Foundling Hospital

Orphanage in/near Queen’s Park, existing until 1926

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Orphanage · * · WC1N ·
MARCH
28
2017

The Foundling Hospital in London was founded in 1741 by the philanthropic sea captain Thomas Coram.

It was a children's home established for the education and maintenance of exposed and deserted young children. The word 'hospital' was used in a more general sense than it is today, simply indicating the institution's hospitality to those less fortunate.

The first children were admitted to the Foundling Hospital on 25 March 1741, into a temporary house located in Hatton Garden. At first, no questions were asked about child or parent, but a distinguishing token was put on each child by the parent. These were often marked coins, trinkets, pieces of cotton or ribbon, verses written on scraps of paper. Clothes, if any, were carefully recorded. One entry in the record reads, Paper on the breast, clout on the head. The applications became too numerous, and a system of balloting with red, white and black balls was adopted. Children were seldom taken after they were twelve months old.

On reception, children were sent to wet nurses in the countryside, where they stayed until they were about four or five years old. At sixteen girls were generally apprenticed as servants for four years; at fourteen, boys were apprenticed into variety of occupations, typically for seven years. There was a small benevolent fund for adults.

In September 1742, the stone of the new Hospital was laid in the area known as Bloomsbury, lying north of Great Ormond Street and west of Gray's Inn Lane. The Hospital was designed by Theodore Jacobsen as a plain brick building with two wings and a chapel, built around an open courtyard. The western wing was finished in October 1745. An eastern wing was added in 1752 'in order that the girls might be kept separate from the boys'. The new Hospital was described as 'the most imposing single monument erected by eighteenth century benevolence' and became London's most popular charity.

In 1756, the House of Commons resolved that all children offered should be received, that local receiving places should be appointed all over the country, and that the funds should be publicly guaranteed. A basket was accordingly hung outside the hospital; the maximum age for admission was raised from two months to twelve, and a flood of children poured in from country workhouses. In less than four years 14,934 children were presented, and a vile trade grew up among vagrants, who sometimes became known as Coram Men, of promising to carry children from the country to the hospital, an undertaking which they often did not perform or performed with great cruelty. Of these 15,000, only 4,400 survived to be apprenticed out. The total expense was about £500,000, which alarmed the House of Commons. After throwing out a bill which proposed to raise the necessary funds by fees from a general system of parochial registration, they came to the conclusion that the indiscriminate admission should be discontinued. The hospital, being thus thrown on its own resources, adopted a system of receiving children only with considerable sums (e.g., £100), which sometimes led to the children being reclaimed by the parent.

This practice was finally stopped in 1801; and it henceforth became a fundamental rule that no money was to be received. The committee of inquiry had to be satisfied of the previous good character and present necessity of the mother, and that the father of the child had deserted both mother and child, and that the reception of the child would probably replace the mother in the course of virtue and in the way of an honest livelihood. At that time, illegitimacy carried deep stigma, especially for the mother but also for the child. All the children at the Foundling Hospital were those of unmarried women, and they were all first children of their mothers. The principle was in fact that laid down by Henry Fielding in The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling: Too true I am afraid it is that many women have become abandoned and have sunk to the last degree of vice [i.e. prostitution] by being unable to retrieve the first slip.

There were some unfortunate incidents, such as the case of Elizabeth Brownrigg (1720–1767), a severely abusive Fetters Lane midwife who mercilessly whipped and otherwise maltreated her adolescent female apprentice domestic servants, leading to the death of one, Mary Clifford, from her injuries, neglect and infected wounds. After the Foundling Hospital authorities investigated, Brownrigg was convicted of murder and sentenced to hang at Tyburn. Thereafter, the Foundling Hospital instituted more thorough investigation of its prospective apprentice masters and mistresses.

The musical service, which was originally sung by the blind children only, was made fashionable by the generosity of George Frideric Handel, who frequently had Messiah performed there, and who bequeathed to the hospital a fair copy (full score) of his greatest oratorio. Handel's involvement had begun on 1 May 1750 when he directed a performance of Messiah to mark the presentation of the organ to the chapel. That first performance was a great success and Handel was elected a Governor of the Hospital on the following day, a position he accepted. In 1774 Dr Charles Burney and a Signor Giardini made an unsuccessful attempt to form in connection with the hospital a public music school, in imitation of the Pio Ospedale della Pietà in Venice, Italy. In 1847, however, a successful juvenile band was started. The educational effects of music were found excellent, and the hospital supplied many musicians to the best army and navy bands.

