Garrett Street, EC1Y

An area which may have existed since the nineteenth century or before- in the area buildings are mainly post-war

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Road · Clerkenwell · EC1Y ·
JANUARY
1
2000

Garrett Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.





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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


The Underground Map   
Added: 20 Sep 2020 13:01 GMT   

Pepys starts diary
On 1 January 1659, Samuel Pepys started his famous daily diary and maintained it for ten years. The diary has become perhaps the most extensive source of information on this critical period of English history. Pepys never considered that his diary would be read by others. The original diary consisted of six volumes written in Shelton shorthand, which he had learned as an undergraduate on scholarship at Magdalene College, Cambridge. This shorthand was introduced in 1626, and was the same system Isaac Newton used when writing.

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Lived here
Katharina Logan   
Added: 9 Aug 2022 19:01 GMT   

Ely place existed in name in 1857
On 7th July 1857 John James Chase and Mary Ann Weekes were married at St John the Baptist Hoxton, he of full age and she a minor. Both parties list their place of residence as Ely Place, yet according to other information, this street was not named until 1861. He was a bricklayer, she had no occupation listed, but both were literate and able to sign their names on their marriage certificate.

Source: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSF7-Q9Y7?cc=3734475

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Comment
Jeff Owen   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 16:18 GMT   

Owen’s School
Owen Street is the site of Owen’s Boys’ School. The last school was built in 1881 and was demolished in the early 1990s to make way for the development which stand there today. It was a “Direct Grant” grammar school and was founded in 1613 by Dame Alice Owen. What is now “Owen’s Fields” was the playground between the old school and the new girls’ school (known then as “Dames Alice Owen’s School” or simply “DAOS”). The boys’ school had the top two floors of that building for their science labs. The school moved to Potters Bar in Hertfordshire in 1971 and is now one of the top State comprehensive schools in the country. The old building remained in use as an accountancy college and taxi-drivers’ “knowledge” school until it was demolished. The new building is now part of City and Islington College. Owen’s was a fine school. I should know because I attended there from 1961 to 1968.

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Born here
Bernard Miller   
Added: 12 Apr 2022 17:36 GMT   

My mother and her sister were born at 9 Windsor Terrace
My mother, Millie Haring (later Miller) and her sister Yetta Haring (later Freedman) were born here in 1922 and 1923. With their parents and older brother and sister, they lived in two rooms until they moved to Stoke Newington in 1929. She always said there were six rooms, six families, a shared sink on the first floor landing and a toilet in the backyard.

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Born here
jack stevens   
Added: 26 Sep 2021 13:38 GMT   

Mothers birth place
Number 5 Whites Row which was built in around 1736 and still standing was the premises my now 93 year old mother was born in, her name at birth was Hilda Evelyne Shaw,

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Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 15:19 GMT   

Bus makes a leap
A number 78 double-decker bus driven by Albert Gunter was forced to jump an accidentally opening Tower Bridge.

He was awarded a £10 bonus.

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Comment
Steven Shepherd   
Added: 4 Feb 2021 14:20 GMT   

Our House
I and my three brothers were born at 178 Pitfield Street. All of my Mothers Family (ADAMS) Lived in the area. There was an area behind the house where the Hoxton Stall holders would keep the barrows. The house was classed as a slum but was a large house with a basement. The basement had 2 rooms that must have been unchanged for many years it contained a ’copper’ used to boil and clean clothes and bedlinen and a large ’range’ a cast iron coal/log fired oven. Coal was delivered through a ’coal hole’ in the street which dropped through to the basement. The front of the house used to be a shop but unused while we lived there. I have many more happy memories of the house too many to put here.

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Comment
MCNALLY    
Added: 17 May 2021 09:42 GMT   

Blackfriars (1959 - 1965)
I lived in Upper Ground from 1959 to 1964 I was 6 years old my parents Vince and Kitty run the Pub The Angel on the corner of Upper Ground and Bodies Bridge. I remember the ceiling of the cellar was very low and almost stretched the length of Bodies Bridge. The underground trains run directly underneath the pub. If you were down in the cellar when a train was coming it was quite frightening

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Martin Eaton    
Added: 14 Oct 2021 03:56 GMT   

Boundary Estate
Sunbury, Taplow House.

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Comment
The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 15:05 GMT   

A plague on all your houses
Aldgate station is built directly on top of a vast plague pit, where thousands of bodies are apparently buried. No-one knows quite how many.

