Embankment

Underground station, existing between the 1870s and now.

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Underground station · * · WC2N ·
October
30
2020
Embankment underground station has been known by various names during its long history - including, indeed, ’Embankment’.

The station has two entrances, one on Victoria Embankment and the other on Villiers Street, adjacent to Victoria Embankment Gardens.

The station is in two parts: sub-surface platforms opened in 1870 by the Metropolitan District Railway (MDR) as part of the company’s extension of the Inner Circle eastwards from Westminster to Blackfriars and deep-level platforms opened in 1906 by the Baker Street and Waterloo Railway (BS&WR) and 1914 by the Charing Cross, Euston and Hampstead Railway (CCE&HR). A variety of underground and mainline services have operated over the sub-surface tracks and the CCE&HR part of the station was reconstructed in the 1920s.

After having been named both Charing Cross and Embankment, in 1974 the station was renamed Charing Cross Embankment. Then, on 12 September 1976, it became Embankment, so that the merged Strand and Trafalgar Square stations could be named Charing Cross.

Contrary to popular belief, the shortest walking distance between two stations is not the 250 metres between Leicester Square and Covent but between Charing Cross and Embankment, a distance of 100 metres.

During summer 2013, Oswald Laurence’s famous ’mind the gap’ announcement was reinstated to Embankment station after a request from his widow who would come to Embankment station after he died just to hear his voice. She asked for a copy of the iconic mind the gap announcement her husband made some 40 years before - instead staff decided to restore the recording.




Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence

CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Dec 2020 00:24 GMT   

Othello takes a bow
On 1 November 1604, William Shakespeare’s tragedy Othello was presented for the first time, at The Palace of Whitehall. The palace was the main residence of the English monarchs in London from 1530 until 1698. Seven years to the day, Shakespeare’s romantic comedy The Tempest was also presented for the first time, and also at the Palace of Whitehall.

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Simon   
Added: 15 Jan 2024 15:44 GMT   

Simon De Charmes, clockmaker
De Charmes (or Des Charmes), Simon, of French Huguenot extraction. Recorded 1688 and Free of the Clockmakers’ Company 1691-1730. In London until 1704 at least at ’his House, the Sign of the Clock, the Corner of Warwick St, Charing Cross’. See Brian Loomes The Early Clockmakers of Great Britain, NAG Press, 1981, p.188

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Linda Webb   
Added: 27 Sep 2021 05:51 GMT   

Hungerford Stairs
In 1794 my ancestor, George Webb, Clay Pipe Maker, lived in Hungerford Stairs, Strand. Source: Wakefields Merchant & Tradesmens General Directory London Westminster 1794

Source: Hungerford Stairs

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Lived here
Richard Roques   
Added: 21 Jan 2021 16:53 GMT   

Buckingham Street residents
Here in Buckingham Street lived Samuel Pepys the diarist, Charles Dickens and Rudyard Kipling

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Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

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Lived here
Linda WEBB   
Added: 8 Jun 2023 23:16 GMT   

Craven Street, WC2N
James webb lived in Craven Street Westminster. He died in 1758 and his states he was of Craven Street.
FROM England & Wales, Prerogative Court of Canterbury Wills, 1384-1858 for James Webb PROB 11: Will Registers
1773-1776 Piece 1004: Alexander, Quire Numbers 1-45 (1775)

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
   
Added: 20 Jul 2024 01:13 GMT   

Whitechapel (1980 - 1981)
Diana Lee-Gobbitt - Artist rented a room at No 1 Berner Street, Whitechapel, opposite Church Passage (Ripper territory) for one year, rent approx 3 pounds pw. Worked as Receptionist for n Indian import/export company in the Watney Markets. Owner of No 1 Berner Street was Sammy Ferrugia, Maltese Taxi company owner. The artist was shown the gambling den in Dutfield’s Yard behind the terrace houses. It was common local knowledge prostitution was high end income for those in the East End during the 1950s.

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Added: 7 Jul 2024 16:26 GMT   

Haycroft Gardens, NW10
My Grandfather bought No 45 Buchanan Gdns in I believe 1902 and died ther in the early 1950s

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Comment
   
Added: 7 Jul 2024 16:20 GMT   

Haycroft Gardens, NW10
I lived in No 7 from 1933 to 1938

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Sylvia guiver   
Added: 4 Jul 2024 14:52 GMT   

Grandparents 1937 lived 37 Blandford Square
Y mother and all her sisters and brother lived there, before this date , my parent wedding photographers were take in the square, I use to visit with my mother I remember the barge ballon in the square in the war.

