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Featured · Queen’s Park ·
August
15
2022

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Houghton Street (1906)
A greengrocer’s on the corner of Houghton Street and Clare Market (behind The Strand) in 1906 just before demolition. The thoroughfare known as Clare Market, leading eastwards into Lincoln’s Inn Fields, was so called in honour of the Earl of Clare, who lived "in a princely mansion" adjacent. His name is inscribed as a parishioner of St. Clement Danes in the ratebooks of 1617. In Howell’s "Londinopolis" of 1657 we read: "Then is there, towards Drury Lane, a new market, called Clare Market; then is there a street and palace of the same name, built by the Earl of Clare, who lived there in a princely mansion, having a house, a street, and a market both for flesh and fish, all bearing his name." It is also mentioned by Strype:- "Clare Market, very considerable and well served with provisions, both flesh and fish; for, besides the butchers in the shambles, it is much resorted unto by the country butchers and higglers. The market-days are Wednesdays and Saturdays."

"This market," says Nightingale, in the tenth volume of the Beauties of England and Wales, "stands on what was...

»more

JULY
25
2022

 

The Hare
The Hare is situated at 505 Cambridge Heath Road The Hare has existed on this site since the 1770s. The current building dates from around 1860.
»read full article


JUNE
21
2022

 

High Barnet - Totteridge walk
This walk takes in the top of the Northern Line High Barnet is a London Underground station and, in the past, a railway station, located in Chipping Barnet. It is the terminus of the High Barnet branch of the Northern line and is the start of a walk which takes us on to Totteridge and Whetstone station.

High Barnet station was an idea of the Edgware, Highgate and London Railway and was opened on 1 April 1872 by the Great Northern Railway which had taken over by then. It was situated on one of the original sites of the Barnet Fair and was the terminus of the branch line that ran from Finsbury Park via Highgate.

The section north of East Finchley was incorporated into the London Underground network because of the Northern Heights project begun in the late 1930s. High Barnet station was served by Northern line trains from 14 April 1940 onwards.

The station retains much of its original Victorian architectural character, with some platform buildings dating from the pre-London Transport era.»more


APRIL
27
2022

 

Lavie Mews, W10
Lavie Mews, W10 was a mews connecting Portobello Road and Murchison Road Lavie Mews was a tiny mews with bends in it, serving a warehouse.

It disappeared as part of the Wornington Estate redevelopments in the early 1970s.
»read full article


APRIL
26
2022

 

Whitehouse Avenue, WD6
Whitehouse Avenue was originally to be called Cornwall Avenue Whitehouse Farm was situated on Furzehill Road, dated to the 18th century and originally spread over 200 acres. It was owned by the Church of England.

After the railway became established in the area, the population grew and as new industries were introduced more houses and roads were required, Drayton Road being the first in Boreham Wood. Developers began buying plots of land, mainly off of Shenley Road and Whitehouse Farm began to shrink. Road building off the north side of Shenley Road reached by 1918 as far to the east as Clarendon Road.

Between the wars, the founding of the film studios and work starting on the Laings estate off Elstree Way, resulted in large areas of farmland being lost. Postwar, the London County Council needed land to house London’s ‘population overspill’ and made a compulsory purchase of Laing’s land off Elstree Way, as well as farmland to the east of Theobald Street.

Whitehouse Avenue was start...
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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
Katharina Logan   
Added: 9 Aug 2022 19:01 GMT   

Ely place existed in name in 1857
On 7th July 1857 John James Chase and Mary Ann Weekes were married at St John the Baptist Hoxton, he of full age and she a minor. Both parties list their place of residence as Ely Place, yet according to other information, this street was not named until 1861. He was a bricklayer, she had no occupation listed, but both were literate and able to sign their names on their marriage certificate.

Source: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSF7-Q9Y7?cc=3734475

Reply
Comment
Reginald John Gregory   
Added: 8 Aug 2022 14:07 GMT   

Worked in the vicinity of my ancestor’s house,
Between the years 1982-1998 (unknown to me at the time) I worked in an office close to the site of my ancestors cottage. I discovered this when researching family history - the cottage was mentioned in the 1871 census for Colindeep Lane/Ancient Street coming up from the Hyde. The family lived in the ares betwen 1805 and 1912.