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Reply
Tom   
Added: 21 May 2021 23:07 GMT   

Blackfriars
What is, or was, Bodies Bridge?

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Comment
   
Added: 21 Apr 2021 16:21 GMT   

Liverpool Street
the Bishopsgate station has existed since 1840 as a passenger station, but does not appear in the site’s cartography. Evidently, the 1860 map is in fact much earlier than that date.

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Comment
   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 14:31 GMT   

correction
Chaucer did not write Pilgrims Progress. His stories were called the Canterbury Tales

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Comment
Lena    
Added: 18 Mar 2021 13:08 GMT   

White Conduit Street, N1
My mum, Rosina Wade of the Wade and Hannam family in the area of Chapel Street and Parkfield Street, bought her first “costume” at S Cohen’s in White Conduit Street. Would have probably been about 1936 or thereabouts. She said that he was a small man but an expert tailor. I hope that Islington Council preserve the shop front as it’s a piece of history of the area. Mum used to get her high heel shoes from an Italian shoe shop in Chapel Street. She had size 2 feet and they would let her know when a new consignment of size 2 shoes were in. I think she was a very good customer. She worked at Killingbacks artificial flower maker in Northampton Square and later at the Halifax bombers factory north of Edgware where she was a riveter.

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STEPHEN ARTHUR JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:12 GMT   

Lynedoch Street, E2
my father Arthur Jackson was born in lynedoch street in 1929 and lived with mm grandparents and siblings, until they were relocated to Pamela house Haggerston rd when the street was to be demolished

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
Julie   
Added: 22 Sep 2022 18:30 GMT   

Well Walk, NW3 (1817 - 1818)
The home of Benthy, the Postman, with whom poet John Keats and his brother Tom lodged from early 1817 to Dec., 1818. They occupied the first floor up. Here Tom died Dec. 1, 1818. It was next door to the Welles Tavern then called ’The Green Man’."

From collected papers and photos re: No. 1 Well Walk at the library of Harvard University.

Source: No. 1, Well Walk, Hampstead. | HOLLIS for

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Comment
   
Added: 4 Sep 2022 15:42 GMT   

Superman 2
I worked here in 1977. The scene in the prison laundry in Superman 2 was filmed here.

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TUM   
Added: 27 Aug 2022 10:22 GMT   

The Underground Map
Michael Faraday successfully demonstrated the first electrical transformer at the Royal Institute, London.

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Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 15:19 GMT   

Bus makes a leap
A number 78 double-decker bus driven by Albert Gunter was forced to jump an accidentally opening Tower Bridge.

He was awarded a £10 bonus.

Reply

Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:44 GMT   

The world’s first underground train
The very first underground train left Paddington on the new Metropolitan Railway bound for Farringdon Street.

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Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:41 GMT   

Baker Street
Baker Street station opened on the Metropolitan Railway - the world’s first underground line.

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Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:17 GMT   

TV comes to Olympia
Over 7000 people queued to see the first high definition television pictures on sets at the Olympia Radio Show. The pictures were transmitted by the BBC from Alexandra Palace, introduced by Leslie Mitchell, their first announcer.

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Lived here
Katharina Logan   
Added: 9 Aug 2022 19:01 GMT   

Ely place existed in name in 1857
On 7th July 1857 John James Chase and Mary Ann Weekes were married at St John the Baptist Hoxton, he of full age and she a minor. Both parties list their place of residence as Ely Place, yet according to other information, this street was not named until 1861. He was a bricklayer, she had no occupation listed, but both were literate and able to sign their names on their marriage certificate.

Source: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSF7-Q9Y7?cc=3734475

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Bunhill Fields Bunhill Fields was in use as a burial ground from 1665 until 1854.
Golden Lane Estate, EC1Y The Golden Lane Housing Estate is a 1950s council housing complex in the City of London.
Hicks Hall Hicks Hall (1611 - 1778) was a building in St John Street, Clerkenwell.
Honourable Artillery Company Museum The Honourable Artillery Company Museum opened in 1987.
St Luke’s Hospital for Lunatics St Luke’s Hospital for Lunatics was founded in London in 1751 for the treatment of incurable pauper lunatics by a group of philanthropists.
Wesley’s Chapel Wesley’s Chapel - originally the City Road Chapel - is a Methodist church built under the direction of John Wesley.
Whitefield’s Tabernacle Whitefield’s Tabernacle is a former church at the corner of Tabernacle Street and Leonard Street.