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Born here
Roy Mathieson   
Added: 27 Jun 2024 16:25 GMT   

St Saviours
My great grandmother was born in Bowling Green Lane in 1848. The family moved from there to Earl Terrace, Bermondsey in 1849. I have never been able to locate Earl Terrace on maps.

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Added: 26 Jun 2024 13:10 GMT   

Buckhurst Street, E1
Mt grandfather, Thomas Walton Ward had a musical instrument workshop in Buckhurst Street from 1934 until the street was bombed during the war. Grandfather was a partner in the musical instrument firm of R.J. Ward and Sons of Liverpool. He died in 1945 and is buried in a common grave at Abney Park Cemetery.

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Lived here
Mike Dowling   
Added: 15 Jun 2024 15:51 GMT   

Family ties (1936 - 1963)
The Dowling family lived at number 13 Undercliffe Road for
Nearly 26 years. Next door was the Harris family

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Evie Helen   
Added: 13 Jun 2024 00:03 GMT   

Vickers Road
The road ’Vickers Road’ is numbered rather differently to other roads in the area as it was originally built as housing for the "Vickers" arms factory in the late 1800’s and early 1900s. Most of the houses still retain the original 19th century tiling and drainage outside of the front doors.

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
101 Strand, WC2R This shop was one of the first in London to have gas lighting fitted.
101 The Strand 101 The Strand was an art school from 1750 until 1806.
Ackermann’s Rudolph Ackermann (20 April 1764 in Stollberg, Saxony – 30 March 1834 in Finchley) was an Anglo-German bookseller, inventor, lithographer, publisher and businessman.
Charing Cross Charing Cross denotes the junction of the Strand, Whitehall and Cockspur Street, just south of Trafalgar Square
Embankment Embankment underground station has been known by various names during its long history - including, indeed, ’Embankment’.
Embankment to Charing Cross walk Arguably the shortest walk between two stations of the London Underground
Hungerford Bridge Hungerford Bridge is a rail bridge crossing the Thames into Charing Cross station.
Hungerford Stairs The Hungerford Stairs were the entrance point to Hungerford Market from the River Thames. They are now the site of Charing Cross railway Station.
Nelson’s Column Nelson’s Column is a monument in Trafalgar Square built to commemorate Horatio Nelson’s decisive victory at the Battle of Trafalgar during which he lost his life.
Northumberland House Northumberland House was a large Jacobean townhouse in London, which was the London residence of the Percy family, the Dukes of Northumberland.
The Adelphi The Adelphi is a small district surrounding the streets of Adelphi Terrace, Robert Street and John Adam Street.
Wyld’s Great Globe Wyld’s Great Globe was an attraction situated in Leicester Square between 1851 and 1862.

