Ambrosden Avenue, SW1P

Buildings in this area date from the nineteenth century or before

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(51.49578 -0.13891, 51.495 -0.138) 
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Road · Victoria · SW1P ·
JANUARY
1
2000

Ambrosden Avenue is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.





CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 19:47 GMT   

Millions Of Rats In Busy London
The Daily Mail on 14 April 1903 reported "MILLIONS OF RATS IN BUSY LONDON"

A rat plague, unprecedented in the annals of London, has broken out on the north side of the Strand. The streets principally infested are Catherine street, Drury lane, Blackmore street, Clare Market and Russell street. Something akin to a reign of terror prevails among the inhabitants after nightfall. Women refuse to pass along Blackmore street and the lower parts of Stanhope street after dusk, for droves of rats perambulate the roadways and pavements, and may be seen running along the window ledges of the empty houses awaiting demolition by the County Council in the Strand to Holborn improvement scheme.

The rats, indeed, have appeared in almost-incredible numbers. "There are millions of them," said one shopkeeper, and his statement was supported by other residents. The unwelcome visitors have been evicted from their old haunts by the County Council housebreakers, and are now busily in search of new homes. The Gaiety Restaurant has been the greatest sufferer. Rats have invaded the premises in such force that the managers have had to close the large dining room on the first floor and the grill rooms on the ground floor and in the basement. Those three spacious halls which have witnessed many as semblages of theatre-goers are now qui:e deserted. Behind the wainscot of the bandstand in the grillroom is a large mound of linen shreds. This represents 1728 serviettes carried theee by the rats.

In the bar the removal of a panel disclosed the astonishing fact that the rats have dragged for a distance of seven or eight yards some thirty or forty beer and wine bottles and stacked them in such a fashion as to make comfortable sleeping places. Mr Williams. the manager of the restaurant, estimates that the rats have destroyed L200 worth of linen. Formerly the Gaiety Restaurant dined 2000 persons daily; no business whatever is now done in this direction.

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Lived here
Richard Roques   
Added: 21 Jan 2021 16:53 GMT   

Buckingham Street residents
Here in Buckingham Street lived Samuel Pepys the diarist, Charles Dickens and Rudyard Kipling

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Comment
Pauline jones   
Added: 16 Oct 2017 19:04 GMT   

Bessborough Place, SW1V
I grew up in bessborough place at the back of our house and Grosvenor road and bessborough gardens was a fantastic playground called trinity mews it had a paddling pool sandpit football area and various things to climb on, such as a train , slide also as Wendy house. There were plants surrounding this wonderful play area, two playground attendants ,also a shelter for when it rained. The children were constantly told off by the playground keepers for touching the plants or kicking the ball out of the permitted area, there was hopscotch as well, all these play items were brick apart from the slide. Pollock was the centre of my universe and I felt sorry and still do for anyone not being born there. To this day I miss it and constantly look for images of the streets around there, my sister and me often go back to take a clumped of our beloved London. The stucco houses were a feature and the backs of the houses enabled parents to see thier children playing.

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Justin Russ   
Added: 15 Feb 2021 20:25 GMT   

Binney Street, W1K
Binney St was previously named Thomas Street before the 1950’s. Before the 1840’s (approx.) it was named Bird St both above and below Oxford St.

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Comment
Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

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Comment
Jessie Doring   
Added: 22 Feb 2021 04:33 GMT   

Tisbury Court Jazz Bar
Jazz Bar opened in Tisbury Court by 2 Australians. Situated in underground basement. Can not remember how long it opened for.

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The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Dec 2020 00:24 GMT   

Othello takes a bow
On 1 November 1604, William Shakespeare’s tragedy Othello was presented for the first time, at The Palace of Whitehall. The palace was the main residence of the English monarchs in London from 1530 until 1698. Seven years to the day, Shakespeare’s romantic comedy The Tempest was also presented for the first time, and also at the Palace of Whitehall.

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Born here
www.violettrefusis.com   
Added: 17 Feb 2021 15:05 GMT   

Birth place
Violet Trefusis, writer, cosmopolitan intellectual and patron of the Arts was born at 2 Wilton Crescent SW1X.

