Bunhill Row, EC1Y

Road in/near Clerkenwell

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(51.52308 -0.08983, 51.523 -0.089) 
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Road · Clerkenwell · EC1Y ·
JANUARY
1
2000

Bunhill Row is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.

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A lot of the street information research on this website is academic in nature - from university research, the Survey of London, British History Online, borough conservation areas and more. Occasionally, the Hive Mind comes up trumps - these derivations come from discoveries on the Wikipedia made during 2019 which is feeding into the project.

If we find any derivations dubious here, we remove them. With that proviso, the TUM project provides them here for your enjoyment...

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Jack Cornwell Street Newham Jack Cornwell First World War sailor boy and recipient of the Victoria Cross, who grew up here: Little Ilford, East Ham.
Jacob’s Well Mews – after Jacob Hinde, husband of Anne Thayer, who inherited this land from her father Thomas Thayer [Marylebone]
James Street – named after Prince James, later James II, son of Charles I who was reigning king when this street was built in the 1630s [Covent Garden]
Jermyn Street Westminster Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of St Albans Developed much of St. James's around the year 1667
Jerusalem Passage – after the Monastic Order of the Knights Hospitallers of St John of Jerusalem [Clerkenwell]
Jewry Street – after the former Jewish community which was based here; formerly Poor Jewry Street [City of London]
Jockey’s Fields – thoguht to date from the old custom of the Lord Mayor and retainers on horseback inspecting the nearby conduit on the river Tyburn [Holborn]
Johanna Street – possibly after local resident and subscriber to the Old Vic Johanna Serres [Waterloo]
John Adam Street – after John Adam, who built the Adelphi development with his brother Robert in the 1760s [Strand]
John Archer Way Wandsworth John Archer First black mayor of a London council - Battersea Borough Council, in 1913/4
John Bradshaw Road Enfield John Bradshaw Benefactor of Southgate, who lived nearby in The Bourne
John Carpenter Street City of London John Carpenter Town clerk of the City of London in the fifteenth century, and founder of the City of London School
John Islip Street Westminster John Islip Abbot of the monastery of Westminster at the time of Henry VIII
John Milton Passage – after the author John Milton [City of London]
John Prince's Street – after John Prince, surveyor to the Cavendish-Harley estate in the 1710s [Marylebone]
John Street – after local 18th century carpenter John Blagrave [Bloomsbury]
John Trundle Highwalk – after John Trundle, 16th–17th century author and book seller [City of London]
John Wesley Highwalk – after John Wesley, founder of Methodism [City of London]
John Wilson Street Greenwich John Wilson Minister of Woolwich Baptist Tabernacle, now Woolwich Central Baptist Church, who gave generously to the local poor
John’s Mews – after local 18th century carpenter John Blagrave [Bloomsbury]
Johnson’s Place – after John Johnson, Victorian-era local paviour/owner [Victoria]
Johnsons Court – after a local 16th century property owning family of this name; the connection with Samuel Johnson is coincidental [City of London]
Jonathan Street – for Jonathan Tyers and his son, owner/managers of the nearby Vauxhall Gardens for much of the 18th century [Vauxhall]
Jones Street – after William Jones, yeoman, who leased a large plot here in 1723 [Mayfair]
Jubilee Walkway – named in 1977 to commemorate the Silver Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II [Southwark]
Judd Street WC1 - Takes its name from Sir Andrew Judd, Lord Mayor, 1551-2, erected one notable free schoole at Tonbridge in Kent he was a land owner of St Pancras. Thus Kentish names like Tonbridge Street in the area. Judd developed the local area via the Skinners’ Company in the 1570s [Bloomsbury]
Juxon Street – after William Juxon, Archbishop of Canterbury 1660-63, by connection with the nearby Lambeth Palace [Lambeth]
Kean Street – after Edmund Kean, successful Shakespearian actor of the 19th century, and his actor son Charles Kean [Covent Garden]
Keats Grove Camden John Keats Writer who lived in the road, and whose house is now a museum. The road was formerly called John Street
Keeley Street – after Robert Keeley, successful actor and comedian of the 19th century [Covent Garden]
Keith Park Road, Uxbridge Street built near the site of the former RAF Uxbridge, and named after an air marshal in the Second World War. Keith Park was leader of No. 11 Group RAF, which was coordinated nearby, in what is now the Battle of Britain Bunker.
Kemble Street – after the Kemble family, who were active in the local theatre community in the 18th and 19th centuries [Covent Garden]
Kendall Place – after William Kendall, local builder and timber merchant in the 18th century [Marylebone]
Kennett Wharf Lane – after its late 18th century owner [City of London]
Kennings Way - unknown; formerly White Hart Row [23]
Kennington Gardens – after the Old English Chenintune (‘settlement of Chenna’a people’); another explanation is that it means place of the King, or town of the King. [Kennington]
Kennington Lane – after the Old English Chenintune (‘settlement of Chenna’a people’); another explanation is that it means place of the King, or town of the King. [Kennington]
Kennington Oval – after the Old English Chenintune (‘settlement of Chenna’a people’); another explanation is that it means place of the King, or town of the King. [Kennington]
Kennington Park Road – after the Old English Chenintune (‘settlement of Chenna’a people’); another explanation is that it means place of the King, or town of the King. [Kennington]
Kennington Road – after the Old English Chenintune (‘settlement of Chenna’a people’); another explanation is that it means place of the King, or town of the King. [Kennington]
Kenrick Place – after William Kenrick, local lecturer and writer in the 18th century [Marylebone]
Kent Passage – after Prince Edward, Duke of Kent and Strathearn, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [Regent’s Park]
Kent Terrace – after Prince Edward, Duke of Kent and Strathearn, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [Regent’s Park]
Kentish Buildings – after 17th century property owner Thomas Kentish; formerly it was Christopher Alley [Southwark]
Kenton Street – after the 18th century vintner Benjamin Kenton, benefactor of the nearby Foundling Hospital [Bloomsbury]
Keppel Row – after Augustus Keppel, 1st Viscount Keppel, 18th century naval figure [Southwark]
Keppel Street – after Elizabeth Keppel, wife of local landowner Francis Russell, Marquess of Tavistock [Bloomsbury]
Keyworth Place – after Leonard James Keyworth, recipient of a Victoria Cross in the First World War [Southwark]
Keyworth Street – after Leonard James Keyworth, recipient of a Victoria Cross in the First World War [Southwark]
Kilmorey Gardens Richmond upon Thames Francis Needham, 2nd Earl of Kilmorey Earl buried with his mistress in the Kilmorey Mausoleum, near the road.
Kilmorey Road Richmond upon Thames Francis Needham, 2nd Earl of Kilmorey Earl buried with his mistress in the Kilmorey Mausoleum, near the road.
King Charles Street – after Charles II reigning monarch when the street was built in 1682 [Westminster]
King Edward Street – named for Edward VI, who turned the adjacent Greyfriars monastery into a hospital; it was formerly known as Stinking Lane [City of London]
King Edward Walk – after Edward VI, who granted land near here to the City of London [Lambeth]
