Showing each underground station so far featured

(N.B. So as not to break the map, this will only show the first 5000).

 HOME  ·  ARTICLE  ·  MAPS  ·  STREETS  BLOG 
(51.507 -0.205, 51.507 -0.205) 
MAP YEAR:175018001810182018301860190019502022Show map without markers
ZOOM:14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 18 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 18
TIP: To create your own sharable map, right click on the map
Underground station · Holland Park · W11 ·
October
16
2015

Holland Park is a district, an underground station (and indeed a park) in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea.

Holland Park has a reputation as an affluent and fashionable area, known for attractive large Victorian townhouses, and high-class shopping and restaurants.

The district was rural until the 19th century. Most of it was formerly the grounds of a Jacobean mansion called Holland House. In the later decades of that century the owners of the house sold off the more outlying parts of its grounds for residential development, and the district which evolved took its name from the house. It also included some small areas around the fringes which had never been part of the grounds of Holland House, notably the Phillimore Estate and the Campden Hill Square area. In the late 19th century a number of notable artists (including Frederic Leighton, P.R.A. and Val Prinsep) and art collectors lived in the area. The group were collectively known as ’The Holland Park Circle’. Holland Park was in most part very comfortably upper middle class when originally developed and in recent decades has gone further upmarket.

Of the 19th-century residential developments of the area, one of the most architecturally interesting is The Royal Crescent designed in 1839. Clearly inspired by its older namesake in Bath, it differs from the Bath crescent in that it is not a true crescent at all but two quadrant terraces each terminated by a circular bow in the Regency style which rises as a tower, a feature which would not have been found in the earlier classically inspired architecture of the 18th century which the design of the crescent seeks to emulate. The design of the Royal Crescent by the planner Robert Cantwell in two halves was dictated by the location of the newly fashionable underground sewers rather than any consideration for architectural aesthetics.

Holland Park is now one of the most expensive residential districts in London.

Holland Park station, on the Central London Railway, opened on 30 July 1900. The station building was refurbished in the 1990s.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence


Click here to explore another London street
We now have 526 completed street histories and 46974 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS


CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 05:50 GMT   

Batham Family (1851 - 1921)
I start with William Batham 1786-1852 born in St.Martins Middlesex. From various sources I have found snippets of information concerning his early life. A soldier in 1814 he married Mary Champelovier of Huguenot descent By 1819 they were in Kensington where they raised 10 children. Apart from soldier his other occupations include whitesmith, bell hanger and pig breeder. I find my first record in the 1851 English sensus. No street address is given, just ’The Potteries’. He died 1853. Only one child at home then George Batham 1839-1923, my great grandfather. By 1861 he is living in Thomas St. Kensington with his mother. A bricklayer by trade 1871, married and still in Thomas St. 1881 finds him in 5,Martin St. Kensington. 1891 10,Manchester St. 1911, 44 Hunt St Hammersmith. Lastly 1921 Census 7, Mersey St. which has since been demolished.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

Reply
Lived here
Tom Vague   
Added: 9 Sep 2020 14:02 GMT   

The Bedford family at 3 Acklam Road (1860 - 1965)
From the 19th century up until 1965, number 3 Acklam Road, near the Portobello Road junction, was occupied by the Bedford family.

When the Westway construction work began the Bedfords sold up and moved to south London. In the early 1970s the house was taken over by the North Kensington Amenity Trust and became the Notting Hill Carnival office before its eventual demolition.

Anne Bedford (now McSweeney) has fond memories of living there, although she recalls: ‘I now know that the conditions were far from ideal but then I knew no different. There was no running hot water, inside toilet or bath, apart from the tin bath we used once a week in the large kitchen/dining room. Any hot water needed was heated in a kettle. I wasn’t aware that there were people not far away who were a lot worse off than us, living in poverty in houses just like mine but families renting one room. We did have a toilet/bathroom installed in 1959, which was ‘luxury’.

‘When the plans for the Westway were coming to light, we were still living in the house whilst all the houses opposite became empty and boarded up one by one. We watched all this going on and decided that it was not going to be a good place to be once the builders moved in to demolish all the houses and start work on the elevated road. Dad sold the house for a fraction of what it should have been worth but it needed too much doing to it to bring it to a good living standard. We were not rich by any means but we were not poor. My grandmother used to do her washing in the basement once a week by lighting a fire in a big concrete copper to heat the water, which would have been there until demolition.

