Chelsea Bridge Road, SW1W

Road in/near Chelsea, existing between 1857 and now

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(51.48736 -0.15221, 51.487 -0.152) 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Road · * · SW1W ·
JANUARY
12
2017

Chelsea Bridge Road was built in the 1850s to connect Chelsea with its bridge.

The Ranelagh pleasure gardens opened in 1742 to become one of the most fashionable pleasure resorts of the 18th century, with access by river as well as by road. In the 1760s Sir Thomas Robinson, one of the proprietors of the pleasure gardens, built a mansion east of the rotunda to his own designs called Prospect Place, where he lived until his death in 1777; by the 1790s the house had been divided.

In 1803 the pleasure gardens closed and Ranelagh House, its Rotunda and other features were cleared. This part of the estate then became gardens in the ownership of the Hospital.

In 1857-8 Chelsea Bridge Road was laid in a straight line from a widened White Lion Street to the new Chelsea Bridge, sweeping away the later Ranelagh House, Wilderness Row and the eastern end of the burial ground; all the land west of the road was thrown into the Hospital’s gardens, including land lying in Westminster. The land between the new road and the Westbourne was taken for Chelsea Infantry barracks in 1860-2.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence



CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
Pauline jones   
Added: 16 Oct 2017 19:04 GMT   

Bessborough Place, SW1V
I grew up in bessborough place at the back of our house and Grosvenor road and bessborough gardens was a fantastic playground called trinity mews it had a paddling pool sandpit football area and various things to climb on, such as a train , slide also as Wendy house. There were plants surrounding this wonderful play area, two playground attendants ,also a shelter for when it rained. The children were constantly told off by the playground keepers for touching the plants or kicking the ball out of the permitted area, there was hopscotch as well, all these play items were brick apart from the slide. Pollock was the centre of my universe and I felt sorry and still do for anyone not being born there. To this day I miss it and constantly look for images of the streets around there, my sister and me often go back to take a clumped of our beloved London. The stucco houses were a feature and the backs of the houses enabled parents to see thier children playing.

Reply
Lived here
   
Added: 1 May 2021 16:46 GMT   

Cheyne Place, SW3
Frances Faviell, author of the Blitz memoir, "A Chelsea Concerto", lived at 33, Cheyne Place, which was destroyed by a bomb. She survived, with her husband and unborn baby.

Reply
Born here
www.violettrefusis.com   
Added: 17 Feb 2021 15:05 GMT   

Birth place
Violet Trefusis, writer, cosmopolitan intellectual and patron of the Arts was born at 2 Wilton Crescent SW1X.

Source: www.violettrefusis.com

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT


Comment
Carol   
Added: 7 May 2021 18:44 GMT   

Nan
My nan lily,her sister Elizabeth and their parents Elizabeth and William lived here in1911

Reply

   
Added: 4 May 2021 19:45 GMT   

V1 Attack
The site of a V1 incident in 1944

Reply
Comment
David Gibbs   
Added: 3 May 2021 16:48 GMT   

73 Bus Crash in Albion Rd 1961
From a Newspaper cutting of which I have a copy with photo. On Tuesday August 15th 1961 a 73 bus destined for Mortlake at 8.10am. The bus had just turned into Albion Road when the driver passed out, apparently due to a heart attack, and crashed into a wall on the western side of Albion Road outside No 207. The bus driver, George Jefferies aged 56 of Observatory Road, East Sheen, died after being trapped in his cab when he collided with a parked car. Passengers on the bus were thrown from their seats as it swerved. Several fainted, and ambulances were called. The bus crashed into a front garden and became jammed against a wall. The car driver, who had just parked, suffered shock.

Reply

Richard Eades   
Added: 3 May 2021 11:42 GMT   

Downsell Primary School (1955 - 1958)
I was a pupil at Downsell road from I think 1955 age 7 until I left in 1958 age 10 having passed my "11plus" and won a scholarship to Parmiters school in bethnal green. I remember my class teacher was miss Lynn and the deputy head was mrs Kirby.
At the time we had an annual sports day for the whole school in july at drapers field, and trolley buses ran along the high street and there was a turning point for them just above the junction with downsell road.
I used to go swimming at cathall road baths, and also at the bakers arms baths where we had our school swimming galas. I nm y last year, my class was taken on a trip to the tower of london just before the end of term. I would love to hear from any pupils who remember me.