King Edward's Road Barking and Dagenham King Edward VII Originally called Creeksmouth Lane; renamed in 1902 to commemorate the king's coronation.
King George VI Avenue Merton King George VI The avenue was made to commemorate the king's coronation in 1937
King Square – built 1820, and named for George IV [Finsbury]
King Street – built after the Great Fire and named for Charles II [City of London]
King Street – named after Charles I, king when this street was built in the 1600s [St James's]
King Street – named after Charles I, king when this street was built in the 1630s [Covent Garden]
King Street Hammersmith and Fulham John King Bishop of London who gave generously to the poor of Fulham in 1620 [60]
King William Street – named for William IV, reigning monarch when the street was built in 1829-35 [City of London]
King William Street Greenwich King William IV His memorial is in the street near the National Maritime Museum.
King William Walk City of London King William IV. The City example is one of many — merely built in his reign.
King’s Arms Yard – named after a former inn of this name [City of London]
King’s Bench Street – after the King’s Bench Prison formerly located here [Southwark]
King’s Bench Walk – named for the adjacent housing for lawyers of the King’s Bench [City of London]
King’s Cross Bridge – after a former statue of George IV that formerly stood near where the train station is now; the Road was formerly called Bagnigge Wells, after a tea garden of that name near here [Clerkenwell]
King’s Head Yard – after a former inn here of this name [Southwark]
King’s Mews – by association with Theobald's Road, formerly King's Way [Bloomsbury]
King’s Scholars’ Passage – after the King’s Scholars of Westminster School [Westminster]
Kinghorn Street – formerly King Street, renamed in 1885 to avoid confusion with many other streets of this name [City of London]
Kingly Court – originally off ‘King Street’, in honour either of the original owner of this land of Henry III, or James II, reigning monarch when built;
Kingly Street – originally ‘King Street’, in honour either of the original owner of this land of Henry III, or James II, reigning monarch when built; it was renamed in 1906 so as to avoid confusion with other King Streets [Soho]
Kings Cross N1 - The Station at Kings cross took it's name from the statue of George the IV that was at the cross road with Pentonville Road and Grays Inn Road.
Kings Cross Road – after a former statue of George IV that formerly stood near where the train station is now; the Road was formerly called Bagnigge Wells, after a tea garden of that name near here [Clerkenwell]
Kings Road SW1 - Once an old footpath through fields taken over by Charles II, as his own private road leading him to Richmond and Kew Palace.
Kingscote Street – formerly King Edward Street (for Edward VI), renamed in 1885 to avoid confusion with the street of this name off Newgate Street [City of London]
Kingsway – named in honour of Edward VII, reigning king when this road was completed in 1906 [Holborn]
Kingsway Camden / Westminster King Edward VII Opened the street in 1905.
Kinnerton Place North - after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), who owned land in Lower Kinnerton, Cheshire [Belgravia]
Kinnerton Place South - after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), who owned land in Lower Kinnerton, Cheshire [Belgravia]
Kinnerton Street - after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), who owned land in Lower Kinnerton, Cheshire [Belgravia]
Kinnerton Yard - after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), who owned land in Lower Kinnerton, Cheshire [Belgravia]
Kirby Street – from Christopher Hatton’s Kirby House in Northamptonshire [Hatton Garden]
Kirkman Place – after local 18th century brewer and property developer Joseph Kirkman [Fitzrovia]
Kneller Road Richmond upon Thames Godfrey Kneller Lived at Kneller Hall in the road, now the Royal Military School of Music, Whitton, Twickenham.
Knightrider Court – thought to be literally a street where knights used to ride [City of London]
Knightrider Street – thought to be literally a street where knights used to ride [City of London]
Kossuth Street Greenwich Lajos Kossuth Hungarian national hero who lived in London in the 1850s.
Ladbroke Crescent Kensington and Chelsea James Weller Ladbroke Developed the North Kensington area around 1840.
Ladbroke Gardens Kensington and Chelsea James Weller Ladbroke Developed the North Kensington area around 1840.
Ladbroke Grove Kensington and Chelsea James Weller Ladbroke Developed the North Kensington area around 1840.
Ladbroke Road Kensington and Chelsea James Weller Ladbroke Developed the North Kensington area around 1840.
Ladbroke Square Kensington and Chelsea James Weller Ladbroke Developed the North Kensington area around 1840.
Ladbroke Terrace Kensington and Chelsea James Weller Ladbroke Developed the North Kensington area around 1840.
Ladbroke Walk Kensington and Chelsea James Weller Ladbroke Developed the North Kensington area around 1840.
Lamb Walk – after a 17th-century inn here of this nam [Southwark]
Lamb’s Buildings – after its early 19th century owner William (or Thomas) Lamb; it was formerly known as Great Swordbearers Alley [Finsbury]
Lamb’s Conduit Passage – after a conduit built by William Lambe in the 16th century to bring clean water from the countryside north of London [Holborn]
Lamb’s Passage – after its early 19th century owner William (or Thomas) Lamb; it was formerly known as Great Swordbearers Alley [Finsbury]
Lambert Jones Mews – after Lambert Jones, Victorian-era councilman [City of London]
Lambeth High Street, Lambeth Road and Lambeth Palace Road – refers to a harbour where lambs were either shipped from or to. It is formed from the Old English 'lamb' and 'hythe'. Lambeth Palace is the official London residence of the Archbishop of Canterbury [Lambeth]
Lambeth Hill – corruption of Lambert/Lambart, local property owner [City of London]
Lambeth Road - refers to a harbour where lambs were either shipped from or to. It is formed from the Old English 'lamb' and 'hythe'. [Vauxhall]
Lambeth SE1 - Original name was Lambhythe, Hythe being a Dock where lambs were transported.
Lamb's Conduit Street WC1 - In Henry VIII's time there was a Kentish man named William Lambe who built a faire conduit in Holborn where there was spring water as clear as crystal. The water was carried along in lead pipes from the north fields for more than two thousand yards at his own cost of more than fifteen hundred pounds. The conduit was removed in 1746, but Lamb's name remains at the end of the street were his conduit once stood. Lamb's Conduit Street – named after William Lambe, in recognition of the £1,500 he gave for the rebuilding of the Holborn Conduit in 1564. (According to The London Encyclopaedia, The conduit was an Elizabethan dam made in one of the tributaries of the Fleet River and restored in 1577 by William Lamb, who also provided 120 pails for poor women) [Bloomsbury]
Lancaster Place – former site of the Savoy Palace. It passed into the ownership of the earls of Lancaster in the 13th century, the most famous of which was John of Gaunt, who owned the palace at the times of its destruction in Peasant’s Revolt of 1381 [Strand]
Lancaster Street – unknown; formerly Union Street [Southwark]
Langham Place – after Sir James Langham, who owned a house near here in the early 19th century [Marylebone]
Langham Street – after Sir James Langham, who owned a house near here in the early 19th century [Marylebone]
Langley Court – after Sir Roger Langley, who owned land here in the early 18th century [Covent Garden]
Langley Street – after Sir Roger Langley, who owned land here in the early 18th century [Covent Garden]
Langthorn Court – named after a former property owner of this name [City of London]
