Dove Walk, SW1W

Road in/near Belgravia

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(51.49257 -0.15114, 51.492 -0.151) 
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Road · Belgravia · SW1W ·
JANUARY
1
2000

Dove Walk is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.

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A lot of the street information research on this website is academic in nature - from university research, the Survey of London, British History Online, borough conservation areas and more. Occasionally, the Hive Mind comes up trumps - these derivations come from discoveries on the Wikipedia made during 2019 which is feeding into the project.

If we find any derivations dubious here, we remove them. With that proviso, the TUM project provides them here for your enjoyment...

A-B-C D-E-F G-H-I J-K-L M-N-O P-Q-R S T-U-V W-X-Y-Z

Paddington Street – this was on old path leading to Paddington [Marylebone]
Page Street – after William Page, head of Westminster School 1814-19 [Westminster]
Paget Street – after Sir James Paget, 19th century surgeon, who had a clinic on nearby Friend Street [Clerkenwell]
Pakenham Street – after its builder the 3rd Lord Calthorpe, who owned land at Pakenham, Suffolk [Clerkenwell]
Palace Mews – probably by association with the nearby Buckingham Palace Road [Belgravia]
Palace Place – named by association with Buckingham Palace, originally built for John Sheffield, Duke of Buckingham [Westminster]
Palace Street – named by association with Buckingham Palace, originally built for John Sheffield, Duke of Buckingham [Westminster]
Pall Mall – laid out as a grounds for playing pall mall in the 17th century [St James's]
Pall Mall East – laid out as a grounds for playing pall mall in the 17th century [Soho]
Pall Mall Place – laid out as a grounds for playing pall mall in the 17th century [St James's]
Palmer Street – after the Reverend James Palmer, who founded (now demolished) almshouses near here in 1656 [Westminster]
Pancras Lane – after St Pancras, Soper Lane church which stood here until destroyed in the Great Fire; it was formerly Needlers Lane, after the needle making trade here [City of London]
Pancras Road – after the adjacent St Pancras Old Church, named for the Roman-era Christian matyr Pancras of Rome [Somers Town]
Panton Street – after Colonel Thomas Panton, local property dealer of the 17th century [Soho]
Panton Street WC2 - Colonel Thomas Panton, having made an enormous fortune out of gambling, decided never to gamble again. Instead he bought Shaver's Hall (named not from a barbers but from Lord Dunbar who lost £3,000 there at one sitting, whereon it was said a nothern lord was shaved there) which stood on the north-east corner of the Haymarket and Coventry Street, all the way down to present day Panton Street. He demolished the gambling hall to build over.
Panyer Alley – after a Medieval brewery here called the ‘panyer’ (basket) [City of London]
Pardon Street – after the Pardon Chapel which stood near here in the Middle Ages [Clerkenwell]
Pardoner Street – after the character of the pardoner in Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, by reference to the adjacent Pilgrimage Street [Southwark]
Paris Garden – the name of the former manor here, it may derive from ‘parish’ or the Old French ‘pareil’ (enclosure), or possibly after 15th century local family the de Parys [Waterloo]
Park Crescent – as they are adjacent to Regent's Park [Marylebone]
Park Crescent Mews East – as they are adjacent to Regent's Park [Marylebone]
Park Crescent Mews West – as they are adjacent to Regent's Park [Marylebone]
Park Lane, Old Park Lane and Park Street – after the nearby Hyde Park; Park Lane was formerly Tyburn Lane, after the Tyburn gibbet and stream, and Park Street was formerly Hyde Park Street [Mayfair]
Park Place – after the nearby Green Park [St James's]
Park Road – after the adjacent Regent’s Park [Lisson Grove]
Park Road – after the adjacent Regent’s Park [Regent’s Park]
Park Square - after the adjacent Regent’s Park [Regent’s Park]
Park Square East - after the adjacent Regent’s Park [Regent’s Park]
Park Square Mews - after the adjacent Regent’s Park [Regent’s Park]
Park Square West - after the adjacent Regent’s Park [Regent’s Park]
Park Street – after a former park here attached to Winchester House [Southwark]
Park Village East – after the adjacent Regent’s Park [Regent’s Park]
Park Village West – after the adjacent Regent’s Park [Regent’s Park]
Parker Mews and Parker Street – from Philip Parker, a local resident in the 17th century [Covent Garden]
Parker Road Croydon Matthew Parker Archbishop of Canterbury (1559-1575) who lived at Croydon Palace
Parker Road Westminster Most Rev. Matthew Parker Archbishop of Canterbury from 1559 until 1575.
Parliament Square – after the Houses of Parliament [Westminster]
Parliament Street – after the Houses of Parliament [Westminster]
Parr Way Hounslow Catherine Parr. The sixth wife of King Henry VIII. Catherine inherited Hanworth Manor from 1544 until her death in 1548.
Parry Street – after Thomas Parry, 17th century statesman and owner of Copt Hall, a house near here [Vauxhall]
Passing Alley – altered from the descriptive Pissing Alley, renamed at some point prior to the 1790s [Farringdon]
Passmore Street – after its 1830s builder Richard Passmore [Belgravia]
Paternoster Lane, Paternoster Row and Paternoster Square – after the paternoster (rosary) makers who formerly worked here [City of London]
Paveley Street – this land was in Medieval times owned by the Order of Knights of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem; the street is named either for Richard de Paveley (Grand Prior 1315–21) or John de Paveley (Grand Prior 1358–71) [Lisson Grove]
Paxton Terrace – thought to be after Joseph Paxton, Victoria-era gardener and designer of The Crystal Palace [Victoria]
Peabody Avenue – after George Peabody, 19th century American philanthropist in London [Victoria]
Pear Tree Court – thought to be from a local pear tree [Clerkenwell]
Pear Tree Street – after the pear trees formerly grown here [Finsbury]
Peerless Street – site of the Peerless Pool, a bath used in the 18th century, thought to be a corruption of ‘perilous’ [Finsbury]
Pelham Crescent, Pelham Place and Pelham Street Kensington and Chelsea Henry Pelham, 3rd Earl of Chichester A former trustee of the Smith's Charity Estate, on which the road was built.
Pemberton Row – after James Pemberton, Lord Mayor of London in 1611 [City of London]
Pemberton Row City of London Sir James Pemberton Lord Mayor of London in 1611, and a member of the Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths, on whose estate the road was built
Penfold Place and Penfold Street – after Reverend George Penfold, vicar of several local churches in the early 1800s [Lisson Grove]
Penton Rise – after Henry Penton, who developed this area in the late 18th century [Clerkenwell]
Pentonville Road – after Henry Penton, who developed this area in the late 18th century [Clerkenwell]
Pepys Street – after 17th century diarist Samuel Pepys, who lived and worked here [City of London]
Pepys Street City of London Samuel Pepys 1923 renaming; Pepys lived there during the Great Fire of London.