NEARBY STREETS
Amias Place, EC1Y Amias Place was formerly George Yard.
Anchor Yard, EC1Y Anchor Yard is named after a former inn here of this name.
Ashby Street, EC1V Ashby Street was named after local landowners who had a seat at Castle Ashby, Northamptonshire.
Baldwin Street, EC1V Baldwin Street was named after Richard Baldwin, Treasurer at St Bartholomew’s Hospital when the street was built in 1811.
Baltic Street East, EC1Y Baltic Street East was built by a timber merchant around 1810 who named local streets after trade-related activities.
Baltic Street West, EC1Y Baltic Street is split into east and west halves.
Banner Street, EC1Y Banner Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Bartholomew Square, EC1V This is a street in the EC1V postcode area
Bastwick Street, EC1V Bastwick Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Bath Street, EC1V Bath Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Beech Street, EC2Y Beech Street is the western extension of Chiswell Street.
Berry Place, EC1V Berry Place is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Berry Street, EC1M Berry Street is a road in the EC1M postcode area
Brackley Street, EC2Y Brackley Street was named after Viscount Brackley - the title given to the eldest sons of the Earl of Bridgewater who owned a townhouse on Bridgewater Square.
Braithwaite House, EC1Y Braithwaite House is a block on Bunhill Row
Brewery Square, EC1V Brewery Square is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Brewhouse Yard, EC1V Brewhouse Yard is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Bridgewater Square, EC2Y Bridgewater Square is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Broad Yard, EC1M Broad Yard is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Bryer Court, EC2Y Bryer Court is a block on Bridgewater Square
Bunhill Fields, EC1Y Bunhill Fields is a road in the EC1Y postcode area
Bunhill Row, EC1Y Bunhill Row is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Carthusian Street, EC1A Carthusian Street is a road in the EC1A postcode area
Central Street, EC1V Central Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Charterhouse Buildings, EC1A Charterhouse Buildings is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Charterhouse Mews, EC1A Charterhouse Mews is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Charterhouse Square, EC1M Charterhouse Square is the largest courtyard associated with London Charterhouse, mostly formed of Tudor and Stuart architecture restored after the Blitz.
Chequer Street, EC1Y Chequer Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Cherry Tree Walk, EC1Y Cherry Tree Walk is a road in the EC1Y postcode area
Chiswell Street, EC1Y Chiswell Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
City Road, EC1Y City Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Clerkenwell Road, EC1M Clerkenwell Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Compton Street, EC1V Compton Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Corsham Street, N1 Corsham Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Cranwood Street, EC1V Cranwood Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Crescent Row, EC1Y Crescent Row is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Cripplegate Street, EC1Y Cripplegate Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Cyrus Street, EC1V Cyrus Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Dallington Street, EC1V Dallington Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Davina House, EC1V Davina House is a block on Goswell Road
Dingley Road, EC1V Dingley Road is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Domingo Street, EC1Y Domingo Street links Old Street with Baltic Street East.
Dufferin Avenue, EC1Y Dufferin Avenue is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Dufferin Street, EC1Y Dufferin Street runs between Bunhill Row and Whitecross Street.
Errol Street, EC1Y Errol Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Fann Street, EC1Y Fann Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Farringdon Road, EC1V Farringdon Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Faulkners Alley, EC1M Faulkners Alley is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Featherstone Street, EC1Y Featherstone Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Finsbury Court, EC2A Finsbury Court was obliterated in a redevelopment programme taking in Finsbury Pavement.
Finsbury Street, EC2A Finsbury Street is a road in the EC2Y postcode area
Florin Court, EC1M Florin Court is a block on Charterhouse Square
Fortune Street, EC1Y Fortune Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Galway Street, EC1V Galway Street was named for the Earl of Galway.
Gate House, EC1M Residential block
Gee Street, EC1V Gee Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Glasshouse Yard, EC2Y Glasshouse Yard is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Godfrey House St Lukes Estate, EC1V Godfrey House is on the St Lukes Estate.