‘When we moved from number 3, I remember the upright piano that my grandparents used to play ’ and me of sorts ’ being lowered out of the top floor and taken away, presumably to be sold. I used to play with balls up on the wall of the chemist shop on the corner of Acklam and Portobello. We would mark numbers on the pavement slabs in a grid and play hopscotch. At the Portobello corner, on one side there was the Duke of Sussex pub, on the other corner, a chemist, later owned by a Mr Fish, which I thought was amusing. When I was very young I remember every evening a man peddling along Acklam Road with a long thin stick with which he lit the streetlights.’ Michelle Active who lived at number 33 remembers: ‘6 of us lived in a one-bed basement flat on Acklam Road. When they demolished it we moved to a 4-bed maisonette on Silchester Estate and I thought it was a palace, two toilets inside, a separate bathroom that was not in the kitchen, absolute heaven.’



Reply
Born here
Susan Wright   
Added: 16 Sep 2017 22:42 GMT   

Ada Crowe, 9 Bramley Mews
My Great Grandmother Ada Crowe was born in 9 Bramley Mews in 1876.

Reply
Comment
Joan Clarke   
Added: 2 Feb 2021 10:54 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens
My late aunt Ivy Clarke (nee Burridge) lived with her whole family at 19 Avondale Park Gardens, according to the 1911 census and she was still there in 1937.What was it like in those days, I wonder, if the housing was only built in 1920?


Reply
Comment
PETER FAIRCLOUGH   
Added: 10 May 2021 14:46 GMT   

We once lived here
My family resided at number 53 Brindley Street Paddington.
My grandparents George and Elizabeth Jenkinson (ne Fowler) had four children with my Mother Olive Fairclough (ne Jenkinson) being born in the house on 30/09/1935.
She died on 29/04/2021 aged 85 being the last surviving of the four siblings

Reply

Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:17 GMT   

TV comes to Olympia
Over 7000 people queued to see the first high definition television pictures on sets at the Olympia Radio Show. The pictures were transmitted by the BBC from Alexandra Palace, introduced by Leslie Mitchell, their first announcer.

Reply
Lived here
David Jones-Parry   
Added: 7 Sep 2017 12:13 GMT   

Mcgregor Road, W11 (1938 - 1957)
I was born n bred at 25 Mc Gregor Rd in 1938 and lived there until I joined the Royal Navy in 1957. It was a very interesting time what with air raid shelters,bombed houses,water tanks all sorts of areas for little boys to collect scrap and sell them on.no questions asked.A very happy boyhood -from there we could visit most areas of London by bus and tube and we did.

Reply

Dave Fahey   
Added: 6 Jan 2021 02:40 GMT   

Bombing of the Jack O Newberry
My maternal grandfather, Archie Greatorex, was the licensee of the Earl of Warwick during the Second World War. My late mother Vera often told the story of the bombing of the Jack. The morning after the pub was bombed, the landlord’s son appeared at the Warwick with the pub’s till on an old pram; he asked my grandfather to pay the money into the bank for him. The poor soul was obviously in shock. The previous night, his parents had taken their baby down to the pub cellar to shelter from the air raids. The son, my mother never knew his name, opted to stay in his bedroom at the top of the building. He was the only survivor. I often wondered what became of him.

Reply
Comment
Brenda Newton   
Added: 5 Jun 2021 07:17 GMT   

Hewer Street W10
John Nodes Undertakers Hewer Street W10

Reply
Comment
ken gaston   
Added: 16 Jan 2021 11:04 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens
My grandmother Hilda Baker and a large family lived in number 18 . It was a close community and that reflected in the coronation celebration held on the central green . I grew up in that square and went to school at Sirdar Road then St. Clements it was a great place to grow up with a local park and we would also trek to Holland Park or Kensington Gardens .Even then the area was considered deprived and a kindergarden for criminals . My generation were the first to escape to the new towns and became the overspill from London to get decent housing and living standards .

Reply
Lived here
Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 15:38 GMT   

6 East Row (1960 - 1960)
We lived at 6 East Row just before it was demolished.

Reply
Comment
danny currie   
Added: 30 Nov 2022 18:39 GMT   

dads yard
ron currie had a car breaking yard in millers yard back in the 60s good old days

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 4 Sep 2022 15:42 GMT   

Superman 2
I worked here in 1977. The scene in the prison laundry in Superman 2 was filmed here.

