Great Sutton Street, EC1M

An area which may have existed since the nineteenth century or before with most of the buildings dating from the 2000s

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(51.52341 -0.10047, 51.523 -0.1) 
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Road · Clerkenwell · EC1M ·
JANUARY
1
2000

Great Sutton Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.





CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
Jeff Owen   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 16:18 GMT   

Owen’s School
Owen Street is the site of Owen’s Boys’ School. The last school was built in 1881 and was demolished in the early 1990s to make way for the development which stand there today. It was a ’Direct Grant’ grammar school and was founded in 1613 by Dame Alice Owen. What is now ’Owen’s Fields’ was the playground between the old school and the new girls’ school (known then as ’Dames Alice Owen’s School’ or simply ’DAOS’). The boys’ school had the top two floors of that building for their science labs. The school moved to Potters Bar in Hertfordshire in 1971 and is now one of the top State comprehensive schools in the country. The old building remained in use as an accountancy college and taxi-drivers’ ’knowledge’ school until it was demolished. The new building is now part of City and Islington College. Owen’s was a fine school. I should know because I attended there from 1961 to 1968.

Reply

Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 19:47 GMT   

Millions Of Rats In Busy London
The Daily Mail on 14 April 1903 reported "MILLIONS OF RATS IN BUSY LONDON"

A rat plague, unprecedented in the annals of London, has broken out on the north side of the Strand. The streets principally infested are Catherine street, Drury lane, Blackmore street, Clare Market and Russell street. Something akin to a reign of terror prevails among the inhabitants after nightfall. Women refuse to pass along Blackmore street and the lower parts of Stanhope street after dusk, for droves of rats perambulate the roadways and pavements, and may be seen running along the window ledges of the empty houses awaiting demolition by the County Council in the Strand to Holborn improvement scheme.

The rats, indeed, have appeared in almost-incredible numbers. "There are millions of them," said one shopkeeper, and his statement was supported by other residents. The unwelcome visitors have been evicted from their old haunts by the County Council housebreakers, and are now busily in search of new homes. The Gaiety Restaurant has been the greatest sufferer. Rats have invaded the premises in such force that the managers have had to close the large dining room on the first floor and the grill rooms on the ground floor and in the basement. Those three spacious halls which have witnessed many as semblages of theatre-goers are now qui:e deserted. Behind the wainscot of the bandstand in the grillroom is a large mound of linen shreds. This represents 1728 serviettes carried theee by the rats.

In the bar the removal of a panel disclosed the astonishing fact that the rats have dragged for a distance of seven or eight yards some thirty or forty beer and wine bottles and stacked them in such a fashion as to make comfortable sleeping places. Mr Williams. the manager of the restaurant, estimates that the rats have destroyed L200 worth of linen. Formerly the Gaiety Restaurant dined 2000 persons daily; no business whatever is now done in this direction.

Reply
Comment
Steven Shepherd   
Added: 4 Feb 2021 14:20 GMT   

Our House
I and my three brothers were born at 178 Pitfield Street. All of my Mothers Family (ADAMS) Lived in the area. There was an area behind the house where the Hoxton Stall holders would keep the barrows. The house was classed as a slum but was a large house with a basement. The basement had 2 rooms that must have been unchanged for many years it contained a ’copper’ used to boil and clean clothes and bedlinen and a large ’range’ a cast iron coal/log fired oven. Coal was delivered through a ’coal hole’ in the street which dropped through to the basement. The front of the house used to be a shop but unused while we lived there. I have many more happy memories of the house too many to put here.

Reply
Comment
MCNALLY    
Added: 17 May 2021 09:42 GMT   

Blackfriars (1959 - 1965)
I lived in Upper Ground from 1959 to 1964 I was 6 years old my parents Vince and Kitty run the Pub The Angel on the corner of Upper Ground and Bodies Bridge. I remember the ceiling of the cellar was very low and almost stretched the length of Bodies Bridge. The underground trains run directly underneath the pub. If you were down in the cellar when a train was coming it was quite frightening

Reply
Reply
Tom   
Added: 21 May 2021 23:07 GMT   

Blackfriars
What is, or was, Bodies Bridge?