Source: www.violettrefusis.com

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Born here
Ron Shepherd   
Added: 18 Sep 2021 17:28 GMT   

More Wisdom
Norman Joseph Wisdom was born in St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington, West London.

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Comment
Jonathan Penner   
Added: 11 Sep 2021 16:03 GMT   

Pennard Road, W12
My wife and I, young Canadians, lodged at 65 (?) Pennard Road with a fellow named Clive and his girlfriend, Melanie, for about 6 months in 1985. We loved the area and found it extremely convenient.

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Comment
   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 16:58 GMT   

Prefabs!
The "post-war detached houses" mentioned in the description were "prefabs" - self-contained single-storey pre-fabricated dwellings. Demolition of houses on the part that became Senegal Fields was complete by 1964 or 1965.

Source: Prefabs in the United Kingdom - Wikipedia

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Comment
Matthew Moggridge ([email protected])   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 10:38 GMT   

Lord Chatham’s Ride (does it even exist?)
Just to say that I cycled from my home in Sanderstead to Knockholt Pound at the weekend hoping to ride Lord Chatham’s Ride, but could I find it? No. I rode up Chevening Lane, just past the Three Horseshoes pub and when I reached the end of the road there was a gate and a sign reading "Private, No Entry". I assumed this was the back entrance to Chevening House, country retreat of the Foreign Secretary, and that Lord Chatham’s Ride was inside the grounds. At least that’s what I’m assuming as I ended up following a footpath that led me into some woods with loads of rooted pathways, all very annoying. Does Lord Chatham’s Ride exist and if so, can I ride it, or is it within the grounds of Chevening House and, therefore, out of bounds? Here’s an account of my weekend ride with images, see URL below.

Source: No Visible Lycra: Lord Chatham’s ride: a big disappointmen

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Comment
norma brown   
Added: 20 Aug 2021 21:12 GMT   

my grandparents lived there as well as 2 further generations
my home

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Comment
Ruth   
Added: 6 Aug 2021 13:31 GMT   

Cheltenham Road, SE15
Harris Girls’ Academy, in Homestall Road, just off Cheltenham Road, was formerly Waverley School. Before that it was built as Honor Oak Girls’ Grammar School. It was also the South London Emergency School during WW2,taking girls from various schools in the vicinity, including those returning from being evacuated.

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Comment
Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

Reply
Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 09:12 GMT   

Dunloe Avenue, N17
I was born in 1951,my grandparents lived at 5 Dunloe Avenue.I had photos of the coronation decorations in the area for 1953.The houses were rented out by Rowleys,their ’workers yard’ was at the top of Dunloe Avenue.The house was fairly big 3 bedroom with bath and toilet upstairs,and kitchenette downstairs -a fairly big garden.My Grandmother died 1980 and the house was taken back to be rented again

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Apollo Victoria Theatre The Apollo Victoria Theatre is a West End theatre, across from London Victoria Station.
Goring Hotel The Goring Hotel is a 5-star hotel in London, England.
Little Ben Little Ben is a cast iron miniature clock tower, situated at the intersection of Vauxhall Bridge Road and Victoria Street, close to the approach to Victoria station.
Royal Mews The Royal Mews is a mews (i.e. combined stables, carriage house and in recent times also the garage) of the British Royal Family.
St Mary’s Church, Vincent Square St Mary’s was established in 1837 and closed in 1923.
Tothill Fields Bridewell Tothill Fields Bridewell (also known as Tothill Fields Prison and Westminster Bridewell) was a prison located in Westminster between 1618 and 1884.
Victoria Bus Station Victoria bus station is a bus station outside Victoria Station in Terminus Place.
Victoria Palace Theatre Victoria Palace Theatre stands opposite Victoria Station.
Westminster Cathedral The ’Metropolitan Cathedral of the Precious Blood of Our Lord Jesus Christ’ is the mother church of the Catholic Church in England and Wales.
Westminster Cathedral Choir School Westminster Cathedral Choir School is a boarding and day preparatory school for boys in Victoria.
Westminster Under School Westminster Under School is an independent school and preparatory school for boys aged 7 to 13 and is attached to Westminster School.