Langton Close – after the Arthur Langton Nurses Home formerly located here [Clerkenwell]
Lansbury Gardens Tower Hamlets George Lansbury British politician (MP 1910-1912, 1922-1940) and social reformer who led the Labour Party from 1932 to 1935. Blackwall (ex.-Poplar)
Lansdowne Crescent Kensington and Chelsea Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice, 3rd Marquess of Lansdowne Home Secretary and later Chancellor of the Exchequer at the time the road was built.
Lansdowne Rise Kensington and Chelsea Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice, 3rd Marquess of Lansdowne Home Secretary and later Chancellor of the Exchequer at the time the road was built.
Lansdowne Road Kensington and Chelsea Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice, 3rd Marquess of Lansdowne Home Secretary and later Chancellor of the Exchequer at the time the road was built.
Lansdowne Row – former site of Lansdowne House, home of William Petty, 1st Marquess of Lansdowne in the 18th century [Mayfair]
Lansdowne Terrace – after William Petty, 1st Marquess of Lansdowne, Prime Minister 1782–83 [Bloomsbury]
Lant Street SE1 - Derives its name from the Lant family who inherited the estates known as Southwark Olace which was formerly in the possesion of Heath, Archbishop of York.
Latimer Road, Kensington Edward Latymer Clerk at the Court of Wards and Liveries who bequeathed the land on which Latimer Road was later built to help fund Latymer Upper School, which he founded. The school's playing fields are situated west of the road.
Latymer Road, Edmonton Edward Latymer Clerk at the Court of Wards and Liveries. The roads in Edmonton are located near The Latymer School, founded by Edward Latymer
Latymer Way, Edmonton Edward Latymer Clerk at the Court of Wards and Liveries. The roads in Edmonton are located near The Latymer School, founded by Edward Latymer
Laud Street – after William Laud, Archbishop of Canterbury from 1633-45, by association with the nearby Lambeth Palace [Vauxhall]
Laud Street Croydon William Laud Archbishop of Canterbury (1633-1645) who lived at Croydon Palace
Lauderdale Place – named for the Earls of Lauderdale, who owned a house here [City of London]
Launcelot Street – after Launcelot Holland, local developer in the 1820s [Waterloo]
Laurence Pountney Hill and Laurence Pountney Lane – after the former St Laurence Pountney church, built by Sir John de Pulteney but destroyed in the Great Fire [City of London]
Lavington Street – after Thomas Lant, local 18th century developer [Southwark]
Lawn Lane – after a former row of houses here called The Lawn, after their grass plots, demolished in 1889-90 [Vauxhall]
Lawrence Lane – after the nearby St Lawrence Jewry church [City of London]
Laxton Place – after its 1806 developer, the baker George Laxton [Regent’s Park]
Laystall Street – after a former nearby laystall, a term for a refuse heap [Clerkenwell]
Leadenhall Market – after the Leaden Hall, a house owned by Sir Hugh Neville in the 14th century [City of London]
Leadenhall Place – after the Leaden Hall, a house owned by Sir Hugh Neville in the 14th century [City of London]
Leadenhall Street – after the Leaden Hall, a house owned by Sir Hugh Neville in the 14th century [City of London]
Leake Court – after John Leake, founder of a local hospital in 1767 [Waterloo]
Leake Street – after John Leake, founder of a local hospital in 1767 [Waterloo]
Leather Lane – thought to come not from ‘leather’ but from Leofrun, a personal name in Old English; formerly known as Le Vrunelane (13th century), Loverone Lane (14th century) and Liver Lane [Hatton Garden]
Leathermarket Court – after the tanneries and leather market formerly located here [Southwark]
Leathermarket Street – after the tanneries and leather market formerly located here [Southwark]
Lees Place – after either Robert Lee (or Lees), owner of the Two Chairman pub which formerly stood here [107] or one Thomas Barrett of Lee, Kent, 19th century builder [Mayfair]
Leicester Court – Leicester Court was formerly Ryder Court, after local leaseholder Richard Ryder – it was renamed in 1936 [Chinatown]
Leicester Place – the square was home to Leicester House in the 17th century, home of Robert Sidney, 2nd Earl of Leicester [Chinatown]
Leicester Square Westminster Robert Sidney, 2nd Earl of Leicester Owner of the land on which the square is built, from 1630; ordered by the Privy Council to allow public access to the square.
Leicester Street – the square was home to Leicester House in the 17th century, home of Robert Sidney, 2nd Earl of Leicester; [Chinatown]
Leigh Hunt Drive Enfield Leigh Hunt English writer born in Southgate
Leigh Hunt Street – after the author Leigh Hunt, who served a short sentence in a nearby prison [Southwark]
Leigh Place – from the Barons Leigh, who bought land in the area from the Baldwin family in 1689 [Hatton Garden]
Leigh Street – after Leigh in Kent, home county of local 16th century landowner Andrew Judd [Bloomsbury]
Lennox Gardens SW3 - Named after Lord William Lennox.
Leo Yard – from the Latin for lion, as it was formerly Red Lion Yard [Clerkenwell]
Lewisham Street – after William Legge, 1st Earl of Dartmouth, Viscount Lewisham, Lord Privy Seal in the 1710s and local resident [Westminster]
Lexington Street – named in 1885 after the Baron Lexington, whose family – the Suttons – purchased this land in 1645; it was formerly known as Little Windmill Street [Soho]
Lilestone Street – after the former manor of Lilestone which covered this area [Lisson Grove]
Lillie Road Hammersmith and Fulham Sir John Scott Lillie Lillie first laid out the easternmost section of the road across his North End Hermitage estate in 1826.
Lillie Yard Hammersmith and Fulham Sir John Scott Lillie owned the North End Hermitage estate.
Lime Street – Medieval name denoting a place of lime kilns [City of London]
Limeburner Lane – after the lime burning trade formerly located here [City of London]
Lincoln's Inn Fields – after Lincoln’s Inn, the townhouse of the Lacy family, earls of Lincoln, later leased to lawyers in the 14th century [Holborn]
Lind Road Sutton Jenny Lind Swedish singer, who entertained the people of Sutton in 1847 with her singing.
Lisle Street – after Philip, Viscount Lisle, who succeeded to the earldom of Leicester in 1677 [Chinatown]
Lisson Grove and Lisson Street – corruption of Lilestone, the former manor which covered this area, probably after a personal name (i.e. the Saxon Lille) [Lisson Grove]
Litchfield Street – possibly after Edward Lee, 1st Earl of Lichfield, who was brother-in-law of Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Grafton and son of Charles II [78], or Charlotte Lee, Countess of Lichfield, daughter of Charles II [Covent Garden]
Little Albany Street – after Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [Regent’s Park]
Little Argyll Street – after John Campbell, 2nd Duke of Argyll, owner of the land in the 18th century [Soho]
Little Britain – thought to be after Robert le Bretoun, 13th century local landowner, probably from Brittany [City of London]
Little Chester Street – after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), who owned land in Chester [Belgravia]
Little College Lane – after the adjacent St Michael Paternoster Royal, which was created as a collegiate church by Richard Whittington in 1419; College Street was formerly Paternoster Street (meaning rosary makers and College Hill was Royal Street (a corruption of La Réole, France, where local wine merchants hailed from) [City of London]
Little Dean’s Yard – location of the Dean of Westminster’s house [Westminster]
Little Dorrit Court – after the novel Little Dorrit by Charles Dickens, by association with Dickens Square [Southwark]
