Bleeding Heart Yard, EC1N

Road in/near Farringdon, existing between 1680 and now

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(51.51931 -0.10666, 51.519 -0.106) 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Road · * · EC1N ·
MARCH
18
2020

Bleeding Heart Yard is a courtyard off of Greville Street.

This cobbled courtyard is probably named after a 16th-century inn sign dating to the Reformation that was displayed on a pub called ’The Bleeding Heart’ in nearby Charles Street. The sign showed the heart of the Virgin Mary pierced by five swords.

The yard was laid out in the 1680s by Abraham Arlidge, leasing the old dung hill of Ely Palace where pigs kept by locals were foraged.

The courtyard’s name may also commemorate the murder of Lady Elizabeth Hatton, the wife of Sir William Hatton, whose family had owned the area around Hatton Garden. It is said that her body was found here on 27 January 1626, "torn limb from limb, but with her heart still pumping blood."

The yard features in the Charles Dickens novel ’Little Dorrit’ as the home of the Plornish family.

Greville Street links Bleeding Heart Yard to another notable street from Charles Dickens’ novels: Saffron Hill, which was the home of Fagin in Oliver Twist.

A gate at the south of the yard leads to Ely Place.


Main source: http://www.camdenhistorysociety.org/s/Street-names-their-origins.pdf
Further citations and sources




CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
MCNALLY    
Added: 17 May 2021 09:42 GMT   

Blackfriars (1959 - 1965)
I lived in Upper Ground from 1959 to 1964 I was 6 years old my parents Vince and Kitty run the Pub The Angel on the corner of Upper Ground and Bodies Bridge. I remember the ceiling of the cellar was very low and almost stretched the length of Bodies Bridge. The underground trains run directly underneath the pub. If you were down in the cellar when a train was coming it was quite frightening

Reply
Reply
Tom   
Added: 21 May 2021 23:07 GMT   

Blackfriars
What is, or was, Bodies Bridge?

Reply

Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 19:47 GMT   

Millions Of Rats In Busy London
The Daily Mail on 14 April 1903 reported "MILLIONS OF RATS IN BUSY LONDON"

A rat plague, unprecedented in the annals of London, has broken out on the north side of the Strand. The streets principally infested are Catherine street, Drury lane, Blackmore street, Clare Market and Russell street. Something akin to a reign of terror prevails among the inhabitants after nightfall. Women refuse to pass along Blackmore street and the lower parts of Stanhope street after dusk, for droves of rats perambulate the roadways and pavements, and may be seen running along the window ledges of the empty houses awaiting demolition by the County Council in the Strand to Holborn improvement scheme.

The rats, indeed, have appeared in almost-incredible numbers. "There are millions of them," said one shopkeeper, and his statement was supported by other residents. The unwelcome visitors have been evicted from their old haunts by the County Council housebreakers, and are now busily in search of new homes. The Gaiety Restaurant has been the greatest sufferer. Rats have invaded the premises in such force that the managers have had to close the large dining room on the first floor and the grill rooms on the ground floor and in the basement. Those three spacious halls which have witnessed many as semblages of theatre-goers are now qui:e deserted. Behind the wainscot of the bandstand in the grillroom is a large mound of linen shreds. This represents 1728 serviettes carried theee by the rats.

In the bar the removal of a panel disclosed the astonishing fact that the rats have dragged for a distance of seven or eight yards some thirty or forty beer and wine bottles and stacked them in such a fashion as to make comfortable sleeping places. Mr Williams. the manager of the restaurant, estimates that the rats have destroyed L200 worth of linen. Formerly the Gaiety Restaurant dined 2000 persons daily; no business whatever is now done in this direction.

Reply
Lived here
Richard Roques   
Added: 21 Jan 2021 16:53 GMT   

Buckingham Street residents
Here in Buckingham Street lived Samuel Pepys the diarist, Charles Dickens and Rudyard Kipling

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Comment
Lena    
Added: 18 Mar 2021 13:08 GMT   

White Conduit Street, N1
My mum, Rosina Wade of the Wade and Hannam family in the area of Chapel Street and Parkfield Street, bought her first “costume” at S Cohen’s in White Conduit Street. Would have probably been about 1936 or thereabouts. She said that he was a small man but an expert tailor. I hope that Islington Council preserve the shop front as it’s a piece of history of the area. Mum used to get her high heel shoes from an Italian shoe shop in Chapel Street. She had size 2 feet and they would let her know when a new consignment of size 2 shoes were in. I think she was a very good customer. She worked at Killingbacks artificial flower maker in Northampton Square and later at the Halifax bombers factory north of Edgware where she was a riveter.