Reply
Lived here
   
Added: 1 May 2021 16:46 GMT   

Cheyne Place, SW3
Frances Faviell, author of the Blitz memoir, "A Chelsea Concerto", lived at 33, Cheyne Place, which was destroyed by a bomb. She survived, with her husband and unborn baby.

Reply

James Preston   
Added: 28 Apr 2021 09:06 GMT   

School
Was this the location of Rosslyn House prep school? I have a photograph of the Rosslyn House cricket team dated 1910 which features my grandfather (Alan Westbury Preston). He would have been 12 years old at the time. All the boys on the photo have been named. If this is the location of the school then it appears that the date of demolition is incorrect.

Reply
Comment
Tricia   
Added: 27 Apr 2021 12:05 GMT   

St George in the East Church
This Church was opened in 1729, designed by Hawksmore. Inside destroyed by incendrie bomb 16th April 1941. Rebuilt inside and finished in 1964. The building remained open most of the time in a temporary prefab.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 21 Apr 2021 16:21 GMT   

Liverpool Street
the Bishopsgate station has existed since 1840 as a passenger station, but does not appear in the site’s cartography. Evidently, the 1860 map is in fact much earlier than that date.

Reply
NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Orange Square, SW1W Orange Square is a small open area in Belgravia.
River Westbourne outflow The River Westbourne flowed into the Thames at this point.

NEARBY STREETS
Avery Farm Row, SW1W Avery Farm Row - after a former farm here of this name, ’Avery’ being a corruption of ’Ebury’.
Bloomfield Terrace, SW1W Bloomfield Terrace is a road in the SW1W postcode area
Buckland House, SW1V Residential block
Bunhouse Place, SW1W Bunhouse Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Cavalry Square, SW1W Cavalry Square is a road in the SW1W postcode area
Cavalry Square, SW3 Cavalry Square is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Chelsea Bridge, SW1W A street within the SW3 postcode
Chelsea Embankment, SW1W Chelsea Embankment is a road in the SW1W postcode area
Cheylesmore House, SW1W Residential block
Cumberland Street, SW1V Cumberland Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Duke Of York Square, SW3 Duke Of York Square is a shopping and retail development.
East Road, SW3 East Road is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Ebury Bridge Road, SW1W Ebury Bridge Road used to lead to Ebury Bridge which spanned the Grosvenor Canal.
Ebury Bridge, SW1V Ebury Bridge is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Ebury Bridge, SW1W Ebury Bridge is a road in the SW1W postcode area
Embankment Gardens, SW3 Embankment Gardens is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Franklins Row, SW3 Franklins Row is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Garrison Square, SW1W Garrison Square is a location in London.
Gatliff Road, SW1W Gatliff Road is a road in the SW1W postcode area
Grosvenor Road, SW1W Grosvenor Road is a road in the SW1W postcode area
Holbein Mews, SW1W Holbein Mews is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Holbein Place, SW1W Holbein Place links Sloane Square and Pimlico Road.
Lower Sloane Street, SW1W Lower Sloane Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Ormonde Place, SW1W Ormonde Place is a road in the SW1W postcode area
Passmore Street, SW1W Passmore Street, formerly Union Street, contains a social mix.
Peabody Avenue, SW1V Peabody Avenue is a road in the SW1W postcode area
Peabody Avenue, SW1V Peabody Avenue, completed in 1885, is a monument to the birth of social housing.
Pimilco Walk, SW1W Pimilco Walk is a road in the N1 postcode area
Pimlico Road, SW1W Pimlico Road is a combination of roads formerly called Grosvenor Row and Queen Street.
Ranelagh Grove, SW1W Ranelagh Grove was formerly called Wilderness Row and Ranelagh Walk.
Sloane Court East, SW3 This is a street in the SW3 postcode area
Sloane Court West, SW3 This is a street in the SW3 postcode area
Sloane Gardens, SW1W Sloane Gardens is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
St Barnabas Mews, SW1W St Barnabas Mews is a road in the SW1W postcode area
St Barnabas Street, SW1W St Barnabas Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
St Georges Row, SW1V St Georges Row was built as Monster Row circa 1785, and renamed in 1833.
Sussex Street, SW1V Sussex Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Sutherland Street, SW1V Sutherland Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Tintern House, SW1V Residential block
Turks Row, SW3 Turks Row is a location in London.
Turpentine Lane, SW1V Turpentine Lane is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Walden House, SW1W Residential block
Wellington Buildings, SW1W Wellington Buildings is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
West Road, SW3 West Road is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Westmoreland Terrace, SW1V Westmoreland Terrace is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Whistler Square, SW1W Whistler Square is a location in London.


