenders Avenue came into being; other roads spread out from it.

After the Second World War, South Oxhey Estate was built by London County Council between the railway line and Oxhey Woods. The land had formerly been part of the extensive Blackwells’ estate (of Crosse and Bl...
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JUNE
7
2021

 

Oliphant Street, W10
Oliphant Street was the final alphabetical street on the original Queen’s Park Estate naming scheme. The Manor and Parish of Chelsea owned an enclave - covering Kensal Town and Queen’s Park - until 1901 when it was divided between Kensington and Paddington. Kensal Town went to the former and the other side of the Harrow Road to the latter.

The north section was developed in 1875 by the Artizans, Labourers & General Dwellings Company, who were the landlords until 1964. The north-south streets of their grid were numbered 1-6 and euphemistically entitled ’avenues’ : First, Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Avenues. The remaining streets were simply labelled A Street through to O Street.

Eight years later it was decided that even artisans and labourers deserved a little better. A became Alperton, after the Company’s brickyard in Middlesex, and was followed by Barfett, Caird, Droop (after H R. Droop, Artizans, Labourers & General Dwellings Company Director 1877-1883), Enbrook, Farrant (Sir Richard Farrant, Director 1877-1906), Galton (probably i...
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JUNE
6
2021

 

Turk’s Head
The Turk’s Head was one of two Wapping pubs of the same name. It was situated beside Union Stairs and had the grim task assigned to it of briefly hosting prisoners on their journey to Execution Dock. They would be allowed one quart of ale before departure.

Its address was 30 Wapping High Street (at number 326 on the same street before Victorian renumbering).

Its rather un-PC name derives from many such names coined during the Crusades. Any pub called ‘The Turk’s Head’ or ‘The Saracen’s Head’ is a reference to that period.

It had a dining room by 1940 but the pub was destroyed in the Blitz.
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JUNE
5
2021

 

Abbotsbury Road, W14
Abbotsbury Road runs between Melbury Road and the road known as Holland Park. Abbotsbury Road takes its name from one of the Dorset estates of the Earl of Ilchester. It is exclusively residential.

It is a wide tree-lined street and most houses have off street parking – some with their own garages. The road has humps in it to slow down the traffic. Traffic can go both ways. The south end is very close to the shops in Kensington High Street, and the north end to the shops in Holland Park Avenue. Holland Park itself is next to the road.

Work began in the early years of the 20th century, but only Nos. 3-9 odd, and 8-10 and 24-28 (even) were built before the Second World War.

During the 1960s houses and blocks were built on the west side of Abbotsbury Road. These include Abbotsbury House, a 10-storey block of flats, and Abbotsbury Close, a series of small crescents with houses and landscaped gardens, designed by Stone Toms and Partners and built by Wates Builders.

The brick houses are fairly uniform in...
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JUNE
4
2021

 

Victoria Embankment, EC4Y
Victoria Embankment is part of the Thames Embankment scheme of 19th-century civil engineering that reclaimed land next to the River Thames. The Victoria Embankment was primarily designed by Sir Joseph Bazalgette with architectural work on the embankment wall and river stairs by Charles Henry Driver. Started in 1862, it incorporates the main low level interceptor sewer and the underground District Line over which a wide road and riverside walkway were built. In total, Bazalgette’s scheme reclaimed 22 acres of land from the river. It prevented flooding, such as around what had been the remnants of Thorney Island (Westminster).

Much of the granite used in the projects was brought from Lamorna Cove in Cornwall.

The named named Victoria Embankment runs from the Houses of Parliament to Blackfriars Bridge. It incorporates gardens and open space collectively known as the Embankment Gardens.

Some parts of the Embankment were rebuilt in the 20th century due to wartime bomb damage or natural disasters such as the 1928 Thames flood.
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JUNE
3
2021

 

Carmelite Street, EC4Y
Carmelite Street continues south from Whitefriars Street, which itself is just off Fleet Street. Carmelite Street is a very narrow road and runs down a slope to its south end, where it meets the Victoria Embankment. Named in 1901, it commemorates the old foundation of the Carmelite or Whitefriars monastery here. Before 1901, it had been an extension of Whitefriars Street but was wharfland until the 1860s.

The street seems to have begun as an alley to serve ship berthings which by the 1860s had been repurposed to lead to the new Sir Joseph Bazalgette-designed Embankment.

The buildings which now stand on Carmelite Street were mostly constructed after the Second World War. There are also some very old buildings such as The Harrow, a public house said to have been frequented by Evening News reporters.

Founded by a City merchant, William Ward, in 1881, the City of London School for Girls opened in Carmelite Street in 1894 at a time when there was so little faith in academic education for girls that the building was designed so that it cou...
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JUNE
2
2021

 

Gloucester Road
Gloucester Road: Where Rumpole of the Bailey hung his hat. Gloucester Road - the street - runs north-south between Kensington Gardens (at which point it is known as Palace Gate) and the Old Brompton Road at the south end. At its intersection with Cromwell Road is Gloucester Road tube station, close to which there are several pubs, restaurants, many hotels and St. Stephen’s Church (built in 1867 and, notably, the church warden of which was the poet T. S. Eliot).

The road is named after Maria, Duchess of Gloucester and Edinburgh who built a house there in 1805. It was earlier called Hog Moore Lane (1612), that is ’lane through marshy ground where hogs are kept’, a name that was still used until about 1850.

Gloucester Road is the residence (25B Froxbury Court) of the fictional barrister Horace Rumpole of John Mortimer’s Rumpole of the Bailey series of short stories.

Gloucester Road underground station is in two parts: sub-surface platforms, opened in 1868 by the Metropolitan Railway as part of...
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JUNE
1
2021

 

Abbeville Road, SW4
Abbeville Road runs parallel to Clapham Common Southside, lying close to the line of Stane Street - the Roman military road from London to Chichester. The earliest settlement of Clapham was centred around present day North Street, Turret Grove and Rectory Grove. The land surrounding Clapham Common remained undeveloped and covered with farmland until the late 17th century, at which point the village began to expand towards the Common.

Throughout the 18th and 19th centuries, large individual villas and houses lined Clapham Common Southside, set within extensive grounds - for example, The Clock House and Eagle House which can be seen on Stanford map of 1860. This land remained virtually undeveloped until 1875 when Clock House Farm was sold and the most southerly portion of Abbeville Road, close to the junction with Cavendish Road, was laid out.

Development along Abbeville Road and on its surrounding streets gathered pace during the last decades of the 19th century as more of the large mansions lining Clapham Common were demolished and their land sold off.

Locally Hambalt Road, Narbonne Av...
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