Reply

Barry J. Page   
Added: 27 Jul 2022 19:41 GMT   

Highbury Corner V1 Explosion
Grandma described the V1 explosion at Highbury Corner on many occasions. She was working in the scullery when the flying bomb landed. The blast shattered all the windows in the block of flats and blew off the bolt on her front door. As she looked out the front room window, people in various states of injury and shock were making their way along Highbury Station Road. One man in particular, who was bleeding profusely from glass shard wounds to his neck, insisted in getting home to see if his family was all right. Others were less fortunate. Len, the local newsagent, comforted a man, who had lost both legs caused by the blast, until the victim succumbed to his injuries. The entire area was ravaged and following are statistics. The flying bomb landed during lunch hour (12:46 p.m.) on June 27th 1944. 26 people lost their lives, 84 were seriously injured and 71 slightly injured.

Reply
Comment
ANON   
Added: 20 Jul 2022 13:36 GMT   

The Square & Ashmore park
The Square and Ashmore park was the place to be 2000-2005. Those were the greatest times on the estate. everyday people were playing out. the park was full of kids just being kids and having fun, now everyone is grown up and only bump into eachother when heading to the shops or work. I miss the good days( Im 25yrs old as im writing this)

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Spotted here
   
Added: 18 Jul 2022 13:56 GMT   

Map of Thornsett Road Esrlsfield


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Born here
Carolyn Hirst   
Added: 16 Jul 2022 15:21 GMT   

Henry James Hirst
My second great grandfather Henry James Hirst was born at 18 New Road on 11 February 1861. He was the eighth of the eleven children of Rowland and Isabella Hirst. I think that this part of New Road was also known at the time as Gloucester Terrace.

Reply
Lived here
Richard   
Added: 12 Jul 2022 21:36 GMT   

Elgin Crescent, W11
Richard Laitner (1955-1983), a barrister training to be a doctor at UCL, lived here in 1983. He was murdered aged 28 with both his parents after attending his sister’s wedding in Sheffield in 1983. The Richard Laitner Memorial Fund maintains bursaries in his memory at UCL Medical School

Source: Ancestry Library Edition

Reply
Comment
Anthony Mckay   
Added: 11 Jul 2022 00:12 GMT   

Bankfield Cottages, Ass House Lane, Harrow Weald
Bankfield Cottages (now demolished) at the end of Ass House Lane, appear twice in ’The Cheaters’ televison series (made 1960) in the episodes ’The Fine Print’ and ’Tine to Kill’

Source: THE CHEATERS: Episode Index

Reply

MARCH
31
2022

 

Blechynden Mews, W10
Blechynden Mews is a former side street in London W11. Before it was redeveloped, Blechynden Mews ran beside Silchester Road Baths. Sometimes also called Lancaster Road Baths or simply the Kensington Public Baths, the official name was Argyle Hall.
»read full article


MARCH
30
2022

 

Collins Yard, N1
Collins Yard is so-named as it ran alongside the Collins’ Music Hall giving access to the rear of the hall. Collins Yard referred in particular to a piece of ground circa 60 feet square at the rear of the former music hall, between Gaskin Street and Islington Green. This was called ’Jones’ Burial Ground’ also ’Little Bunhill Fields’ and the ’New Bunhill Fields’. This burial ground in connection with the New Islington Chapel (1814/15) was closed for burial purposes at the end of 1853 and by 1895 the land had been divided up.

The ground here was by tradition a plague pit during the Great Plague of London.
»read full article


MARCH
29
2022

 

Camberwell Public Baths
Camberwell Public Baths opened in 1892 and has been in continuous operation as community baths and more recently as a public leisure centre. Camberwell Public Baths is more recently known as both Camberwell Baths and Camberwell Leisure Centre. The facilities now include a gym as well as a swimming pool.

Commissioners were commissioned in 1887 by the Vestry of Camberwell to establish three Public Baths and Wash-houses in the Parish of Camberwell - one in each of the parliamentary divisions of North Camberwell, Peckham and Dulwich.

The Camberwell Public Baths officially opened on 1 October 1892 and had cost £28 575.