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 21 Apr 2021 16:21 GMT   

Liverpool Street
the Bishopsgate station has existed since 1840 as a passenger station, but does not appear in the site’s cartography. Evidently, the 1860 map is in fact much earlier than that date.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 14:31 GMT   

correction
Chaucer did not write Pilgrims Progress. His stories were called the Canterbury Tales

Reply
Comment
Lena    
Added: 18 Mar 2021 13:08 GMT   

White Conduit Street, N1
My mum, Rosina Wade of the Wade and Hannam family in the area of Chapel Street and Parkfield Street, bought her first ’costume’ at S Cohen’s in White Conduit Street. Would have probably been about 1936 or thereabouts. She said that he was a small man but an expert tailor. I hope that Islington Council preserve the shop front as it’s a piece of history of the area. Mum used to get her high heel shoes from an Italian shoe shop in Chapel Street. She had size 2 feet and they would let her know when a new consignment of size 2 shoes were in. I think she was a very good customer. She worked at Killingbacks artificial flower maker in Northampton Square and later at the Halifax bombers factory north of Edgware where she was a riveter.

Reply

   
Added: 3 Jun 2021 15:50 GMT   

All Bar One
The capitalisation is wrong

Reply
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
John Neill   
Added: 25 Nov 2021 11:30 GMT   

Sandringham Road, E10 (1937 - 1966)
I lived at No. 61 with my parents during these years. I went to Canterbury Road school (now Barclay Primary) and sang as a boy soprano (treble) in the church choir at St Andrew’s church, on the corner of Forest Glade.
Opposite us lived the Burgess family. Their son Russell also sang in my choir as a tenor. He later became a well-known musician and the choirmaster at Wandsworth Boys’ School.
Just at the end of WW2 a German rocket (V2) landed in the grounds of Whipps Cross Hospital, damaging many of the houses in Sandringham Road, including ours.

Reply
Comment
Tim Stevenson   
Added: 16 Nov 2021 18:03 GMT   

Pub still open
The Bohemia survived the 2020/21 lockdowns and is still a thriving local social resource.

Reply
Comment
STEPHEN JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:25 GMT   

Fellows Court, E2
my family moved into the tower block 13th floor (maisonette), in 1967 after our street Lenthall rd e8 was demolished, we were one of the first families in the new block. A number of families from our street were rehoused in this and the adjoining flats. Inside toilet and central heating, all very modern at the time, plus eventually a tarmac football pitch in the grounds,(the cage), with a goal painted by the kids on the brick wall of the railway.

Reply

STEPHEN ARTHUR JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:12 GMT   

Lynedoch Street, E2
my father Arthur Jackson was born in lynedoch street in 1929 and lived with mm grandparents and siblings, until they were relocated to Pamela house Haggerston rd when the street was to be demolished

Reply

Sir Walter Besant   
Added: 11 Nov 2021 18:47 GMT   

Sir Walter adds....
All the ground facing Wirtemberg Street at Chip and Cross Streets is being levelled for building and the old houses are disappearing fast. The small streets leading through into little Manor Street are very clean and tenanted by poor though respectable people, but little Manor Street is dirty, small, and narrow. Manor Street to Larkhall Rise is a wide fairly clean thoroughfare of mixed shops and houses which improves towards the north. The same may be said of Wirtemberg Street, which commences poorly, but from the Board School north is far better than at the Clapham end.

