Golders Green crossroads

Crossing in/near Golders Green, existing between the 1820s and now

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(51.572 -0.1955, 51.572 -0.195) 
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Crossing · * · NW11 ·
October
18
2021

The Golders Green name derives from that of a local family - the Goodyers - and was first recorded in 1612.

The hamlet of Golders Green originated as a group of cottages on waste ground on each side of the main road. In 1754, manorial waste at Golders Green stretched for some distance on either side of the main road from Hampstead.

By 1754 there were about 16 houses with small gardens at Golders Green, most of them on small inclosures from the waste and by 1751 there were two inns at Golders Green: the Hoop, commemorated later by the name ’’Hoop Lane’’, and the White Swan. The White Swan had tea gardens for summer visitors to Golders Green in 1882.

In the early 19th century, the manorial waste at Golders Green was enclosed for villas. In 1814 Golders Green contained ’many ornamental villas and cottages, surrounded with plantations’, and in 1828 detached houses spread on both sides of the road as far as Brent Bridge. The green was finally enclosed in 1873-4.

At Golders Green, a straggling hamlet in 1901, new houses were built at the corner of Wentworth Road and Hoop Lane in 1905.

The underground railway arrived in 1907. In that year, trams, and motorbuses, the area began to be developed into suburban streets of semi-detached houses, a process which continued into the 1930s.

At Golders Green cross-roads, near the Underground station, rows of shops were under construction in 1911-12 on a site which in 1904 had been deserted; churches, chapels, a theatre, a cinema, and a large shopping centre followed. The fire brigade opened a sub-station at Golders Green in 1900.

In 1911 the population had grown to 4465, and by 1931 it had reached 17 837.

The Refectory, now a pub, was opened in February 1916, and is thought to by some to be the first ever public restaurant supplied by electricity. The shopping district called ’Cheapside’), was well established by 1914. In June 1918 a Handley Page bomber crashed near to houses in Golders Green and in December 1920 a Handley Page passenger aircraft crashed into houses in Basing Hill.

By 1940 the area had developed into a centre in its own right, separate from Hendon, with a theatre (The Hippodrome 1913), a library (1935) and a cinemas (the Ionic 1913).

It is for its Jewish community that Golders Green is mostly famous. There were Jewish businesses and homes in Golders Green even by 1910, and by 1915 there were thought to be about 300 Jewish families living in Golders Green. By 1959 around a quarter of the population of the Borough of Hendon (which included Golders Green) was Jewish.

More recently, the lower half of Golders Green Road has attracted some Japanese and Asian businesses and many Polish people have moved into the area.




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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
MARY RUSHTON-BEALES   
Added: 25 Jan 2021 17:58 GMT   

MY GRANDMA GREW UP HERE - 100 WILLIFIELD WAY
MY GRANDMA WINIFRED AND HER BROTHERS ERIC AND JEFF LIVED AT 100 WILLIFIELD WAY. THEY WERE PART OF THE HAMPSTEAD GARDEN SUBURB SOCIAL EXPERIMENT. GRANDMA ALWAYS TALKED ABOUT WILLIFIELD WAY AND HER LIFE IN HAMPSTEAD GARDEN SUBURB WITH GREAT AFFECTION. SHE WAS CONVINCED THAT THEY HAD BETTER EDUCATION BECAUSE THEY LIVED THERE. NOT LONG AGO MY BROTHER AND I TOOK THE TRAIN TO THIS PART OF LONDON AND WALKED DOWN THE ROAD. THE HOUSE IS STILL THERE

Reply
Comment
Graham Margetson   
Added: 9 Feb 2021 14:33 GMT   

I lived at 4 Arkwright Road before it was the school
My parents lived at 4 Arkwright Road. Mrs Goodwin actually owned the house and my parents rented rooms from her.


