Kettlebaston Road, E10

Road in/near Lea Bridge

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(51.56701 -0.0311, 51.567 -0.031) 
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Road · Lea Bridge · E10 ·
JANUARY
1
2000

Kettlebaston Road is one of the streets of London in the E10 postal area.





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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

None so far :(
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Born here
   
Added: 27 Mar 2023 18:28 GMT   

Nower Hill, HA5
lo

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Added: 26 Mar 2023 14:50 GMT   

Albert Mews
It is not a gargoyle over the entrance arch to Albert Mews, it is a likeness of Prince Albert himself.

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Christine D Elliott   
Added: 20 Mar 2023 15:52 GMT   

The Blute Family
My grandparents, Frederick William Blute & Alice Elizabeth Blute nee: Warnham lived at 89 Blockhouse Street Deptford from around 1917.They had six children. 1. Alice Maragret Blute (my mother) 2. Frederick William Blute 3. Charles Adrian Blute 4. Violet Lillian Blute 5. Donald Blute 6. Stanley Vincent Blute (Lived 15 months). I lived there with my family from 1954 (Birth) until 1965 when we were re-housed for regeneration to the area.
I attended Ilderton Road School.
Very happy memories of that time.

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Pearl Foster   
Added: 20 Mar 2023 12:22 GMT   

Dukes Place, EC3A
Until his death in 1767, Daniel Nunes de Lara worked from his home in Dukes Street as a Pastry Cook. It was not until much later the street was renamed Dukes Place. Daniel and his family attended the nearby Bevis Marks synagogue for Sephardic Jews. The Ashkenazi Great Synagogue was established in Duke Street, which meant Daniel’s business perfectly situated for his occupation as it allowed him to cater for both congregations.

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Dr Paul Flewers   
Added: 9 Mar 2023 18:12 GMT   

Some Brief Notes on Hawthorne Close / Hawthorne Street
My great-grandparents lived in the last house on the south side of Hawthorne Street, no 13, and my grandmother Alice Knopp and her brothers and sisters grew up there. Alice Knopp married Charles Flewers, from nearby Hayling Road, and moved to Richmond, Surrey, where I was born. Leonard Knopp married Esther Gutenberg and lived there until the street was demolished in the mid-1960s, moving on to Tottenham. Uncle Len worked in the fur trade, then ran a pet shop in, I think, the Kingsland Road.

From the back garden, one could see the almshouses in the Balls Pond Road. There was an ink factory at the end of the street, which I recall as rather malodorous.

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KJH   
Added: 7 Mar 2023 17:14 GMT   

Andover Road, N7 (1939 - 1957)
My aunt, Doris nee Curtis (aka Jo) and her husband John Hawkins (aka Jack) ran a small general stores at 92 Andover Road (N7). I have found details in the 1939 register but don’t know how long before that it was opened.He died in 1957. In the 1939 register he is noted as being an ARP warden for Islington warden

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Added: 2 Mar 2023 13:50 GMT   

The Queens Head
Queens Head demolished and a NISA supermarket and flats built in its place.

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Mike   
Added: 28 Feb 2023 18:09 GMT   

6 Elia Street
When I was young I lived in 6 Elia Street. At the end of the garden there was a garage owned by Initial Laundries which ran from an access in Quick Street all the way up to the back of our garden. The fire exit to the garage was a window leading into our garden. 6 Elia Street was owned by Initial Laundry.

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V:5

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Lea Bridge Lea Bridge is a district spanning an area between the London boroughs of Hackney and Waltham Forest.
Lea Bridge Farm Lea Bridge Farm (Leabridge Farm) was originally in the middle of Leyton Marsh.

