Lakeside Road, W14

Road in/near Holland Park, existing between the 1870s and now

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Road · * · W14 ·
October
17
2021

Lakeside Road was built on the site of artificial lakes formed by local brickworks.

Black Bull Ditch (or Parr’s Ditch) was first mentioned in 1493 as an artificial tributary of the Stamford Brook, flowing into the Thames south of Chancellor’s Wharf where it formed the boundary between Hammersmith and Fulham.

The hamlet of Brook Green, around the ditch, was established by the 16th century, originating as an outlying farm of a manor. It was largely marshland with the brook running through, and where an annual fair was held until 1823.

Nearer to the River Thames, the good soil enabled farmers to grow soft fruits such as gooseberries, red currants, raspberries and strawberries which were taken by boat to sell at Covent Garden market.

Further from the Thames during the early 19th century a considerable amount of the local farmland was turned over to the creation of brickfields. The clay soil provided good building materials for London as it continued to expand westwards. Many ponds and lakes were formed as a result of this activity and the name of Lakeside Road is a reminder of this extremely profitable business. The brook itself became polluted with waste from nearby brick fields, was eventually covered, and finally converted to a sewer in 1876.


'The Ocean', Brook Green, Hammersmith
(click image to enlarge)

On the site of Lakeside Road, lay the ’Ocean’ - an area of flooded workings.

Brook Green did not begin to be desirable for suburban expansion until after the 1850s. The largest proportion of properties were built later in the 19th century as a response to improved transport links in the area and to increased pressure for housing.

By 1896 the Victorian building boom was largely complete. There are a number of street names that no longer exist. Alexandra Road became part of Milson Road, Havelock Road became Irving Road, while Craven Cottages are now Hofland Road (although the cottages themselves still exist).

Lakeside Road started its life as Wharton Road in the 1870s. On 13 March 1906 it was renamed Rayleigh Road and became Lakeside Road by the late 1940s.




Main source: The Fulham and Hammersmith Historical Society | To foster and en
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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Lived here
Tom Vague   
Added: 9 Sep 2020 14:02 GMT   

The Bedford family at 3 Acklam Road (1860 - 1965)
From the 19th century up until 1965, number 3 Acklam Road, near the Portobello Road junction, was occupied by the Bedford family.

When the Westway construction work began the Bedfords sold up and moved to south London. In the early 1970s the house was taken over by the North Kensington Amenity Trust and became the Notting Hill Carnival office before its eventual demolition.

Anne Bedford (now McSweeney) has fond memories of living there, although she recalls: ’I now know that the conditions were far from ideal but then I knew no different. There was no running hot water, inside toilet or bath, apart from the tin bath we used once a week in the large kitchen/dining room. Any hot water needed was heated in a kettle. I wasn’t aware that there were people not far away who were a lot worse off than us, living in poverty in houses just like mine but families renting one room. We did have a toilet/bathroom installed in 1959, which was ’luxury’.

’When the plans for the Westway were coming to light, we were still living in the house whilst all the houses opposite became empty and boarded up one by one. We watched all this going on and decided that it was not going to be a good place to be once the builders moved in to demolish all the houses and start work on the elevated road. Dad sold the house for a fraction of what it should have been worth but it needed too much doing to it to bring it to a good living standard. We were not rich by any means but we were not poor. My grandmother used to do her washing in the basement once a week by lighting a fire in a big concrete copper to heat the water, which would have been there until demolition.

’When we moved from number 3, I remember the upright piano that my grandparents used to play - and me of sorts - being lowered out of the top floor and taken away, presumably to be sold. I used to play with balls up on the wall of the chemist shop on the corner of Acklam and Portobello. We would mark numbers on the pavement slabs in a grid and play hopscotch. At the Portobello corner, on one side there was the Duke of Sussex pub, on the other corner, a chemist, later owned by a Mr Fish, which I thought was amusing. When I was very young I remember every evening a man peddling along Acklam Road with a long thin stick with which he lit the streetlights.’ Michelle Active who lived at number 33 remembers: ’6 of us lived in a one-bed basement flat on Acklam Road. When they demolished it we moved to a 4-bed maisonette on Silchester Estate and I thought it was a palace, two toilets inside, a separate bathroom that was not in the kitchen, absolute heaven.’



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Born here
Susan Wright   
Added: 16 Sep 2017 22:42 GMT   

Ada Crowe, 9 Bramley Mews
My Great Grandmother Ada Crowe was born in 9 Bramley Mews in 1876.

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Comment
Joan Clarke   
Added: 2 Feb 2021 10:54 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens
My late aunt Ivy Clarke (nee Burridge) lived with her whole family at 19 Avondale Park Gardens, according to the 1911 census and she was still there in 1937.What was it like in those days, I wonder, if the housing was only built in 1920?