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Comment
Jeff Owen   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 16:18 GMT   

Owen’s School
Owen Street is the site of Owen’s Boys’ School. The last school was built in 1881 and was demolished in the early 1990s to make way for the development which stand there today. It was a “Direct Grant” grammar school and was founded in 1613 by Dame Alice Owen. What is now “Owen’s Fields” was the playground between the old school and the new girls’ school (known then as “Dames Alice Owen’s School” or simply “DAOS”). The boys’ school had the top two floors of that building for their science labs. The school moved to Potters Bar in Hertfordshire in 1971 and is now one of the top State comprehensive schools in the country. The old building remained in use as an accountancy college and taxi-drivers’ “knowledge” school until it was demolished. The new building is now part of City and Islington College. Owen’s was a fine school. I should know because I attended there from 1961 to 1968.

Reply

   
Added: 3 Jun 2021 15:50 GMT   

All Bar One
The capitalisation is wrong

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Peter H Davies   
Added: 17 Jun 2021 09:33 GMT   

Ethelburga Estate
The Ethelburga Estate - named after Ethelburga Road - was an LCC development dating between 1963–65. According to the Wikipedia, it has a "pleasant knitting together of a series of internal squares". I have to add that it’s extremely dull :)

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Lived here
Norman Norrington   
Added: 8 Jun 2021 08:08 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
Lived here #40 1942-1967

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Comment
Brenda Newton   
Added: 5 Jun 2021 07:17 GMT   

Hewer Street W10
John Nodes Undertakers Hewer Street W10

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Comment
   
Added: 2 Jun 2021 16:58 GMT   

Parachute bomb 1941
Charles Thomas Bailey of 82 Morley Road was killed by the parachute bomb March 1941

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Added: 1 Jun 2021 12:41 GMT   

Abbeville Road (1940 street directory)
North west side
1A Clarke A S Ltd, motor engineers
15 Plumbers, Glaziers & Domestic Engineers Union
25 Dixey Edward, florist
27 Vicary Miss Doris J, newsagent
29 Stenning John Andrew, dining rooms
31 Clarke & Williams, builders
33 Hill Mrs Theodora, confectioner
35 Golding W & sons, corn dealers
... here is Shandon road ...
37 Pennington Mrs Eliz Harvie, wine & spirit merchant
39 Westminster Catering Co Ltd, ham, beef & tongue dealers
41 Masters A (Clapham) Ltd, butchers
43 Thomas Euan Ltd, grocers
45 Garrett C T & Co Ltd, undertakers
47 Mayle T & Sons, fishmongers
49 Mayles Ltd, fruiterers
51 & 73 Hardy Arthur Sydney, draper
53 United Dairies (London) Ltd
... here is Narbonne avenue ...
55 Norris William Lennox, baker
57 Silver Star Laundry Ltd
59 Thorp John, oilman
61 Bidgood Leonard George, boot makers
63 Wilkie Rt Miln, chemist
65 Gander George Albert Isaac, hairdresser
67 Harris Alfred William, greengrocer
69 & 71 Lambert Ernest & Son Ltd, grocers
... here is Hambolt road ...
73 & 51 Hardy Arthur Sydney, draper
75 Cambourn Frederick, butcher
77 Siggers Clement, chemist
77 Post, Money Order, Telephone Call & Telegraph Office & Savings Bank
79 Hemmings William, baker
... here is Elms road ...
85 Cornish Joseph
91 Bedding Mrs
151 Johnson Mrs H K
157 Robinson Albert Ernest, grainer
173 Yardleys London & Provincial Stores Ltd, wine & spirit merchants
175 Clark Alfred, butcher
175A Morley Douglas Frederick, confectioner
... here is Crescent lane ...
... her is St Alphonsus road ...