Percival Street – after local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton, one of whom was a cousin of Spencer Perceval [Clerkenwell]
Percy Circus – after Robert Percy Smith, 19th century MP who was a director of the New River Company who developed the area, including the circus.
Percy Passage – after either Hugh Percy, 1st Duke of Northumberland, changing his name from ‘Smithson’ to ‘Percy’ following his marriage to Elizabeth Percy, Duchess of Northumberland, landowner or the Percy Coffee House formerly located here in the 18th century [Fitzrovia]
Percy Street – after either Hugh Percy, 1st Duke of Northumberland, changing his name from ‘Smithson’ to ‘Percy’ following his marriage to Elizabeth Percy, Duchess of Northumberland, landowner or the Percy Coffee House formerly located here in the 18th century [Fitzrovia]
Percy Yard – after Robert Percy Smith, 19th century MP who was a director of the New River Company [Clerkenwell]
Perkin’s Rents – after a local landlord by the name of Perkin, recorded in the late 17th century [Westminster]
Peter Street – thought to be from a nearby saltpetre factory that stood here in the 17th century [Soho]
Peter’s Hill – after St Peter, Paul's Wharf church, which formerly stood here until destroyed in the 1666 fire [City of London]
Peter’s Lane – after the former St Peter’s Key pub on this site [Farringdon]
Peterborough Court – after the abbots of Peterborough, who prior to the Dissolution of the Monasteries had a house here [City of London]
Peter's Hill EC4 - Named after the church of the same name, built in the twelfth century. Burnt in the great fire of 1666, and not rebuilt. The churchyard today is remembered by an inscription on a modern wall.Piccadilly W1 - The name is taken from the collar or neckerchief called a piccdil, that was made by a tailor close by in the Haymarket.
Peter's Lane EC1 - Listed in Stow's Survay as St Peter's Lane, the church once stood close to the tavern called Cross Keys. Today a modern office block stands here but the sign lives on. Opposite the lane is the old site of Hicks Hall, the old Sessions house built by Sir Baptis Hicks in the seventeenth century.
Peto Place – after Samuel Morton Peto, MP, entrepreneur, civil engineer and railway developer, who paid for a Batist chapel to be built here in 1855 (since closed) [Regent’s Park]
Petticoat Square – the name Petticoat stems from the clothes market formerly held here [City of London]
Petty France – after a small French settlement that existed here in the 16th century [Westminster]
Petty Wales – unknown, but possibly after a Welsh community formerly based here [City of London]
Philpot Lane – commemorates prominent local family the Philpots; originally probably after John Philpot, 14th century grocer [City of London]
Phoenix Place and Phoenix Yard – after the former Phoenix Iron Foundry near here [Clerkenwell]
Phoenix Road – thought to be after a former tavern of this name; formerly Phoenix Street [Somers Town]
Phoenix Street – named after an inn that formerly stood near here [St Gile's]
Piccadilly – after Piccadilly Hall, home of local tailor Robert Baker in the 17th century, believed to be named after the pickadils (collars/hem trimmings) which made his fortune. [St James's]
Piccadilly Arcade – after Piccadilly Hall, home of local tailor Robert Baker in the 17th century, believed to be named after the pickadils (collars/hem trimmings) which made his fortune. [St James's]
Piccadilly Circus – after Piccadilly Hall, home of local tailor Robert Baker in the 17th century, believed to be named after the pickadils (collars/hem trimmings) which made his fortune. Piccadilly Circus was laid out by John Nash in 1819 [St James's]
Piccadilly Place – after Piccadilly Hall, home of local tailor Robert Baker in the 17th century, believed to be named after the pickadils (collars/hem trimmings) which made his fortune; it was laid out by John Nash in 1819 [Mayfair]
Pickard Street – after a clergyman of this name who founded the Orphan Working School here in 1754 [Finsbury]
Pickering Place SW1 - Hidden just behind Berry Brothers and Rudd is a quite and unspoilt Georgian corner of London. Built by William Pickering as a hide-a-way from his money making coffee company. William Pickering, local painter stainer and grocer, leased property here in the 1730s [St James's]
Pickwick Street – after the novel The Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens, by association with Dickens Square [Southwark]
Picton Place – after Thomas Picton, general who lived near here before his death at the Battle of Waterloo [Marylebone]
Pigott Street Tower Hamlets Francis Pigott Stainsby Conant Family owned the undeveloped estate. Limehouse.
Pilgrim Street – thought to be a former route for pilgrims to St Paul's cathedral; formerly known as Stonecutters Alley and Little Bridge Street [City of London]
Pilgrimage Street – as this formed part of the ancient pilgrimage route to Canterbury [Southwark]
Pimlico Road – as it leads to Pimlico, possibly named after Ben Pimlico, 17th century brewer [Belgravia]
Pindar Street – after Paul Pindar, 14th–16th century diplomat, who had a house here [City of London]
Pine Apple Court – after a former inn here of this name [Westminster]
Pine Street – Wood Street prior to 1877, probably both names after an avenue of tree that formerly stood here, or possibly after Thomas Wood, 18th century leaseholder [Clerkenwell]
Pitt’s Head Mews – after a former pub on this site called the Pitt’s Head, thought to be name after William Pitt the Elder [Mayfair]
Plaisterers Highwalk – after the nearby Worshipful Company of Plaisterers [City of London]
Platt Street – after Richard Platt, 16th century brewer, who donated this land to the Worshipful Company of Brewers, who built this street in 1848-53 [Somers Town]
Playhouse Yard – after the Blackfriars Playhouse, which stood here in the 17th century [City of London]
Playhouse Yard EC4 - Named after the Blackfriars theatre which stood here in Shakespeare's time and where his play's were performed.
Plender Street Camden William Plender, 1st Baron Plender Accountant and public servant who served as Sheriff of the County of London in 1927
Pleydell Court and Pleydell Street – formerly Silver Street, it was renamed in 1848 by association with the neighbouring Bouverie Street; the Bouverie family were by this time known as the
Pleydell Street City of London Earls of Radnor The Pleydell-Bouveries, Earls of Radnor, were landlords of this area.
Plough Court EC3 - A tavern of the same name stood in it. The poet Alexander Pope was born here in 1688.
Plough Place – after the Plough/Plow, a 16th-century eating place located here [City of London]
Plumtree Court – thought to be after either literally a plumtree, or else an inn of this name [City of London]
Plympton Place and Plympton Street – unknown; formerly Little Grove Street [Lisson Grove]
Pocock Street – after the locally prominent Pocock family [Southwark]
Poland Street – from The King of Poland, former pub on this street named in honour of the Polish victory at the Battle of Vienna [Soho]
Pollen Street – after the Pollen family, who inherited the estate from the Maddox family [Mayfair]
Polperro Mews – probably after the Cornish town Polperro, as the Duchy of Cornwall formerly owned much of the land here [Lambeth]