Reply
Lived here
Norman Norrington   
Added: 28 Dec 2020 08:31 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
I was born in Hammersmith Hospital (Ducane Rd) I lived at 40 Blecynden Street from birth in 1942 to 1967 when I moved due to oncoming demolition for the West way flyover.
A bomb fell locally during the war and cracked one of our windows, that crack was still there the day I left.
It was a great street to have grown up in I have very fond memories of living there.



Reply
Reply
john ormandy   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 17:48 GMT   

Mary Place Workhouse
There was a lady called Ivy who lived in the corner she use to come out an tell us kids off for climbing over the fence to play football on the green. Those were the days.

Reply

LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
danny currie   
Added: 30 Nov 2022 18:39 GMT   

dads yard
ron currie had a car breaking yard in millers yard back in the 60s good old days

Reply

Lynette beardwood   
Added: 29 Nov 2022 20:53 GMT   

Spy’s Club
Topham’s Hotel at 24-28 Ebury Street was called the Ebury Court Hotel. Its first proprietor was a Mrs Topham. In WW2 it was a favourite watering hole for the various intelligence organisations based in the Pimlico area. The first woman infiltrated into France in 1942, FANY Yvonne Rudellat, was recruited by the Special Operations Executive while working there. She died in Bergen Belsen in April 1945.

Reply
Born here
   
Added: 16 Nov 2022 12:39 GMT   

The Pearce family lived in Gardnor Road
The Pearce family moved into Gardnor Road around 1900 after living in Fairfax walk, my Great grandfather, wife and there children are recorded living in number 4 Gardnor road in the 1911 census, yet I have been told my grand father was born in number 4 in 1902, generations of the Pearce continue living in number 4 as well other houses in the road up until the 1980’s

Reply
Lived here
Phil Stubbington   
Added: 14 Nov 2022 16:28 GMT   

Numbers 60 to 70 (1901 - 1939)
A builder, Robert Maeers (1842-1919), applied to build six houses on plots 134 to 139 on the Lincoln House Estate on 5 October 1901. He received approval on 8 October 1901. These would become numbers 60 to 70 Rodenhurst Road (60 is plot 139). Robert Maeers was born in Northleigh, Devon. In 1901 he was living in 118 Elms Road with his wife Georgina, nee Bagwell. They had four children, Allan, Edwin, Alice, and Harriet, born between 1863 and 1873.
Alice Maeers was married to John Rawlins. Harriet Maeers was married to William Street.
Three of the six houses first appear on the electoral register in 1904:
Daniel Mescal “Ferncroft”
William Francis Street “Hillsboro”
Henry Elkin “Montrose”

By the 1905 electoral register all six are occupied:

Daniel Mescal “St Senans”
Henry Robert Honeywood “Grasmere”
John Rawlins “Iveydene”
William Francis Street “Hillsboro”
Walter Ernest Manning “St Hilda”
Henry Elkin “Montrose”

By 1906 house numbers replace names:

Daniel Mescal 70
Henry Robert Honeywood 68
John Rawlins 66
William Francis Street 64
Walter Ernest Manning 62
Henry Elkin 60

It’s not clear whether number 70 changed from “Ferncroft” to “St Senans” or possibly Daniel Mescal moved houses.

In any event, it can be seen that Robert Maeers’ two daughters are living in numbers 64 and 66, with, according to local information, an interconnecting door. In the 1911 census William Street is shown as a banker’s clerk. John Rawlins is a chartering clerk in shipping. Robert Maeers and his wife are also living at this address, Robert being shown as a retired builder.

By 1939 all the houses are in different ownership except number 60, where the Elkins are still in residence.