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Lived here
David Jones-Parry   
Added: 7 Sep 2017 12:13 GMT   

Mcgregor Road, W11 (1938 - 1957)
I was born n bred at 25 Mc Gregor Rd in 1938 and lived there until I joined the Royal Navy in 1957. It was a very interesting time what with air raid shelters,bombed houses,water tanks all sorts of areas for little boys to collect scrap and sell them on.no questions asked.A very happy boyhood -from there we could visit most areas of London by bus and tube and we did.

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ken gaston   
Added: 16 Jan 2021 11:04 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens
My grandmother Hilda Baker and a large family lived in number 18 . It was a close community and that reflected in the coronation celebration held on the central green . I grew up in that square and went to school at Sirdar Road then St. Clements it was a great place to grow up with a local park and we would also trek to Holland Park or Kensington Gardens .Even then the area was considered deprived and a kindergarden for criminals . My generation were the first to escape to the new towns and became the overspill from London to get decent housing and living standards .

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Jonathan Penner   
Added: 11 Sep 2021 16:03 GMT   

Pennard Road, W12
My wife and I, young Canadians, lodged at 65 (?) Pennard Road with a fellow named Clive and his girlfriend, Melanie, for about 6 months in 1985. We loved the area and found it extremely convenient.

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Lived here
Norman Norrington   
Added: 28 Dec 2020 08:31 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
I was born in Hammersmith Hospital (Ducane Rd) I lived at 40 Blecynden Street from birth in 1942 to 1967 when I moved due to oncoming demolition for the West way flyover.
A bomb fell locally during the war and cracked one of our windows, that crack was still there the day I left.
It was a great street to have grown up in I have very fond memories of living there.



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john ormandy   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 17:48 GMT   

Mary Place Workhouse
There was a lady called Ivy who lived in the corner she use to come out an tell us kids off for climbing over the fence to play football on the green. Those were the days.

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Comment
charlie evans   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 18:51 GMT   

apollo pub 1950s
Ted Lengthorne was the landlord of the apollo in the 1950s. A local called darkie broom who lived at number 5 lancaster road used to be the potman,I remember being in the appollo at a street party that was moved inside the pub because of rain for the queens coronation . Not sure how long the lengthornes had the pub but remember teds daughter julie being landlady in the early 1970,s

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john ormandy   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 17:30 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
Went to school St Johns with someone named Barry Green who lived in that St. Use to wait for him on the corner take a slow walk an end up being late most days.

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Lived here
Norman Norrington   
Added: 8 Jun 2021 08:08 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
Lived here #40 1942-1967

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john ormandy   
Added: 14 Mar 2021 18:59 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens, W11
We moved to number 6 in 1950 an family still live there now. I think i remember a family name of Larter living in the house you mention also living in the Gdns were names Prior, Cannon, Parsons Clives at number 26 who i went to school with.


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Brian Lucas   
Added: 15 Mar 2021 16:02 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens, W11
I also lived here at No. 15 1854 then move to No. 23 The Lucas Family

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john ormandy   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 17:21 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens, W11
Remember the Lucas family think the eldest was about same age as me cant remember his name though seem to rember had several younger sisters may have been twins!!

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Comment
john ormandy   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 18:02 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens, W11
Went to that coranation party with my two younger brothers who both went to St Clements along with Alan Mullery the footballer. I went to St James before moving on to St Johns along with Alan who lived in Mary Place where we were both in the same class.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
John Neill   
Added: 25 Nov 2021 11:30 GMT   

Sandringham Road, E10 (1937 - 1966)
I lived at No. 61 with my parents during these years. I went to Canterbury Road school (now Barclay Primary) and sang as a boy soprano (treble) in the church choir at St Andrew’s church, on the corner of Forest Glade.
Opposite us lived the Burgess family. Their son Russell also sang in my choir as a tenor. He later became a well-known musician and the choirmaster at Wandsworth Boys’ School.
Just at the end of WW2 a German rocket (V2) landed in the grounds of Whipps Cross Hospital, damaging many of the houses in Sandringham Road, including ours.

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Comment
Tim Stevenson   
Added: 16 Nov 2021 18:03 GMT   

Pub still open
The Bohemia survived the 2020/21 lockdowns and is still a thriving local social resource.

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Comment
STEPHEN JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:25 GMT   

Fellows Court, E2
my family moved into the tower block 13th floor (maisonette), in 1967 after our street Lenthall rd e8 was demolished, we were one of the first families in the new block. A number of families from our street were rehoused in this and the adjoining flats. Inside toilet and central heating, all very modern at the time, plus eventually a tarmac football pitch in the grounds,(the cage), with a goal painted by the kids on the brick wall of the railway.

