Great Guildford Street, SE1

Road in/near Southwark

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(51.5041 -0.09668, 51.504 -0.096) 
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Road · Southwark · SE1 ·
July
5
2022

Great Guildford Street runs north-south in Southwark.





CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



The Underground Map   
Added: 20 Sep 2020 13:01 GMT   

Pepys starts diary
On 1 January 1659, Samuel Pepys started his famous daily diary and maintained it for ten years. The diary has become perhaps the most extensive source of information on this critical period of English history. Pepys never considered that his diary would be read by others. The original diary consisted of six volumes written in Shelton shorthand, which he had learned as an undergraduate on scholarship at Magdalene College, Cambridge. This shorthand was introduced in 1626, and was the same system Isaac Newton used when writing.

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Bruce McTavish   
Added: 11 Mar 2021 11:37 GMT   

Kennington Road
Lambeth North station was opened as Kennington Road and then Westminster Bridge Road before settling on its final name. It has a wonderful Leslie Green design.

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MCNALLY    
Added: 17 May 2021 09:42 GMT   

Blackfriars (1959 - 1965)
I lived in Upper Ground from 1959 to 1964 I was 6 years old my parents Vince and Kitty run the Pub The Angel on the corner of Upper Ground and Bodies Bridge. I remember the ceiling of the cellar was very low and almost stretched the length of Bodies Bridge. The underground trains run directly underneath the pub. If you were down in the cellar when a train was coming it was quite frightening

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Johna216   
Added: 9 Aug 2017 16:26 GMT   

Thanks!
I have recently started a web site, the info you provide on this site has helped me greatly. Thank you for all of your time & work. There can be no real freedom without the freedom to fail. by Erich Fromm. eeggefeceefb

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Johnshort   
Added: 7 Oct 2017 21:07 GMT   

Hurley Road, SE11
There were stables in the road mid way - also Danny reading had a coal delivery lorry.

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Robert smitherman   
Added: 23 Aug 2017 11:01 GMT   

Saunders Street, SE11
I was born in a prefab on Saunders street SE11 in the 60’s, when I lived there, the road consisted of a few prefab houses, the road originally ran from Lollard street all the way thru to Fitzalan street. I went back there to have a look back in the early 90’s but all that is left of the road is about 20m of road and the road sign.

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Tom   
Added: 21 May 2021 23:07 GMT   

Blackfriars
What is, or was, Bodies Bridge?

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Comment
   
Added: 21 Apr 2021 16:21 GMT   

Liverpool Street
the Bishopsgate station has existed since 1840 as a passenger station, but does not appear in the site’s cartography. Evidently, the 1860 map is in fact much earlier than that date.

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Comment
   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 14:31 GMT   

correction
Chaucer did not write Pilgrims Progress. His stories were called the Canterbury Tales

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Born here
sam   
Added: 31 Dec 2021 00:54 GMT   

Burdett Street, SE1
I was on 2nd July 1952, in Burdett chambers (which is also known as Burdett buildings)on Burdett street

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Added: 3 Jun 2021 15:50 GMT   

All Bar One
The capitalisation is wrong

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
Katharina Logan   
Added: 9 Aug 2022 19:01 GMT   

Ely place existed in name in 1857
On 7th July 1857 John James Chase and Mary Ann Weekes were married at St John the Baptist Hoxton, he of full age and she a minor. Both parties list their place of residence as Ely Place, yet according to other information, this street was not named until 1861. He was a bricklayer, she had no occupation listed, but both were literate and able to sign their names on their marriage certificate.

Source: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSF7-Q9Y7?cc=3734475

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Reginald John Gregory   
Added: 8 Aug 2022 14:07 GMT   

Worked in the vicinity of my ancestor’s house,
Between the years 1982-1998 (unknown to me at the time) I worked in an office close to the site of my ancestors cottage. I discovered this when researching family history - the cottage was mentioned in the 1871 census for Colindeep Lane/Ancient Street coming up from the Hyde. The family lived in the ares betwen 1805 and 1912.