The original facilities were:

- Men’s First Class: 24 private baths, one public swimming bath 120 feet by 35 feet with 81 dressing boxes at the side
- Men’s Second Class: 40 private baths, one public swimming bath, 120 feet by 35 feet with 65 dressing boxes
- Ladies First Class: 12 private baths
- Ladies Second Class: 20 private baths
- Public Laundry: 78 compartments
- Establishment Laundry

...
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MARCH
28
2022

 

Hallam Street, W1W
Hallam Street was formerly named both Charlotte Street and Duke Street but renamed in 1905 after Henry Hallam, a noted historian and local resident. Hallam Street was developed by the Dukes of Portland, who owned most of the eastern half of Marylebone in the 18th century. Twenty acres of Conduit Field began to be developed after the 1760s. Hallam Street was laid out in the 1770s – the southern section was Duke Street and the northern section had been Charlotte Street.

Many houses were turned into lodging houses, beginning in the 1830s, leading to a decline in the status of the street.

Little remains of the original developments of either Duke Street or Charlotte Street – Hallam Street is now mostly twentieth-century buildings, predominantly blocks of service flats – often single-bedroomed without kitchens but with basement restaurants and servants.
»read full article


MARCH
27
2022

 

Friday Hill, E4
Friday Hill derives its name from John Friday who held land here in the fifteenth century - prior to this, it was known as Jackatt Hill. Friday Hill, as well as being a road, is also the name of the surrounding housing estate. On older maps, the road is called Friday Hill Road.

On the crest of the hill is Friday Hill House, designed by the architect Lewis Vulliamy and built in 1839. It is a Grade II listed building. Friday Hill House served as the manor house of the Heathcote family and had attached farmland of 160 acres.

According to legend, King Charles II is said to have knighted a loin of beef ("Sir Loin") at Friday Hill - the story is generally assumed to be apocryphal. The pub on Friday Hill, later called The Dovecote, in the past has traded as The Sirloin.

Louisa Boothby-Heathcote succeeded as Lady of the Manor in 1915. She was the last resident of the house and after the Second World War, the estate was sold to London County Council to enlarge their large housing estate, also called Friday Hill. The house became a community centre.

The London C...
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MARCH
26
2022

 

Renters Farm
Near to where Brent Cross Shopping Centre is today was a farm called Renter’s. Renter’s Farm was situated in Shirehall Lane close to Shire Hall, Hendon.

The Renter’s estate had been owned by the priory of St Bartholomew, Smithfield. Their Hendon estate consisted around 1538 of fifteen fields, crofts, meadows and some woodland, north of the Clitterhouse estate.

It may have become known as Renter’s after the freehold was held by Geoffrey le Renter in 1309. He was recorded as holding a freehold estate in 1321, along with ’Bourncroft’ - perhaps the same location as ’Bone Croft’, which lay north of Renters farm.

The manor was granted by the king in 1543, along with the manor of Edgware Boys, to both Sir John Williams and Antony Stringer. They granted it in 1548 to Sir Roger Cholmley, together with a barn, 30 acres of arable land, 40 acres of meadow, 60 acres of pasture and 26 acres of wood. Cholmley was a judge, who in 1565 left it to his servant and clerk Jasper Cholmley.
...
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MARCH
25
2022

 

Bellenden Road, SE15
Bellenden Road was originally Victoria Road and was renamed Bellenden Road in 1873. Possibly named after the 7th Lord Bellenden of Broughton, Bellenden Road was laid out along with neighbouring streets from the 1870s on what had formerly been largely fruit gardens serving the City of London. It was also possibly named after Lady Margaret Bellenden in Sir Walter Scott’s novel Old Mortality.

The name was extended north along the road, which originally consisted of numerous individually named groups and terraces. The northern section, off Peckham High Street, was formerly called Basing Road, and the manor house of Basing lay to the east.

The original terraces were (in alphabetical order): Alpine Villas, Argyle Villas, Bellenden Terrace, Bellenden Villas, Cedar Cottages, Chapel Terrace, Denmark Villas, Devonshire Villas, Erith Villas, Ida Mount, Leamington Villas, Meadow Terrace, Myrtle Villas, Oxford Terrace, St Johns Terrace, Selwyn Terrace, Troy Villas and Victoria Terrace.

From its earliest days, Bellenden...
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MARCH
24
2022

 

Drummond Street, NW1
Drummond Street is alternatively known as ’Banglatown’, Drummond Street, west of Euston Station, seems like an unassuming stretch of townhouses, flats, restaurants and shops.