NEARBY STREETS
Abbey Orchard Street, SW1P Abbey Orchard Street was the heart of a former slum area.
Allington Street, SW1E Allington Street was named after Allington in Lincolnshire.
Angela Hooper Place, SW1E Angela Hooper Place is a location in London.
Arneway Street, SW1P Arneway Street is named for Thomas Arneway, former benefactor to the Westminster parish poor.
Artillery Place, SW1P Artillery Place was named after a former nearby artillery practice ground which stood here in the 19th century.
Artillery Row, SW1P Artillery Row skirts a former artillery ground.
Ashley Gardens, SW1P Ashley Gardens is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Ashley Place, SW1P Ashley Place is thought to be named after Anthony Ashley Cooper, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury, Victorian politician and philanthropist.
Beeston Place, SW1W Beeston Place was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate and the family owned land in Beeston, Cheshire.
Bloomberg Street, SW1V Bloomberg Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Bloomburg Street, SW1V Bloomburg Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Bressenden Place, SW1E Bressenden Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1E postal area.
Brewers Green, SW1H Brewers Green is one of the streets of London in the SW1H postal area.
Bridge Place, SW1V Bridge Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Broadway, SW1H Broadway - formerly the location of the headquarters of both London Transport and the Metropolitan Police.
Buckingham Gate, SW1E Buckingham Gate was created in the 17th century.
Buckingham Mews, SW1E Buckingham Mews is one of the streets of London in the SW1E postal area.
Buckingham Palace Road, SW1W Buckingham Palace Road runs from the south side of Buckingham Palace towards Chelsea.
Buckingham Palace, SW1W Buckingham Palace is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Buckingham Place, SW1E Buckingham Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1E postal area.
Bulleid Way, SW1V Bulleid Way is a road in the SW1W postcode area
Cardinal Walk, SW1E Cardinal Walk is a road in the SW1E postcode area
Carlisle Mansions, SW1P Carlisle Mansions is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Carlisle Place, SW1P Carlisle Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Castle Lane, SW1E Castle Lane is one of the streets of London in the SW1E postal area.
Catherine Place, SW1E Catherine Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1E postal area.
Caxton Street, SW1H William Caxton was responsible for the introduction of the printing press to England.
Chadwick Street, SW1P Chadwick Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Chapter Chambers, SW1P Chapter Chambers is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Chapter Street, SW1P Chapter Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Churton Place, SW1V Churton Place is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Coburg Close, SW1P Coburg Close is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Colonnade Walk, SW1W Colonnade Walk is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Dacre Street, SW1H Dacre Street is named after Lady Anne Dacre.
Dalkeith Court, SW1P Dalkeith Court is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Dean Farrar Street, SW1H Frederic William Farrar was a canon of Westminster Abbey.
Dells Mews, SW1V Dells Mews is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Denbigh Mews, SW1V Denbigh Mews is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
East Concourse, SW1V East Concourse is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Eaton Lane, SW1W Eaton Lane is a road in the SW1W postcode area
Eccleston Bridge, SW1W Eccleston Bridge derives its name from Eccleston in Cheshire, where the Grosvenor family own property.
Eccleston Square Mews, SW1V Eccleston Square Mews is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Eccleston Square, SW1V Eccleston Square is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Eland House, SW1E Eland House is an office building on Bressenden Place.
Elizabeth Bridge, SW1V Elizabeth Bridge is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Elverton Street, SW1P Elverton Street is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Emery Hill Street, SW1P Emery Hill Street is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Esterbrooke Street, SW1P Esterbrooke Street is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Evelyn Mansions, SW1P Evelyn Mansions is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Fountain Square, SW1W Fountain Square is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Francis Street, SW1P Francis Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Gillingham Row, SW1V This is a street in the SW1V postcode area
Gillingham Street, SW1V Gillingham Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Gordon House, SW1P Residential block
Greencoat Place, SW1P Greencoat Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Greenwood, SW1V Greenwood is a road in the SE26 postcode area
Greycoat Gardens, SW1P Greycoat Gardens is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Greycoat Place, SW1P Greycoat Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Greycoat Street, SW1P Greycoat Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Greycote Place, SW1P Greycote Place is a location in London.
Grosvenor Gardens Mews East, SW1W Grosvenor Gardens Mews East is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Grosvenor Gardens, SW1W Grosvenor Gardens is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Guildhouse Street, SW1V Guildhouse Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Hatherley Street, SW1V Hatherley Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Hide Place, SW1P Hide Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Howick Place, SW1P Howick Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Howick Place, SW1P This is a street in the SW1E postcode area
Hudsons Place, SW1V Hudsons Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Hugh Street, SW1V Hugh Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Joseph Conrad House, SW1V Residential block