Reply
Lived here
   
Added: 10 Dec 2020 23:51 GMT   

Wellgarth Road, NW11
I lived at 15 Wellgarth Road with my parents and family from 1956 until I left home in the 70s and continued to visit my mother there until she moved in the early 80s. On the first day we moved in we kids raced around the garden and immediately discovered an air raid shelter that ran right underneath the house which I assume was added in the run-up to WW2. There was a basement room with its own entrance off the garden and right opposite where the air raid shelter emerged. In no time at all up high near the ceiling of this room, we discovered a door which, while we were little enough, we could enter by standing on some item of furniture, haul ourselves in and hide from the grownups. That room was soundproof enough for us kids to make a racket if we wanted to. But not too loud if my dad was playing billiards in the amazing wood-panelled room immediately above. We had no idea that we were living in such an historical building. To us it was just fun - and home!

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
John Neill   
Added: 25 Nov 2021 11:30 GMT   

Sandringham Road, E10 (1937 - 1966)
I lived at No. 61 with my parents during these years. I went to Canterbury Road school (now Barclay Primary) and sang as a boy soprano (treble) in the church choir at St Andrew’s church, on the corner of Forest Glade.
Opposite us lived the Burgess family. Their son Russell also sang in my choir as a tenor. He later became a well-known musician and the choirmaster at Wandsworth Boys’ School.
Just at the end of WW2 a German rocket (V2) landed in the grounds of Whipps Cross Hospital, damaging many of the houses in Sandringham Road, including ours.

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Comment
Tim Stevenson   
Added: 16 Nov 2021 18:03 GMT   

Pub still open
The Bohemia survived the 2020/21 lockdowns and is still a thriving local social resource.

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Comment
STEPHEN JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:25 GMT   

Fellows Court, E2
my family moved into the tower block 13th floor (maisonette), in 1967 after our street Lenthall rd e8 was demolished, we were one of the first families in the new block. A number of families from our street were rehoused in this and the adjoining flats. Inside toilet and central heating, all very modern at the time, plus eventually a tarmac football pitch in the grounds,(the cage), with a goal painted by the kids on the brick wall of the railway.

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STEPHEN ARTHUR JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:12 GMT   

Lynedoch Street, E2
my father Arthur Jackson was born in lynedoch street in 1929 and lived with mm grandparents and siblings, until they were relocated to Pamela house Haggerston rd when the street was to be demolished

Reply

Sir Walter Besant   
Added: 11 Nov 2021 18:47 GMT   

Sir Walter adds....
All the ground facing Wirtemberg Street at Chip and Cross Streets is being levelled for building and the old houses are disappearing fast. The small streets leading through into little Manor Street are very clean and tenanted by poor though respectable people, but little Manor Street is dirty, small, and narrow. Manor Street to Larkhall Rise is a wide fairly clean thoroughfare of mixed shops and houses which improves towards the north. The same may be said of Wirtemberg Street, which commences poorly, but from the Board School north is far better than at the Clapham end.

Source: London: South of the Thames - Chapter XX by Sir Walter Besant (1912)

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Comment
   
Added: 6 Nov 2021 15:03 GMT   

Old Nichol Street, E2
Information about my grandfather’s tobacconist shop

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Comment
tom   
Added: 3 Nov 2021 05:16 GMT   

I met
someone here 6 years ago

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Comment
Fion Anderson   
Added: 2 Nov 2021 12:55 GMT   

Elstree not Borehamwood
Home of the UK film industry

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Golders Green crossroads The Golders Green name derives from that of a local family - the Goodyers - and was first recorded in 1612.
Golders Green crossroads Golders Green crossroads was formed when the new Finchley Road crossed North End Road in the 1830s.
Golders Green, looking south (1905) This photo from the London Transport Collection shows Golders Green crossroads looking south in 1905. While this predates the arrival of the Hampstead Tube (Northern Line) by a couple of years’ land speculation is already taking place.
Heruka Buddhist Centre Heruka Kadampa Meditation Centre (KMC) is the main New Kadampa Tradition Buddhist Centre for north & central London.
Hodford Farm The Hodford and Cowhouse estate consisted of a compact block of lands stretching from the Hampstead border to a point north of Golders Green station and from Cricklewood to Golders Hill.
Looking towards Temple Fortune (1905) This image shows the arrival of street lamps on the hill leading up to Temple Fortune from Golders Green.