Look closer - almost every store and restaurant is South Asian. Menus feature Mumbai-style street food, Lahori lamb kebabs and South Indian masala dosa.

The 1970s witnessed an arrival of East African Asians in the UK. Drummond Street became a taste of home to London’s South Asian community because of a growing presence of family-run cafes and stores.

Diwana Bhel Poori House - which opened in 1970 - claims to be the oldest South Indian vegetarian restaurant in Britain.

Drummond Street had begun some 150 years before. The leasing of land locally for house building was handled by John and Charles Drummond, who were bankers, and hence the name. The area was laid out from the mid-1820s onwards on formerly agricultural land. Three squares were planned as markets for the sale of, respectively, hay, vegetables ...
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MARCH
23
2022

 

Gooshays Drive, RM3
Gooshays Drive was the first complete street on the Harold Hill Estate. Mr And Mrs Rutherford, the tenants of the first permanent house on the LCC’s Harold Hill Estate, received the keys to 44 Gooshays Drive from Mr Owen, Chairman of the LCC’s Housing Committee, handed over in a special ceremony on 25 November 1948. The Rutherfords moved from the Becontree Estate in Dagenham where they had lived for twenty years.
»read full article


MARCH
22
2022

 

High Street, KT1
High Street is the main shopping steet of Hampton Wick. Hampton Wick was formerly a village on the Thames.

It was dominated by market gardening until well into the twentieth century. Its development was confined by Bushy Park and Hampton Court Park to its west, and the river to its east.

Kingston Bridge, the first bridge linking the High Street with Kingston upon Thames dates from about 1219 and replaced a Roman ford.

The architect Edward Lapidge designed a church, St John’s Hampton Wick, built in 1831.
»read full article


MARCH
21
2022

 

Acre Lane, SW2
Acre Lane runs between Brixton and Clapham. While Acre Lane can be considered the heart of Brixton containing its grand town hall, as late as 1800 it was an old parish highway but had no houses standing. In an 1802 auction, George Wheeler purchased the Hither Six Acres Field and the Further Six Acres Field. Thomas Bailey purchased the Eight Acres Field.

That same year, Wheeler sold a piece of the land which he had recently acquired to William Coward of Brixton Causeway, who became responsible for its development.

Trinity Asylum for Aged Persons was ’built and endowed by Thomas Bailey’ in 1822. He was ’desirous of establishing an asylum for pious aged women’ and he stated candidates for admission had to be members of the Church of England and between 57-67 years of age.

Victorian Brixton became a genteel place. Many of Acre Lane’s houses were elegant and large. Second World War bombing raids destroyed a lot of the fabric of the road and 1960s planner co...
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MARCH
20
2022

 

Bosworth Road, W10
Bosworth Road was the first street built as Kensal New Town started to expand to the east. Our Lady of the Holy Souls, on the corner of Bosworth Road, was opened in 1882. The building has a commanding presence in the local street scene and is of interest as an early design by a significant Catholic architect.

In the early twentieth century, the houses on the west side of Bosworth Road were demolished and a park put in their place.

During the early 1960s, the area underwent a major transformation as houses were demolished and blocks put up in their place.
»read full article


MARCH
19
2022

 

Narcissus Road, NW6
Narcissus Road connects Pandora Road with Mill Lane. On the west side of West End Lane, the land between the three railway lines was still largely untouched but beyond them building spread during the 1880s. New roads were constructed and 346 houses were built between 1882 and 1894 in Sumatra Road, Solent Road, Holmdale Road, Glenbrook Road, Pandora Road, and Narcissus Road, mostly by J.I. Chapman of Solent Road, G. W. Cossens of Mill Lane, Jabez Reynolds of Holmdale Road and James Gibb of Dennington Park Road.

Narcissus Road is the name for the debut album by English Indie rock band The Hours, named after the street with a picture of the road sign on the back cover.
»read full article


MARCH
18
2022

 

Honeybourne Road, NW6
Honeybourne Road runs between West End Lane and Fawley Road. There were two large houses on West End Lane - Treherne House and Canterbury Houses. Both were sold at the same time and Honeybourne Road, Fawley Road, Lymington Road and Crediton Hill (originally Crediton Road) were laid out on the combined estates about 1897.