Little Edward Street - after Prince Edward, Duke of Kent and Strathearn, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [Regent’s Park]
Little Marlborough Street – after John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough, 17th – 18th century general [Soho]
Little New Street – built in the mid-1600s, and named simply because it was then new [City of London]
Little Newport Street – after Mountjoy Blount, Earl of Newport (Isle of Wight), who owned a house on this street (then just Newport Street) in the 17th century. Following the construction of Charing Cross Road, Newport Street was split in two and the two sections renamed as they are today [Chinatown]
Little Portland Street – after the Dukes of Portland, who owned much of this land following the marriage of William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland to heiress Margaret Bentinck, Duchess of Portland in 1734 [Marylebone]
Liverpool Street EC2 Robert Banks Jenkinson, 2nd Earl of Liverpool The street was built in 1829 and named after the former Prime Minister, who had died the previous year. Also home to the Great Eastern Railway and one of London's largest stations.
Livonia Street – thought to be after Livonia (roughly modern Latvia), in allusion to the nearby Poland Street. Prior to 1894 it was called Bentinck Street, from the family name of the Duke of Portland, local landowners [Soho]
Lizard Street – after the Worshipful Company of Ironmongers, who owned this land; their arms incorporates a salamander motif [Finsbury]
Lloyd’s Avenue – as the headquarters of the Lloyd's Register (named for Lloyd's Coffee House) were located here [City of London]
Lloyd’s Row, Lloyd Square, Lloyd Street and Lloyd Baker Street – after the Lloyd Baker family, local 19th century landowners [Clerkenwell]
Lodge Road – as it leads to the Hanover Lodge in Regent’s Park [Lisson Grove]
Lollard Street – named to commemorate the persecution of the Lollards in the 14th century; it was formerly East Street, after a branch of the local landowning Clayton family [Lambeth]
Loman Street – after the former Loman’s Pond located here [Southwark]
Lombard Court – from Lombardy, as this area was home to a community from there; the name was altered from Lombard Street to avoid confusion with the other street of this name [City of London]
Lombard Lane – from Lombardy, as this area was home to a community from there; the name was altered from Lombard Street to avoid confusion with the other street of this name [City of London]
London Bridge Street – after the adjacent London Bridge [Southwark]
London Bridge Walk – after the adjacent London Bridge [Southwark]
London Road – the road that led to London [Lambeth]
London Street – named after local 18th century property owner John London, not the city; the ‘New’ section was a later extension [City of London]
London Wall – after the city wall which formerly ran along this route (though there are still some ruins visible) [City of London]
Long Acre – after the garden/field of the abbey of St Peter; the road was laid out in 1615 [Covent Garden]
Long Yard – simply a descriptive name for this former stable yard [Bloomsbury]
Longmoore Street – after the marshes formerly located here [Victoria]
Lonsdale Road Richmond upon Thames Earls of Lonsdale William Lowther, 2nd Earl of Lonsdale bought the land in 1846, on which the roads were later built
Lord North Street – originally just North Street, as led north from Smith Square, however this was altered in 1936 to commemorate Lord North, Prime Minister 1770-82, so as to avoid confusion with similarly name streets [Westminster]
Lorenzo Street – unknown; formerly York Street [Clerkenwell]
Lorne Close – after the John Campbell, 9th Duke of Argyll (the Marquess of Lorne), husband of Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll, daughter of Queen Victoria [Lisson Grove]
Lothbury – meaning ‘burgh’ of Lotha/Hlothere, a 7th-century name [City of London]
Lots Road SW3 - In 1544 it was recorded as lez lotte when the name discribed the lots of ground which were originally part of the manor over which the parishoners held Lammas rights. Thus bringing the words allotments into present day word.
Lovat Street – thought to be either a corruption of Lucas Lane, after a local landowner, or for Lord Lovat, local politician; it was formerly ‘Love Lane’, probably a euphemism for prostitution, and changed to avoid confusion with the other city lane of this name [City of London]
Love Lane – unknown, but possible with reference to the prostitution that occurred here in the 16th century; it was formerly Roper Lane, probably after the rope making trade, but possibly after a person with this surname [City of London]
Lower Belgrave Street – after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), after their home estate of Belgrave, Cheshire [Belgravia]
Lower James Street – after James Axtell, co-owner of the land when Golden Square was developed in the 1670s [Soho]
Lower John Street – after John Emlyn, co-owner of the land when Golden Square was developed in the 1670s [Soho]
Lower Marsh – as this land was formerly a marsh prior to the 19th century [Waterloo]
Lower Robert Street – after Robert Adam, who built the Adelphi development with his brother John in the 1760s [Strand]
Lower Sloane Street – after Hans Sloane, local landowner when this area was built up in the 18th century [Belgravia]
Lower Thames Street and Upper Thames Street – thought to mark the bank of the Thames in Roman/Saxon times [City of London]
Lowndes Close – after the Lowndes family, former local landowners [Belgravia]
Lowndes Court – after William Lowndes, 16th-17th century financier and politician, who owned land here [Soho]
Lowndes Place – after the Lowndes family, former local landowners [Belgravia]
Lowndes Square – after the Lowndes family, former local landowners [Belgravia]
Lowndes Street – after the Lowndes family, former local landowners [Belgravia]
Lowther Road Richmond upon Thames Earls of Lonsdale William Lowther, 2nd Earl of Lonsdale bought the land in 1846, on which the roads were later built
Loxham Street – possibly for directors of the East End Dwellings Company who developed these streets in the 1890s [Bloomsbury]
Ludgate Broadway, Ludgate Circus, Ludgate Hill and Ludgate Square – the former city gate of this name that formerly stood here, thought to an Old English term for ‘postern-gate’ [City of London]
Ludgate Circus – the former city gate of this name that formerly stood here, thought to an Old English term for ‘postern-gate’ [City of London]
Ludgate Hill – the former city gate of this name that formerly stood here, thought to an Old English term for ‘postern-gate’ [City of London]
Ludgate Square – the former city gate of this name that formerly stood here, thought to an Old English term for ‘postern-gate’ [City of London]
Lumley Street – after Sibell Lumley, wife of Victor, Earl Grosvenor, local landowner [Mayfair]
Lupus Street – after Hugh Grosvenor, 1st Duke of Westminster, whose family owned much of the surrounding land [Victoria]
Lyall Mews – after Charles Lyall, business partner with local landowners the Lowndes [Belgravia]
Lyall Mews West – after Charles Lyall, business partner with local landowners the Lowndes [Belgravia]
Lyall Street – after Charles Lyall, business partner with local landowners the Lowndes [Belgravia]
Lyndhurst Grove Southwark John Copley, 1st Baron Lyndhurst Lawyer and politician, three times Lord Chancellor of Great Britain.
Lyndhurst Square Southwark John Copley, 1st Baron Lyndhurst Lawyer and politician, three times Lord Chancellor of Great Britain.
Lyndhurst Way Southwark John Copley, 1st Baron Lyndhurst Lawyer and politician, three times Lord Chancellor of Great Britain.
Lyons Place – this land was formerly owned by Harrow School; this street was named for the school’s founder John Lyon [Lisson Grove]