NEARBY STREETS
Accommodation Road, NW11 The oddly-named Accommodation Road is a service road in Golders Green.
Armitage Road, NW11 Armitage Road is a street in Golders Green.
Basing Hill, NW11 Basing Hill is a street in Golders Green.
Beechcroft Avenue, NW11 Beechcroft Avenue is a street in Golders Green.
Broadwalk Lane, NW11 Broadwalk Lane is a road in the NW11 postcode area
Corringham Court, NW11 Corringham Court is a road in the NW11 postcode area
Corringham Road, NW11 Corringham Road is a manifestation of designer Raymond Unwin’s later ’Georgian’ phase.
Corringway, NW11 Corringway included a unique Hampstead Garden Suburb feature - a large block of garages (now demolished)
Dunstan Road, NW11 Dunstan Road is a street in Golders Green.
Elmcroft Avenue, NW11 Elmcroft Avenue is a street in Golders Green.
Finchley Road, NW11 Finchley Road was one of the major improvement roads of the 1820s.
Golders Green Crescent, NW11 Golders Green Crescent is a street in Golders Green.
Golders Park Close, NW11 Golders Park Close is a road in the NW11 postcode area
Golders Way, NW11 Golders Way is a road in the NW11 postcode area
Heath Close, NW11 Heath Close is a road in the NW11 postcode area
Heathview Court, NW11 Heathview Court is on Corringway.
Helenslea Avenue, NW11 Helenslea Avenue is a street in Golders Green.
Hodford Road, NW11 Hodford Road is a street in Golders Green.
Middleton Road, NW11 Middleton Road is a street in Golders Green.
North End Road, NW11 North End Road ultimately links Hampstead with Hendon.
Park Avenue, NW11 Park Avenue is a road in the NW11 postcode area
Park Drive, NW11 Park Drive is a street in Golders Green.
Powis Gardens, NW11 Powis Gardens is a street in Golders Green.
Ridgeway, NW11 Ridgeway is a location in London.
Rodborough Road, NW11 Rodborough Road is a street in Golders Green.
Rotherwick Road, NW11 Rotherwick Road, like Corringham Road, links Golders Green with Hampstead Garden Suburb.
St Alban’s Lane, NW11 St Alban’s Lane runs behind St Alban’s Church, Golders Green.
St Albans Close, NW11 St Albans Close is a small cul-de-sac serving St Albans Church.
Station Forecourt, NW11 Station Forecourt is a street in Golders Green.
The Park, NW11 The Park is a road in the NW11 postcode area
The Ridgeway, NW11 The Ridgeway takes its name from a very old road in Mill Hill.
The Riding, NW11 The Riding is a street in Golders Green.
Vale Rise, NW11 Vale Rise is a road in the NW11 postcode area
West Heath Avenue, NW11 West Heath Avenue is a street in Golders Green.
West Heath Court, NW11 West Heath Court is a block in Golders Green.
West Heath Drive, NW11 West Heath Drive is a street in Golders Green.
White Lodge, NW11 White Lodge is a street in Golders Green.
Woodstock Road, NW11 Woodstock Road is named after Woodstock House which used to be a large house in Golders Green.

NEARBY PUBS
Gate Lodge This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Hoop Lane Montessori School This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Refectory This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Golders Green

Golders Green was a rural hamlet at the crossroads of Finchley Road and North End Road until the arrival of the tube in 1907.

Golders Green station was opened by the Charing Cross, Euston & Hampstead Railway (CCE&HR, now part of the Northern Line) on 22 June 1907. It was one of the railway's two northern terminals (the other being at Archway) and was also the site of the railway's depot.

Before World War I plans were made to extend the CCE&HR north from Golders Green to Hendon and Edgware to open up new areas of the Middlesex countryside to development and to create a source of new passengers. The war postponed the construction of the extension and work did not begin until 12 June 1922. The first section of the extension, as far as Hendon Central opened on 19 November 1923.


LOCAL PHOTOS
North End Road, NW11
TUM image id: 1492987726
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In the neighbourhood...

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North End Road, NW11
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Golders Green crossroads pictured before the arrival of the tube station in the early 1900s
Credit: London Transport Museum
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To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

The corner of Corringway and Corringham Road in Hampstead Garden Suburb (2021)
Credit: Instagram/@audsbitsnbobs
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