Source: London: South of the Thames - Chapter XX by Sir Walter Besant (1912)

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 6 Nov 2021 15:03 GMT   

Old Nichol Street, E2
Information about my grandfather’s tobacconist shop

Reply
Comment
tom   
Added: 3 Nov 2021 05:16 GMT   

I met
someone here 6 years ago

Reply
Comment
Fion Anderson   
Added: 2 Nov 2021 12:55 GMT   

Elstree not Borehamwood
Home of the UK film industry

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Clerkenwell Preceptory The following is a list of monastic houses in Greater London, England.
Clerkenwell Priory Clerkenwell Priory was a priory of the Monastic Order of the Knights Hospitallers of St John of Jerusalem, located in Clerkenwell, London.
Golden Lane Estate, EC1Y The Golden Lane Housing Estate is a 1950s council housing complex in the City of London.
Hicks Hall Hicks Hall (1611 - 1778) was a building in St John Street, Clerkenwell.
Maison Novelli Maison Novelli was a restaurant in Clerkenwell, Central London, located opposite the Old Session House.
Marx Memorial Library The Marx Memorial Library in London holds more than 43,000 books, pamphlets and newspapers on Marxism, Scientific Socialism and Working class history.
Middlesex Sessions House The Former Middlesex Session(s) House or the Old Sessions House is a large building on Clerkenwell Green.
Museum of the Order of St John The Museum of the Order of St John in Clerkenwell, London, tells the story of the Venerable Order of Saint John.
St James’s Church, Clerkenwell St James Church, Clerkenwell, is an Anglican parish church.
St John Clerkenwell St John Clerkenwell is a former parish church in Clerkenwell, now used as the chapel of the modern Order of St John.
St John’s Gate, Clerkenwell St John’s Gate is one of the few tangible remains from Clerkenwell’s monastic past; it was built in 1504 by Prior Thomas Docwra as the south entrance to the inner precinct of Clerkenwell Priory, the priory of the Knights of Saint John - the Knights Hospitallers.