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



Some street name derivations – The Underground Map   

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Comment
The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 15:05 GMT   

A plague on all your houses
Aldgate station is built directly on top of a vast plague pit, where thousands of bodies are apparently buried. No-one knows quite how many.

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Comment
MCNALLY    
Added: 17 May 2021 09:42 GMT   

Blackfriars (1959 - 1965)
I lived in Upper Ground from 1959 to 1964 I was 6 years old my parents Vince and Kitty run the Pub The Angel on the corner of Upper Ground and Bodies Bridge. I remember the ceiling of the cellar was very low and almost stretched the length of Bodies Bridge. The underground trains run directly underneath the pub. If you were down in the cellar when a train was coming it was quite frightening

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Reply
Tom   
Added: 21 May 2021 23:07 GMT   

Blackfriars
What is, or was, Bodies Bridge?

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Comment
   
Added: 21 Apr 2021 16:21 GMT   

Liverpool Street
the Bishopsgate station has existed since 1840 as a passenger station, but does not appear in the site’s cartography. Evidently, the 1860 map is in fact much earlier than that date.

Reply

The Underground Map   
Added: 20 Sep 2020 13:01 GMT   

Pepys starts diary
On 1 January 1659, Samuel Pepys started his famous daily diary and maintained it for ten years. The diary has become perhaps the most extensive source of information on this critical period of English history. Pepys never considered that his diary would be read by others. The original diary consisted of six volumes written in Shelton shorthand, which he had learned as an undergraduate on scholarship at Magdalene College, Cambridge. This shorthand was introduced in 1626, and was the same system Isaac Newton used when writing.

