Gambier House, EC1V

An area which may have existed since the nineteenth century or before with housing mainly dating from the 1960s

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Block · Clerkenwell · EC1V ·
JANUARY
1
2000

Gambier House is a block on Mora Street





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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


The Underground Map   
Added: 20 Sep 2020 13:01 GMT   

Pepys starts diary
On 1 January 1659, Samuel Pepys started his famous daily diary and maintained it for ten years. The diary has become perhaps the most extensive source of information on this critical period of English history. Pepys never considered that his diary would be read by others. The original diary consisted of six volumes written in Shelton shorthand, which he had learned as an undergraduate on scholarship at Magdalene College, Cambridge. This shorthand was introduced in 1626, and was the same system Isaac Newton used when writing.

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Lived here
Katharina Logan   
Added: 9 Aug 2022 19:01 GMT   

Ely place existed in name in 1857
On 7th July 1857 John James Chase and Mary Ann Weekes were married at St John the Baptist Hoxton, he of full age and she a minor. Both parties list their place of residence as Ely Place, yet according to other information, this street was not named until 1861. He was a bricklayer, she had no occupation listed, but both were literate and able to sign their names on their marriage certificate.

Source: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSF7-Q9Y7?cc=3734475

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Jeff Owen   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 16:18 GMT   

Owen’s School
Owen Street is the site of Owen’s Boys’ School. The last school was built in 1881 and was demolished in the early 1990s to make way for the development which stand there today. It was a “Direct Grant” grammar school and was founded in 1613 by Dame Alice Owen. What is now “Owen’s Fields” was the playground between the old school and the new girls’ school (known then as “Dames Alice Owen’s School” or simply “DAOS”). The boys’ school had the top two floors of that building for their science labs. The school moved to Potters Bar in Hertfordshire in 1971 and is now one of the top State comprehensive schools in the country. The old building remained in use as an accountancy college and taxi-drivers’ “knowledge” school until it was demolished. The new building is now part of City and Islington College. Owen’s was a fine school. I should know because I attended there from 1961 to 1968.

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Born here
Bernard Miller   
Added: 12 Apr 2022 17:36 GMT   

My mother and her sister were born at 9 Windsor Terrace
My mother, Millie Haring (later Miller) and her sister Yetta Haring (later Freedman) were born here in 1922 and 1923. With their parents and older brother and sister, they lived in two rooms until they moved to Stoke Newington in 1929. She always said there were six rooms, six families, a shared sink on the first floor landing and a toilet in the backyard.

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Born here
jack stevens   
Added: 26 Sep 2021 13:38 GMT   

Mothers birth place
Number 5 Whites Row which was built in around 1736 and still standing was the premises my now 93 year old mother was born in, her name at birth was Hilda Evelyne Shaw,

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Lived here
margaret clark   
Added: 15 Oct 2021 22:23 GMT   

Margaret’s address when she married in 1938
^, Josepine House, Stepney is the address of my mother on her marriage certificate 1938. Her name was Margaret Irene Clark. Her father Basil Clark was a warehouse grocer.

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Comment
   
Added: 6 Nov 2021 15:03 GMT   

Old Nichol Street, E2
Information about my grandfather’s tobacconist shop

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Barry J. Page   
Added: 27 Jul 2022 19:41 GMT   

Highbury Corner V1 Explosion
Grandma described the V1 explosion at Highbury Corner on many occasions. She was working in the scullery when the flying bomb landed. The blast shattered all the windows in the block of flats and blew off the bolt on her front door. As she looked out the front room window, people in various states of injury and shock were making their way along Highbury Station Road. One man in particular, who was bleeding profusely from glass shard wounds to his neck, insisted in getting home to see if his family was all right. Others were less fortunate. Len, the local newsagent, comforted a man, who had lost both legs caused by the blast, until the victim succumbed to his injuries. The entire area was ravaged and following are statistics. The flying bomb landed during lunch hour (12:46 p.m.) on June 27th 1944. 26 people lost their lives, 84 were seriously injured and 71 slightly injured.

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Comment
Steven Shepherd   
Added: 4 Feb 2021 14:20 GMT   

Our House
I and my three brothers were born at 178 Pitfield Street. All of my Mothers Family (ADAMS) Lived in the area. There was an area behind the house where the Hoxton Stall holders would keep the barrows. The house was classed as a slum but was a large house with a basement. The basement had 2 rooms that must have been unchanged for many years it contained a ’copper’ used to boil and clean clothes and bedlinen and a large ’range’ a cast iron coal/log fired oven. Coal was delivered through a ’coal hole’ in the street which dropped through to the basement. The front of the house used to be a shop but unused while we lived there. I have many more happy memories of the house too many to put here.