A builder - A. Davis - applied to build houses in Honeybourne Road in 1900 and by 1913 building was complete. Yale Court and Harvard Court - two blocks - were built around 1903.
»read full article


MARCH
17
2022

 

Willifield Way, NW11
Willifield Way runs south from ‘Crickmer Circus’ to meet Hampstead Way before the junction with Meadway. This area was part of the original 1907 land purchase from Eton College, and was developed mainly in 1907-08. Willifield Way contains cottages built by Parker and Unwin but building was completed as late as 1912 in the Sutcliffe group at the south end of Willifield Way.

The houses on Willifield Way were designed in groups by architects closely associated with Unwin. There are groups of houses by G. Lucas, Michael Bunney, Sutcliffe and Crickmer.

Willifield Way Green is a 0.29 hectare green space beside the road. It evokes an idealised rural ambience around which houses are formally grouped.
»read full article


MARCH
16
2022

 

Carlton House Terrace, SW1Y
Carlton House Terrace consists of a pair of terraces - white stucco-faced houses on the south side of the street overlooking St James’s Park. The land on which Carlton House Terrace was built had once been part of the grounds of St James’s Palace, known as "the Royal Garden" and "the Wilderness". The Wilderness was at one time in the possession of Prince Rupert of the Rhine and was later called Upper Spring Garden.

From 1700 the land was held by Henry Boyle, who spent nearly £3000 on improving the existing house in the Royal Garden. Boyle was created Baron Carleton in 1714. On his death the lease passed to his nephew, Lord Burlington, and thence in 1732 to Frederick, Prince of Wales, eldest son of George II. After Frederick’s premature death in 1751, his widow Augusta continued living in the house. After her death in 1772, the house devolved to her son - George III - who in turn granted it to his eldest son, George, Prince of Wales. The Prince spent enormous sums on the property, running up huge debts. The house became a rival Court to his father. When the Prince became King George IV in 1820, he...
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MARCH
15
2022

 

Branstone Street, W10
Branstone Street, originally Bramston Street, disappeared in 1960s developments. Branstone Street ran along the back of Barlby Road School between Exmoor Street and Porlock Street. It was renamed from Bramston Street in 1929.

As 1960s developments transformed the area, the street disappeared from the map.
»read full article


MARCH
14
2022

 

Ansleigh Place, W11
Ansleigh Place is an ex mews to the west of Notting Dale. Originally the stable house accommodation for the main houses on Stoneleigh Street, the primary purpose of the Mews properties is now residential. When the London Poverty Maps were published in the late nineteenth century, the area was noted as having a mixture of normal living conditions and lower than the average household salary.

During the Second World War, a high explosive bomb fell onto Treadgold Street, north-east of the mews.

The 1987 film ‘Withnail & I’ used Ansleigh Place as a filming location.
»read full article


MARCH
13
2022

 

Albany Courtyard, SW1Y
The courtyard is named after Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany, who in 1791 purchased Melbourne House which stood on this site. Melbourne House had been built between 1771 and 1776 by Sir William Chambers for the newly created 1st Viscount Melbourne. Melbourne had bought a house - Piccadilly House - and its land from Henry Fox, 1st Baron Holland for £16 500. The new house was called Melbourne House and was a three-storey mansion, seven bays wide. It had a pair of service wings flanking a front courtyard.

Twenty years later, Lord Melbourne had built up considerable debt funding a particularly extravagant lifestyle. In 1791 he downsized by exchanging Melbourne House for Dover House in Whitehall with the recently married Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany. He wanted a larger property in order to "entertain in style”.

Only ten years after that, in 1802 the Duke in turn gave up the house and it was converted into 69 bachelor apartments (known as "sets") by Henry Holland. The main block and its two service wings was subdivided. Two new parallel long buildings were built over t...
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MARCH
12
2022

 

St James’s Place, SW1A
St James’s Place runs west from St James’s Street. St James’s Place was first developed around 1694. The historian John Strype described it in 1720 as a "good Street ... which receiveth a fresh Air out of the Park; the Houses are well-built, and inhabited by Gentry". Henry Benjamin Wheatley wrote in 1870 that it was one of the oddest built streets in London."