Golden Lane, EC1Y Golden Lane connects Old Street and Beech Street.
Goswell Road, EC1V Goswell Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Goswell Road, EC1Y Goswell Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Great Sutton Street, EC1M Great Sutton Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Hayne Street, EC1A Hayne Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Helmet Row, EC1V Helmet Row is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Honduras Street, EC1Y Honduras Street dates from the 1810s.
Ironmonger Row, EC1V Ironmonger Row is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
King Square, EC1V King Square is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Lamb’s Passage, EC1Y Lamb’s Passage was formerly Great Swordbearers (Sword Bearers) Alley.
Lauderdale Tower, EC2Y Lauderdale Tower is the westernmost tower in the Barbican, facing onto Lauderdale Place.
Leo Yard, EC1V Leo Yard is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Lever Street, EC1V Lever Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Lizard Street, EC1V Lizard Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Long Lane, EC1M Long Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Mallow Street, EC1Y Mallow Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Malta Street, EC1V This is a street in the EC1V postcode area
Martha’s Buildings, EC1Y Martha’s Buildings is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Memel Street, EC1Y Memel Street was built over the site of a former brewery in the 1810s.
Milton Court, EC2Y Milton Court is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Milton Street, EC2Y Milton Street was formerly known as Grub Street.
Mitchell Street, EC1V Mitchell Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Mora Street, EC1V Mora Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Murton Street, EC1V Murton Street dates from about 1829.
Norman Street, EC1V Norman Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Northampton Square, EC1V Northampton Square is a square between Finsbury and Clerkenwell, located between Goswell Road and St John Street.
Northburgh Street, EC1M Northburgh Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Northburgh Street, EC1M Northburgh Street in the EC1V postcode is a western extension of the main part of the street.
Old Street, EC1Y Old Street runs west to east from Goswell Road in Clerkenwell to a crossroads in Shoreditch.
Oliver’s Yard, EC2A Oliver’s Yard is a road in the EC2A postcode area
Pardon Street, EC1V Pardon Street was named after Pardon Chapel, founded in the wake of the Black Death in 1348.
Passing Alley, EC1M Passing Alley is a road in the EC1M postcode area
Paton Street, EC1V Paton Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Pear Tree Street, EC1V Pear Tree Street connects Central Street and Goswell Road.
Peerless Street, EC1V Peerless Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Percival Street, EC1V Percival Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Peter’s Lane, EC1M Peter’s Lane is named after the church which once stood close to the Cross Keys tavern.
Pickax Street, EC2Y Pickax Street once ran from Long Lane to Goswell Road (which before 1864 was called Goswell Street).
Provost & East Building, Provost & East Building lies within the postcode.
Quaker Court, EC1Y Quaker Court is a block on Banner Street
Radnor Street, EC1V Radnor Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Roscoe Street, EC1Y Roscoe Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Saint John Street, EC1M This is a street in the EC1M postcode area
Sebastian Street, EC1V Sebastian Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Seward Street, EC1V Seward Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Silicon Way, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Smokehouse Yard, EC1M Smokehouse Yard is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
St Johns Lane, EC1M St Johns Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Sutton Lane, EC1M Sutton Lane is a road in the EC1M postcode area
Sutton Road, EC1M Sutton Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Sycamore Street, EC1Y Sycamore Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
The Charterhouse, EC1M Residential block
Tilney Court, EC1Y Tilney Court lies off of Old Street.
Timber Street, EC1Y Timber Street was formerly called Norway Street.
Tompion House, EC1V Tompion House is a block on Cyrus Street
Victoria House, EC1V A street within the EC1V postcode
Warwick Yard, EC1Y Warwick Yard is a road in the EC1Y postcode area
Waterloo Street, EC1V Waterloo Street once ran from Lever Street to Radnor Street.
Whitecross Street, EC1Y Whitecross Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Young’s Buildings, EC1Y Young’s Buildings was named after Francis Young, a local 18th century property owner