NEARBY STREETS
Agdon Street, EC1V Agdon Street was originally called Woods Close.
Albemarle Way, EC1M Albemarle Way was named after Elizabeth, Dowager Duchess of Albermarle, who lived at Newcastle House nearby in the 18th century.
Albion Courtyard, EC1A Albion Courtyard is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Albion Place, EC1M Albion Place was formerly George Court.
Aldersgate Street, EC2Y Aldersgate Street is located on the west side of the Barbican Estate.
Amias Place, EC1Y Amias Place was formerly George Yard.
Anchor Yard, EC1Y Anchor Yard is named after a former inn here of this name.
Aylesbury Street, EC1V Aylesbury Street - after the earl of Aylesbury who owned a house near here in the 17th century.
Baltic Street East, EC1Y Baltic Street East was built by a timber merchant around 1810 who named local streets after trade-related activities.
Baltic Street West, EC1Y Baltic Street is split into east and west halves.
Banner Street, EC1Y Banner Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Bartholomew Square, EC1V This is a street in the EC1V postcode area
Bastwick Street, EC1V Bastwick Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Beech Street, EC1Y Beech Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Benjamin Street, EC1M Benjamin Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Berkeley Court, EC1M Berkeley Court ran south out of Berkley Street (now Briset Street).
Berry Place, EC1V Berry Place is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Berry Street, EC1M Berry Street is a road in the EC1M postcode area
Bowling Green Lane, EC1R Bowling Green Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Brewery Square, EC1V Brewery Square is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Brewhouse Yard, EC1V Brewhouse Yard is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Bridgewater Square, EC2Y Bridgewater Square is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Briset Street, EC1M Briset Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Britton Street, EC1M Britton Street was named after Thomas Britten, a 17th century coalman.
Broad Yard, EC1M Broad Yard is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Bryer Court, EC2Y Bryer Court is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Carthusian Street, EC1A Carthusian Street is a road in the EC1A postcode area
Central Street, EC1V Central Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Charterhouse Buildings, EC1A Charterhouse Buildings is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Charterhouse Mews, EC1A Charterhouse Mews is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Charterhouse Square, EC1M Charterhouse Square is the largest courtyard associated with London Charterhouse, mostly formed of Tudor and Stuart architecture restored after the Blitz.
Clerkenwell Close, EC1R Clerkenwell Close is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Clerkenwell Green, EC1M Clerkenwell Green is the street named after the historical green.
Clerkenwell Road, EC1M Clerkenwell Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Cloth Court, EC1M Cloth Court is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Cloth Street, EC1M Cloth Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Compton Street, EC1V Compton Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Cornwell House, EC1M Residential block
Corporation Row, EC1R Corporation Row is a road in the EC1R postcode area
Cowcross Street, EC1M Cowcross Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Crescent Row, EC1Y Crescent Row is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Cripplegate Street, EC1Y Cripplegate Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Cyrus Street, EC1V Cyrus Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Dallington Street, EC1V Dallington Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Davina House, EC1V Residential block
Defoe House, EC2Y Residential block
Domingo Street, EC1Y Domingo Street links Old Street with Baltic Street East.
Eagle Court, EC1M Eagle Court is a courtyard situated off of Benjamin Street.
East Passage, EC1A East Passage is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Fann Street, EC1Y Fann Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Farringdon Lane, EC1R Farringdon Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Farringdon Road, EC1V Farringdon Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Farringdon Road, EC4A Farringdon Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Faulkners Alley, EC1M Faulkners Alley is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Finsbury Estate, EC1R Finsbury Estate is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Florin Court, EC1M Florin Court is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Fortune Street, EC1Y Fortune Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Garrett Street, EC1Y Garrett Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Gate House, EC1M Residential block
Gee Street, EC1V Gee Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Glasshouse Yard, EC2Y Glasshouse Yard is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Gloucester Way, EC1R Gloucester Way is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Golden Lane, EC1Y Golden Lane connects Old Street and Beech Street.
Goswell Road, EC1A Goswell Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Goswell Road, EC1Y Goswell Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Greenhills Rents, EC1A Greenhills Rents is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Greville Street, EC1N Greville Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1N postal area.
Grimthorpe House, EC1V Residential block
Hatton Garden, EC1N Hatton Garden is a street and area noted as London’s jewellery quarter and centre of the UK diamond trade.
Hatton Place, EC1N Hatton Place is one of the streets of London in the EC1N postal area.
Hayne Street, EC1A Hayne Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Haywards Place, EC1V Haywards Place is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Helmet Row, EC1V Helmet Row is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Honduras Street, EC1Y Honduras Street dates from the 1810s.