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Comment
Steven Shepherd   
Added: 4 Feb 2021 14:20 GMT   

Our House
I and my three brothers were born at 178 Pitfield Street. All of my Mothers Family (ADAMS) Lived in the area. There was an area behind the house where the Hoxton Stall holders would keep the barrows. The house was classed as a slum but was a large house with a basement. The basement had 2 rooms that must have been unchanged for many years it contained a ’copper’ used to boil and clean clothes and bedlinen and a large ’range’ a cast iron coal/log fired oven. Coal was delivered through a ’coal hole’ in the street which dropped through to the basement. The front of the house used to be a shop but unused while we lived there. I have many more happy memories of the house too many to put here.

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Comment
   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 14:31 GMT   

correction
Chaucer did not write Pilgrims Progress. His stories were called the Canterbury Tales

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Comment
Lena    
Added: 18 Mar 2021 13:08 GMT   

White Conduit Street, N1
My mum, Rosina Wade of the Wade and Hannam family in the area of Chapel Street and Parkfield Street, bought her first “costume” at S Cohen’s in White Conduit Street. Would have probably been about 1936 or thereabouts. She said that he was a small man but an expert tailor. I hope that Islington Council preserve the shop front as it’s a piece of history of the area. Mum used to get her high heel shoes from an Italian shoe shop in Chapel Street. She had size 2 feet and they would let her know when a new consignment of size 2 shoes were in. I think she was a very good customer. She worked at Killingbacks artificial flower maker in Northampton Square and later at the Halifax bombers factory north of Edgware where she was a riveter.

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Comment
Jeff Owen   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 16:18 GMT   

Owen’s School
Owen Street is the site of Owen’s Boys’ School. The last school was built in 1881 and was demolished in the early 1990s to make way for the development which stand there today. It was a “Direct Grant” grammar school and was founded in 1613 by Dame Alice Owen. What is now “Owen’s Fields” was the playground between the old school and the new girls’ school (known then as “Dames Alice Owen’s School” or simply “DAOS”). The boys’ school had the top two floors of that building for their science labs. The school moved to Potters Bar in Hertfordshire in 1971 and is now one of the top State comprehensive schools in the country. The old building remained in use as an accountancy college and taxi-drivers’ “knowledge” school until it was demolished. The new building is now part of City and Islington College. Owen’s was a fine school. I should know because I attended there from 1961 to 1968.

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Comment
Marion James   
Added: 12 Mar 2021 17:43 GMT   

26 Edith Street Haggerston
On Monday 11th October 1880 Charlotte Alice Haynes was born at 26 Edith Street Haggerston the home address of her parents her father Francis Haynes a Gilder by trade and her mother Charlotte Alice Haynes and her two older siblings Francis & George who all welcomed the new born baby girl into the world as they lived in part of the small Victorian terraced house which was shared by another family had an outlook view onto the world of the Imperial Gas Works site - a very grey drab reality of the life they were living as an East End working class family - 26 Edith Street no longer stands in 2021 - the small rundown polluted terrace houses of Edith Street are long since gone along with the Gas Companies buildings to be replaced with green open parkland that is popular in 21st century by the trendy residents of today - Charlotte Alice Haynes (1880-1973) is the wife of my Great Grand Uncle Henry Pickett (1878-1930) As I research my family history I slowly begin to understand the life my descendants had to live and the hardships that they went through to survive - London is my home and there are many areas of this great city I find many of my descendants living working and dying in - I am yet to find the golden chalice! But in all truthfulness my family history is so much more than hobby its an understanding of who I am as I gather their stories. Did Charlotte Alice Pickett nee Haynes go on to live a wonderful life - no I do not think so as she became a widow in 1930 worked in a canteen and never remarried living her life in and around Haggerston & Hackney until her death in 1973 with her final resting place at Manor Park Cemetery - I think Charlotte most likely excepted her lot in life like many women from her day, having been born in the Victorian era where the woman had less choice and standing in society, which is a sad state of affairs - So I will endeavour to write about Charlotte and the many other women in my family history to give them the voice of a life they so richly deserve to be recorded !

Edith Street was well situated for the new public transport of two railway stations in 1880 :- Haggerston Railway Station opened in 1867 & Cambridge Heath Railway Station opened in 1872


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Added: 3 Jun 2021 15:50 GMT   

All Bar One
The capitalisation is wrong

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

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Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 09:12 GMT   

Dunloe Avenue, N17
I was born in 1951,my grandparents lived at 5 Dunloe Avenue.I had photos of the coronation decorations in the area for 1953.The houses were rented out by Rowleys,their ’workers yard’ was at the top of Dunloe Avenue.The house was fairly big 3 bedroom with bath and toilet upstairs,and kitchenette downstairs -a fairly big garden.My Grandmother died 1980 and the house was taken back to be rented again

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Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 08:59 GMT   

Spigurnell Road, N17
I was born and lived in Spigurnell Road no 32 from 1951.My father George lived in Spigurnell Road from 1930’s.When he died in’76 we moved to number 3 until I got married in 1982 and moved to Edmonton.Spigurnell Road was a great place to live.Number 32 was 2 up 2 down toilet out the back council house in those days

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Comment
Lewis   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 20:48 GMT   

Ploy
Allotment

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Comment
   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 14:31 GMT   

correction
Chaucer did not write Pilgrims Progress. His stories were called the Canterbury Tales

Reply
Comment
old lady   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 11:58 GMT   

mis information
Cheltenham road was originally
Hall road not Hill rd
original street name printed on house still standing

Reply
Comment
Patricia Bridges   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 10:57 GMT   

Lancefield Coachworks
My grandfather Tom Murray worked here

Reply
Lived here
Former Philbeach Gardens Resident   
Added: 14 Jul 2021 00:44 GMT   

Philbeach Gardens Resident (Al Stewart)
Al Stewart, who had huts in the 70s with the sings ’Year of the Cat’ and ’On The Borders’, lived in Philbeach Gdns for a while and referenced Earl’s Court in a couple of his songs.
I lived in Philbeach Gardens from a child until my late teens. For a few years, on one evening in the midst of Summer, you could hear Al Stewart songs ringing out across Philbeach Gardens, particularly from his album ’Time Passages". I don’t think Al was living there at the time but perhaps he came back to see some pals. Or perhaps the broadcasters were just his fans,like me.
Either way, it was a wonderful treat to hear!