NEARBY STREETS
Adam Street, WC2N Adam Street is named after John and Robert Adam, who built the Adelphi development in the 1760s (Charing Cross)
Adelaide Street, WC2R Adelaide Street was named for Queen Adelaide, Consort to King William IV (Charing Cross)
Adelphi Terrace, WC2N Adelphi Terrace is named after John and Robert Adam, who built the Adelphi development in the 1760s (Embankment)
Admiralty House, SW1A Admiralty House is a block on Whitehall (Westminster)
Agar Street, WC2N Agar Street is named after George Agar, who built the street in the 1830s with John Ponsonby, Earl of Bessborough (Charing Cross)
Bear Street, WC2H Bear Street is a streetname with two possible derivations (Leicester Square)
Beaufort’s Buildings, WC2R Beaufort’s Buildings was replaced by Savoy Court (Charing Cross)
Bedford Street, WC2E Bedford Street was named after local 18th century landowners the Russell family, earls/dukes of Bedford (Covent Garden)
Bedfordbury, WC2N Bedfordbury is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area (Covent Garden)
Belvedere Crescent, SE1 Belvedere Crescent used to run off Belvedere Road (South Bank)
Belvedere Road, SE1 Belvedere Road was laid out between 1814 and 1827 (South Bank)
Brettenham House, WC2R Brettenham House is a block on Savoy Street (Charing Cross)
Brydges Place, WC2N Brydges Place replaced Taylor’s Buildings in 1904 when the Colloseum was built (Charing Cross)
Buckingham Street, WC2N Buckingham Street is named after George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham (Charing Cross)
Bull Inn Court, WC2R Bull Inn Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2R postal area (Temple)
Burleigh Mansions, WC2H Burleigh Mansions dates from 1885 (Leicester Square)
Canada House, SW1A Canada House is a Greek Revival building situated on Trafalgar Square (Charing Cross)
Carting Lane, WC2R Carting Lane is thought to be named after the carts that brought goods to and from the wharf formerly located here. (Charing Cross)
Casson Square, SE1 Casson Square is a square of South Bank buildings (South Bank)
Cecil Court, WC2N Cecil Court is a pedestrian street with Victorian shop-frontages (Leicester Square)
Cecil Street, WC2N Cecil Street was built on the site of Cecil House (Charing Cross)
Chandos Place, WC2N Chandos Place replaced the northern section of Chandos Street in 1938 (Charing Cross)
Chandos Street, WC2N Chandos Street (called Chandos Place after 1938), was named after the third Lord Chandos, the father-in-law of the fourth Earl of Bedford. (Charing Cross)
Charing Cross Mansions, WC2H Charing Cross Mansions is one of the mid 1880s block built around a widened Cecil Court (Leicester Square)
Charing Cross, WC2N Charing Cross, long regarded as London’s central point, as an address is an enigma (Charing Cross)
Charles Court, WC2N Charles Court ran between Villiers Street and Hungerford Market (Charing Cross)
Church Court, WC2N Church Court once led from Church Lane - now demolished - to Strand (Charing Cross)
Church Lane, WC2N Church Lane was once a small lane leading from the back of St-Martins-in-the-Fields church to the Strand (Charing Cross)
Cockspur Court, SW1A Cockspur Court runs west for a short section from Spring Gardens (Charing Cross)
Cockspur Street, SW1A Cockspur Street is possibly after the cock fighting that formerly occurred here, cocks often having spurs attached to their feet during fights (Charing Cross)
Concert Hall Approach, SE1 Concert Hall Approach ’does what it says on the tin’ (South Bank)
Craig’s Court, SW1A Craig’s Court is an alleyway off Whitehall (Charing Cross)
Craven Passage, WC2N Craven Passage is named after William Craven, 3rd Baron Craven, who owned the land when the street was built in the 1730s (Charing Cross)
Craven Street, WC2N Craven Street is named after William Craven, 3rd Baron Craven, who owned the land when the street was built in the 1730s (Charing Cross)
Dover House, SW1A Dover House is a block on Whitehall (Westminster)
Downing Street, SW1A Downing Street has been the home of British Prime Minsters since the eighteenth century (Westminster)
Duncannon Street, WC2N Duncannon Street connects Trafalgar Square and Strand (Charing Cross)
Durham House Street, WC2N Durham House Street was the former site of a palace belonging to the bishops of Durham in medieval times. (Charing Cross)
Embankment Place, WC2N Embankment Place runs from Villiers Street, under a railway arch, on to Northumberland Avenue (Embankment)
Exchange Court, WC2R Exchange Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2R postal area (Temple)
Fox Under Hill Alley, WC2N Fox Under Hill Alley ran alongside Cecil House and later Salisbury Street (Charing Cross)
George Court, WC2N George Court is named after George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham (Charing Cross)
Golden Jubilee Bridge, WC2N Golden Jubilee Bridge is a road in the WC2N postcode area (River Thames)
Goodwins Court, WC2N Goodwins Court connects Bedfordbury with St Martin’s Lane (Covent Garden)