Polygon Road – after the Polygon, a 17th century housing development here instigated by Jacob Leroux and Job Hoare [Somers Town]
Ponsonby Place – after John Ponsonby, 5th Earl of Bessborough and later Baron Duncannon of Bessborough [Westminster]
Ponsonby Terrace – after John Ponsonby, 5th Earl of Bessborough and later Baron Duncannon of Bessborough [Westminster]
Pont Street – thought to be from the French ‘pont’ (bridge), over the river Westbourne [Belgravia]
Pope’s Head Alley – after the Pope’s Head Tavern which formerly stood here, thought to stem from the 14th century Florentine merchants who were in Papal service [City of London]
Pope's Avenue Richmond upon Thames Alexander Pope Poet who had built the demolished Pope's Villa and surviving Pope's Grotto, and is buried in St Mary's Church, Twickenham.
Pope's Grove Richmond upon Thames Alexander Pope Poet who had built the demolished Pope's Villa and surviving Pope's Grotto, and is buried in St Mary's Church, Twickenham.
Poppins Court – shortening of Popinjay Court, meaning a parrot; it is thought to stem from the crest of Cirencester Abbey (which featured the bird), who owned a town house here [City of London]
Portal Close, Uxbridge Street built near the site of the former RAF Uxbridge, and named after an air marshal in the Second World War. Charles Portal was Chief of the Air Staff.
Porter Street – after David Porter, builder of the nearby Montagu Square [Marylebone]
Portland Mews – after William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland, built in the 1730s [Soho]
Portland Place Westminster William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland Margaret Bentinck, Duchess of Portland, the daughter of Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer inherited his land and property and married into the Portland family
Portman Close, Portman Mews South, Portman Square and Portman Street – after the Portman family who owned this estate since William Portman acquired it in the 16th century; he was originally from Orchard Portman, Somerset [Marylebone]
Portman Gate – this land was formerly owned by the Portman estate [Lisson Grove]
Portman Square Westminster Henry William Portman Built between 1674 and 1684 on land belonging to Portman
Portpool Lane – thought to be a corruption of ‘Purta’s Pool’, the local area is recorded as the manor of Purtepol in the early 13th century; written Purple Lane in Arlidge's Survey [Hatton Garden]
Portsmouth Street – a house belonging to Louise de Kérouaille, Duchess of Portsmouth, mistress of Charles II, lay on this site [Holborn]
Portsoken Street – after ‘port-soke’, as it was a soke near a port (gate) of the City [City of London]
Portugal Street – named in honour of Charles II’s Portuguese queen Catherine of Braganza, [71] or possibly after the Portuguese embassy which was formerly located here [Holborn]
Post Office Court – after the General Post Office which formerly stood near here [City of London]
Potters Fields – after the Roman pottery found near here or a former pottery located here [Southwark]
Pottery Lane W11 - Takes its name from the brickfields at its northern end, where high-quality clay was dug from about 1818. The original kiln still stands and has been extended and converted into a three-bedroom house, and dates back to about 1820.Powys Lane Enfield Henry Philip Powys Rented nearby Broomfield House in 1816.
Poultry – after the poultry which was formerly sold at the market here [City of London]
Powis Place – former site of Powis House, built for William Herbert, 2nd Marquess of Powis, a prominent 17th – 18th century Jacobite [Bloomsbury]
Praed Street W2 - Named after Sir William Praed, first chairman and for many years manager of the Regent Canal company - its canal basin which lies just to the north.
Pratt Street Camden Charles Pratt, 1st Earl Camden Owner of the land on which the road and much of the surviving development was built in 1791.
Pratt Walk – named by its late 18th century builder Joseph Mawbey for his mother’s family [Lambeth]
Price’s Street – after a local builder of this name [Southwark]
Prideaux Place – after Arthur R Prideaux, 19th century director of the New River Company [Clerkenwell]
Priest’s Court – with allusion to the adjacent St Vedast Church [City of London]
Primrose Hill – thought to be named after a builder of this name, or possibly the primroses which formerly grew here; formerly called Salisbury Court, as it approaches Salisbury Square [City of London]
Primrose Street – thought to be named after a builder of this name, or possibly the primroses which formerly grew here [City of London]
Prince Albert Road – after Albert, Prince Consort; formerly Primrose Hill Road [Regent’s Park]
Prince Albert Road Camden / Westminster Prince Albert Originally called Albert Road; renamed after the Prince Consort of Queen Victoria in 1938
Prince Arthur Road Camden Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught and Strathearn Son of Queen Victoria who opened a home for sailor's daughters in the area in 1869
Prince Consort Road Westminster Albert, Prince Consort Part of Albertopolis
Prince Henry Road Greenwich Henry Frederick, Prince of Wales The road was built on the estate of Charlton House, whose original owner, Adam Newton, was the Prince's tutor.
Prince Imperial Road Bromley Napoléon, Prince Imperial Lived in exile at nearby Camden Place from 1871 until his death in 1879.
Prince of Wales Passage – after the Royal family [Regent’s Park]
Prince Regent Mews – after the Prince Regent, later George IV, by association with Regent’s Park [Regent’s Park]
Prince’s Street – named in reference to the adjacent King and Queen Streets [City of London]
Princes Arcade – built 1929-33, named after the former Prince’s Hotel, which stood here [St James's]Bush Lane – thought to be after a former inn of this name [City of London]
Princes Street – named in a generic sense in honour of the then reigning House of Hanover [Mayfair]
Princeton Street – formerly ‘Prince Street’, though after which prince exactly is unknown. It was changed so as to avoid confusion with other Prince Streets. [Holborn]
Printer Street – after the printing industry which formerly flourished here [City of London]
Printers Inn Court – after the printing industry which formerly flourished here [City of London]
Prioress Street – after the character of the prioress in Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, by reference to the adjacent Pilgrimage Street [Southwark]
Procter Street – after the 19th century poet Bryan Waller Procter, who lived at Red Lion Square [Holborn]
public square. In the twelfth century, standing on the corner of Lombard street, was the house of the Earl of Ferrers, where his brother was murdered, and his body thrown onto the street.
Pudding Lane – from the former term ‘pudding’ meaning animals' entrails, which were dumped here in Medieval times by local butchers; it was formerly Rothersgate, after a watergate located here [City of London]
Puddle Dock – thought to be either descriptive (after the water here), or named for a local wharf owner of this name [City of London]
Pump Court – after a former pump located here [City of London]
