Furze Street, E3

An area which may have existed since the nineteenth century or before with housing mainly dating from the 2010s

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(51.51808 -0.02173, 51.518 -0.021) 
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Road · Bow · E3 ·
JANUARY
1
2000

Furze Street is one of the streets of London in the E3 postal area.





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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

Born here
colin Passfield   
Added: 1 Jan 2021 15:28 GMT   

Dora Street, E14
My grandmother was born in 1904 at 34 Dora Street

Reply
Lived here
   
Added: 16 Feb 2021 13:41 GMT   

Giraud Street
I lived in Giraud St in 1938/1939. I lived with my Mother May Lillian Allen & my brother James Allen (Known as Lenny) My name is Tom Allen and was evacuated to Surrey from Giraud St. I am now 90 years of age.

Reply
Lived here
Kim Johnson   
Added: 24 Jun 2021 19:17 GMT   

Limehouse Causeway (1908)
My great grandparents were the first to live in 15 Tomlins Terrace, then my grandparents and parents after marriage. I spent the first two years of my life there. My nan and her family lived at number 13 Tomlins Terrace. My maternal grandmother lived in Maroon house, Blount Street with my uncle. Nan, my mum and her brothers were bombed out three times during the war.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 13 Jan 2021 13:11 GMT   

Zealand Rd E3 used to be called Auckland Road
Zealand Road E3 used to be called Auckland Road. I seen it on a Philips ABC of London dated about 1925. There is a coalhole cover in nearby Driffield R oad showing a suppliers address in Auckland Road.

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Comment
   
Added: 31 Oct 2022 18:47 GMT   

Memories
I lived at 7 Conder Street in a prefab from roughly 1965 to 1971 approx - happy memories- sad to see it is no more ?

Reply

LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
danny currie   
Added: 30 Nov 2022 18:39 GMT   

dads yard
ron currie had a car breaking yard in millers yard back in the 60s good old days

Reply

Lynette beardwood   
Added: 29 Nov 2022 20:53 GMT   

Spy’s Club
Topham’s Hotel at 24-28 Ebury Street was called the Ebury Court Hotel. Its first proprietor was a Mrs Topham. In WW2 it was a favourite watering hole for the various intelligence organisations based in the Pimlico area. The first woman infiltrated into France in 1942, FANY Yvonne Rudellat, was recruited by the Special Operations Executive while working there. She died in Bergen Belsen in April 1945.

Reply
Born here
   
Added: 16 Nov 2022 12:39 GMT   

The Pearce family lived in Gardnor Road
The Pearce family moved into Gardnor Road around 1900 after living in Fairfax walk, my Great grandfather, wife and there children are recorded living in number 4 Gardnor road in the 1911 census, yet I have been told my grand father was born in number 4 in 1902, generations of the Pearce continue living in number 4 as well other houses in the road up until the 1980’s

Reply
Born here
   
Added: 16 Nov 2022 12:38 GMT   

The Pearce family lived in Gardnor Road
The Pearce family moved into Gardnor Road around 1900 after living in Fairfax walk, my Great grandfather, wife and there children are recorded living in number 4 Gardnor road in the 1911 census, yet I have been told my grand father was born in number 4 in 1902, generations of the Pearce continue living in number 4 as well other houses in the road up until the 1980’s

Reply
Lived here
Phil Stubbington   
Added: 14 Nov 2022 16:28 GMT   

Numbers 60 to 70 (1901 - 1939)
A builder, Robert Maeers (1842-1919), applied to build six houses on plots 134 to 139 on the Lincoln House Estate on 5 October 1901. He received approval on 8 October 1901. These would become numbers 60 to 70 Rodenhurst Road (60 is plot 139). Robert Maeers was born in Northleigh, Devon. In 1901 he was living in 118 Elms Road with his wife Georgina, nee Bagwell. They had four children, Allan, Edwin, Alice, and Harriet, born between 1863 and 1873.
Alice Maeers was married to John Rawlins. Harriet Maeers was married to William Street.
Three of the six houses first appear on the electoral register in 1904:
Daniel Mescal “Ferncroft”
William Francis Street “Hillsboro”
Henry Elkin “Montrose”