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STEPHEN ARTHUR JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:12 GMT   

Lynedoch Street, E2
my father Arthur Jackson was born in lynedoch street in 1929 and lived with mm grandparents and siblings, until they were relocated to Pamela house Haggerston rd when the street was to be demolished

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Sir Walter Besant   
Added: 11 Nov 2021 18:47 GMT   

Sir Walter adds....
All the ground facing Wirtemberg Street at Chip and Cross Streets is being levelled for building and the old houses are disappearing fast. The small streets leading through into little Manor Street are very clean and tenanted by poor though respectable people, but little Manor Street is dirty, small, and narrow. Manor Street to Larkhall Rise is a wide fairly clean thoroughfare of mixed shops and houses which improves towards the north. The same may be said of Wirtemberg Street, which commences poorly, but from the Board School north is far better than at the Clapham end.

Source: London: South of the Thames - Chapter XX by Sir Walter Besant (1912)

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Comment
   
Added: 6 Nov 2021 15:03 GMT   

Old Nichol Street, E2
Information about my grandfather’s tobacconist shop

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tom   
Added: 3 Nov 2021 05:16 GMT   

I met
someone here 6 years ago

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Fion Anderson   
Added: 2 Nov 2021 12:55 GMT   

Elstree not Borehamwood
Home of the UK film industry

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Blythe House Blythe House is a listed building located at 23 Blythe Road.
Cape Nursery The Cape Nursery once lay along the south side of Shepherd’s Bush Green.
Shepherd’s Bush Market Shepherd’s Bush Market is a street market located on the east side of the railway viaduct for the Hammersmith and City Tube line.
Shepherd’s Bush Market Shepherd’s Bush Market was first established in 1914.

NEARBY STREETS
Addison Gardens, W14 Addison Gardens stands on part of the Holland estate.
Adie Road, W6 Adie Road is a street in Hammersmith.
Amor Road, W6 Amor Road is a road in the W6 postcode area
Anley Road, W14 Anley Road is a street in West Kensington.
Applegarth Road, W14 Applegarth Road is a road in the W14 postcode area
Astrop Terrace, W6 Astrop Terrace is a road in the W6 postcode area
Augustine Road, W14 Augustine Road is a road in the W14 postcode area
Aynhoe Road, W14 Aynhoe Road is a street in West Kensington.
Bamborough Gardens, W6 This is a street in the W12 postcode area
Barb Mews, W6 Barb Mews is a through road off Shepherds Bush Road.
Batoum Gardens, W6 Batoum Gardens is a street in Hammersmith.
Berghem Mews, W14 Berghem Mews is a street in West Kensington.
Blythe Mews, W14 Blythe Mews is a street in West Kensington.
Blythe Road, W14 Blythe Road is a street in West Kensington.
Bolingbroke Road, W14 Bolingbroke Road is a road in the W14 postcode area
Caithness Road, W14 Caithness Road is a street in West Kensington.
Ceylon Road, W14 Ceylon Road is a street in West Kensington.
Charecroft Way, W14 Charecroft Way is a street in West Kensington.
Charecroft Way, W14 Shepherd’s East is a block.
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Dewhurst Road, W14 Dewhurst Road is a street in West Kensington.
Dunsany Road, W14 Dunsany Road is a road in the W14 postcode area
Elsham Road, W14 Elsham Road is a street in West Kensington.
Faroe Road, W14 Faroe Road is a street in West Kensington.
Gainsborough Court, W12 Gainsborough Court is a road in the W12 postcode area
Gratton Road, W14 Gratton Road is a road in the W14 postcode area
Grove Mews, W6 Grove Mews is a street in Hammersmith.
Haarlem Road, W14 Haarlem Road runs from Dunsany Road to Augustine Road in West Kensington,
Hammersmith Grove, W6 Hammersmith Grove is a street in Hammersmith.
Hansard Mews, W14 Hansard Mews is a street in West Kensington.
Hansard Mews, W14 Hansard Mews is a road in the W12 postcode area
Hazlitt Mews, W14 Hazlitt Mews is a street in West Kensington.
Hazlitt Road, W14 Hazlitt Road is a road in the W14 postcode area
Hofland Road, W14 Hofland Road is a street in West Kensington.
Holland Road, W11 Holland Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Irving Road, W14 This is a street in the W14 postcode area
Lena Gardens, W6 Lena Gardens is a street in Hammersmith.
Lime Grove, W12 Lime Grove is a road in the W12 postcode area
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Lower Addison Gardens, W14 Lower Addison Gardens runs between Holland Road and Holland Villas Road.
Masbro Road, W14 Masbro Road is a street in West Kensington.
Melrose Gardens, W6 Melrose Gardens is a road in the W6 postcode area
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Netherwood Place, W14 Netherwood Place is a street in West Kensington.
Netherwood Road, W14 Netherwood Road is a street in West Kensington.
Pennard Road, W12 Pennard Road is a road in the W12 postcode area
Poplar Grove, W6 Poplar Grove is a street in Hammersmith.
Redan Street, W14 Redan Street is a street in West Kensington.
Richford Gate, W6 Richford Gate is a street in Hammersmith.
Richford Street, W6 Richford Street is a street in Hammersmith.
Richmond Way, W12 This is a street in the W12 postcode area
Richmond Way, W14 Richmond Way is a street in West Kensington.
Rockley Court, W12 Rockley Court is a road in the W14 postcode area
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Shepherd’s Bush Green, W14 Shepherds Bush Green is the southern section of road lining Shepherd’s Bush Green itself.
Shepherds Bush Road, W6 Shepherds Bush Road is the main road connecting Shepherds Bush and Hammersmith.
Sinclair Gardens, W14 Sinclair Gardens is a street in West Kensington.
Sinclair Road, W14 Sinclair Road is a street in West Kensington.
Souldern Road, W14 Souldern Road is a street in West Kensington.
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Sterndale Road, W14 Sterndale Road is a road in the W6 postcode area
Sulgrave Road, W6 Sulgrave Road is a street in Hammersmith.
Thackerey Court, W14 Thackerey Court is a block in the Holland Park area.
The Grampians, W14 The Grampians is a street in Hammersmith.
The Trail, W6 The Trail is a road in the W12 postcode area
Trussley Road, W6 Trussley Road is a street in Hammersmith.
Upper Addison Gardens, W14 Upper Addison Gardens runs between Holland Road and Holland Villas Road.
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Westwick Gardens, W14 Westwick Gardens is a street in West Kensington.
Woodger Road, W12 Woodger Road is a road in the W12 postcode area
Woodstock Grove, W12 Woodstock Grove is a road in the W12 postcode area