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Comment
MCNALLY    
Added: 17 May 2021 09:42 GMT   

Blackfriars (1959 - 1965)
I lived in Upper Ground from 1959 to 1964 I was 6 years old my parents Vince and Kitty run the Pub The Angel on the corner of Upper Ground and Bodies Bridge. I remember the ceiling of the cellar was very low and almost stretched the length of Bodies Bridge. The underground trains run directly underneath the pub. If you were down in the cellar when a train was coming it was quite frightening

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Martin Eaton    
Added: 14 Oct 2021 03:56 GMT   

Boundary Estate
Sunbury, Taplow House.

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STEPHEN JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:25 GMT   

Fellows Court, E2
my family moved into the tower block 13th floor (maisonette), in 1967 after our street Lenthall rd e8 was demolished, we were one of the first families in the new block. A number of families from our street were rehoused in this and the adjoining flats. Inside toilet and central heating, all very modern at the time, plus eventually a tarmac football pitch in the grounds,(the cage), with a goal painted by the kids on the brick wall of the railway.

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The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 15:05 GMT   

A plague on all your houses
Aldgate station is built directly on top of a vast plague pit, where thousands of bodies are apparently buried. No-one knows quite how many.

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Tom   
Added: 21 May 2021 23:07 GMT   

Blackfriars
What is, or was, Bodies Bridge?

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Comment
   
Added: 21 Apr 2021 16:21 GMT   

Liverpool Street
the Bishopsgate station has existed since 1840 as a passenger station, but does not appear in the site’s cartography. Evidently, the 1860 map is in fact much earlier than that date.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

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Richard Lake   
Added: 28 Sep 2022 09:37 GMT   

Trade Union Official
John William Lake snr moved with his family to 22 De Laune Street in 1936. He was the London Branch Secretary for the Street Masons, Paviours and Road Makers Union. He had previously lived in Orange St now Copperfield St Southwark but had been forced to move because the landlord didn’t like him working from home and said it broke his lease.
John William snr died in 1940. His son John William Lake jnr also became a stone mason and at the end of World War two he was responsible for the engraving of the dates of WW2 onto the Cenotaph in Whitehall.

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Lived here
Julie   
Added: 22 Sep 2022 18:30 GMT   

Well Walk, NW3 (1817 - 1818)
The home of Benthy, the Postman, with whom poet John Keats and his brother Tom lodged from early 1817 to Dec., 1818. They occupied the first floor up. Here Tom died Dec. 1, 1818. It was next door to the Welles Tavern then called ’The Green Man’."

From collected papers and photos re: No. 1 Well Walk at the library of Harvard University.

Source: No. 1, Well Walk, Hampstead. | HOLLIS for

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Comment
   
Added: 4 Sep 2022 15:42 GMT   

Superman 2
I worked here in 1977. The scene in the prison laundry in Superman 2 was filmed here.

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TUM   
Added: 27 Aug 2022 10:22 GMT   

The Underground Map
Michael Faraday successfully demonstrated the first electrical transformer at the Royal Institute, London.

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Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 15:19 GMT   

Bus makes a leap
A number 78 double-decker bus driven by Albert Gunter was forced to jump an accidentally opening Tower Bridge.

He was awarded a £10 bonus.

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Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:44 GMT   

The world’s first underground train
The very first underground train left Paddington on the new Metropolitan Railway bound for Farringdon Street.

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Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:41 GMT   

Baker Street
Baker Street station opened on the Metropolitan Railway - the world’s first underground line.

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Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:17 GMT   

TV comes to Olympia
Over 7000 people queued to see the first high definition television pictures on sets at the Olympia Radio Show. The pictures were transmitted by the BBC from Alexandra Palace, introduced by Leslie Mitchell, their first announcer.

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
St Luke’s Hospital for Lunatics St Luke’s Hospital for Lunatics was founded in London in 1751 for the treatment of incurable pauper lunatics by a group of philanthropists.