Grand Buildings, SW1A Grand Buildings replaced the Grand Hotel in 1986 (Charing Cross)
Great Scotland Yard, SW1A Great Scotland Yard is a street located in Westminster, London, connecting Northumberland Avenue and Whitehall. (Charing Cross)
Gwydyr House, SW1A Gwydyr House is a building on Whitehall (Westminster)
Half Moon Street, WC2N Half Moon Street was an old name for the lower portion of Bedford Street (Charing Cross)
Heathcock Court, WC2E Heathcock Court runs north off Strand (Covent Garden)
Hobhouse Court, WC2H Hobhouse Court is named after Sir John Cam Hobhouse, Victorian MP and arts patron (Leicester Square)
Hop Gardens, WC2N Hop Gardens is a small courtyard (Covent Garden)
Horse Guards Avenue, SW1A Horse Guards Avenue stretches from Whitehall to the Embankment (Westminster)
Horse Guards Parade, SW1A Horse Guards Parade dates to the time of Henry VIII (Westminster)
Horse Guards Road, SW1A Horse Guards Road runs along the eastern edge of St James’s Park (Westminster)
Hudson’s Court, WC2N Hudson’s Court is one of the courtyards swept away by the building of Trafalgar Square and Duncannon Street during the 1830s (Charing Cross)
Hungerford House, WC2N Residential block (Embankment)
Hungerford Lane, WC2N Hungerford Lane was a dark narrow alley that went alongside and then under Charing Cross Station (Charing Cross)
Irving Street, WC2H Irving Street is named after Henry Irving, the popular Victorian actor (Leicester Square)
Ivybridge Lane, WC2N Ivybridge Lane is named after a former ivy-covered bridge (Charing Cross)
John Adam House, WC2N John Adam House can be found on John Adam Street (Charing Cross)
John Adam Street, WC2N John Adam Street is named after John Adam, who built the Adelphi development with his brother Robert in the 1760s (Charing Cross)
Johnson’s Court, SW1A Johnson’s Court is a former courtyard next to Northumberland House (Charing Cross)
Kinnaird House, SW1Y Kinnaird House is a block on Pall Mall (St James’s)
Kipling House, WC2N Kipling House is a block on Villiers Street (Charing Cross)
Kirkland House, SW1A Kirkland House is a block on Whitehall (Westminster)
Lancaster Court, WC2N Lancaster Court was an old Strand courtyard, swept away in the 1830s (Charing Cross)
Lancaster Place, WC2R Lancaster Place is part of the northern approach to Waterloo Bridge (Charing Cross)
Leicester Square, WC2H Leicester Square is a central tourist attraction of London (Leicester Square)
Maiden Lane, WC2E Maiden Lane runs from Bedford Street in the west to Southampton Street in the east (Covent Garden)
Main Building, SW1A Main Building is a block on Horse Guards Avenue (Westminster)
Manners Street, SE1 Manners Street ran northeast off Vine Street (South Bank)
May’s Court, WC2N May’s Court is a road in the WC2N postcode area (Covent Garden)
Narrow Wall, SE1 Narrow Wall was, by the Tudor period, a road on the line of the old earth embankment of the River Thames (South Bank)
National Film Theatre, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode (South Bank)
New Street, SW1A New Street was made part of Spring Gardens in 1881 (Westminster)
Norman House, WC2R Norman House can be found on Strand, behind Savoy Steps (Charing Cross)
Northumberland Avenue, WC2N Northumberland Avenue runs from Trafalgar Square in the west to the Thames Embankment. (Charing Cross)
Northumberland Court, SW1A Northumberland Court was a courtyard beside Northumberland House (Charing Cross)
Northumberland House, SW1A Northumberland House is a modern block on Northumberland Avenue sharing the same name as a notable house of Charing Cross (Charing Cross)
Northumberland Street, WC2N Northumberland Street commemorates the former Northumberland House, built originally in the 17th century for the earls of Northampton and later acquired by the earls of Northumberland. (Charing Cross)
Oceanic House, SW1Y Oceanic House is a block on Pall Mall East (Charing Cross)
Old Admiralty Building, SW1A Old Admiralty Building is a block on Spring Gardens (Westminster)
Orange Street, WC2H Orange Street gets its name from William III, Prince of Orange - the reigning king when the street was built. (Leicester Square)
Pall Mall East, SW1A Pall Mall East is an eastern extension of Pall Mall towards Trafalgar Square (Charing Cross)
Richmond Terrace, SW1A Richmond Terrace is on the site of Richmond House, destroyed by a fire on 21 December 1791 (Westminster)
Robert Street, WC2N Robert Street is named after Robert Adam, who built the Adelphi development with his brother John in the 1760s (Embankment)
Salisbury Street, WC2N Salisbury Street was named after Robert Cecil, the first Earl of Salisbury (Charing Cross)
Savoy Court, WC2R Savoy Court is a modern name for Beaufort Buildings (Charing Cross)
Savoy Hill, WC2R Savoy Hill is located at a site originally called Savoy Manor (Charing Cross)
Savoy Place, WC2N Savoy Place is located at a site originally called Savoy Manor - taking its name from Peter II, Count of Savoy. (Charing Cross)