Ironmonger Row, EC1V Ironmonger Row is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Jerusalem Passage, EC1V Jerusalem Passage was named for an old public house, St. John of Jerusalem, which stood at the northeast corner until 1760.
Joseph Close, EC1R Joseph Close is a road in the N4 postcode area
Joseph Trotter Close, EC1R Joseph Trotter Close is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Kingsway Place, EC1R Kingsway Place is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Kirby Street, EC1N Kirby Street was named for Christopher Hatton’s Kirby House in Northamptonshire.
Lauderdale Tower, EC2Y Lauderdale Tower is the westernmost tower in the Barbican, facing onto Lauderdale Place.
Leo Yard, EC1V Leo Yard is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Lever Street, EC1V Lever Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Lindsey Street, EC1A Lindsey Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Long Lane, EC1A Long Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Long Lane, EC1M Long Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Malta Street, EC1V This is a street in the EC1V postcode area
Memel Street, EC1Y Memel Street was built over the site of a former brewery in the 1810s.
Meredith Street, EC1R Meredith Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Middle Street, EC1A Middle Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Mitchell Street, EC1V Mitchell Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Murton Street, EC1V Murton Street dates from about 1829.
Myddelton Street, EC1R Myddelton Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Newington Close, EC1R This is a street in the EC1R postcode area
Norman Street, EC1V Norman Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Northampton Road, EC1R Northampton Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Northampton Square, EC1V Northampton Square is a square between Finsbury and Clerkenwell, located between Goswell Road and St John Street.
Northburgh Street, EC1M Northburgh Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Northburgh Street, EC1M Northburgh Street in the EC1V postcode is a western extension of the main part of the street.
Pardon Street, EC1V Pardon Street was named after Pardon Chapel, founded in the wake of the Black Death in 1348.
Passing Alley, EC1M Passing Alley is a road in the EC1M postcode area
Paton Street, EC1V Paton Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Pear Tree Court, EC1R Pear Tree Court is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Pear Tree Street, EC1V Pear Tree Street connects Central Street and Goswell Road.
Penny Bank Chambers, EC1M Penny Bank Chambers is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Percival Street, EC1V Percival Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Peter’s Lane, EC1M Peter’s Lane is named after the church which once stood close to the Cross Keys tavern.
Pickax Street, EC2Y Pickax Street once ran from Long Lane to Goswell Road (which before 1864 was called Goswell Street).
Radnor Street, EC1V Radnor Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Roscoe Street, EC1Y Roscoe Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Rosoman Place, EC1R Rosoman Place is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Rosoman Street, EC1R Rosoman Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Saffron Hill, EC1N Saffron Hill’s name derives the time that it was part of an estate on which saffron grew.
Saint John Street, EC1M This is a street in the EC1M postcode area
Sans Walk, EC1R Sans Walk was named after Edward Sans in 1893, who was then the oldest member of the local parish vestry.
Sans Works, EC1R Sans Works is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Scotswood Street, EC1R Scotswood Street is a road in the EC1R postcode area
Sebastian Street, EC1V Sebastian Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Sekforde Court, EC1R Sekforde Court is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Sekforde Street, EC1R Sekforde Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Seward Street, EC1V Seward Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Skinner Street, EC1R Skinner Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Smokehouse Yard, EC1M Smokehouse Yard is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
St Cross Street, EC1N St Cross Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1N postal area.
St Jamess Walk, EC1R St Jamess Walk is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
St John Street, EC1V St John Street runs from Finsbury to Farringdon.
St John Street, EC1V The northern section of St John Street was confusingly, before the 20th century, named Saint John Street Road.
St John’s Square, EC1M St John’s Square, south of Clerkenwell Road, is in the EC1M postal area.
St John’s Square, EC1M St John’s Square is split into two sections, north and south of Clerkenwell Road.
St Johns House, EC1M Residential block
St Johns Lane, EC1M St Johns Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
St Johns Path, EC1M St Johns Path is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
St Johns Place, EC1M St Johns Place is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
St John’s Gate, EC1M St John’s Gate is a road in the EC1M postcode area
Sutton Lane, EC1M Sutton Lane is a road in the EC1M postcode area
Sutton Road, EC1M Sutton Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Sycamore Street, EC1Y Sycamore Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
The Charterhouse, EC1M Residential block
The Horseshoe Path, EC1R The Horseshoe Path runs around the back of the Horseshoe pub.
Timber Street, EC1Y Timber Street was formerly called Norway Street.
Tompion House, EC1V Residential block
Tompion Street, EC1V Tompion Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Turnmill Street, EC1 Turnmill Street appears in the works of Shakespeare.
Warwick Yard, EC1Y Warwick Yard is a road in the EC1Y postcode area
Waterloo Street, EC1V Waterloo Street once ran from Lever Street to Radnor Street.
Whitecross Street, EC1Y Whitecross Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Woodbridge Street, EC1R Woodbridge Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Wyclif Street, EC1V Wyclif Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Young’s Buildings, EC1Y Young’s Buildings was named after Francis Young, a local 18th century property owner