By the 1905 electoral register all six are occupied:

Daniel Mescal “St Senans”
Henry Robert Honeywood “Grasmere”
John Rawlins “Iveydene”
William Francis Street “Hillsboro”
Walter Ernest Manning “St Hilda”
Henry Elkin “Montrose”

By 1906 house numbers replace names:

Daniel Mescal 70
Henry Robert Honeywood 68
John Rawlins 66
William Francis Street 64
Walter Ernest Manning 62
Henry Elkin 60

It’s not clear whether number 70 changed from “Ferncroft” to “St Senans” or possibly Daniel Mescal moved houses.

In any event, it can be seen that Robert Maeers’ two daughters are living in numbers 64 and 66, with, according to local information, an interconnecting door. In the 1911 census William Street is shown as a banker’s clerk. John Rawlins is a chartering clerk in shipping. Robert Maeers and his wife are also living at this address, Robert being shown as a retired builder.

By 1939 all the houses are in different ownership except number 60, where the Elkins are still in residence.


Reply
Comment
stephen garraway   
Added: 13 Nov 2022 13:56 GMT   

Martin Street, Latimer Road
I was born at St Charlottes and lived at 14, Martin Street, Latimer Road W10 until I was 4 years old when we moved to the east end. It was my Nan Grant’s House and she was the widow of George Frederick Grant. She had two sons, George and Frederick, and one daughter, my mother Margaret Patricia.
The downstairs flat where we lived had two floors, the basement and the ground floor. The upper two floors were rented to a Scot and his family, the Smiths. He had red hair. The lights and cooker were gas and there was one cold tap over a Belfast sink. A tin bath hung on the wall. The toilet was outside in the yard. This was concreted over and faced the the rear of the opposite terraces. All the yards were segregated by high brick walls. The basement had the a "best" room with a large , dark fireplace with two painted metal Alsation ornaments and it was very dark, cold and little used.
The street lights were gas and a man came round twice daily to turn them on and off using a large pole with a hook and a lighted torch on the end. I remember men coming round the streets with carts selling hot chestnuts and muffins and also the hurdy gurdy man with his instrument and a monkey in a red jacket. I also remember the first time I saw a black man and my mother pulling me away from him. He had a Trilby and pale Mackintosh so he must of been one of the first of the Windrush people. I seem to recall he had a thin moustache.
Uncle George had a small delivery lorry but mum lost touch with him and his family. Uncle Fred went to Peabody Buildings near ST.Pauls.
My Nan was moved to a maisonette in White City around 1966, and couldn’t cope with electric lights, cookers and heating and she lost all of her neighbourhood friends. Within six months she had extreme dementia and died in a horrible ward in Tooting Bec hospital a year or so later. An awful way to end her life, being moved out of her lifelong neighbourhood even though it was slums.

Reply

Eve Glover   
Added: 22 Oct 2022 09:28 GMT   

Shenley Road
Shenley Road is the main street in Borehamwood where the Job Centre and Blue Arrow were located

Reply
Comment
Richard Lake   
Added: 28 Sep 2022 09:37 GMT   

Trade Union Official
John William Lake snr moved with his family to 22 De Laune Street in 1936. He was the London Branch Secretary for the Street Masons, Paviours and Road Makers Union. He had previously lived in Orange St now Copperfield St Southwark but had been forced to move because the landlord didn’t like him working from home and said it broke his lease.
John William snr died in 1940. His son John William Lake jnr also became a stone mason and at the end of World War two he was responsible for the engraving of the dates of WW2 onto the Cenotaph in Whitehall.

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Langdon Park Langdon Park is a DLR station in Poplar which opened in 2007.

