Church Gardens, W5

Road in/near South Ealing

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(51.5031 -0.30572, 51.503 -0.305) 
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Road · South Ealing · W5 ·
JANUARY
1
2000

Church Gardens is a street in Ealing.





CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

None so far :(
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
   
Added: 14 Jan 2022 03:06 GMT   

Goldbourne Gardens W 10
I lived in Goldbourne Gardens in the 50,s very happy big bomb site

Reply

Chris Nash   
Added: 10 Jan 2022 22:54 GMT   

Shortlands Close, DA17
Shortlands Close and the flats along it were constructed in the mid-1990s. Prior to this, the area was occupied by semi-detached houses with large gardens, which dated from the post-war period and were built on the site of Railway Farm. The farm and its buildings spanned the length of Abbey Road, on the south side of the North Kent Line railway tracks.

Reply

Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 07:17 GMT   

Smithy in Longacre
John Burris 1802-1848 Listed 1841 census as Burroughs was a blacksmith, address just given as Longacre.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

Reply

Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 05:50 GMT   

Batham Family (1851 - 1921)
I start with William Batham 1786-1852 born in St.Martins Middlesex. From various sources I have found snippets of information concerning his early life. A soldier in 1814 he married Mary Champelovier of Huguenot descent By 1819 they were in Kensington where they raised 10 children. Apart from soldier his other occupations include whitesmith, bell hanger and pig breeder. I find my first record in the 1851 English sensus. No street address is given, just ’The Potteries’. He died 1853. Only one child at home then George Batham 1839-1923, my great grandfather. By 1861 he is living in Thomas St. Kensington with his mother. A bricklayer by trade 1871, married and still in Thomas St. 1881 finds him in 5,Martin St. Kensington. 1891 10,Manchester St. 1911, 44 Hunt St Hammersmith. Lastly 1921 Census 7, Mersey St. which has since been demolished.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

Reply
Born here
sam   
Added: 31 Dec 2021 00:54 GMT   

Burdett Street, SE1
I was on 2nd July 1952, in Burdett chambers (which is also known as Burdett buildings)on Burdett street

Reply
Lived here
John Neill   
Added: 25 Nov 2021 11:30 GMT   

Sandringham Road, E10 (1937 - 1966)
I lived at No. 61 with my parents during these years. I went to Canterbury Road school (now Barclay Primary) and sang as a boy soprano (treble) in the church choir at St Andrew’s church, on the corner of Forest Glade.
Opposite us lived the Burgess family. Their son Russell also sang in my choir as a tenor. He later became a well-known musician and the choirmaster at Wandsworth Boys’ School.
Just at the end of WW2 a German rocket (V2) landed in the grounds of Whipps Cross Hospital, damaging many of the houses in Sandringham Road, including ours.

Reply
Comment
Tim Stevenson   
Added: 16 Nov 2021 18:03 GMT   

Pub still open
The Bohemia survived the 2020/21 lockdowns and is still a thriving local social resource.

Reply
Comment
STEPHEN JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:25 GMT   

Fellows Court, E2
my family moved into the tower block 13th floor (maisonette), in 1967 after our street Lenthall rd e8 was demolished, we were one of the first families in the new block. A number of families from our street were rehoused in this and the adjoining flats. Inside toilet and central heating, all very modern at the time, plus eventually a tarmac football pitch in the grounds,(the cage), with a goal painted by the kids on the brick wall of the railway.

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
South Ealing South Ealing is notable in Underground trivia for having, along with Mansion House, every vowel in its name.