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Bunhill Fields Bunhill Fields was in use as a burial ground from 1665 until 1854.
Golden Lane Estate, EC1Y The Golden Lane Housing Estate is a 1950s council housing complex in the City of London.
Honourable Artillery Company Museum The Honourable Artillery Company Museum opened in 1987.
St Luke’s Hospital for Lunatics St Luke’s Hospital for Lunatics was founded in London in 1751 for the treatment of incurable pauper lunatics by a group of philanthropists.
Tenter Ground Tenter Ground harks back to the seventeenth century when this patch of land was surrounded by weavers’ houses and workshops and used to wash and stretch their fabrics on ’tenters’ to dry.
Wesley’s Chapel Wesley’s Chapel - originally the City Road Chapel - is a Methodist church built under the direction of John Wesley.
Whitefield’s Tabernacle Whitefield’s Tabernacle is a former church at the corner of Tabernacle Street and Leonard Street.

NEARBY STREETS
Aldersgate Street, EC2Y Aldersgate Street is located on the west side of the Barbican Estate.
Amias Place, EC1Y Amias Place was formerly George Yard.
Anchor Yard, EC1Y Anchor Yard is named after a former inn here of this name.
Appold Street, EC2A Appold Street runs north-south on the City of London side of Liverpool Street station.
Baldwin Street, EC1V Baldwin Street was named after Richard Baldwin, Treasurer at St Bartholomew’s Hospital when the street was built in 1811.
Baltic Street East, EC1Y Baltic Street East was built by a timber merchant around 1810 who named local streets after trade-related activities.
Baltic Street West, EC1Y Baltic Street is split into east and west halves.
Banner Street, EC1Y Banner Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Bartholomew Square, EC1V This is a street in the EC1V postcode area
Bath Place, EC2A Bath Place leads off of Rivington Street.
Bath Street, EC1V Bath Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Beech Street, EC1Y Beech Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Blackall Street, EC2A Blackall Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Bonhill Street, EC2A Bonhill Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Boot Street, N1 Boot Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Bornhill Street, EC2A Bornhill Street is a location in London.
Braithwaite House, EC1Y Residential block
Bridgewater Square, EC2Y Bridgewater Square is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Broadgate Circle, EC2M Broadgate Circle is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Bryer Court, EC2Y Bryer Court is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Bunhill Fields, EC1Y Bunhill Fields is a road in the EC1Y postcode area
Central Street, EC1V Central Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Chapel Place, EC2A Chapel Place is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Chequer Street, EC1Y Chequer Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Cherry Tree Walk, EC1Y Cherry Tree Walk is a road in the EC1Y postcode area
Chiswell Street, EC2Y Chiswell Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Chiswell Street, SE5 Chiswell Street is a location in London.
Christopher Street, EC2A Christopher Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
City Lofts, EC2A City Lofts is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
City Road, EC1Y City Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Clere Street, EC2A Clere Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Clifton Street, EC2A Clifton Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Cowper Street, EC2A Cowper Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Cranwood Street, EC1V Cranwood Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Crescent Row, EC1Y Crescent Row is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Cripplegate Street, EC1Y Cripplegate Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Crown Place, EC2A Crown Place is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Defoe House, EC2Y Residential block
Domingo Street, EC1Y Domingo Street links Old Street with Baltic Street East.
Dominion Street, EC2M Dominion Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Dufferin Avenue, EC1Y Dufferin Avenue is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Dufferin Street, EC1Y Dufferin Street runs between Bunhill Row and Whitecross Street.
Earl Street, EC2A Earl Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Epworth Street, EC2A Epworth Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Errol Street, EC1Y Errol Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Fann Street, EC1Y Fann Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Featherstone Street, EC1Y Featherstone Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Finsbury Court, EC2A Finsbury Court was obliterated in a redevelopment programme taking in Finsbury Pavement.
Finsbury Pavement, EC2M Finsbury Pavement was the first pavement of firm ground north of the marshy Moorfields.
Finsbury Square, EC2A Finsbury Square is a 0.7-hectare square in central London which includes a six-rink grass bowling green.
Finsbury Street, EC2A Finsbury Street is a road in the EC2Y postcode area
Fortune Street, EC1Y Fortune Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Galway Street, EC1V Galway Street was named for the Earl of Galway.
Garden Walk, EC2A Garden Walk is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Garrett Street, EC1Y Garrett Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Gee Street, EC1V Gee Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Gilbert Bridge, EC2Y Gilbert Bridge is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Gilbert House, EC2Y Residential block
Godfrey House, EC1V Godfrey House is on the St Lukes Estate.
Golden Lane, EC1Y Golden Lane connects Old Street and Beech Street.
Golden Lane, EC2Y Golden Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Goswell Road, EC1A Goswell Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Helmet Row, EC1V Helmet Row is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Holywell Centre, EC2A Holywell Centre is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Holywell Row, EC2A Holywell Row is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Honduras Street, EC1Y Honduras Street dates from the 1810s.
Kiffen Street, EC2A Kiffen Street links Leonard Street to Clere Street.
Lackington Street, EC2M Lackington Street is a road in the EC2A postcode area
Lamb’s Passage, EC1Y Lamb’s Passage was formerly Great Swordbearers (Sword Bearers) Alley.
Lauderdale Tower, EC2Y Lauderdale Tower is the westernmost tower in the Barbican, facing onto Lauderdale Place.
Leonard Circus, EC2A Leonard Circus is a location in London.
Leonard Street, EC2A Leonard Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Lizard Street, EC1V Lizard Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Lomax Cocoon, EC2A A street within the EC2A postcode
Luke Street, EC2A Luke Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Mallow Street, EC1Y Mallow Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Mark Street, EC2A Mark Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Martha’s Buildings, EC1Y Martha’s Buildings is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Memel Street, EC1Y Memel Street was built over the site of a former brewery in the 1810s.
Mill House, EC2A Residential block
Milton Court, EC2Y Milton Court is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Milton Street, EC2Y Milton Street was formerly known as Grub Street.
Mitchell Street, EC1V Mitchell Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
New North Place, EC2A New North Place is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Norman Street, EC1V Norman Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Old Street, EC1Y Old Street runs west to east from Goswell Road in Clerkenwell to a crossroads in Shoreditch.
Oliver’s Yard, EC2A Oliver’s Yard is a road in the EC2A postcode area
One Ropemaker Street, EC2Y One Ropemaker Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Paton Street, EC1V Paton Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Paul Street, EC2A Paul Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Pear Tree Street, EC1V Pear Tree Street connects Central Street and Goswell Road.
Peerless Street, EC1V Peerless Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Pickax Street, EC2Y Pickax Street once ran from Long Lane to Goswell Road (which before 1864 was called Goswell Street).
Pindar Street, EC2A Pindar Street is a road in the EC2A postcode area
Primrose Street, EC2A Primrose Street is a location in London.
Quaker Court, EC1Y Quaker Court is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Radnor Street, EC1V Radnor Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Ravey Street, EC2A Ravey Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Ropemaker Street, EC2M Ropemaker Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Roscoe Street, EC1Y Roscoe Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Scrutton Street, EC2A Scrutton Street is the eastern extension of Epworth Street.
Silk Street, EC2Y Silk Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Singer Street, EC1V Singer Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Singer Street, EC1V Singer Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Snowden Street, EC2A Snowden Street is a road in the EC2A postcode area
Standard Place, EC2A Standard Place is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Sun Street, EC2M Sun Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Sycamore Street, EC1Y Sycamore Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Tabernacle Street, EC2A Tabernacle Street was where George Whitefield’s ’Tabernacle’ was built by his supporters after he separated from Wesley in 1741.
The Sutton Estate, EC1Y The Sutton Estate is a road in the N1 postcode area
Tilney Court, EC1Y Tilney Court lies off of Old Street.
Timber Street, EC1Y Timber Street was formerly called Norway Street.
Vandy Street, EC2A Vandy Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Victoria House, EC2A Victoria House is a location in London.
Vince Street, EC1V Vince Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Warwick Yard, EC1Y Warwick Yard is a road in the EC1Y postcode area
Waterloo Street, EC1V Waterloo Street once ran from Lever Street to Radnor Street.
Whitecross Place, EC2M Whitecross Place is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Whitecross Street, EC1Y Whitecross Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Willow Court, EC2A Willow Court is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Willow Street, EC2A Willow Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Wilson Street, EC2A Wilson Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Wilson Street, EC2M Wilson Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Worship Street, EC2A Worship Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Young’s Buildings, EC1Y Young’s Buildings was named after Francis Young, a local 18th century property owner
Zeus House 16-30, EC2A A street within the EC2A postcode