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Barry J. Page   
Added: 27 Jul 2022 19:41 GMT   

Highbury Corner V1 Explosion
Grandma described the V1 explosion at Highbury Corner on many occasions. She was working in the scullery when the flying bomb landed. The blast shattered all the windows in the block of flats and blew off the bolt on her front door. As she looked out the front room window, people in various states of injury and shock were making their way along Highbury Station Road. One man in particular, who was bleeding profusely from glass shard wounds to his neck, insisted in getting home to see if his family was all right. Others were less fortunate. Len, the local newsagent, comforted a man, who had lost both legs caused by the blast, until the victim succumbed to his injuries. The entire area was ravaged and following are statistics. The flying bomb landed during lunch hour (12:46 p.m.) on June 27th 1944. 26 people lost their lives, 84 were seriously injured and 71 slightly injured.

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ANON   
Added: 20 Jul 2022 13:36 GMT   

The Square & Ashmore park
The Square and Ashmore park was the place to be 2000-2005. Those were the greatest times on the estate. everyday people were playing out. the park was full of kids just being kids and having fun, now everyone is grown up and only bump into eachother when heading to the shops or work. I miss the good days( Im 25yrs old as im writing this)

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Spotted here
   
Added: 18 Jul 2022 13:56 GMT   

Map of Thornsett Road Esrlsfield


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Born here
Carolyn Hirst   
Added: 16 Jul 2022 15:21 GMT   

Henry James Hirst
My second great grandfather Henry James Hirst was born at 18 New Road on 11 February 1861. He was the eighth of the eleven children of Rowland and Isabella Hirst. I think that this part of New Road was also known at the time as Gloucester Terrace.

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Lived here
Richard   
Added: 12 Jul 2022 21:36 GMT   

Elgin Crescent, W11
Richard Laitner (1955-1983), a barrister training to be a doctor at UCL, lived here in 1983. He was murdered aged 28 with both his parents after attending his sister’s wedding in Sheffield in 1983. The Richard Laitner Memorial Fund maintains bursaries in his memory at UCL Medical School

Source: Ancestry Library Edition

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Anthony Mckay   
Added: 11 Jul 2022 00:12 GMT   

Bankfield Cottages, Ass House Lane, Harrow Weald
Bankfield Cottages (now demolished) at the end of Ass House Lane, appear twice in ’The Cheaters’ televison series (made 1960) in the episodes ’The Fine Print’ and ’Tine to Kill’

Source: THE CHEATERS: Episode Index

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
The Ring The Ring was a boxing stadium which once stood on Blackfriars Road in Southwark.