NEARBY STREETS
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Brabazon Street, E14 Brabazon Street is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
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Brushwood Close, E14 A street within the E14 postcode
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Ellesmere Street, E14 Ellesmere Street is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
Equinox Square, E14 A street within the E14 postcode
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Fern Street, E3 Fern Street is one of the streets of London in the E3 postal area.
Frances Wharf, E14 A street within the E14 postcode
Gale Street, E3 Gale Street is a road in the E3 postcode area
Giraud Street, E14 Giraud Street nowadays is a short road running north from Cordelia Street.
Glaucus Street, E3 Glaucus Street is a road in the E3 postcode area
Godalming Road, E14 Godalming Road is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
Guthridge Close, Guthridge Close lies within the postcode.
Hawgood Street, E14 Hawgood Street is one of the streets of London in the E3 postal area.
Hobday Street, E14 Hobday Street is a road in the E14 postcode area
Huddart Street, E3 Huddart Street is a road in the E3 postcode area
Kilner Street, E14 Kilner Street is a road in the E14 postcode area
Knapp Road, E3 Knapp Road is one of the streets of London in the E3 postal area.
Leopold Street, E3 Leopold Street is one of the streets of London in the E3 postal area.
Limehouse Cut, E14 Limehouse Cut is a named path following the canal of the same name.
Lockhart Street, E3 Lockhart Street is one of the streets of London in the E3 postal area.
Locksons Close, E14 A street within the E14 postcode
Maddams Street, E3 Maddams Street is a road in the E3 postcode area
Madeira Street, E14 Madeira Street is a location in London.
Masjid Lane, E14 Masjid Lane is a road in the E14 postcode area
Medina Place, E14 Medina Place is a location in London.
Metropolitan Close, E14 A street within the E14 postcode
Morris Road, E14 Morris Road is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
Passfield Drive, E14 A street within the E14 postcode
Pioneer Close, E14 A street within the E14 postcode
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Radial Avenue, E14 Radial Avenue is a location in London.
Railway Arches, E3 Railway Arches is one of the streets of London in the E3 postal area.
Rifle Street, E14 Rifle Street dates from the early 1870s.
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Spanby Road, E3 Spanby Road is a road in the E3 postcode area
Spratt’s Complex, E14 Spratt’s Complex is a housing development in Poplar.
St Andrews Way, E3 St Andrews Way is one of the streets of London in the E3 postal area.
St Pauls Way, E14 St Paul’s Way is the western extension of Devons Road.
St. Gabriels Close, E14 St Gabriel Close lies off Morris Road.
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Thomas Road Industrial Estate, E14 The Thomas Road Industrial Estate is on Thomas Road.
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Warner Terrace, E14 Warner Terrace is a road in the E14 postcode area
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Weatherley Close, E3 Weatherley Close is one of the streets of London in the E3 postal area.
Wellington Street, E14 Wellington Street, later Woodin Street, disappeared from the map in the 1950s. .
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Yeo Street, E14 Yeo Street is one of the streets of London in the E3 postal area.


Click here to explore another London street
We now have 524 completed street histories and 46976 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS


Bow

Bow lies at the heart of London’s East End.

The area was formerly known as Stratford, and "Bow" is an abbreviation of the medieval name Stratford-atte-Bow, in which "Bow" refers to a bridge built in the early 12th century. Bow is adjacent to the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park and a section of the district is part of the park.

Old Ford, and with it Fish Island, are usually taken to be part of Bow, but Bromley-by-Bow (historically and officially just ’Bromley’) immediately to the south, is a separate locality. These distinctions have their roots in historic parish boundaries.

Stratforde was first recorded as a settlement in 1177. The ford originally lay on a pre-Roman trackway at Old Ford about 600 metres to the north, but when the Romans decided on Colchester as the initial capital for their occupation, the road was upgraded to run from the area of London Bridge, as one of the first paved Roman roads in Britain. The ’paved way’ is likely to refer to the presence of a stone causeway across the marshes, which formed a part of the crossing.