South east side
... here is Trouville road ...
4 Bossy Miss, private school
... here are Bonneville gardens ...
24 Osborn Charles Edward, ladies hairdresser
24 Hall H Ltd, builders
24A Walton Lodge Laundry Ltd
... here are Shandon road & Abbeville mansions ...
28 Copley Fred Smith, chemist
30 Finch H G Ltd, laundry
32 Carter William Alfred, furniture dealer
34 Spriggs Charles & Co, wireless supplies dealer
36 Miles Frederick William, confectioner
38 Pitman Frederick, hairdresser
40 Rowe Frederick F, valeting service
42 Modridge Edward J, oilman
... here is Narbonne avenue ...
44 Southorn Albert, butcher
46 Brown Ernest, fruiterer
48 Stanley Mrs A A, confectioner
50 Fryatt Owen, delixatessen store
52 Benbrooks, domestic stores
54 Davis William Clifford, boot repairer
56 Blogg Alfred, newsagent
58 Rowlands Thomas & Sons, dairy
... here are Hambalt, Elms, Franconia, Caldervale & Leppoc roads ...
124 Clarke Frederick, decorator
... here are Crescent lane, Briarwood road & Park hill ...

Reply
Comment
Boo Horton    
Added: 31 May 2021 13:39 GMT   

Angel & Trumpet, Stepney Green
The Angel & Trumpet Public House in Stepney Green was run by my ancestors in the 1930’s. Unfortunately, it was a victim on WWII and was badly damaged and subsequently demolished. I have one photograph that I believe to bethe pub, but it doesn’t show much more that my Great Aunt cleaning the steps.

Reply
Comment
MCNALLY    
Added: 17 May 2021 09:42 GMT   

Blackfriars (1959 - 1965)
I lived in Upper Ground from 1959 to 1964 I was 6 years old my parents Vince and Kitty run the Pub The Angel on the corner of Upper Ground and Bodies Bridge. I remember the ceiling of the cellar was very low and almost stretched the length of Bodies Bridge. The underground trains run directly underneath the pub. If you were down in the cellar when a train was coming it was quite frightening

Reply
Comment
PETER FAIRCLOUGH   
Added: 10 May 2021 14:46 GMT   

We once lived here
My family resided at number 53 Brindley Street Paddington.
My grandparents George and Elizabeth Jenkinson (ne Fowler) had four children with my Mother Olive Fairclough (ne Jenkinson) being born in the house on 30/09/1935.
She died on 29/04/2021 aged 85 being the last surviving of the four siblings