Reply
Comment
stephen garraway   
Added: 13 Nov 2022 13:56 GMT   

Martin Street, Latimer Road
I was born at St Charlottes and lived at 14, Martin Street, Latimer Road W10 until I was 4 years old when we moved to the east end. It was my Nan Grant’s House and she was the widow of George Frederick Grant. She had two sons, George and Frederick, and one daughter, my mother Margaret Patricia.
The downstairs flat where we lived had two floors, the basement and the ground floor. The upper two floors were rented to a Scot and his family, the Smiths. He had red hair. The lights and cooker were gas and there was one cold tap over a Belfast sink. A tin bath hung on the wall. The toilet was outside in the yard. This was concreted over and faced the the rear of the opposite terraces. All the yards were segregated by high brick walls. The basement had the a "best" room with a large , dark fireplace with two painted metal Alsation ornaments and it was very dark, cold and little used.
The street lights were gas and a man came round twice daily to turn them on and off using a large pole with a hook and a lighted torch on the end. I remember men coming round the streets with carts selling hot chestnuts and muffins and also the hurdy gurdy man with his instrument and a monkey in a red jacket. I also remember the first time I saw a black man and my mother pulling me away from him. He had a Trilby and pale Mackintosh so he must of been one of the first of the Windrush people. I seem to recall he had a thin moustache.
Uncle George had a small delivery lorry but mum lost touch with him and his family. Uncle Fred went to Peabody Buildings near ST.Pauls.
My Nan was moved to a maisonette in White City around 1966, and couldn’t cope with electric lights, cookers and heating and she lost all of her neighbourhood friends. Within six months she had extreme dementia and died in a horrible ward in Tooting Bec hospital a year or so later. An awful way to end her life, being moved out of her lifelong neighbourhood even though it was slums.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 31 Oct 2022 18:47 GMT   

Memories
I lived at 7 Conder Street in a prefab from roughly 1965 to 1971 approx - happy memories- sad to see it is no more ?

Reply

Eve Glover   
Added: 22 Oct 2022 09:28 GMT   

Shenley Road
Shenley Road is the main street in Borehamwood where the Job Centre and Blue Arrow were located

Reply
Comment
Richard Lake   
Added: 28 Sep 2022 09:37 GMT   

Trade Union Official
John William Lake snr moved with his family to 22 De Laune Street in 1936. He was the London Branch Secretary for the Street Masons, Paviours and Road Makers Union. He had previously lived in Orange St now Copperfield St Southwark but had been forced to move because the landlord didn’t like him working from home and said it broke his lease.
John William snr died in 1940. His son John William Lake jnr also became a stone mason and at the end of World War two he was responsible for the engraving of the dates of WW2 onto the Cenotaph in Whitehall.

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Aubrey House Aubrey House is a large 18th-century detached house with two acres of gardens in the Campden Hill area of Holland Park.
Coach and Horses The Coach & Horses was situated at 108 Notting Hill Gate.
Earl of Zetland The Earl of Zetland - a pub in the Potteries
Horbury Chapel (Kensington Temple) In September 1849, the Horbury Chapel, Notting Hill was officially opened.
Mercury Theatre The Mercury Theatre was situated at 2a Ladbroke Road, next to the Kensington Temple.
St John’s Notting Hill St John’s Notting Hill is a Victorian Anglican church built in 1845 in Lansdowne Crescent, Notting Hill.
St John’s Hill St John’s Hill is the highest point in the area.
The Crown The Crown was situated at 57 Princedale Road.