Chelsea

Chelsea is an affluent area, bounded to the south by the River Thames.

Its eastern boundary was once defined by the River Westbourne, which is now in a pipe above Sloane Square tube station. The modern eastern boundary is Chelsea Bridge Road and the lower half of Sloane Street, including Sloane Square, along with parts of Belgravia. To the north and northwest, the area fades into Knightsbridge and South Kensington, but it is safe to say that the area north of King’s Road as far northwest as Fulham Road is part of Chelsea.

The word Chelsea originates from the Old English term for chalk and landing place on the river. The first record of the Manor of Chelsea precedes the Domesday Book and records the fact that Thurstan, governor of the King’s Palace during the reign of Edward the Confessor (1042–1066), gave the land to the Abbot and Convent of Westminster. Abbot Gervace subsequently assigned the manor to his mother, and it passed into private ownership. The modern-day Chelsea hosted the Synod of Chelsea in 787 AD.

Chelsea once had a reputation for the manufacture of Chelsea buns (made from a long strip of sweet dough tightly coiled, with currants trapped between the layers, and topped with sugar).

King Henry VIII acquired the manor of Chelsea from Lord Sandys in 1536; Chelsea Manor Street is still extant. Two of King Henry’s wives, Catherine Parr and Anne of Cleves, lived in the Manor House; Princess Elizabeth – the future Queen Elizabeth I – resided there; and Thomas More lived more or less next door at Beaufort House. In 1609 James I established a theological college on the site of the future Chelsea Royal Hospital, which Charles II founded in 1682.

By 1694, Chelsea – always a popular location for the wealthy, and once described as ’a village of palaces’ – had a population of 3000. Even so, Chelsea remained rural and served London to the east as a market garden, a trade that continued until the 19th-century development boom which caused the final absorption of the district into the metropolis.

Chelsea shone, brightly but briefly, in the 1960s Swinging London period and the early 1970s. The Swinging Sixties was defined on King’s Road, which runs the length of the area. The Western end of Chelsea featured boutiques Granny Takes a Trip and The Sweet Shop, the latter of which sold medieval silk velvet caftans, tabards and floor cushions, with many of the cultural cognoscenti of the time being customers, including Keith Richards, Twiggy and many others.

The exclusivity of Chelsea as a result of its high property prices has historically resulted in the term Sloane Ranger to be used to describe its residents. From 2011, Channel 4 broadcast a reality television show called Made in Chelsea, documenting the ’glitzy’ lives of several young people living in Chelsea. Moreover, Chelsea is home to one of the largest communities of Americans living outside of the United States, with 6.53% of Chelsea-residents being born in the United States.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Boscobel Oaks, 1804
TUM image id: 1487173198
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Edbury Square, c. 1906.
TUM image id: 1483984627
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Royal Hospital, Chelsea
TUM image id: 1524258791
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Boscobel Place
TUM image id: 1546446783
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

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Boscobel Oaks, 1804
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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Edbury Square, c. 1906.
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Royal Hospital, Chelsea
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The Monster Tea Gardens (1820)
Credit: Old and New London
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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Orange Square
Credit: GoArt/The Underground Map
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

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