NEARBY STREETS
All Hallows Place, SE1 All Hallows Place disappeared due to Second World World bombing.
America Street, SE1 America Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Anchor Terrace, SE1 Anchor Terrace is a large symmetrical building on the east side of Southwark Bridge Road, situated very close to the River Thames.
Angel Place, SE1 Angel Place was the site of the Marshalsea Prison between 1811 and 1842.
Applegarth House, SE1 Residential block
Argent Street, SE1 Silver Street connected Orange Street (now Copperfield Street) and Loman Street.
Ayres Street, SE1 Ayres Street was formerly known as Whitecross Street.
Baden Place, SE1 Baden Place is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Bank End, SE1 Bank End is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Bankside Lofts, SE1 Bankside Lofts is a block in Southwark.
Bear Gardens, SE1 Bear Gardens is the site of a medieval pleasure ground.
Bear Lane, SE1 Bear Lane is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Bedale Street, SE1 Bedale Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Belvedere Buildings, SE1 Belvedere Buildings is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Benbow House, SE1 Benbow House is a block on New Globe Walk
Betsham House, SE1 Residential block
Black Friars Road, SE1 Black Friars Road is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Blackfriars Foundry 154-156, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Blackfriars Road, SE1 Blackfriars Road runs between St George’s Circus at the southern end and Blackfriars Bridge over the River Thames at the northern end, leading to the City of London.
Borough High Street, SE1 Borough High Street was the Roman ’Stane Street’.
Bowling Green Place, SE1 Bowling Green Place is a location in London.
Boyfield Street, SE1 Boyfield Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Brinton Walk, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Burrell Street, SE1 Burrell Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Canvey Street, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Cathedral Street, SE1 Cathedral Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Chaloner Court, SE1 Chaloner Court is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Chancel Street, SE1 Chancel Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Chapel Court, SE1 Chapel Court has hosted The Blue-Eyed Maid pub since 1613.
Clennam Street, SE1 Clennam Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Clink Street, SE1 Clink Street is best known as the historic location of the Clink Prison.
Clink Wharf, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Collinson Walk, SE1 Collinson Walk is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Copperfield Street, SE1 Copperfield Street was named after the novel David Copperfield by Charles Dickens, by association with nearby Dickens Square.
Crosby Row, SE1 Crosby Row is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Disney Place, SE1 Disney Place is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Disney Street, SE1 Disney Street is a location in London.
Dolben Street, SE1 Dolben Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Doyce Street, SE1 Doyce Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Emerson Street, SE1 Emerson Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Empire Square East, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Empire Square South, SE1 Empire Square South is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Empire Square West, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Europoint House, SW8 Europoint House is a location in London.
Ewer Street, SE1 Ewer Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Falcon Point Piazza, SE1 Falcon Point Piazza is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Gaitskell Way, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Gallery Court, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Gambia Street, SE1 Gambia Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Gare Apartments, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Gatehouse Square, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Gay Street, SE1 Gay Street is a road in the SW15 postcode area
Glasshill Street, SE1 Glasshill Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Godfree Court, SE1 Godfree Court is a block in Southwark.
Grande Vitesse Industrial Centre, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Great Guildford Business Square, SE1 Great Guildford Business Square is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Great Suffolk Street, SE1 Great Suffolk Street was at one time called Dirty Lane.
Green Dragon Court, SE1 Green Dragon Court ran off Bedale Street.
Halfmoon Yard, SE1 Halfmoon Yard lay off Borough High Street,
Hart Yard, E3 Hart Yard is a location in London.
Heath Lodge, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Holland Street, SE1 Today’s Holland Street was originally part of a street called Gravel Lane.
Hopton Street, SE1 Hopton Street was known as Green Walk until the late nineteenth century.
Horseshoe Wharf Apartments, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Invicta Plaza, SE1 Invicta Plaza is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Isaac Way, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Junction Approach, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Kentish Buildings, SE1 Kentish Buildings is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
King James Court, SE1 King James Court is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Kings Bench Street, SE1 Kings Bench Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Kings Head Yard, SE1 Kings Head Yard is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Lagare Apartments, SE1 Lagare Apartments is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Langdale House, SE1 Residential block
Lant Street, SE1 Lant Street derives its name from the Lant family who inherited the estates known as Southwark Olace.
Lavington Street, SE1 Lavington Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Layton’s Buildings, SE1 Layton’s Buildings lay off Borough High Street.
Layton’s Grove, SE1 Layton’s Grove was situated off Borough High Street.
Little Dorrit Court, SE1 Little Dorrit’s Court, North of Marshalsea Road, is named after the Dickens character.