THE STREETS OF HOLLAND PARK
Abbotsbury Close, W14 Abbotsbury Close is a road in the W14 postcode area
Abbotsbury Road, W14 Abbotsbury Road runs between Melbury Road and the road known as Holland Park.
Addison Avenue, W11 Addison Avenue runs north from Holland Park Avenue and was originally called Addison Road North.
Addison Crescent, W14 Addison Crescent consists of north and south sections.
Addison Gardens, W14 Addison Gardens stands on part of the Holland estate.
Addison Place, W11 In the nineteenth century, Addison Place was known by two names - Crescent Mews East and Phoenix Place.
Addison Road, W14 Addison Road stretches from Holland Park Avenue to Kensington High Street.
Anley Road, W14 Anley Road is a street in West Kensington.
Applegarth Road, W14 Applegarth Road is a road in the W14 postcode area
Augustine Road, W14 Augustine Road is a road in the W14 postcode area
Auriol Road, W14 Auriol Road is a street in West Kensington.
Avonmore Road, W14 Avonmore Road is a street in West Kensington.
Aynhoe Road, W14 Aynhoe Road is a street in West Kensington.
Beckford Close, W14 Beckford Close is a road in the W14 postcode area
Berghem Mews, W14 Berghem Mews is a street in West Kensington.
Blythe Mews, W14 Blythe Mews is a street in West Kensington.
Blythe Road, W14 Blythe Road is a street in West Kensington.
Bolingbroke Road, W14 Bolingbroke Road is a road in the W14 postcode area
Boxmoor Street, W11 Boxmoor Street was also known as Henry Place and Beaumont Street during its brief life.
Boyne Terrace Mews, W11 Boyne Terrace Mews is a mews in Notting Hill, London W11.
Caithness Road, W14 Caithness Road is a street in West Kensington.
Carlton Mansions, W14 Carlton Mansions is a street in West Kensington.
Ceylon Road, W14 Ceylon Road is a street in West Kensington.
Dewhurst Road, W14 Dewhurst Road leads east from Shepherds Bush Road.
Dunsany Road, W14 Dunsany Road is a road in the W14 postcode area
Elsham Road, W14 Elsham Road is a street in West Kensington.
Farley Court, W14 Farley Court is located on Melbury Road
Faroe Road, W14 Faroe Road is a street in West Kensington.
Fenelon Place, W14 Fenelon Place is a road in the W14 postcode area
Fitz-George Avenue, W14 Fitz-George Avenue is a road in the W14 postcode area
Fitzjames Avenue, W14 Fitzjames Avenue is a street in West Kensington.
Girdlers Road, W14 Girdlers Road is a road in the W14 postcode area
Gorleston Street, W14 Gorleston Street is a street in West Kensington.
Gratton Road, W14 Gratton Road is a road in the W14 postcode area
Hammersmith Road, W14 Hammersmith Road is a street in West Kensington.
Hansard Mews, W14 Hansard Mews is a street in West Kensington.
Hofland Road, W14 Hofland Road is a street in West Kensington.
Holland Gardens, W14 Holland Gardens is a road in the W14 postcode area
Holland House, W8 Residential block
Holland Park Avenue, W11 Holland Park Avenue is one of London’s most ancient thoroughfares.
Holland Park Gardens, W14 Holland Park Gardens is a street in West Kensington.
Holland Park Ilchester Place, W14 Holland Park Ilchester Place is a street in Kensington.
Holland Park Mews, W11 Holland Park Mews runs between the two branches of the road known as Holland Park.
Holland Park Road, W14 Holland Park Road is a street in West Kensington.
Holland Park Road, W14 Holland Park Road runs between Addison Road and Melbury Road.
Holland Park Roundabout, W11 Holland Park Roundabout is a road in the W12 postcode area
Holland Park Terrace, W11 Holland Park Terrace is a street in Notting Hill.
Holland Park, W11 The roads known as Holland Park consist of three main branches.
Holland Park, W11 Holland Park is a road in the W14 postcode area
Holland Park, W8 Holland Park is a street in Notting Hill.
Holland Road, W11 Holland Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Holland Road, W14 Holland Road is a street in West Kensington.
Holland Road, W14 Holland Road is a road in the E13 postcode area
Holland Villas Road, W14 Holland Villas Road is a wide tree-lined avenue which runs between Upper Addison Gardens and the junction of Addison Crescent and Holland Road.
Ilchester Place, W14 Ilchester Place runs between Abbotsbury Road and Melbury Road, immediately adjacent to the southern boundary of Holland Park itself.
Ilchester Place, W14 Ilchester Place is a road in the W8 postcode area
Irving Road, W14 This is a street in the W14 postcode area
Lakeside Road, W14 Lakeside Road was built on the site of artificial lakes formed by local brickworks.
Lansdowne Mews, W11 Lansdowne Mews is a cul-de-sac in Notting Hill.
Lisgar Terrace, W14 Lisgar Terrace is a road in the W14 postcode area
Lorne Gardens, W11 Lorne Gardens is a street in Notting Hill.
Lower Addison Gardens, W14 Lower Addison Gardens runs between Holland Road and Holland Villas Road.
Masbro Road, W14 Masbro Road is a street in West Kensington.
Matheson Road, W14 Matheson Road is a street in West Kensington.
Melbury Road, W14 Melbury Road is a grand, sweeping avenue, laid out from 1875 onwards.
Milson Road, W14 Milson Road is a street in West Kensington.
Mornington Avenue, W14 Mornington Avenue is a road in the W14 postcode area
Munden Street, W14 Munden Street is a street in West Kensington.
Napier Road, W14 Napier Road is a street in West Kensington.
Netherwood Place, W14 Netherwood Place is a street in West Kensington.
Netherwood Road, W14 Netherwood Road is a street in West Kensington.
Norland Place, W11 Norland Place began its life as Norland Stables.
Norland Square, W11 Norland Square is a street in Notting Hill.
Oakwood Court, W14 Oakwood Court is a street in West Kensington.
Oxford Gate, W14 Oxford Gate is a road in the W14 postcode area
Park Close, W14 Park Close is a road in the W14 postcode area
Prince’s Yard, W11 This is a small cul-de-sac off of Princes Road.
Queensdale Road, W11 Queensdale Road is a long road stretching from west to east, containing terraces of Victorian houses.
Queensdale Walk, W11 Queensdale Walk is a small cul-de-sac with 2-storey cottages running south off Queensdale Road.
Redan Street, W14 Redan Street is a street in West Kensington.
Redlynch Court, W14 Redlynch Court is a block on the corner of Addison Crescent and Addison Road.
Richmond Way, W14 Richmond Way lies south of Shepherd’s Bush Green.
Royal Crescent Mews, W11 Royal Crescent Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Royal Crescent, W11 The Royal Crescent is a Grade II* listed street in Holland Park.
Russell Gardens Mews, W14 Russell Gardens Mews is a street in West Kensington.
Russell Gardens, W14 Russell Gardens is a street in West Kensington.
Sinclair Gardens, W14 Sinclair Gardens is a street in West Kensington.
Sinclair Road, W14 Sinclair Road is a street in West Kensington.
Somerset Square, W14 Somerset Square is a street in West Kensington.
Souldern Road, W14 Souldern Road is a street in West Kensington.
Southcombe Street, W14 Southcombe Street is a street in West Kensington.
Springvale Terrace, W14 Springvale Terrace is a street in West Kensington.
St Mary Abbots Terrace, W14 St Mary Abbots Terrace is a street in West Kensington.
Stable Yard Ilchester Place, W14 Stable Yard Ilchester Place is a street in Kensington.
Stanwick Road, W14 Stanwick Road is a street in West Kensington.
Sterndale Road, W14 Sterndale Road is a street in West Kensington.
Stonor Road, W14 Stonor Road is a street in West Kensington.
Strangways Terrace, W14 Strangways Terrace is a road in the W14 postcode area
Thackerey Court, W14 Thackerey Court is a block in the Holland Park area.
Upper Addison Gardens, W14 Upper Addison Gardens runs between Holland Road and Holland Villas Road.
Vernon Street, W14 Vernon Street is a road in the W14 postcode area
Westwick Gardens, W14 Westwick Gardens is a street in West Kensington.
Windsor Way, W14 Windsor Way is a street in West Kensington.
Woodsford Square, W14 Woodsford Square is a 1970s development consisting of a series of interconnecting squares hidden away on the eastern side of Addison Road.