Spencer House, commissioned by the 1st Earl Spencer in 1756, is at number 27 and is listed as Grade I. A further thirteen properties are Grade II listed.
»read full article


MARCH
11
2022

 

St James’s
St James’s is an exclusive area in the West End of London. St James’s was once part of the same royal park as Green Park and St James’s Park. In the 1660s, Charles II gave the right to develop the area to Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of St Albans, who proceeded to develop it as a predominantly aristocratic residential area with a grid of streets centered on St James’s Square. Until the Second World War, St James’s remained one of the most exclusive residential enclaves in London. Famous residences in St James’s include St James’s Palace, Clarence House, Marlborough House, Lancaster House, Spencer House, Schomberg House and Bridgewater House.

St James’s is the home of many of the best known gentlemen’s clubs in London. The clubs found here are organisations of English high society. A variety of groups congregate here, such as royals, military officers, motoring enthusiasts and other groups.

It is now a predominantly commercial area with some of the highest rents in London...
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MARCH
10
2022

 

Blackheath Road, SE10
Blackheath Road leads from Deptford Bridge to Blackheath Hill. It is part of the ancient route from London to Dover and is named after the area of Blackheath - the name is said to originate from the 1340s after its use after as a mass burial ground for victims of the Black Death. It probably comes though from Old English words meaning dark soil.

Blackheath due to its being an area of open high ground outside the City of London was a place of strategic importance. For this reason, the Romans first built their London to Dover road, known as Watling Street across it. Blackheath Road is part of this.

During the Peasants’ Revolt, Wat Tyler’s 100 000 anti-poll tax rebels marched along the road here in 1381 on the way to London, where they were defeated.

Lime kilns - the burning of chalk to produce quicklime, an ancillary industry in the building trade for the production of both mortar and lime wash - were situated here. Roque’s 1746 map shows a cluster of buildings around the junctio...
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MARCH
9
2022

 

Addle Street, EC2V
Addle Street, there from ancient times, was a victim of the bulldozer after the Second World War. In the 1633 edition of Stow’s Survey it is suggested that the name is derived from King Adelstane, who is said to have had a house with an entrance in Adel Street, and that in evidence the street is called King Adel Street. There do not appear to be any records giving this form of the name. While the Saxon word Atheling means noble, Sheila Fairfield suggests that the word derives from the word for dung.

The church of St Mary Aldermanbury stood on the west side of Aldermanbury, between Love Lane and Addle Street.

General development of the area put paid to the street in the early 1960s.
»read full article


MARCH
8
2022

 

Regents Park Estate, NW1
The Regent’s Park Estate is a large housing estate in the London Borough of Camden. In 1951, land was sold by the Crown Estate to the Metropolitan Borough of St Pancras after many of the buildings in the area suffered destruction during the Second World War. The Borough then built council housing - some 2000 homes on either side of Robert Street, between Albany Street and Hampstead Road.

Most of the estate is named after places in the Lake District such as Windermere, Cartmel and Rydal Water.

The site of the estate incorporates the sites of Cumberland Market, Munster Square and Clarence Gardens.


»read full article


MARCH
7
2022

 

Trafalgar Avenue, SE15
This area of Peckham, close to the Old Kent Road, was developed from the 1840s onwards. In the 1850s, north Peckham was developing as a handsome, middle-class suburb. Leading south from the Old Kent Road, Trafalgar Road (later Trafalgar Avenue) was laid out including an earlier bridge (the Trafalgar Bridge) over the Grand Surrey Canal. The canal was filled in during 1970.

On the corner of Trafalgar Avenue and Waite Street, a pub was built: "The Victory".

After the Second World War and its war damage, much of the southern part of Trafalgar Avenue was demolished to make way for parkland.
»read full article


MARCH
6
2022

 

Galton Street, W10
Galton Street lies within the Queen’s Park Estate, W10. Because of its townscape and architectural quality and its historical interest, the Queen’s Park Estate was designed as a conservation area in 1978. A number of properties had been sold and many of them had already been "improved" in such an insensitive way that the visual unity of whole terraces was threatened.