NEARBY STREETS
Alford Place, N1 Alford Place is a road in the N1 postcode area
Amias Place, EC1Y Amias Place was formerly George Yard.
Anchor Yard, EC1Y Anchor Yard is named after a former inn here of this name.
Aurora Buildings, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Bache’s Street, N1 This is a street in the N1 postcode area
Baldwin Street, EC1V Baldwin Street was named after Richard Baldwin, Treasurer at St Bartholomew’s Hospital when the street was built in 1811.
Banner Street, EC1Y Banner Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Bartholomew Square, EC1V This is a street in the EC1V postcode area
Bastwick Street, EC1V Bastwick Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Bath Street, EC1V Bath Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Bevenden Street, N1 Bevenden Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Bletchley Court, N1 Bletchley Court is a block on Cavendish Street
Bletchley Street, N1 Bletchley Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Bollinder Place, EC1V Bollinder Place lies along City Road.
Boreas Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Britannia Walk, N1 Britannia Walk is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Brunswick Place, EC1V Brunswick Place is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Central Street, EC1V Central Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Chart Street, N1 Chart Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Cherbury Street, N1 Cherbury Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
City Forum, EC1V City Forum is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
City Garden Row, N1 City Garden Row is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
City Road, EC1V City Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
City Road, EC1Y City Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Clunbury Street, N1 Clunbury Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Coombs Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Corsham Street, N1 Corsham Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Cowper Street, EC2A Cowper Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Cranwood Street, EC1V Cranwood Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Cullum Welch Court, N1 Cullum Welch Court is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Custance Street, N1 Custance Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Dallington Street, EC1V Dallington Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Davina House, EC1V Davina House is a block on Goswell Road
Dingley Road, EC1V Dingley Road is a road in the EC1V postcode area
East Road, N1 East Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Ebenezer Street, EC1V A street within the N1 postcode
Evelyn Court, N1 Evelyn Court can be found on Evelyn Walk
Evelyn Walk, N1 Evelyn Walk is a road in the N1 postcode area
Falcon Court, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Farringdon Road, EC1V Farringdon Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Featherstone Street, EC1Y Featherstone Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Fullwoods Mews, N1 Fullwoods Mews is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Galway Street, EC1V Galway Street was named for the Earl of Galway.
Gard Street, EC1V Gard Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Gee Street, EC1V Gee Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Godfrey House St Lukes Estate, EC1V Godfrey House is on the St Lukes Estate.
Haberdasher Street, N1 Haberdasher Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Haverstock Place, EC1V A street within the N1 postcode
Haverstock Street, EC1V Haverstock Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Helmet Row, EC1V Helmet Row is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Hoffman Square, N1 Hoffman Square is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Ironmonger Row, EC1V Ironmonger Row is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Jasper Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Kiffen Street, EC2A Kiffen Street links Leonard Street to Clere Street.
King Square, EC1V King Square is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Leo Yard, EC1V Leo Yard is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Lever Street, EC1V Lever Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Lizard Street, EC1V Lizard Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Macclesfield Road, EC1V Macclesfield Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Mallow Street, EC1Y Mallow Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Martha’s Buildings, EC1Y Martha’s Buildings is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Masons Place, EC1V Masons Place is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Micawber Street, N1 Micawber Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Mitchell Street, EC1V Mitchell Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Mora Street, EC1V Mora Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Moreland Street, EC1V Moreland Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Murray Grove, N1 Murray Grove is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Murton Street, EC1V Murton Street dates from about 1829.
Nelson Place, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Nile Street, N1 Nile Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Norman Street, EC1V Norman Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Oakley Crescent, EC1V Oakley Crescent is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Old Street, EC1Y Old Street runs west to east from Goswell Road in Clerkenwell to a crossroads in Shoreditch.
Oliver’s Yard, EC2A Oliver’s Yard is a road in the EC2A postcode area
Paper Mill Buildings, EC1V A street within the N1 postcode
Pardon Street, EC1V Pardon Street was named after Pardon Chapel, founded in the wake of the Black Death in 1348.
Paton Street, EC1V Paton Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Pear Tree Street, EC1V Pear Tree Street connects Central Street and Goswell Road.
Peerless Street, EC1V Peerless Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Peregrine House, EC1V Peregrine House is a block on Hall Street
Pickfords Wharf, N1 Pickfords Wharf is a road in the N1 postcode area
Prestwood Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Provost & East Building, Provost & East Building lies within the postcode.
Provost Street, N1 Provost Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Quaker Court, EC1Y Quaker Court is a block on Banner Street
Radnor Street, EC1V Radnor Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Remington Road, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Remington Street, EC1V Remington Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Seward Street, EC1V Seward Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Shepherdess Building, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Shepherdess Place, N1 Shepherdess Place is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Shepherdess Walk, N1 Shepherdess Walk is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Silbury Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Silicon Way, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Singer Street, EC1V Singer Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Singer Street, EC1V Singer Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Sturt Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Tabernacle Street, EC2A Tabernacle Street was where George Whitefield’s ’Tabernacle’ was built by his supporters after he separated from Wesley in 1741.
Taplow Street, N1 Taplow Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Theseus Walk, N1 Theseus Walk is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Thoresby Street, N1 Thoresby Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Tilney Court, EC1Y Tilney Court lies off of Old Street.
Underwood Row, N1 Underwood Row is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Underwood Street, N1 Underwood Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Vestry Street, N1 Vestry Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Victoria House, EC1V A street within the EC1V postcode
Vince Street, EC1V Vince Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Waterloo Street, EC1V Waterloo Street once ran from Lever Street to Radnor Street.
Wellesley Terrace, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Wenlock Mews, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Wenlock Street, N1 Wenlock Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Westland Place, N1 Westland Place is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Wharf Road, N1 Wharf Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Windsor Terrace, N1 Windsor Terrace is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Young’s Buildings, EC1Y Young’s Buildings was named after Francis Young, a local 18th century property owner