NEARBY PUBS
BarSmith This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Be At One This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Best Mangal Bar & Restaurant This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Bourne & Hollingsworth Buildings This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Charterhouse Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Circle Bar, Level 0 This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
City Pride This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Clerkenwell & Social This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Crown Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Hand & Shears This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Hat & Tun This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Hat and Feathers At the corner of Clerkenwell Road and Goswell Road sits the Hat and Feathers pub.
Lazybones This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Ninth Ward London This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Nomad Club This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Piano Smithfield This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Sabor Iberico This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Sir John Oldcastle This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Sutton Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Sutton Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Artisan This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Betsey Trotwood This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Bowler This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Castle This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Fence This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Fox and Anchor This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Green This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Horseshoe This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Old Ivy House This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The One Tun This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Peasant This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Shakespeare This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Slaughtered Lamb This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Trader This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Well This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Three Kings This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
White Bear This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Clerkenwell

Clerkenwell was once known as London’s Little Italy because of the large number of Italians living in the area from the 1850s until the 1960s.

Clerkenwell took its name from the Clerks’ Well in Farringdon Lane. In the Middle Ages, the London Parish clerks performed annual mystery plays there, based on biblical themes. Part of the well remains visible, incorporated into a 1980s building called Well Court.

In the 17th century South Clerkenwell became a fashionable place of residence. Oliver Cromwell owned a house on Clerkenwell Close, just off the Green. Several aristocrats had houses there, most notably the Duke of Northumberland, as did people such as Erasmus Smith.

Before Clerkenwell became a built-up area, it had a reputation as a resort a short walk out of the city, where Londoners could disport themselves at its spas, of which there were several, based on natural chalybeate springs, tea gardens and theatres. The present day Sadler’s Wells has survived as heir to this tradition.

Clerkenwell was also the location of three prisons: the Clerkenwell Bridewell, Coldbath Fields Prison (later Clerkenwell Gaol) and the New Prison, later the Clerkenwell House of Detention, notorious as the scene of the Clerkenwell Outrage in 1867, an attempted prison break by Fenians who killed many in the tenement houses on Corporation Row in trying to blow a hole in the prison wall.

The Industrial Revolution changed the area greatly. It became a centre for breweries, distilleries and the printing industry. It gained a special reputation for the making of clocks and watches, which activity once employed many people from around the area. Flourishing craft workshops still carry on some of the traditional trades, such as jewellery-making. Clerkenwell is home to Witherby’s, Europe’s oldest printing company.

After the Second World War, Clerkenwell suffered from industrial decline and many of the premises occupied by the engineering, printing publishing and meat and food trades (the last mostly around Smithfield) fell empty. Several acclaimed council housing estates were commissioned by Finsbury Borough Council. Modernist architect and Russian migr Berthold Lubetkin’s listed Spa Green Estate, constructed 19431950, has recently been restored. The Finsbury Estate, constructed in 1968 to the designs of Joseph Emberton includes flats, since altered and re-clad.

A general revival and gentrification process began in the 1980s, and the area is now known for loft-living in some of the former industrial buildings. It also has young professionals, nightclubs and restaurants and is home to many professional offices as an overspill for the nearby City of London and West End.

Amongst other sectors, there is a notable concentration of design professions around Clerkenwell, and supporting industries such as high-end designer furniture showrooms.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Smithfield Market
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The Angel, Islington (c.1890)
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Amen Court, EC4M
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Farringdon Street, EC4M
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Kirby Street sign
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In the neighbourhood...

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Smithfield Market
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Saint Johns Gate, Clerkenwell, the main gateway to the Priory of Saint John of Jerusalem. The church was founded in the 12th century by Jordan de Briset, a Norman knight. Prior Docwra completed the gatehouse shown in this photograph in 1504. The gateway served as the main entry to the Priory, which was the center of the Order of St John of Jerusalem (the Knights Hospitallers).
Credit: Henry Dixon (1880)
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Clerkenwell Green (1898) The water fountain shown here became public toilets.
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View of Cloth Fair in 1884 showing the side entrance to St Bartholomews Priory, Smithfield.
Credit: John Crowther
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Great Arthur House, at the centre of the Golden Lane Estate, was the tallest residential building in Britain at the time of its construction.
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Kirby Street sign
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Pardon Street
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Saffron Hill street sign
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Sans Walk, Clerkenwell
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Until combined in the twentieth century, St John Street was split between St John Street (south) and St John Street Road (north)
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