Reply

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NEARBY STREETS
Albemarle Way, EC1M Albemarle Way was named after Elizabeth, Dowager Duchess of Albermarle, who lived at Newcastle House nearby in the 18th century.
Albion Courtyard, EC1A Albion Courtyard is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Albion Place, EC1M Albion Place was formerly George Court.
Back Hill, EC1N Back Hill is simply named as it lies off (or to the ’back’) of a main road.
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Berkeley Court, EC1M Berkeley Court ran south out of Berkley Street (now Briset Street).
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Central Markets, EC1A Central Markets is the address of traders within Smithfield Market.
Chancery Lane, WC2A Chancery Lane has formed the western boundary of the City of London since 1994, having previously been divided between the London boroughs of Westminster and Camden.
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Charterhouse Square, EC1M Charterhouse Square is the largest courtyard associated with London Charterhouse, mostly formed of Tudor and Stuart architecture restored after the Blitz.
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Clerkenwell Road, EC1M Clerkenwell Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Clerkenwell Road, EC1R Clerkenwell Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Cloth Fair, EC1A Cloth Fair stands where the original Bartholomew Fair was held in medieval times.
Cock Lane, EC1A Cock Lane leads from Giltspur Street in the east to Snow Hill in the west.
Cornwell House, EC1M Residential block
Cowcross Street, EC1M Cowcross Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Crawford Passage, EC1R Crawford Passage is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Cursitor Street, EC4A Cursitor Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Dyer’s Buildings, EC1N This is a street in the EC1N postcode area
Eagle Court, EC1M Eagle Court is a courtyard situated off of Benjamin Street.
East Central Markets, EC1A East Central Markets is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
East Harding Street, EC4A This is a street in the EC4A postcode area
East Poultry Avenue, EC1A East Poultry Avenue is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Eldons Passage, EC1N A street within the EC1N postcode
Elm Street, WC1X Elm Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Ely Court, EC1N Ely Court is one of the streets of London in the EC1N postal area.
Ely Place, EC1N Ely Place is a gated road at the southern tip of the London Borough of Camden.
Eyre Street Hill, EC1R Eyre Street Hill is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Farringdon Lane, EC1R Farringdon Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Farringdon Road, EC1A Farringdon Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Farringdon Road, EC4A Farringdon Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Farringdon Street, EC1A The building of Farringdon Street is considered one of the greatest urban engineering achievements of the 19th century.
Faulkners Alley, EC1M Faulkners Alley is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Fetter Lane, EC4A Fetter Lane is corrupted from ’Fautre’ which was the name for a spear rest - spears were made close by.
Fulwood Place, WC1R Fulwood Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1V postal area.
Furnival Street, EC4A Furnival Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Gate House, EC1M Residential block
Giltspur Street, EC1A Giltspur Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Grand Avenue, EC1A Grand Avenue runs through the centre of Smithfield Market.
Gravel Street, EC1N Gravel Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1N postal area.
Grays Inn Place, WC1R Grays Inn Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1R postal area.
Grays Inn Square Chambers, WC1R Grays Inn Square Chambers is one of the streets of London in the WC1R postal area.
Grays Inn Square, WC1R Grays Inn Square is one of the streets of London in the WC1R postal area.
Great New Street, EC4A Great New Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Greenhills Rents, EC1A Greenhills Rents is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
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New Street Square, EC4A New Street Square is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
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Norwich Street, EC4A Norwich Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
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Rosebery Court, EC1R Rosebery Court is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
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Saint John Street, EC1M This is a street in the EC1M postcode area
Serle Street, WC2A Serle Street is a road in the WC2A postcode area
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Silver Vaults, WC1V Silver Vaults is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Smithfield Street, EC1A Smithfield Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Smokehouse Yard, EC1M Smokehouse Yard is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Snow Hill, EC1A Snow Hill is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
South Square, WC1X South Square is one of the streets of London in the WC1R postal area.
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St Andrew Street, EC4A St Andrew Street is the northern extension of Shoe Lane.
St Cross Street, EC1N St Cross Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1N postal area.
St John’s Square, EC1M St John’s Square, south of Clerkenwell Road, is in the EC1M postal area.
St John’s Square, EC1M St John’s Square is split into two sections, north and south of Clerkenwell Road.
St Johns House, EC1M Residential block
St Johns Lane, EC1M St Johns Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
St Johns Path, EC1M St Johns Path is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
St Johns Place, EC1M St Johns Place is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
St John’s Gate, EC1M St John’s Gate is a road in the EC1M postcode area
Staple Inn Buildings North, WC1X Staple Inn Buildings North is one of the streets of London in the WC1V postal area.
Staple Inn Buildings, WC1V Staple Inn Buildings is part of historic Staple Inn.
Staple Inn Buildings, WC1X Staple Inn Buildings is one of the streets of London in the WC1V postal area.
Star Yard, WC2A Star Yard is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Stone Buildings, WC2A Stone Buildings is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Stonecutter Street, EC4A Stonecutter Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Summers Street, EC1N Summers Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Sutton Lane, EC1M Sutton Lane is a road in the EC1M postcode area
Sutton Road, EC1M Sutton Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
The Charterhouse, EC1M Residential block
Took’s Court, EC4A Took’s Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Turnmill Street, EC1 Turnmill Street appears in the works of Shakespeare.
Verulam Street, WC1X Verulam Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Vestry House, EC1A Residential block
Vine Hill, EC1R Vine Hill now displays no evidence on the vines that once flourished in the grounds on which it stands.
Warner Street, EC1R Warner Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Warner Yard, EC1R Warner Yard is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Warwick Court, WC1R Warwick Court is one of the streets of London in the WC1R postal area.
Warwick Lane, EC1A Warwick Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
Waterhouse Square, EC1N Waterhouse Square is one of the streets of London in the EC1N postal area.
West Smithfield, EC1A West Smithfield is the oldest street of the Smithfield area.
White Bear Yard, EC1R White Bear Yard is location of London.