NEARBY PUBS
Bavarian Beerhouse This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Block Brewery Limited This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Love’s Company, Unit 1 This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Masque Haunt This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
McQueen This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Nomad Club This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Prince Arthur This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Angel This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Beehive This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Duke of Wellington This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Eagle This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Old Fountain This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Old Ivy House This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Trader This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
William IV This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
XOYO (GROUND FLOOR) This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Click here to explore another London street
We now have 507 completed street histories and 46993 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS


Clerkenwell

Clerkenwell was once known as London’s Little Italy because of the large number of Italians living in the area from the 1850s until the 1960s.

Clerkenwell took its name from the Clerks’ Well in Farringdon Lane. In the Middle Ages, the London Parish clerks performed annual mystery plays there, based on biblical themes. Part of the well remains visible, incorporated into a 1980s building called Well Court.

In the 17th century South Clerkenwell became a fashionable place of residence. Oliver Cromwell owned a house on Clerkenwell Close, just off the Green. Several aristocrats had houses there, most notably the Duke of Northumberland, as did people such as Erasmus Smith.

Before Clerkenwell became a built-up area, it had a reputation as a resort a short walk out of the city, where Londoners could disport themselves at its spas, of which there were several, based on natural chalybeate springs, tea gardens and theatres. The present day Sadler’s Wells has survived as heir to this tradition.

Clerkenwell was also the location of three prisons: the Clerkenwell Bridewell, Coldbath Fields Prison (later Clerkenwell Gaol) and the New Prison, later the Clerkenwell House of Detention, notorious as the scene of the Clerkenwell Outrage in 1867, an attempted prison break by Fenians who killed many in the tenement houses on Corporation Row in trying to blow a hole in the prison wall.

The Industrial Revolution changed the area greatly. It became a centre for breweries, distilleries and the printing industry. It gained a special reputation for the making of clocks and watches, which activity once employed many people from around the area. Flourishing craft workshops still carry on some of the traditional trades, such as jewellery-making. Clerkenwell is home to Witherby’s, Europe’s oldest printing company.

After the Second World War, Clerkenwell suffered from industrial decline and many of the premises occupied by the engineering, printing publishing and meat and food trades (the last mostly around Smithfield) fell empty. Several acclaimed council housing estates were commissioned by Finsbury Borough Council. Modernist architect and Russian émigré Berthold Lubetkin’s listed Spa Green Estate, constructed 1943–1950, has recently been restored. The Finsbury Estate, constructed in 1968 to the designs of Joseph Emberton includes flats, since altered and re-clad.

A general revival and gentrification process began in the 1980s, and the area is now known for loft-living in some of the former industrial buildings. It also has young professionals, nightclubs and restaurants and is home to many professional offices as an overspill for the nearby City of London and West End.

Amongst other sectors, there is a notable concentration of design professions around Clerkenwell, and supporting industries such as high-end designer furniture showrooms.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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St Lukes Hospital for Lunatics, London
TUM image id: 1554045418
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
St Lukes Hospital for Lunatics, London
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The gravestone of English poet William Blake in Bunhill Fields Burial Ground
Credit: https://careergappers.com/
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Great Arthur House, at the centre of the Golden Lane Estate, was the tallest residential building in Britain at the time of its construction.
Credit: Steve F/Wiki commons
Licence: CC BY 2.0


At the corner of Clerkenwell Road and Goswell Road sits the Hat and Feathers. It was built on the site of an earlier tavern around 1860 for owner James Leask. It was designed by William Finch Hill who specialised in music halls and pubs.
Credit: Ewan Munro
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Royal Oak, Waterloo Street in the early 1960s. Waterloo Street once ran from Lever Street to Radnor Street. The original street dates from around 1829 and like other streets of similar name, commemorates Wellington’s 1815 victory. The whole area was redeveloped for the Pleydell Estate in 1965.
Credit: James Wyatt
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