NEARBY STREETS
Airedale Road, W5 Airedale Road is a road in the W5 postcode area
Alacross Road, W5 Alacross Road is a street in Ealing.
Almond Avenue, W5 Almond Avenue is a street in Ealing.
Ascott Avenue, W5 Ascott Avenue is a street in Ealing.
Ash Grove, W5 Ash Grove is a street in Ealing.
Baillies Walk, W5 Baillies Walk is a footpath in (South) Ealing leading from St Mary’s Ealing to Warwick Road.
Beaconsfield Road, W5 Beaconsfield Road is a road in the W5 postcode area
Beech Gardens, W5 Beech Gardens is a street in Ealing.
Blandford Road, W5 Blandford Road is a road in the W5 postcode area
Cairn Avenue, W5 Cairn Avenue is a road in the W5 postcode area
Carew Road, W13 Carew Road is a road in the W13 postcode area
Cedar Grove, W5 Cedar Grove is a road in the W5 postcode area
Cherry Close, W5 Cherry Close is a road in the W5 postcode area
Chestnut Grove, W5 Chestnut Grove is a street in Ealing.
Church Lane, W5 Church Lane is a street in Ealing.
Church Place, W5 Church Place is a street in Ealing.
Clovelly Road, W5 Clovelly Road is a street in Ealing.
Coningsby Cottages, W5 Coningsby Cottages is a road in the W5 postcode area
Coningsby Road, W5 Coningsby Road is a street in Ealing.
Creighton Road, W5 Creighton Road is a road in the W5 postcode area
Devonshire Road, W5 Devonshire Road is a street in Ealing.
Dorset Road, W5 Dorset Road is a street in Ealing.
Ealing Park Mansions, W5 Ealing Park Mansions is a street in Ealing.
Gideon Mews, W5 Gideon Mews is a road in the W5 postcode area
Gloucester Road, W5 Gloucester Road is a street in Ealing.
Hereford Road, W5 Hereford Road is a road in the W5 postcode area
Keswick Mews, W5 Keswick Mews is a street in Ealing.
Lammas Park Gardens, W5 Lammas Park Gardens is a road in the W5 postcode area
Lammas Park Road, W5 Lammas Park Road is a road in the W5 postcode area
Lilac Gardens, W5 Lilac Gardens is a road in the W5 postcode area
Limes Walk, W5 Limes Walk is a road in the W5 postcode area
Liverpool Road, W5 Liverpool Road is a road in the W5 postcode area
Lothair Road, W5 Lothair Road is a street in Ealing.
Maple Grove, W5 Maple Grove is a street in Ealing.
Marlborough Road, W5 Marlborough Road is a street in Ealing.
Netherbury Road, W5 Netherbury Road is a road in the W5 postcode area
Nicholas Gardens, W5 Nicholas Gardens is a street in Ealing.
Olive Road, W5 Olive Road is a street in Ealing.
Overdale Road, W5 Overdale Road is a street in Ealing.
Palm Grove, W5 Palm Grove is a road in the W5 postcode area
Queen Anne’s Grove, W5 Queen Anne’s Grove is a road in the W5 postcode area
Queen Annes Gardens, W5 Queen Annes Gardens is a street in Ealing.
Ranelagh Road, W5 Ranelagh Road leads east from St Mary’s Road.
Richmond Road, W5 Richmond Road is a street in Ealing.
Rose Gardens, W5 Rose Gardens is a road in the W5 postcode area
Soane Close, W5 Soane Close is a road in the W5 postcode area
South Ealing Road, W5 South Ealing Road is a street in Ealing.
St Mary’s Court, W5 St Mary’s Court is a road in the W5 postcode area
St Mary’s Place, W5 St Mary’s Place is a road in the W5 postcode area
St Marys Road, W5 St Marys Road is a street in Ealing.
Sunderland Road, W5 Sunderland Road is a road in the W5 postcode area
Sycamore Avenue, W5 Sycamore Avenue is a road in the W5 postcode area
The Pavement, W5 The Pavement is a street in Ealing.
Trent Avenue, W5 Trent Avenue is a street in Ealing.
Venetia Road, W5 Venetia Road is a street in Ealing.
Waldemar Avenue, W13 Waldemar Avenue is a street in Ealing.
Walpole Close, W13 Walpole Close is a road in the W13 postcode area
Warwick Place, W5 Warwick Place is a road in the W5 postcode area
Weymouth Avenue, W5 Weymouth Avenue dates from the period of the First World War.
Windermere Road, W5 Windermere Road is a street in Ealing.

NEARBY PUBS
Grosvenor House Social Club This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Rose & Crown This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Castle Inn This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


South Ealing

South Ealing is notable in Underground trivia for having, along with Mansion House, every vowel in its name.

South Ealing station was opened by the District Railway on 1 May 1883 on a new branch line from Acton to Hounslow. At that time there was no stop at Northfields and the next station on the new line was Boston Road (now Boston Manor).

Electrification of the District Railway’s tracks took place and electric trains replacing steam trains on the Hounslow branch from 13 June 1905.

The Northfields district then was just a muddy lane passing through market gardens. But housing began to be built at Northfields and in 1908, a small halt was built there.

Housing also began to appear to the north of South Ealing station - the area became rather commercial with new shops around the station.

The lines of the London Underground came under one ownership and, services from Ealing along the District Line into London having a lot of intermediate stops, it was decided to extend the Piccadilly Line parallel to the District tracks. Piccadilly Line services ran fast through the likes of Turnham Green and Stamford Brook speeding commuters into the West End.

The powers that be also decided to run Piccadilly line trains on the Hounslow branch - mainly because the western end of the Piccadilly line needed a new depot to store trains overnight and service them.

1932 was a very major year involving additional Piccadilly line tracks adjacent to the District Line on the Hounslow branch with the consequent rebuilding of road bridges and stations. In particular, land was found for the building of a new train depot immediately west of Northfields. This necessitated the Northfield station platforms being moved so they faced towards South Ealing on the other side of Northfields Avenue.

A situation arose where the new South Ealing station platform faced the new Northfields station platforms under 300 yards from each other.

In the meantime the original South Ealing station had been demolished to enable the widening of the tracks and a temporary station entrance was built. Piccadilly line services, which had been running non-stop through the station since January 1933, began serving South Ealing from 29 April 1935. From this date, the branch was operated jointly by both lines until District line services were withdrawn on 10 October 1964.

No one in planning the stations had seemed to be too concerned that the two stations were now so close to each other until London Underground senior management paid a site visit and were dismayed to see what had happened with extra-close stations on the same line.

They proposed that South Ealing station should be closed and a brand new station built nearer Acton where the Ascott Avenue road bridge is and which could serve the newly built council estate south of the railway.

Local residents - and in particular the South Ealing Road shopkeepers - were very upset at this proposal. To pacify people, London Underground built a nearer entrance to Northfields station in Weymouth Avenue - a rather curious affair with a ticket office and a long elevated walkway to the Northfields platforms, part of the remains of which can still be seen today.

When London Underground in 1935 conducted a survey they found that most people preferred their station to be nearer where they shopped than where they lived. In addition far more passengers were now found to be using South Ealing because Brentford FC had been promoted to the first division of the football league. So South Ealing station had a reprieve.

With the war intervening, the temporary South Ealing station took on the status of a permanent station. It wasn’t until 1988 that a ‘proper’ permanent station was built - back on the other side of the line where the 1883 station originally stood. South Ealing had never had a Charles Holden designed station like the other 1930s Piccadilly Line stations. so the 1988 new station had a small "Holden style" tower.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Charles Blondin at work
TUM image id: 1545167428
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Mall, W5
TUM image id: 1466532857
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Baillies Walk, W5 is a curious relic of a public right of way which was neither made up into a road nor abolished. It still provides a secret back way between South Ealing station and Ealing Common.
Credit: The Underground Map
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