NEARBY PUBS
Central Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Shepherds Bush Empire This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Thatched Barn This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Grove Bar And Restaurant This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Havelock Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Jameson This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Richmond Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Shepherd & Flock This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Sindercombe Social This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Unknown as yet This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Holland Park

Holland Park is a district, an underground station (and indeed a park) in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea.

Holland Park has a reputation as an affluent and fashionable area, known for attractive large Victorian townhouses, and high-class shopping and restaurants.

The district was rural until the 19th century. Most of it was formerly the grounds of a Jacobean mansion called Holland House. In the later decades of that century the owners of the house sold off the more outlying parts of its grounds for residential development, and the district which evolved took its name from the house. It also included some small areas around the fringes which had never been part of the grounds of Holland House, notably the Phillimore Estate and the Campden Hill Square area. In the late 19th century a number of notable artists (including Frederic Leighton, P.R.A. and Val Prinsep) and art collectors lived in the area. The group were collectively known as ’The Holland Park Circle’. Holland Park was in most part very comfortably upper middle class when originally developed and in recent decades has gone further upmarket.

Of the 19th-century residential developments of the area, one of the most architecturally interesting is The Royal Crescent designed in 1839. Clearly inspired by its older namesake in Bath, it differs from the Bath crescent in that it is not a true crescent at all but two quadrant terraces each terminated by a circular bow in the Regency style which rises as a tower, a feature which would not have been found in the earlier classically inspired architecture of the 18th century which the design of the crescent seeks to emulate. The design of the Royal Crescent by the planner Robert Cantwell in two halves was dictated by the location of the newly fashionable underground sewers rather than any consideration for architectural aesthetics.

Holland Park is now one of the most expensive residential districts in London.

Holland Park station, on the Central London Railway, opened on 30 July 1900. The station building was refurbished in the 1990s.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Shepherd's Bush Market in the 1950s
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Addison Place
Credit: Google Maps
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Colet House
Credit: The Study Society
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Hippodrome Place street sign
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Bangor Street after a Rag Fair (1900s)
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In the neighbourhood...

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The main block of Blythe House, seen from Hazlitt Road, Olympia. Blythe House was built between 1899 and 1903 as the main office of the Post Office Savings Bank, which had outgrown its previous headquarter in Queen Victoria Street. By 1902 the Bank had 12,000 branches and more than 9 million accounts.
Credit: Wiki Commons/Docben
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Shepherd's Bush Market in the 1950s
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Addison Gardens, W14
Old London postcard
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Addison Place
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St Anns Villas, W11 looking south from St Anns Road towards Royal Crescent. The developer was Charles Stewart, a wealthy barrister who had served as an MP in the early 1830s. Between 1840 and 1846 he took building leases with his principal ventures being in Royal Crescent (where he had 43 houses) and St Anns Villas (34 houses). The Stewart Arms public house on Norland Road commemorates his name.
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Boxmoor Street, W11 In the 1930s, Boxmoor Street was described as "a little road off the Norland Market in Shepherds Bush". It was quite unique as it was part of W11 lying within the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham. The M41 (West Cross Route) motorway was built over the top of the street.
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