NEARBY STREETS
Argall Way, E10 Argall Way is a road in the E10 postcode area
Beck Square, E10 Beck Square was developed as part of the Motion Estate.
Belvedere Road, E10 Belvedere Road is a road in the E10 postcode area
Bloxhall Road, E10 Bloxhall Road is one of the streets of London in the E10 postal area.
Blyth Road, E17 Blyth Road is a road in the E17 postcode area
Burwell Road, E10 Burwell Road is one of the streets of London in the E10 postal area.
Clementina Road, E10 Clementina Road is one of the streets of London in the E10 postal area.
Dagenham Road, E10 Dagenham Road is a road in the E10 postcode area
Elm Park Road, E10 Elm Park Road is a cul-de-sac leading southeast off Lea Bridge Road.
Estate Way, E10 Commercial area
Fairways Business Park, E10 Fairways Business Park is one of the streets of London in the E10 postal area.
Flempton Road, E10 Flempton Road is one of the streets of London in the E10 postal area.
Gateway Business Centre, E10 Gateway Business Centre is an enterprise area off Church Road.
Gloucester Road, E10 Gloucester Road is a road in the E10 postcode area
Hemstall Lane, E10 Hemstall Lane was described in 1630 as a ’chase lane’, leading west from the junction of Markhouse Lane (now Markhouse Road).
Heybridge Way, E17 Heybridge Way is one of the streets of London in the E10 postal area.
Hitcham Road, E10 Hitcham Road is a road in the E10 postcode area
Hitcham Road, E17 Hitcham Road is one of the streets of London in the E17 postal area.
Lammas Road, E10 Lammas Road is one of the streets of London in the E10 postal area.
Lea Bridge Gardens, E10 A bungalow town of 69 shacks, with wells and earth closets, sprang up in the 1880s at Lea Bridge Gardens.
Lea Bridge Industrial Estate, E10 An industrial area within the E10 postcode
Lea Valley Business Park, E10 Lea Valley Business Park is a business park near to Lea Bridge.
Liden Close, E17 Liden Close is a road in the E17 postcode area
Marsh Lane, E10 Marsh Lane was known as Mill Field Lane and Mill Lane, having been first mentioned in 1443.
Mellish Flats, E10 A street within the E10 postcode
Millicent Road, E10 Millicent Road is one of the streets of London in the E10 postal area.
Morieux Road, E10 Morieux Road is a road in the E10 postcode area
Motion, E10 The Motion is a 2010s development next to Lea Bridge station.
Norton Road, E10 Norton Road is one of the streets of London in the E10 postal area.
Nursery Place, E10 Nursery Place ran alongside Pamplin’s nursery.
Overton Road, E10 Overton Road is one of the streets of London in the E10 postal area.
Period Works, E10 Period Works is an industrial location near to Lea Bridge.
Perth Road, E10 Perth Road runs southeast from Lea Bridge Road.
Rigg Approach, E10 Rigg Approach is one of the streets of London in the E10 postal area.
Roxwell Trading Park, E10 Roxwell Trading Park lies within the E10 postcode.
Sanderstead Road, E10 Sanderstead Road is one of the streets of London in the E10 postal area.
Seymour Road, E10 Seymour Road is one of the streets of London in the E10 postal area.
St Helen’s Place, E10 St Helen’s Place is a road in the E10 postcode area
St. Helens Place, E10 A street within the E10 postcode
Staffa Road, E10 Staffa Road is one of the streets of London in the E10 postal area.
Sybourn Street, E17 Sybourn Street is one of the streets of London in the E17 postal area.
Tallack Road, E10 Tallack Road is a road in the E10 postcode area
Viking Place, E10 Viking Place is a road in the E10 postcode area
Wellington Road, E10 Wellington Road is one of the streets of London in the E10 postal area.

NEARBY PUBS


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Lea Bridge

Lea Bridge is a district spanning an area between the London boroughs of Hackney and Waltham Forest.

It is named for a timber bridge built across the River Lea in 1745 which formed the dividing line between Middlesex and Essex. The road leading to it became known as Lea Bridge Road, with a tollhouse at the Middlesex bank. The bridge was rebuilt in 1821 and tolls continued to be levied until 1872.

Lea Bridge gives access to the lower reaches of the extensive Lee Valley Park. To the south are the Hackney Marshes, and to the north the Walthamstow Marshes.

The old Middlesex Filter Beds have been converted into a nature reserve, and on the Leyton side the Essex Filter Beds are now a reserve for birds. Next to the south side of the bridge are two pubs: ’The Princess of Wales’ and ’The Ship Aground’.

Lea Bridge station opened on 15 September 1840 by the Northern and Eastern Railway as Lea Bridge Road and is thought to be the earliest example of a station having its building on a railway bridge, with staircases down to the platforms.

The station closed on 8 July 1985 but after service changes, reopened in May 2016.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Clapping people
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In the neighbourhood...

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Lea Bridge Farm, as imagined by artist Lindsay Topping
Credit: Lindsay Topping
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