Lockesley Square, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Loman Street, SE1 Loman Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Madison Apartments, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Maiden Lane, SE1 Maiden Lane is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Maidstone Buildings Mews, SE1 Maidstone Buildings Mews is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Marlborough Gardens, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Marshalsea Road, SE1 Marshalsea Road was previously called Mint Street after a royal Tudor coin mint in the area.
Maya House, SE1 Maya House, on Borough High Street, is notable for its distinctive sculptures.
Mermaid Court, SE1 Mermaid Court is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Merrow Street, SE1 Merrow Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Mint Street, SE1 Mint Street, an ancient Southwark street, (now) runs off Marchelsea Road.
Montague Close, SE1 Montague Close is a street close to London Bridge.
Nelson Square, SE1 Nelson Square is a road in the SE1 postcode area
New Globe Walk, SE1 New Globe Walk is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Newcomen Street, SE1 Newcomen Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Nicholson Street, SE1 Nicholson Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
O’Meara Street, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Oystergate Walk, SE1 Oystergate Walk is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Park Street, SE1 Park Street runs one block south of Bankside.
Partners Ltd, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Peckham High Street, SE1 Peckham High Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Pepper Street, SE1 Pepper Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Perkins Square, SE1 Perkins Square is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Pickwick Street, SE1 Pickwick Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Plantain Place, SE1 Plantain Place is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Pocock Street, SE1 Pocock Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Porter Street, SE1 Porter Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Price’s Street, SE1 Price’s Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Quastels House, SE1 Residential block
Queen’s Head Yard, SE1 Queen’s Head Yard is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Reach Walk, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Redcross Way, SE1 Redcross Way was previously called Red Cross Street.
Risborough Street, SE1 Risborough Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Robinson Road, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Rochester Walk, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Rose Alley, SE1 Rose Alley is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Rowland Hill House, SE1 Rowland Hill House is a block on Union Street
Rushworth Street, SE1 Rushworth Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Sanctuary Street, SE1 Sanctuary Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Sawyer Street, SE1 Sawyer Street is named after Bob Sawyer, a character in the novel The Pickwick Papers by local resident Charles Dickens.
Scoresby Street, SE1 Scoresby Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Silex Street, SE1 Silex Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Soho Wharf, SE1 Soho Wharf is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Solomon Way, E1 Solomon Way is a location in London.
Southall Place, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Southwalk Street, SE1 Southwalk Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Southwark Bridge Road, SE1 Southwark Bridge Road is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Southwark Street, SE1 Southwark Street is a major street just south of the River Thames. It runs between Blackfriars Road to the west and Borough High Street to the east.
St Alphege House, SE1 Residential block
St. Georges Cottages, SE1 St. Georges Cottages is a location in London.
Stoney Street, SE1 Stoney Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Stopher House, SE1 Stopher House is a block on Webber Street
Sudrey Street, SE1 Sudrey Street was formerly Little Suffolk Street.
Sumner Street, SE1 Sumner Street runs from Great Guildford Street to Southwark Bridge Road.
Surrey Row, SE1 Surrey Row is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Surrey Rowe, SE1 Surrey Rowe is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Talbot Yard, SE1 Talbot Yard used to host one of the most famous inns in English literature.
Tennis Street, SE1 Tennis Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Thames Reach, SE28 Thames Reach is a location in London.
The Blue Fin Building, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
The Foundry, SE1 The Foundry is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
The Hop Exchange, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
The Mews, SE1 The Mews is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
The Ride, SE1 The Ride connected Bowling Green Lane (later Bowling Green Lane) and Tennis Court (later Tennis Street).
The Terrace, SE1 The Terrace is a road in the SE1 postcode area
The Vineyard, SE1 The Vineyard is a location in London.
Thrale Street, SE1 Thrale Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Three Crown Square, SE1 Three Crown Square is an official address within Borough Market.
Toulmin Street, SE1 Toulmin Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Trundle Street, SE1 Trundle Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Union Street, SE1 Union Street was so-called as it linked two other streets.
Victor Wharf, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Vine Yard, SE1 Vine Yard is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Webber Street, SE1 Webber Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Weller Street, SE1 Weller Street is one of several local streets named after Dickens characters.
White Hart Yard, SE1 This is a street in the SE1 postcode area
Winchester Square, SE1 Winchester Square is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Winchester Walk, SE1 Winchester Walk is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Winchester Wharf, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Zoar Street, SE1 Zoar Street is named after the former Zoar Chapel here, named for the Biblical Zoara.