The designation enabled the City Council to safeguard the character of the Estate and give guidance to owner-occupiers on suitable improvements. The conservation area was extended in 1991 to include parts of the Grand Union Canal and the Harrow Road Library (part of this extension was transferred to the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in 1994).
»read full article


MARCH
5
2022

 

Lord Hills Road, W2
Lord Hill’s Road was at first called Ranelagh Road. By the middle of the eighteenth century, Westbourne House - a large house and also known as Westbourne Place - had been rebuilt as an elegant Georgian mansion by the architect Isaac Ware. Residents had included Sir William Yorke (a Venetian ambassador), architect Samuel Pepys Cockerell (a distant relative of diarist Samuel Pepys) and finally General Rowland Hill, 1st Viscount Hill.

The River Westbourne flowed in a southeasterly direction across Paddington and beside Westbourne House. In its last incarnation it was the Ranelagh sewer - some of its course was still open in 1871 along the later line of Kilburn Park Road and Shirland Road. This was then built over but further south, it had already disappeared beneath new roads known as Formosa Road, Ranelagh Road and Cleveland Square.

General Rowland Hill left Westbourne House in 1836 and following his departure, the mansion was demolished and replaced by Westbourne Park Villas. Hill was Commander-in-Chief of...
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MARCH
4
2022

 

Hanbury Street, E1
Hanbury Street is a long road running west-east from Commercial Street to Vallance Road. The street-line of the western section dates from around 1649 when it was known as Lolesworth Lane or Lolesworth Street as it crossed Lolesworth Field.

It appears as Browne’s Lane on maps of 1677, named after Jeffrey Browne, a local landowner who also owned part of the Spital Field which later became the market. The north side had become built up by 1681. The street was later extended east of Brick Lane, though called Montague Street, Church Street and Wells Street.

Considerable rebuilding took place during the early 1700s, resulting in the typical Georgian houses that dominated much of the area (and still do in nearby streets). Following the progressive expansion of Truman’s Black Eagle Brewery, Browne’s Lane and its continuations eastward were renamed and renumbered as Hanbury Street in 1876, in honour of Samson Hanbury and possibly his brother Osgood, who became partners in the brewery business from 1780. A widely reproduced br...
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MARCH
3
2022

 

All Saints Road, W11
Built between 1852-61, All Saints Road is named after All Saints Church on Talbot Road. The church of All-Saints-With-St Columb was built by the the Reverend Samuel Walker, who came from St Columb Major, near St Ervan Cornwall: hence also the names of nearby Cornwall Crescent and St Ervan’s Road.

In 1852, Walker bought several fields of Portobello Farm and spent thousands of pounds developing them, starting with the church.

The church was isolated and derelict for ten years and local residents and irreverently called it ’Walker’s Folly’ or ’All Sinners in the Mud.

By the 1950s, All Saints Road was attracting its first West Indian immigrants. Nearby was the Tavistock Road lodging house of Mrs Fisher, who was known as the first Notting Hill landlady to rent to black people.

Amongst many cinematic claims to fame, Ringo Starr’s ’walkabout’ from ’A Hard Day’s Night’ partly took place in the street.

The Westway motorway was built to th...
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MARCH
2
2022

 

Farringdon Road, EC1R
Farringdon Road is a road in Clerkenwell and Finsbury. The construction of Farringdon Road, which took almost 20 years between the 1840s and the 1860s, is considered one of the greatest urban engineering achievements of the 19th century. Not only was it one of the first engineered multi-lane roads, but it also buried the River Fleet in a system of underground tunnels, solving one of London’s most daunting sanitary problems.

Its construction also included the building of the world’s first stretch of underground railway, a branch of the Metropolitan Railway that later became part of the London Underground running beneath Farringdon Road from King’s Cross St Pancras into the City at Farringdon.

Like Clerkenwell Road and Rosebery Avenue, it had an enormous impact on the terrain, not just as a new route and topographical boundary across a tortuously laid out district, but also in bringing about wholesale redevelopment of the building fabric. With the making of the road some of the worst social a...
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MARCH
1
2022

 

Wardour Street, W1D
The W1D part of Wardour Street south of Shaftesbury Avenue runs through London’s Chinatown. Another part of Wardour Street runs north of Shaftesbury Avenue.

Chinatown’s fourth gate on Wardour Street was completed in 2016, and built in traditional Qing Dynasty style. It is the largest Chinese gate in the country. Chinatown has buildings and streets decorated with Chinese symbols such as dragons and lanterns. Local street signs are written in both English and Chinese.

Wardour Street was ultimately named after local 17th century landowners, the Wardour family.
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