Purchese Street – after Frederick Purchese, local resident, vestryman, county council member and Mayor of St Pancras [Somers Town]
Purser's Cross SW6 - On the 7 August 1738, a highwayman having commited several robberies on Finchley Common, was pursued to London. He thought he was safe in a public house in Burlington Gardens, (near Piccadilly) though it was not long before he was pursued again. He escaped by horse and rode through Hyde Park where gentlemans' servants who were airing their horses gave chase, and persued him to Fulham Fields, where the Highwayman having no escape, threw money to the peasants at work in the fields, and told them 'they would soon witness the end of an unfortunate man'. He pulled out his pistol, clapped it to his ear, and shot himself. He was buried at the cross road with a stake through him, it was never discovered who he was.
Pye Street SW1 - Derives its name from Sir Robert Pye, member for Westminster in the time of Charles I.
Quality Court – a descriptive name, as it was superior when built compared with the surrounding streets [City of London]
Quebec Mews, New Quebec Street and Old Quebec Street – after the former Quebec Chapel on this site, named after the Battle of Quebec, built 1787 demolished in 1912 [Marylebone]
Queen Anne Mews and Queen Anne Street – after Queen Anne; it was originally meant to lead to a square called Queen Anne Square, however this was never completed [Marylebone]
Queen Anne’s Walk – after Queen Anne, reigning monarch when the square was laid out [Bloomsbury]
Queen Anne's Gate Westminster Queen Anne Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland from 1702, and after the Act of Union, Queen of Great Britain until 1714
Queen Caroline Street Hammersmith and Fulham Caroline of Brunswick Wife of George IV, who lived and died in nearby Brandenburg House
Queen Elizabeth Road Kingston upon Thames Queen Elizabeth I The queen founded Kingston Grammar School at Lovekyn Chapel, which is at the south end of the street (the school's main buildings are opposite)
Queen Elizabeth's Walk Hackney Queen Elizabeth I The queen's friend, Robert Dudley, 1st Earl of Leicester, lived in Stoke Newington.
Queen Square – after Queen Anne, reigning monarch when the square was laid out [Bloomsbury]
Queen Square Place – after Queen Anne, reigning monarch when the square was laid out [Bloomsbury]
Queen Street – named in honour of Catherine of Braganza, wife of Charles II [City of London]
Queen Street – when it was built in 1735 there was no reigning queen, so to which queen it refers, if any, is unknown [Mayfair]
Queen Street Place – named in honour of Catherine of Braganza, wife of Charles II [City of London]
Queen Victoria Street – built in 1871 and named for the then reigning monarch [City of London]
Queen’s Walk – after Caroline of Ansbach, wife of George II, who took a strong interest in the Royal Parks [St James's]
Queenhithe – formerly Ethelredshythe, after its founder King Æthelred the Unready, and hythe meaning a wharf/landing place; it was renamed after its later owner Matilda of Scotland, wife of Henry I [City of London]
Queens Avenue Hounslow Elizabeth I of England. Elizabeth spent part of her childhood at Hanworth Manor close nearby and sometimes stayed there during her reign.
Queens Head Passage – after a former house here called the Queens Head, demolished 1829 [City of London]
Queen's Head Yard – after a former grammar school here named for Queen Elizabeth I [Southwark]
Queensway Westminster Queen Victoria named Queen's Road in honour of Victoria, who had been born at nearby Kensington Palace. Later renamed.
Quick Street N1 - Recalls the favourite comedian of King George III John Quick.
Quilp Street – after Daniel Quilp, a character in the novel The Old Curiosity Shop by Charles Dickens, by association with Dickens Square [Southwark]
Radnor Street – after the Earls of Radnor, who governed the French Hospital that was formerly here [Finsbury]
Ramillies Place – after the British victory at the Battle of Ramillies in Ramillies, Belgium [Soho]
Ramillies Street – after the British victory at the Battle of Ramillies in Ramillies, Belgium [Soho]
Rampayne Street – after Charles Rampanyne, who in 1705 left funds in his will for the children of the nearby Grey Coat Hospital [Victoria]
Ranelagh Grove – after Richard Jones, 1st Earl of Ranelagh who owned a house near here in the late 17th century [Belgravia]
Ranelagh Road – as it led to the former New Ranelagh Tea Gardens on the Thames, named in imitation of the popular Ranelagh Gardens in Chelsea, which were named for Richard Jones, 1st Earl of Ranelagh [Victoria]
Rangoon Street – after the former warehouses here of the East India Company, Burma then been part of British India [City of London]
Ranston Street – for the Baker family, assistants of local landowners the Portmans, who owned land in Ranston, Dorset [Lisson Grove]
Rathbone Place and Rathbone Street – after Thomas Rathbone, local 18th century builder [Fitzrovia]
Rathbone Place Camden Captain Rathbone One Captain Rathbone was the builder of the road and properties thereon, from about 1718
Ravensdon Street – unknown; formerly Queen's Row [Lambeth]
Rawstorne Place – after local 18th century bricklayer Thomas Rawstorne [Clerkenwell]
Rawstorne Street – after local 18th century bricklayer Thomas Rawstorne [Clerkenwell]
Ray Street – corruption of ‘Rag’, after the former local rag trade here; the streets was formerly two different streets – Hockley in the Hole and Town’s End Lane [Clerkenwell]
Ray Street Bridge – corruption of ‘Rag’, after the former local rag trade here; the streets was formerly two different streets – Hockley in the Hole and Town’s End Lane [Clerkenwell]
Raymond Buildings – after Lord Chief Justice Raymond, who was called to the bar at Gray's Inn in 1697 [Holborn]
reat Pulteney Street – after Sir William Pulteney, who built the street in 1719-20; the ‘great’ prefix was to distinguish it from Little Pulteney Street, now the eastern end of Brewer Street [Soho]
Red Lion Court – after a former inn of this name [City of London]
Red Lion Square WC1 - Formerly known as Red Lion Fields where in the early 17th century stood the Red Lion Inn, and it was here that Cromwell's body was dragged and rested at the Inn. It is said his decapitated head was buried somewhere under the present day square.
Red Lion Street – from the 17th century Red Lion Inn, now demolished [Holborn]
Red Place – coined in Victorian times after the colour of the local buildings [Mayfair]
Redcross Way – after either the Redcross burial ground formerly located here or an inn of this name [Southwark]
Reeves Mews – after Spelsant Reeves, local leaseholder in the 18th century [Mayfair]
Regency Place – as it was opened by George, Prince Regent (later King George IV) in 1811 [Westminster]
Regency Street – as it was opened by George, Prince Regent (later King George IV) in 1811 [Westminster]
Regent Place – made in the 1810s by John Nash and named after the Prince Regent, later George IV [Soho]
Regent Square – after the Prince Regent, later George IV; the square dates to after the Regency ended, however the name has already been chosen years before [Bloomsbury]
Regent Street Westminster King George IV Named c. 1811, when George IV was Prince Regent. Made in the 1810s by John Nash.