NEARBY PUBS
Bankside house This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Barrow boy & banker This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Belushis & st christophers village This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Blackfriars wine bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Blue eyed maid This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Bunch of grapes This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Charles dickens This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Dover Castle This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Katzenjammers This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Lord clyde This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Mar i terra This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Old thameside inn This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Prince william henry This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Rose & crown This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Royal oak This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Ruse This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Slug and lettuce This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
St christopher’s This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Anchor The Anchor is a pub on the south bank of the River Thames, close to Southwark Cathedral and London Bridge station.
The boot & flogger This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The george inn This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The gladstone This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The globe tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The goldsmith This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The heeltap This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The kings arms public house This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The libertine This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The lord nelson This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The market porter This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The mudlark This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The old school yard This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The rake This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The southwark tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The union jack nolia gallary This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Trinity This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Vinopolis city of wine This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
White hart This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Southwark

Southwark is the area immediately south of London Bridge, opposite the City of London.

Southwark is on a previously marshy area south of the River Thames. Recent excavation has revealed prehistoric activity including evidence of early ploughing, burial mounds and ritual activity. The area was originally a series of islands in the River Thames. This formed the best place to bridge the Thames and the area became an important part of Londinium owing its importance to its position as the endpoint of the Roman London Bridge. Two Roman roads, Stane Street and Watling Street, met at Southwark in what is now Borough High Street.

At some point the Bridge fell or was pulled down. Southwark and the city seem to have become largely deserted during the Early Middle Ages. Archaeologically, evidence of settlement is replaced by a largely featureless soil called the Dark Earth which probably (although this is contested) represents an urban area abandoned.

Southwark appears to recover only during the time of King Alfred and his successors. Sometime in and around 886 AD the Bridge was rebuilt and the City and Southwark restored. Southwark was called ’Suddringa Geworc’ which means the ’defensive works of the men of Surrey’. It was probably fortified to defend the bridge and hence the re-emerging City of London to the north. This defensive role is highlighted by the use of the Bridge as a defense against King Swein, his son King Cnut and in 1066, against King William the Conqueror. He failed to force the Bridge during the Norman conquest of England, but Southwark was devastated.

Much of Southwark was originally owned by the church - the greatest reminder of monastic London is Southwark Cathedral, originally the priory of St Mary Overy.

During the Middle Ages, Southwark remained outside of the control of the City and was a haven for criminals and free traders, who would sell goods and conduct trades outside the regulation of the City Livery Companies. An important market - later to become known as the Borough Market - was established there some time in the 13th century. The area was renowned for its inns, especially The Tabard, from which Chaucer’s pilgrims set off on their journey in The Canterbury Tales.

After many decades’ petitioning, in 1550, Southwark was incorporated into the City of London as ’The Ward of Bridge Without’. It became the entertainment district for London, and it was also the red-light area. In 1599, William Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre was built on the South Bank in Southwark, though it burned down in 1613. A modern replica, also called the Globe, has been built near the original site. Southwark was also a favorite area for entertainment like bull and bear-baiting. There was also a famous fair in Southwark which took place near the Church of St. George the Martyr. William Hogarth depicted this fair in his engraving of Southwark Fair (1733).

In 1844 the railway reached Southwark with the opening of London Bridge station.

In 1861 the Great Fire of Southwark destroyed a large number of buildings between Tooley Street and the Thames, including those around Hays Wharf, where Hays Galleria was later built, and blocks to the west almost as far as St Olave’s Church.

In 1899 Southwark was incorporated along with Newington and Walworth into the Metropolitan Borough of Southwark, and in 1965 this was incorporated with the Metropolitan Borough of Camberwell and Metropolitan Borough of Bermondsey into the London Borough of Southwark.

Southwark tube station was opened on 20 November 1999 as part of the Jubilee Line Extension.

The original plan for the Extension did not include a station between those at Waterloo and London Bridge; Southwark station was added after lobbying by the local council. Although it is close to Waterloo, not near the Bankside attractions it was intended to serve, and its only rail interchange is to London Waterloo East mainline station; the passenger usage matches those of other minor central stations. It does however get over double the traffic of nearby Borough station and around triple Lambeth North.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Bank station
Credit: IG/steven.maddison
TUM image id: 1653840363
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Postal area SE1
TUM image id: 1483541461
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Hopton Street, Borough, 1977.
TUM image id: 1557142131
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Ayres Street
TUM image id: 1544924072
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Postal area SE1
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Georg Giese from Danzig, 34-year-old German merchant at the Steelyard, painted in London by Hans Holbein in 1532
Credit: Hans Holbein
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Walbrook Wharf is an operating freight wharf located in the City of London adjacent to Cannon Street station.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Hopton’s Almshouses, Hopton Street, Bankside (1957)
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Wagstaff Buildings, Sumner Road, Bankside, c. 1920.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Hopton Street, Borough, 1977.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Tate Modern viewed from Thames pleasure boat (2003)
Credit: Christine Matthews
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Anchor Terrace, SE1 A large symmetrical building on Southwark Bridge Road, Anchor Terrace was built in 1834 for senior employees of the nearby Anchor Brewery. The building was converted into luxury flats in the late 1990s.
Credit: Wiki Commons/Jwslubbock
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Ayres Street
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Hopton’s Almshouses
Licence: CC BY 2.0


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