THE PUBS OF HOLLAND PARK


Click here to explore another London street
We now have 526 completed street histories and 46974 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS




LOCAL PHOTOS
Click here to see map view of nearby Creative Commons images
Click here to see Creative Commons images near to this postcode
Children of Ruston Close
TUM image id: 1545251090
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Notting Hill
TUM image id: 1510169244
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Pembridge Road (1900s)
TUM image id: 1556889569
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Kensington Park Hotel
TUM image id: 1453375720
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Abingdon Arms Pub, Abingdon Road.
TUM image id: 1489943648
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Children of Ruston Close
Licence: CC BY 2.0


St Peter's Notting Hill
Credit: Asteuartw
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Hippodrome, about 1840, showing St John’s Hill in the background.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Abbotsbury Road, Holland Park (2008) These houses are just by an entrance to Holland Park. Further along the road was the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi meditation centre visited by the Beatles in 1967.
Credit: Geograph/David Hawgood
Licence:


Addison Road, W14 (1909) Addison Road takes its name from the essayist Joseph Addison who lived nearby at Holland House.
Old London postcard
Licence:


Arundel Gardens
Credit: Barbara Avis
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Boyne Terrace Mews, W11
Licence: CC BY 2.0


3-4 Ladbroke Terrace in 2006.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Hippodrome Place street sign
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Holland Park Avenue c.1900, looking west. Old postcard, reproduced courtesy of RBKC.
Credit: Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Print-friendly version of this page

  Contact us · Copyright policy · Privacy policy