Remnant Street – after James Farquharson Remnant, 1st Baron Remnant, lawyer at Lincoln’s Inn and latter MP for Holborn [Holborn]
Rennie Street – after John Rennie the Elder, prominent 18th century engineer, who designed Waterloo Bridge and Southwark Bridge [Waterloo]
Rex Place – formerly King’s Mews, it was renamed after the Latin term for ‘king’ [Mayfair]
Richbell Place – after its 18th century builder, John Richbell [Bloomsbury]
Richmond Buildings – after Thomas Richmond, local carpenter in the 18th century [Soho]
Richmond Mews – after Thomas Richmond, local carpenter in the 18th century [Soho]
Richmond Terrace – after a house owned by the dukes of Richmond which formerly stood on this site in the 17th and 18th centuries [Westminster]
Ridgmount Gardens – after Ridgmont, Bedfordshire, where the dukes of Bedford also owned land [Bloomsbury]
Ridgmount Place – after Ridgmont, Bedfordshire, where the dukes of Bedford also owned land [Bloomsbury]
Ridgmount Street – after Ridgmont, Bedfordshire, where the dukes of Bedford also owned land [Bloomsbury]
Riding House Street – for a local riding school; it was formerly Riding House Lane [Fitzrovia]
Riding House Street – unknown, presumably for a local riding school; it was formerly Riding House Lane [Marylebone]
Rising Sun Court – after the adjacent pub of this name [City of London]
River Passage – after the nearby New River [Clerkenwell]
River Street – after the nearby New River [Clerkenwell]
River Street Mews – after the nearby New River [Clerkenwell]
Robert Adam Street – after Robert Adam, 18th century architect; originally it was just Adams Street, after 18th century developer Samuel Adams [Marylebone]
Robert Close Westminster Robert Browning Poet who lived in Little Venice, near the site of the road.
Robert Street – after Robert Adam, who built the Adelphi development with his brother John in the 1760s [Strand]
Roberts Mews - after Robert Grosvenor, 1st Marquess of Westminster, of the local landowning family the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave) [Belgravia]
Robert's Place – probably after Richard Roberts, who built much of the local area in the 1800s [Clerkenwell]
Robin Hood Court – thought to be after a former inn of this name [City of London]
Rochester Row SW1 - In 1666 the Bishop of Rochester had a house here.
Rochester Street – after the Diocese of Rochester, where the deans of Westminster were bishops from 1663 – 1802 [Westminster]
Rochester Walk – after a former house here owned by the bishops of Rochester [Southwark]
Roger Street – renamed in 1937 from ‘Henry Street’, after local landowner Henry Doughty [Bloomsbury]
Rolls Buildings and Rolls Passage – the former site of a house containing the rolls of Chancery [City of London]
Romilly Street W1 - A small side turning that runs behined Shaftesbury Avenue and takes its name from the lawyer Samuel Romilly, who was successful in campaigning to abolish the death penalty for petty crimes such as theft during 1810. He was born nearby [Soho]
Romney Road Greenwich Henry Sydney, 1st Earl of Romney Built the road in about 1695, when Chief Ranger of Greenwich Park, to restore communication between Greenwich and Woolwich
Romney Street – after Robert, Baron Romney, son of local landowner Sir Robert Marsham [Westminster]
Rood Lane – after a former rood (cross) set up at St Margaret Pattens in the early 16th century; it became an object of veneration and offering, which helped pay for the repair of the church, but was torn down in 1558 as an item of excessive superstition [City of London]
Ropemaker Street – descriptive, after the rope making trade formerly located here [City of London]
Ropemaker Street – descriptive, after the rope making trade formerly located here [Finsbury]
Roscoe Street – thought to be named after a trustee of the Peabody Donation Fund, who redeveloped this former slum area in the 1880s [Finsbury]
Rose Alley – after a former inn of this name [City of London]
Rose Alley – after the Tudor-era Rose Theatre [Southwark]
Rose and Crown Yard – unknown, probably after a former inn of this name [St James's]
Rose Street – after a former tavern of this name here; it was formerly Dicer Lane, possibly after either a dice maker here, or a corruption of ‘ditcher’ [City of London]
Rosebery Avenue Islington Archibald Primrose, 5th Earl of Rosebery, 19th century Prime Minister; First Chairman of the London County Council, who opened the road in 1892 [Clerkenwell]
Rosebery Square – after Archibald Primrose, 5th Earl of Rosebery, 19th century Prime Minister; he was chairman of the London County Council when this street was built in 1889 [Clerkenwell]
Rosoman Place – after Thomas Rosoman, first manager of the nearby Sadler’s Wells Theatre in the 18th century [Clerkenwell]
Rossmore Close and Rossmore Road – this land was formerly owned by the Portman estate; they owned a property called Rossmore [Lisson Grove]
Rotten Row SW1 - A corruption of route du roi.
Roupell Street – after local 19th century property owner John Roupell [Waterloo]
Roy Grove and Cannon Close Richmond upon Thames Major-General William Roy One of Roy's two cannons he used to map Middlesex is in the road in Hampton Hill.
Royal Arcade – after Queen Victoria, who visited this arcade [Mayfair]
Royal Exchange Avenue and Royal Exchange Buildings – after the adjacent Royal Exchange [City of London]
Royal Opera Arcade – originally part of an opera house theatre, built by John Nash [St James's]
Royal Street – after the former Royal George pub here [Lambeth]
Royalty Mews – after the former New Royalty Theatre on this site, demolished in the 1950s [Soho]
Rugby Street – after Rugby School; its founder Lawrence Sheriff gave land here in 1567 as an endowment [Bloomsbury]
Rupert Court – after Prince Rupert of the Rhine, noted 17th century general and son of Elizabeth Stuart, daughter of King James I; he was First Lord of the Admiralty when this street was built in 1676 [Chinatown]
Rupert Street – after Prince Rupert of the Rhine, noted 17th century general and son of Elizabeth Stuart, daughter of King James I; he was First Lord of the Admiralty when this street was built in 1676 [Chinatown]
Rushworth Street – after 17th century politician John Rushworth, who was imprisoned for a period at the nearby King’s Bench Prison [Southwark]
Russell Court – after the Russell family, who lived here in the 1600s [St James's]
Russell Square Camden Dukes of Bedford Family name of the Dukes of Bedford who owned the land
Russell Street – after Francis Russell, 4th Earl of Bedford, local landowners in the 17th century [Covent Garden]
Russia Row – possibly to commemorate Russia's entry into the Napoleonic wars [City of London]
Rutherford Street – after Reverend William Rutherford, Headmaster of Westminster School 1883-1901 [Westminster]
Rutland Gate SW1 - Takes its name from the Duke of Rutland.
Rutland Place – after the Manners family, earls of Rutland, local property owners of the 17th century [Farringdon]
Ryder Court - after Richard Rider, Master Carpenter to Charles II [St James's]
Ryder Street - after Richard Rider, Master Carpenter to Charles II [St James's]
Ryder Yard - after Richard Rider, Master Carpenter to Charles II [St James's]