King’s Scholars’ Passage, SW1V King’s Scholars’ Passage is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Kingsgate Parade, SW1E Kingsgate Parade is one of the streets of London in the SW1E postal area.
Longmoore Street, SW1V Longmoore Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Lower Grosvenor Place, SW1W Lower Grosvenor Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Main Concourse, SW1V Main Concourse is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Medway Street, SW1P Medway Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Morpeth Mansions Morpeth Mansions, SW1V Morpeth Mansions Morpeth Mansions is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Morpeth Mansions, SW1V Morpeth Mansions is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Morpeth Terrace, SW1P Morpeth Terrace is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Neat House Place, SW1V Neat House Place is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Neathouse Place, SW1V Neathouse Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Old Pye Street, SW1P Old Pye Street gets its name from Sir Robert Pye, member of parliament for Westminster in the time of Charles I.
Palace Street, SW1E Palace Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1E postal area.
Palace Street, SW1E This is a street in the SW1 postcode area
Palmer Street, SW1H Palmer Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1H postal area.
Petty France, SW1H Petty France is one of the streets of London in the SW1H postal area.
Phipps Mews, SW1W Phipps Mews is a road in the SW1W postcode area
Portland House, SW1E Portland House is a block 101 metres tall with 29 floors.
Post Office Way, SW1H Post Office Way is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Regency Place, SW1P Regency Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Regency Street, SW1P Regency Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Rochester Row, SW1P Rochester Row was home to the Bishop of Rochester in 1666.
Rochester Street, SW1P Rochester Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Roebuck House, SW1E Residential block
Rutherford Street, SW1P Rutherford Street is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Seaforth Place, SW1E Seaforth Place is a road in the SW1E postcode area
Silverdale Industrial Estate, SW1W A street within the SW1W postcode
Spenser Street, SW1P Spenser Street is a road in the SW1E postcode area
St Matthew Street, SW1P St Matthew Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
St. Ermin’s Hill, SW1H St. Ermin’s Hill is a road in the SW1H postcode area
St. Matthew Street, St. Matthew Street is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Stag Place, SW1E The old brewhouse of the Westminster Abbey moved to Stag Place after the dissolution of the monasteries in the sixteenth century.
Stillington Street, SW1P Stillington Street is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Strutton Ground, SW1P Strutton Ground is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Tachbrook Mews, SW1V Tachbrook Mews is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Terminus Place, SW1 Terminus Place is the home of Victoria Bus Station.
Terminus Place, SW1 Terminus Place is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Terminus Place, SW1W Terminus Place is a road in the SW1W postcode area
The Royal Mews, SW1E The Royal Mews is a road in the SW1W postcode area
The Royal Mews, SW1E The Royal Mews is a road in the SW1E postcode area
Thirleby Road, SW1P Thirleby Road is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Tothill Street, SW1H Tothill Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1H postal area.
Udall Street, SW1V Udall Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Upper Tachbrook Street, SW1V Upper Tachbrook Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Vandon Passage, SW1H Vandon Passage probably dates from the fifteenth century.
Vandon Street, SW1H Vandon Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1H postal area.
Vauxhall Bridge Road, SW1V Vauxhall Bridge Road is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Victoria Arcade, SW1P Victoria Arcade is one of the streets of London in the SW1E postal area.
Victoria Arcade, SW1V Victoria Arcade is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Victoria Place, SW1W Victoria Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Victoria Square, SW1E Victoria Square, a small residential square, lies on land forming part of the Grosvenor Estate to the south of the Royal Mews.
Victoria Street, SW1E Victoria Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Victoria Street, SW1P Victoria Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1E postal area.
Victoria Street, SW1P Victoria Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1H postal area.
Victoria Subway, SW1V Victoria Subway is a road in the SW1X postcode area
Victoria Walk, SW1 Victoria Walk is a road in the E3 postcode area
Vincent Square, SW1P Vincent Square is a large grass-covered square which provides playing fields for Westminster School, which owns it.
Vincent Street, SW1P Vincent Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Walcott Street, SW1P Walcott Street was named after Reverend MEC Walcott, curate of the St Margaret’s, Westminster in the 1840s.
Warwick Row, SW1E Warwick Row is one of the streets of London in the SW1E postal area.
Westminster Palace Gardens, SW1P Westminster Palace Gardens is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Wilcox Place, SW1P Wilcox Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1E postal area.
Wilfred Street, SW1E Wilfred Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1E postal area.
Willow Place, SW1P Willow Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Willow Place, SW1P Willow Place is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Willow Walk, SW1P A street within the SW1V postcode
Wilton Road, SW1V Wilton Road is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Windsor Place, SW1P Windsor Place connects Francis Street with Greencoat Place.