Savoy Street, WC2E Savoy Street is final street east off Strand before the approach road to Waterloo Bridge (Charing Cross)
Savoy Way, WC2R Savoy Way is located on the former site of the Savoy Palace, built for Peter II, Count of Savoy in 1245. (Charing Cross)
Shell Mex House, WC2N Shell Mex House is a grade II listed building located at 80 Strand (Charing Cross)
Southbank Centre Square, SE1 Southbank Centre Square is a road in the SE1 postcode area (South Bank)
Southbank, SE1 Southbank is a road in the SE9 postcode area (South Bank)
Spring Gardens, WC2N Spring Gardens derives its name from the Spring Garden, formed in the 16th century (Charing Cross)
St Martins Court, WC2H St Martins Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area (Leicester Square)
St Martins Lane, WC2N St Martins Lane runs up to Seven Dials from St Martin’s-in-the-Fields (Covent Garden)
St Martins Place, WC2N St Martin’s Place is a short stretch connecting Trafalgar Square to the bottom of Charing Cross Road (Charing Cross)
St Martins Street, WC2H St Martins Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area (Leicester Square)
Strand, WC2E Strand (or the Strand) runs just over 3⁄4 mile from Trafalgar Square eastwards to Temple Bar, where the road becomes Fleet Street inside the City of London (Charing Cross)
Suffolk Place, SW1Y The Earl of Suffolk (Thomas Howard) was the reason for the naming of Suffolk Place (St James’s)
Suffolk Street, SW1Y Suffolk Street was named after Thomas Howard, Earl of Suffolk, who owned a stable yard attached to Northumberland House which lay on this site (St James’s)
Sutton Walk, SE1 Sutton Walk - formerly Sutton Street until 1939 - was redeveloped as part of Concert Hall Approach (South Bank)
The Arches, WC2N The Arches runs directly under Charing Cross station as a short cut from Villiers Street to Northumberland Avenue (Charing Cross)
The Macadam Building Street, WC2R The Macadam Building Street is a location in London (Temple)
The Queen’s Walk, SE1 The Queen’s Walk is a road in the SE1 postcode area (South Bank)
The Terrace, SW1A The Terrace is a road in the SW1A postcode area (Westminster)
Trafalgar Square, WC2N Trafalgar Square commemorates Horatio Nelson’s 1805 victory at the Battle of Trafalgar (Charing Cross)
Trinity Place, SW1A Trinity Place is a former courtyard in the Whitehall area (Charing Cross)
Victoria Embankment, SW1A Victoria Embankment leads north out of the Westminster area (River Thames)
Victoria Embankment, WC2N Victoria Embankment was built as part of Joseph Bazalgette’s Embankment scheme (Embankment)
Victoria Embankment, WC2R Victoria Embankment runs from the Houses of Parliament to Blackfriars Bridge (Temple)
Villiers Street, WC2N Villiers Street was named after George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham (Charing Cross)
Vine Street, SE1 Vine Street roughly followed the route of the contemporary pathway between York Road and the South Bank, beside Waterloo underground station (South Bank)
Warwick House Street, SW1A Warwick House Street formerly approached Warwick House, built in the 17th century for Sir Philip Warwick (Charing Cross)
Watergate Walk, WC2N Watergate Walk is named after a former watergate built in 1626 for George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham as an entrance for the former York House (Embankment)
Waterloo Bridge, SE1 Waterloo Bridge is a road in the WC2R postcode area (South Bank)
Waterloo Bridge, SE1 Waterloo Bridge, as well as being the bridge itself, lends its name to the southern approach road (South Bank)
Wellington House, WC2E Wellington House is a 1930s office block on the corner of Lancaster Place and Strand (Charing Cross)
Whitcomb Street, WC2H Whitcomb Street - named after William Whitcomb, 17th century brewer and property developer (Leicester Square)
Whitehall Court, SW1A Whitehall Court runs north from Horse Guards Avenue (Westminster)
Whitehall Gardens, SW1A Whitehall Gardens is a road in the SW1A postcode area (Westminster)
Whitehall House, SW1A Whitehall House, a grade II listed building, is situated on Whitehall, in close proximity to Trafalgar Square. (Charing Cross)
Whitehall Place, SW1A Whitehall Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area (Westminster)
Whitehall, SW1A Whitehall is recognised as the centre of the government of the United Kingdom (Westminster)
William IV Street, WC2N William IV Street runs from Charing Cross Road to the Strand (Charing Cross)
York Buildings, WC2N York Buildings marks a house was built on this site in the 14th century for the bishops of Norwich (Embankment)
York Place, WC2N York Place marks the location of a house on this site (Charing Cross)
York Road, SE1 York Road skirts the western edge of Waterloo station (Waterloo)
Zimbabwe House, WC2N Charles Holden designed this building located on the corner of Agar Street and Strand for the British Medical Association. (Charing Cross)


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