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



Some street name derivations – The Underground Map   

Wordpress comment (July 23, 2021)
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Comment
Pauline jones   
Added: 16 Oct 2017 19:04 GMT   

Bessborough Place, SW1V
I grew up in bessborough place at the back of our house and Grosvenor road and bessborough gardens was a fantastic playground called trinity mews it had a paddling pool sandpit football area and various things to climb on, such as a train , slide also as Wendy house. There were plants surrounding this wonderful play area, two playground attendants ,also a shelter for when it rained. The children were constantly told off by the playground keepers for touching the plants or kicking the ball out of the permitted area, there was hopscotch as well, all these play items were brick apart from the slide. Pollock was the centre of my universe and I felt sorry and still do for anyone not being born there. To this day I miss it and constantly look for images of the streets around there, my sister and me often go back to take a clumped of our beloved London. The stucco houses were a feature and the backs of the houses enabled parents to see thier children playing.

Reply
Lived here
   
Added: 1 May 2021 16:46 GMT   

Cheyne Place, SW3
Frances Faviell, author of the Blitz memoir, "A Chelsea Concerto", lived at 33, Cheyne Place, which was destroyed by a bomb. She survived, with her husband and unborn baby.

Reply
Born here
www.violettrefusis.com   
Added: 17 Feb 2021 15:05 GMT   

Birth place
Violet Trefusis, writer, cosmopolitan intellectual and patron of the Arts was born at 2 Wilton Crescent SW1X.