Victoria

The railways largely replaced the canals as a means of transport. Uniquely for a main line station, Victoria station was built on top of one.

Before the railway arrived in 1862, this area - like the area immediately south of it - was known as Pimlico. The Grosvenor Canal ended in a large basin here.

Victoria station’s origins lie with the Great Exhibition of 1851, when a railway called the West End of London and Crystal Palace Railway came into existence, serving the site of the exhibition halls which had been transferred to Sydenham from Hyde Park. The terminus of that railway was at Stewarts Lane in Battersea on the south side of the river. In 1858 a joint enterprise was set up to take trains over the river: it was entitled the Victoria Station and Pimlico Railway; and was a mile and a quarter in length. The railway was owned by four railway companies: the Great Western (GWR); London & North Western (LNWR); the London, Brighton and South Coast (LBSCR); and the London Chatham and Dover Railways (LCDR). It was incorporated by Act of Parliament in 1858.

The station was built in two parts: those on the western side, opened in 1862, with six platforms, ten tracks and an hotel (the 300-bedroom Grosvenor) were occupied by the Brighton company; whilst adjacent, and in the same year, the Chatham company were to occupy a less imposing wooden-fronted building. The latter’s station had nine tracks and was shared by broad-gauge trains of the GWR, whose trains arrived from Southall via the West London Extension Joint Railway through Chelsea. The GWR remained part owner of the station until 1932, although its trains had long since ceased to use it. Each side of the station had its own entrance and a separate station master; a wall between the two sections effectively emphasised that fact.

At the start of the twentieth century both parts of the station were rebuilt. It now had a decent frontage and forecourt, but not as yet a unified existence. Work on the Brighton side was completed in 1908 and was carried out in red brick; the Grosvenor Hotel was rebuilt at the same time. The Chatham side, in a Edwardian style with baroque elements, designed by Alfred Bloomfield, was completed a year later. The two sections were eventually connected in 1924 by removing part of a screen wall, when the platforms were renumbered as an entity. The station was redeveloped internally in the 1980s, with the addition of shops within the concourse, and above the western platforms.

The station was now serving boat trains, and during WWI it became the hub of trains carrying soldiers to and from France, many of them wounded. After the war the Continental steamer traffic became concentrated there, including the most famous of those trains, the Golden Arrow. The area around the station also became a site for other other forms of transport: a bus station in the forecourt; a coach terminal to the south; and it is now the terminal for trains serving Gatwick Airport.

Victoria is also well-served by London underground. The sub-surface Circle and District Lines opened on December 24, 1868; and the Victoria Line line came to Victoria Station with the third phase of construction of the line - the station’s platforms were opened on March 7, 1969, six months after the Victoria line had started running in outer London.


LOCAL PHOTOS
The 52 bus
TUM image id: 1556876554
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Broadway SW1
TUM image id: 1530117235
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Grosvenor Gardens Mews East
TUM image id: 1544975168
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Entrance to Pickering Place
TUM image id: 1499523671
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Antrobus Street sign
TUM image id: 1601897046
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Wood engraving showing mothers, with their children, exercising at Tothill Fields Prison, London. Shelfmark: Crime 9 (64)
Credit: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=9228986
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

The Lillington Gardens estate
Credit: Ewan Munro
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The 52 bus
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The sign for the "Stage Door", formerly a pub in Allington Street, SW1
Credit: GoArt/The Underground Map
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Broadway SW1
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