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Charterhouse Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
City of York This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
City Pride This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Clerkenwell & Social This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Clerkenwell house This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Club Gascon This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Corney & Barrow Wine Bars This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Craft Beer Company This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Crown Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Dado 54 This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Enoteca Rabezzana This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Grand Union This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Grand Union Farringdon This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Harrild and Sons This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Hat & Tun This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Inn of Court This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Jamies This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Kanaloa This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Karaoke Box This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Knights Templar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Lazybones This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Magpie & Stump This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Ninth Ward London This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Old Dick Whittington The Dick Whittington Inn at 24 Cloth Fair was a sixteenth century building and once part of a row of medieval buildings lining the street.
Old Red Cow This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Oriole This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Piano Smithfield This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Secrets This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Sir Chrisptopher Hatton This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Sir John Oldcastle This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
St Peters Italian Social Club This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Sutton Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Argyle This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Artisan This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Bleeding Heart Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Butcher’s Hook and Cleaver This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Castle This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Draft House This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Fable This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Fence This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Fox and Anchor This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Green This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Griffin This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Grill on the Market This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Hon. Soc. Of Gray’s Inn This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Hoop & Grapes This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The One Tun This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Rising Sun This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Saint This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The White Swan This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Yorkshire Grey This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Three Kings This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Viaduct Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Vino & Vino This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
White Bear This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Ye Olde Mitre This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Farringdon

Farringdon station - the terminus for the very first underground railway in 1863 - is a London Underground and National Rail station in Clerkenwell, just north of the City of London in the London Borough of Islington. It will change significantly when it becomes an important interchange station between the two largest transport infrastructure programmes currently under way in London, the Thameslink Programme and Crossrail, both of which are scheduled for completion in 2018.

Farringdon is partly within the City of London and partly in the London Borough of Islington. The name originates from the names of wards of the old City (Farringdon Within, Farringdon Without).

Today, as a place Farringdon is somewhat ill-defined, its original site and layout having perhaps been lost under later development: little more than the station and a few street names help to locate it now.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Smithfield Market
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Amen Court, EC4M
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Farringdon Street, EC4M
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Kirby Street sign
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In the neighbourhood...

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Smithfield Market
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The old wooden Temple Bar
Credit: Walter Thornbury
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Saint John’s Gate, Clerkenwell, the main gateway to the Priory of Saint John of Jerusalem. The church was founded in the 12th century by Jordan de Briset, a Norman knight. Prior Docwra completed the gatehouse shown in this photograph in 1504. The gateway served as the main entry to the Priory, which was the center of the Order of St John of Jerusalem (the Knights Hospitallers).
Credit: Henry Dixon (1880)
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Illustration of Fleet Market
Credit: William Henry Prior
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Mount Pleasant Sorting Office on the north-east corner of Farringdon Road (1910). The present building is on the site of the Coldbath Fields Prison where the punishments were particularly cruel in that they were not only long and physically hard but also pointless. The pub at the back used to open at 9am to serve postal workers.
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Amen Court, EC4M
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Clerkenwell Green (1898) The water fountain shown here became public toilets.
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View of Cloth Fair in 1884 showing the side entrance to St Bartholomew’s Priory, Smithfield.
Credit: John Crowther
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Coldbath Square in Clerkenwell was named after a cold water well that stood originally in fields. Cold Bath was fed by a spring which was discovered by a Mr Baynes in 1697. The discoverer declared the water had great power in nervous diseases, and "equalled those of St Magnus and St Winnifred". The bathing hours were from 5am to 1pm, the charge two shillings. The old bathhouse was a building with three gables, and had a large garden with four turret summer houses. In 1811 the trustees of the London Fever Hospital bought the property for £3830, but, being driven away by the frightened inhabitants, the ground was sold for building, the bath remaining as late as 1865.
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Farringdon Road and the Metropolitan Railway, 1868. Looking north from Turnmill Street
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