Source: www.violettrefusis.com

Reply
Comment
Peter H Davies   
Added: 17 Jun 2021 09:33 GMT   

Ethelburga Estate
The Ethelburga Estate - named after Ethelburga Road - was an LCC development dating between 1963–65. According to the Wikipedia, it has a "pleasant knitting together of a series of internal squares". I have to add that it’s extremely dull :)

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Reply
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

Reply
Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 09:12 GMT   

Dunloe Avenue, N17
I was born in 1951,my grandparents lived at 5 Dunloe Avenue.I had photos of the coronation decorations in the area for 1953.The houses were rented out by Rowleys,their ’workers yard’ was at the top of Dunloe Avenue.The house was fairly big 3 bedroom with bath and toilet upstairs,and kitchenette downstairs -a fairly big garden.My Grandmother died 1980 and the house was taken back to be rented again

Reply
Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 08:59 GMT   

Spigurnell Road, N17
I was born and lived in Spigurnell Road no 32 from 1951.My father George lived in Spigurnell Road from 1930’s.When he died in’76 we moved to number 3 until I got married in 1982 and moved to Edmonton.Spigurnell Road was a great place to live.Number 32 was 2 up 2 down toilet out the back council house in those days

Reply
Comment
Lewis   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 20:48 GMT   

Ploy
Allotment

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 14:31 GMT   

correction
Chaucer did not write Pilgrims Progress. His stories were called the Canterbury Tales

Reply
Comment
old lady   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 11:58 GMT   

mis information
Cheltenham road was originally
Hall road not Hill rd
original street name printed on house still standing

Reply
Comment
Patricia Bridges   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 10:57 GMT   

Lancefield Coachworks
My grandfather Tom Murray worked here

Reply
Lived here
Former Philbeach Gardens Resident   
Added: 14 Jul 2021 00:44 GMT   

Philbeach Gardens Resident (Al Stewart)
Al Stewart, who had huts in the 70s with the sings ’Year of the Cat’ and ’On The Borders’, lived in Philbeach Gdns for a while and referenced Earl’s Court in a couple of his songs.
I lived in Philbeach Gardens from a child until my late teens. For a few years, on one evening in the midst of Summer, you could hear Al Stewart songs ringing out across Philbeach Gardens, particularly from his album ’Time Passages". I don’t think Al was living there at the time but perhaps he came back to see some pals. Or perhaps the broadcasters were just his fans,like me.
Either way, it was a wonderful treat to hear!

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Blandel Bridge The bridge over the Westbourne at Sloane Square was called Blandel Bridge and was later renamed Grosvenor Bridge.
Ebury Farm Ebury Farm was a simple marshy farm whose lands later became the richest real estate in London.
Orange Square, SW1W Orange Square is a small open area in Belgravia.
Sloane Square Sloane Square station was opened on 24 December 1868 by the Metropolitan District Railway when the company opened the first section of its line.
Victoria Bus Station Victoria bus station is a bus station outside Victoria Station in Terminus Place.
Victoria Coach Station Victoria Coach Station is the largest coach station in London.