NEARBY PUBS
All Bar One Appold Street This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
All Bar One Moorgate This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Amber Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Artillery Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Casita This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Circle Bar, Level 0 This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
East Village This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Honourable Artillery Company This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Love’s Company, Unit 1 This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Masque Haunt This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
McQueen This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Nomad Club This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Old Kings Head The Old Kings Head is located at 28 Holywell Row, EC2.
Roadtrip Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Sabor Iberico This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Searcys Bars @ GSM & D This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Singer This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Angel This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Fleetwood This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Flying Horse This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Fox This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Griffin This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Jugged Hare This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Old Fountain This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Princess Of Shoreditch This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Shakespeare This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Trader This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Windmill This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Three Blind Mice This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
XOYO (GROUND FLOOR) This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Clerkenwell

Clerkenwell was once known as London’s Little Italy because of the large number of Italians living in the area from the 1850s until the 1960s.

Clerkenwell took its name from the Clerks’ Well in Farringdon Lane. In the Middle Ages, the London Parish clerks performed annual mystery plays there, based on biblical themes. Part of the well remains visible, incorporated into a 1980s building called Well Court.

In the 17th century South Clerkenwell became a fashionable place of residence. Oliver Cromwell owned a house on Clerkenwell Close, just off the Green. Several aristocrats had houses there, most notably the Duke of Northumberland, as did people such as Erasmus Smith.

Before Clerkenwell became a built-up area, it had a reputation as a resort a short walk out of the city, where Londoners could disport themselves at its spas, of which there were several, based on natural chalybeate springs, tea gardens and theatres. The present day Sadler’s Wells has survived as heir to this tradition.

Clerkenwell was also the location of three prisons: the Clerkenwell Bridewell, Coldbath Fields Prison (later Clerkenwell Gaol) and the New Prison, later the Clerkenwell House of Detention, notorious as the scene of the Clerkenwell Outrage in 1867, an attempted prison break by Fenians who killed many in the tenement houses on Corporation Row in trying to blow a hole in the prison wall.

The Industrial Revolution changed the area greatly. It became a centre for breweries, distilleries and the printing industry. It gained a special reputation for the making of clocks and watches, which activity once employed many people from around the area. Flourishing craft workshops still carry on some of the traditional trades, such as jewellery-making. Clerkenwell is home to Witherby’s, Europe’s oldest printing company.

After the Second World War, Clerkenwell suffered from industrial decline and many of the premises occupied by the engineering, printing publishing and meat and food trades (the last mostly around Smithfield) fell empty. Several acclaimed council housing estates were commissioned by Finsbury Borough Council. Modernist architect and Russian émigré Berthold Lubetkin’s listed Spa Green Estate, constructed 1943–1950, has recently been restored. The Finsbury Estate, constructed in 1968 to the designs of Joseph Emberton includes flats, since altered and re-clad.

A general revival and gentrification process began in the 1980s, and the area is now known for loft-living in some of the former industrial buildings. It also has young professionals, nightclubs and restaurants and is home to many professional offices as an overspill for the nearby City of London and West End.

Amongst other sectors, there is a notable concentration of design professions around Clerkenwell, and supporting industries such as high-end designer furniture showrooms.


LOCAL PHOTOS
St Lukes Hospital for Lunatics, London
TUM image id: 1554045418
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Crondall Street
TUM image id: 1575830074
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
St Lukes Hospital for Lunatics, London
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The gravestone of English poet William Blake in Bunhill Fields Burial Ground
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Great Arthur House, at the centre of the Golden Lane Estate, was the tallest residential building in Britain at the time of its construction.
Credit: Steve F/Wiki commons
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Royal Oak, Waterloo Street in the early 1960s.
Credit: James Wyatt
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