NEARBY PUBS
Addiscombe Line This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Artillery Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
BarSmith This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Be At One This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Charterhouse Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Hat and Feathers At the corner of Clerkenwell Road and Goswell Road sits the Hat and Feathers pub.
Honourable Artillery Company This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Love’s Company, Unit 1 This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Masque Haunt This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Nomad Club This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Sabor Iberico This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Searcys Bars @ GSM & D This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Singer This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Sutton Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Sutton Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Angel This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Fence This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Fox and Anchor This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Jugged Hare This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Old Fountain This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Old Ivy House This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Shakespeare This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Slaughtered Lamb This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Trader This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Windmill This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
White Bear This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Click here to explore another London street
We now have 505 completed street histories and 46995 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS


Clerkenwell

Clerkenwell was once known as London’s Little Italy because of the large number of Italians living in the area from the 1850s until the 1960s.

Clerkenwell took its name from the Clerks’ Well in Farringdon Lane. In the Middle Ages, the London Parish clerks performed annual mystery plays there, based on biblical themes. Part of the well remains visible, incorporated into a 1980s building called Well Court.

In the 17th century South Clerkenwell became a fashionable place of residence. Oliver Cromwell owned a house on Clerkenwell Close, just off the Green. Several aristocrats had houses there, most notably the Duke of Northumberland, as did people such as Erasmus Smith.

Before Clerkenwell became a built-up area, it had a reputation as a resort a short walk out of the city, where Londoners could disport themselves at its spas, of which there were several, based on natural chalybeate springs, tea gardens and theatres. The present day Sadler’s Wells has survived as heir to this tradition.

Clerkenwell was also the location of three prisons: the Clerkenwell Bridewell, Coldbath Fields Prison (later Clerkenwell Gaol) and the New Prison, later the Clerkenwell House of Detention, notorious as the scene of the Clerkenwell Outrage in 1867, an attempted prison break by Fenians who killed many in the tenement houses on Corporation Row in trying to blow a hole in the prison wall.

The Industrial Revolution changed the area greatly. It became a centre for breweries, distilleries and the printing industry. It gained a special reputation for the making of clocks and watches, which activity once employed many people from around the area. Flourishing craft workshops still carry on some of the traditional trades, such as jewellery-making. Clerkenwell is home to Witherby’s, Europe’s oldest printing company.

After the Second World War, Clerkenwell suffered from industrial decline and many of the premises occupied by the engineering, printing publishing and meat and food trades (the last mostly around Smithfield) fell empty. Several acclaimed council housing estates were commissioned by Finsbury Borough Council. Modernist architect and Russian émigré Berthold Lubetkin’s listed Spa Green Estate, constructed 1943–1950, has recently been restored. The Finsbury Estate, constructed in 1968 to the designs of Joseph Emberton includes flats, since altered and re-clad.

A general revival and gentrification process began in the 1980s, and the area is now known for loft-living in some of the former industrial buildings. It also has young professionals, nightclubs and restaurants and is home to many professional offices as an overspill for the nearby City of London and West End.

Amongst other sectors, there is a notable concentration of design professions around Clerkenwell, and supporting industries such as high-end designer furniture showrooms.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Smithfield Market
TUM image id: 1620388545
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St Lukes Hospital for Lunatics, London
TUM image id: 1554045418
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Amen Court, EC4M
TUM image id: 1493474208
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Farringdon Street, EC4M
TUM image id: 1530111130
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In the neighbourhood...

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St Lukes Hospital for Lunatics, London
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The gravestone of English poet William Blake in Bunhill Fields Burial Ground
Credit: https://careergappers.com/
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Great Arthur House, at the centre of the Golden Lane Estate, was the tallest residential building in Britain at the time of its construction.
Credit: Steve F/Wiki commons
Licence: CC BY 2.0


At the corner of Clerkenwell Road and Goswell Road sits the Hat and Feathers. It was built on the site of an earlier tavern around 1860 for owner James Leask. It was designed by William Finch Hill who specialised in music halls and pubs.
Credit: Ewan Munro
Licence: CC BY 2.0


View of Cloth Fair in 1884 showing the side entrance to St Bartholomew’s Priory, Smithfield.
Credit: John Crowther
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Pardon Street
Credit: The Underground Map
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Kennedy’s - who sold sausages and pies around Camberwell and Peckham - delivering at Smithfield Market
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Widely known as the ’Agas map’, Civitas Londinum is a bird’s-eye view of London first printed from woodblocks in about 1561. The map offers a richly detailed view both of the buildings and streets of the city and of its environment. No copies survive from 1561, but a modified version was printed in 1633.
Credit: City of London Archives
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Royal Oak, Waterloo Street in the early 1960s. Waterloo Street once ran from Lever Street to Radnor Street. The original street dates from around 1829 and like other streets of similar name, commemorates Wellington’s 1815 victory. The whole area was redeveloped for the Pleydell Estate in 1965.
Credit: James Wyatt
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Kennedy’s of Smithfield Market.
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