NEARBY STREETS
Alderney Street, SW1V Alderney Street was originally Stanley Street, after George Stanley, local landowner.
Avery Farm Row, SW1W Avery Farm Row - after a former farm here of this name, ’Avery’ being a corruption of ’Ebury’.
Belgrave Cottages, SW1W Belgrave Cottages were situated behind Whittaker Street.
Bloomfield Terrace, SW1W Bloomfield Terrace is a road in the SW1W postcode area
Boscobel Place, SW1W Boscobel Place’s name is derived from the story of Charles II.
Bourne Street, SW1W Bourne Street is lined with what were once artisans’ dwellings.
Bridge Place, SW1V Bridge Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Buckingham Palace Road, SW1W Buckingham Palace Road runs from the south side of Buckingham Palace towards Chelsea.
Buckingham Palace, SW1W Buckingham Palace is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Buckland House, SW1V Residential block
Bulleid Way, SW1V Bulleid Way is a road in the SW1W postcode area
Bunhouse Place, SW1W Bunhouse Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Burton Mews, SW1W Burton Mews is a road in the SW1W postcode area
Cadogan Gate S.W 1, SW1X This is a street in the SW1X postcode area
Cadogan Lane, SW1X Cadogan Lane is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Cadogan Place, SW1X Cadogan Place was named after Earl Cadogan and runs parallel to the lower half of Sloane Street.
Cambridge Street, SW1V Cambridge Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Cavalry Square, SW1W Cavalry Square is a road in the SW1W postcode area
Cavalry Square, SW3 Cavalry Square is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Chesham Street, SW1X Chesham Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Chester Row, SW1W Chester Row with its tall stucco houses lies at the heart of the district of Belgravia.
Chester Square Mews, SW1W Chester Square Mews is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Chester Square, SW1W Chester Square was voted London’s second best house address early in the 2000s. Nearby Eaton Square was voted first.
Cheylesmore House, SW1W Residential block
Cliveden Place, SW1W Cliveden Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Colonnade Walk, SW1W Colonnade Walk is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Conduit Street, SW1W Conduit Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1Wpostal area.
Duke of York Square, SW1W Duke of York Square is a road in the SW1W postcode area
East Concourse, SW1V East Concourse is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Eaton Close, SW1W Eaton Close is a road in the SW1W postcode area
Eaton Gate, SW1W Eaton Gate is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Eaton Mews North, SW1W Eaton Mews North is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Eaton Mews South, SW1W Eaton Mews South is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Eaton Mews West, SW1W Eaton Mews West is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Eaton Place, SW1X Eaton Place was developed by Thomas Cubitt between 1826 and 1845.
Eaton Square, SW1W Eaton Square is one of the jewels in Belgravia’s crown.
Eaton Terrace, SW1W Eaton Terrace is a street of elegant five and six storey terraced houses.
Ebury Bridge Road, SW1W Ebury Bridge Road used to lead to Ebury Bridge which spanned the Grosvenor Canal.
Ebury Bridge, SW1V Ebury Bridge is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Ebury Bridge, SW1W Ebury Bridge is a road in the SW1W postcode area
Ebury Mews, SW1W Ebury Mews is a road in the SW1W postcode area
Ebury Square, SW1W In contrast with much of Belgravia’s planned building, Edbury Square developed as a result of London’s natural expansion.
Ebury Street, SW1W Ebury Street runs from the Grosvenor Gardens junction south-westwards to Pimlico Road.
Eccleston Bridge, SW1W Eccleston Bridge derives its name from Eccleston in Cheshire, where the Grosvenor family own property.
Eccleston Place, SW1W Eccleston Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Eccleston Square, SW1V Eccleston Square is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Eccleston Street, SW1W Eccleston Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Eccleston Yard, SW1W Eccleston Yard is a location in London.
Elizabeth Bridge, SW1V Elizabeth Bridge is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Elizabeth Street, SW1W Elizabeth Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Ellis Street, SW1X Ellis Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Fountain Square, SW1W Fountain Square is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Franklins Row, SW3 Franklins Row is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Garrison Square, SW1W Garrison Square is a location in London.
Graham Terrace, SW1W Graham Terrace is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Grosvenor Cottages, SW1W Grosvenor Cottages is a road in the SW1W postcode area
Holbein Mews, SW1W Holbein Mews is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Holbein Place, SW1W Holbein Place links Sloane Square and Pimlico Road.
Hugh Street, SW1V Hugh Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Kings Road, SW1W Kings Road is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Lower Belgrave Street, SW1W Lower Belgrave Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Lower Sloane Street, SW1W Lower Sloane Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Lyall Mews West, SW1X Lyall Mews West is a road in the SW1X postcode area
Main Concourse, SW1V Main Concourse is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Mozart Terrace, SW1W Mozart Terrace is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Mulberry Square, SW1W Mulberry Square is a location in London.
Ollin Street, SW1W Ollin Street is a road in the E14 postcode area
Ormonde Place, SW1W Ormonde Place is a road in the SW1W postcode area
Passmore Street, SW1W Passmore Street, formerly Union Street, contains a social mix.
Phipps Mews, SW1W Phipps Mews is a road in the SW1W postcode area
Pimilco Walk, SW1W Pimilco Walk is a road in the N1 postcode area
Pimlico Road, SW1W Pimlico Road is a combination of roads formerly called Grosvenor Row and Queen Street.
Ranelagh Grove, SW1W Ranelagh Grove was formerly called Wilderness Row and Ranelagh Walk.
Sedding Street, SW1W Sedding Street is a road in the SW1W postcode area
Semley Place, SW1W Semley Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Silverdale Industrial Estate, SW1W A street within the SW1W postcode
Skinner Place, SW1W Skinner Place first appears on 1840 mapping.
Sloane Court East, SW1W Sloane Court East is a road in the SW1W postcode area
Sloane Court West, SW3 This is a street in the SW3 postcode area
Sloane Gardens, SW1W Sloane Gardens is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Sloane Square House, SW1W Residential block
Sloane Square, SW1W Sloane Square forms a boundary between the two largest aristocratic estates in London, the Grosvenor Estate and the Cadogan.
Sloane Terrace, SW1X Sloane Terrace is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
South Eaton Place, SW1W South Eaton Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
St Barnabas Mews, SW1W St Barnabas Mews is a road in the SW1W postcode area
St Barnabas Street, SW1W St Barnabas Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
St Georges Row, SW1V St Georges Row was built as Monster Row circa 1785, and renamed in 1833.
Sutherland Street, SW1V Sutherland Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Terminus Place, SW1 Terminus Place is the home of Victoria Bus Station.
Terminus Place, SW1 Terminus Place is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Terminus Place, SW1W Terminus Place is a road in the SW1W postcode area
Tintern House, SW1V Residential block
Turks Row, SW3 Turks Row is a location in London.
Victoria Place, SW1W Victoria Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Victoria Subway, SW1V Victoria Subway is a road in the SW1X postcode area
Walden House, SW1W Residential block
West Eaton Place Mews, SW1X West Eaton Place Mews is a road in the SW1X postcode area
West Eaton Place, SW1X West Eaton Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Whistler Square, SW1W Whistler Square is a location in London.
Whittaker Street, SW1W Whittaker Street is a road in the SW1W postcode area
Wilbraham Place, SW1X Wilbraham Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1X postal area.
Winchester Street, SW1V Winchester Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.

NEARBY PUBS
Antelope This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Rose and Crown This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Taste Wine 4 LTD This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Belgravia

Belgravia is an affluent area of Westminster, north of Victoria Station.

Belgravia - known as Five Fields during the Middle Ages - was developed in the early 19th century by Richard Grosvenor, 2nd Marquess of Westminster.

The area had begun to be built up after George III moved to Buckingham House (now Buckingham Palace) and constructed a row of houses on what is now Grosvenor Place. In the 1820s, Richard Grosvenor asked Thomas Cubitt to design numerous grand terraces centred on squares. Most of Belgravia was constructed over the next 30 years.

Belgravia has many grand terraces of white stucco houses, and is focused on two squares: Belgrave Square and Eaton Square.

Much of Belgravia is still owned by the Duke of Westminster’s Grosvenor Group.


LOCAL PHOTOS
The 52 bus
TUM image id: 1556876554
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Boscobel Oaks, 1804
TUM image id: 1487173198
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Belgrave Square
Credit: Thomas Shepherd
TUM image id: 1586353394
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Grosvenor Gardens Mews East
TUM image id: 1544975168
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Lowndes Street, c. 1905.
TUM image id: 1483984242
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Edbury Square, c. 1906.
TUM image id: 1483984627
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Royal Hospital, Chelsea
TUM image id: 1524258791
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Boscobel Place
TUM image id: 1546446783
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Boscobel Oaks, 1804
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Belgrave Square
Credit: Thomas Shepherd
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Letter to Chuck Berry from Carl Sagan
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Eaton Square
Credit: GoArt/The Underground Map
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Grosvenor Gardens Mews East
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Lowndes Street, c. 1905.
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Edbury Square, c. 1906.
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Boscobel Place
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The Monster Tea Gardens (1820)
Credit: Old and New London
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Orange Square
Credit: GoArt/The Underground Map
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