In 1110 Matilda, wife of Henry I, reputedly took a tumble at the ford on her way to Barking Abbey, and ordered a distinctively bow-shaped, three-arched bridge to be built over the River Lea, The like of which had not been seen before; the area became known variously as Stradford of the Bow, Stratford of the Bow, Stratford the Bow, Stratforde the Bowe, and Stratford-atte-Bow’ (at the Bow) which over time was shortened to Bow to distinguish it from Stratford Langthorne on the Essex bank of the Lea. Land and Abbey Mill were given to Barking Abbey for maintenance of the bridge, who also maintained a chapel on the bridge dedicated to St Katherine, occupied until the 15th century by a hermit. This endowment was later administered by Stratford Langthorne Abbey. By 1549, this route had become known as The Kings Way.

Permission was given to build a chapel of ease to allow the residents a local place to worship. The land was granted by Edward III, on the King’s highway, thus beginning a tradition of island church building. In 1556, during the reign of Mary I of England and under the authority of Edmund Bonner, Bishop of London, many people were brought by cart from Newgate and burned at the stake in front of Bow Church, in one of the many swings of the English Reformation.

During the 17th century Bow and the Essex bank became a centre for the slaughter and butchery of cattle for the City market. This meant a ready supply of cattle bones, and local entrepreneurs Thomas Frye and Edward Heylyn developed a means to mix this with clay and create a form of fine porcelain, said to rival the best from abroad, known as Bow Porcelain.

The Bow China Works prospered, employing some 300 artists and hands, until about 1770, when one of its founders died. By 1776 all of its moulds and implements were transferred to a manufacturer in Derby. In 1867, during drainage operations at the match factory of Bell & Black at Bell Road, St. Leonard’s Street, the foundations of one of the kilns were discovered, with a large quantity of ’wasters’ and fragments of broken pottery. The houses close by were then called China Row, but now lie beneath modern housing. Chemical analysis of the firing remains showed them to contain high quantities of bone-ash, pre-dating the claim of Josiah Spode to have invented the bone china process.

In 1843 the engineer William Bridges Adams founded the Fairfield Locomotive Works, where he specialized in light engines, steam railcars (or railmotors) and inspection trolleys, including the Fairfield steam carriage for the Bristol and Exeter Railway and the Enfield for the Eastern Counties Railway. The business failed and the works closed circa 1872, later becoming the factory of Bryant and May.

Bow was the headquarters of the North London Railway, which opened its locomotive and carriage workshops in 1853. There were two stations, Old Ford and Bow. During World War 2 the North London Railway branch from Dalston to Poplar through Bow was so badly damaged that it was abandoned.

Bow station opened in 1850 and was rebuilt in 1870 in a grand style, designed by Edwin Henry Horne and featuring a concert hall that was 100 ft long (30 m) and 40 ft wide (12 m). This became The Bow and Bromley Institute, then in 1887 the East London Technical College and a Salvation Army hall in 1911. From the 1930s it was used as the Embassy Billiard Hall and after the war became the Bow Palais, but was demolished in 1956 after a fire.

The safety match industry became established in Bow. In 1888, a match girls’ strike occurred at the Bryant and May match factory in Fairfield Road. This was a forerunner of the suffragette movement fight for women’s rights and also the trade union movement. The factory was rebuilt in 1911 and the brick entrance includes a depiction of Noah’s Ark and the word ’Security’ used as a trademark on the matchboxes. Match production ceased in 1979 and the building is now private apartments known as the Bow Quarter.

Bow underwent extensive urban re-generation including the replacement or improvement of council homes, such redevelopment and rejuvenation coinciding with the staging of the 2012 Olympic Games at nearby Stratford.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Poplar Baths (2005)
Credit: Gordon Joly
TUM image id: 1582639714
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Pennyfields, Poplar (around 1900)
TUM image id: 1605021763
Licence: CC BY 2.0

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