In the 1920s, the Hospital decided to move to a healthier location in the countryside. A proposal to turn the buildings over for university use fell through, and they were eventually sold to a property developer called James White in 1926. He hoped to transfer Covent Garden Market to the site, but the local residents successfully opposed that plan. In the end, the original Hospital building was demolished. The children were moved to Redhill, Surrey, where an old convent was used to lodge them, and then in 1935 to the new purpose-built Foundling Hospital in Berkhamsted, Hertfordshire. When, in the 1950s, British law moved away from institutionalisation of children toward more family-oriented solutions, such as adoption and foster care, the Foundling Hospital ceased most of its operations. The Berkhamsted buildings were sold to Hertfordshire County Council for use as a school and the Foundling Hospital changed its name to the Thomas Coram Foundation for Children and currently uses the working name Coram.

The Foundling Hospital still has a legacy on the original site. Seven acres of it were purchased for use as a playground for children with financial support from the newspaper proprietor Lord Rothermere. This area is now called Coram's Fields and owned by an independent charity.


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
MCNALLY    
Added: 17 May 2021 09:42 GMT   

Blackfriars (1959 - 1965)
I lived in Upper Ground from 1959 to 1964 I was 6 years old my parents Vince and Kitty run the Pub The Angel on the corner of Upper Ground and Bodies Bridge. I remember the ceiling of the cellar was very low and almost stretched the length of Bodies Bridge. The underground trains run directly underneath the pub. If you were down in the cellar when a train was coming it was quite frightening

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Tom   
Added: 21 May 2021 23:07 GMT   

Blackfriars
What is, or was, Bodies Bridge?

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Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 19:47 GMT   

Millions Of Rats In Busy London
The Daily Mail on 14 April 1903 reported "MILLIONS OF RATS IN BUSY LONDON"

A rat plague, unprecedented in the annals of London, has broken out on the north side of the Strand. The streets principally infested are Catherine street, Drury lane, Blackmore street, Clare Market and Russell street. Something akin to a reign of terror prevails among the inhabitants after nightfall. Women refuse to pass along Blackmore street and the lower parts of Stanhope street after dusk, for droves of rats perambulate the roadways and pavements, and may be seen running along the window ledges of the empty houses awaiting demolition by the County Council in the Strand to Holborn improvement scheme.

The rats, indeed, have appeared in almost-incredible numbers. "There are millions of them," said one shopkeeper, and his statement was supported by other residents. The unwelcome visitors have been evicted from their old haunts by the County Council housebreakers, and are now busily in search of new homes. The Gaiety Restaurant has been the greatest sufferer. Rats have invaded the premises in such force that the managers have had to close the large dining room on the first floor and the grill rooms on the ground floor and in the basement. Those three spacious halls which have witnessed many as semblages of theatre-goers are now qui:e deserted. Behind the wainscot of the bandstand in the grillroom is a large mound of linen shreds. This represents 1728 serviettes carried theee by the rats.

In the bar the removal of a panel disclosed the astonishing fact that the rats have dragged for a distance of seven or eight yards some thirty or forty beer and wine bottles and stacked them in such a fashion as to make comfortable sleeping places. Mr Williams. the manager of the restaurant, estimates that the rats have destroyed L200 worth of linen. Formerly the Gaiety Restaurant dined 2000 persons daily; no business whatever is now done in this direction.

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Comment
Linda Webb   
Added: 27 Sep 2021 05:51 GMT   

Hungerford Stairs
In 1794 my ancestor, George Webb, Clay Pipe Maker, lived in Hungerford Stairs, Strand. Source: Wakefields Merchant & Tradesmens General Directory London Westminster 1794

Source: Hungerford Stairs

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Lived here
Richard Roques   
Added: 21 Jan 2021 16:53 GMT   

Buckingham Street residents
Here in Buckingham Street lived Samuel Pepys the diarist, Charles Dickens and Rudyard Kipling

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Comment
Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

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Comment
Jessie Doring   
Added: 22 Feb 2021 04:33 GMT   

Tisbury Court Jazz Bar
Jazz Bar opened in Tisbury Court by 2 Australians. Situated in underground basement. Can not remember how long it opened for.

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Comment
Lena    
Added: 18 Mar 2021 13:08 GMT   

White Conduit Street, N1
My mum, Rosina Wade of the Wade and Hannam family in the area of Chapel Street and Parkfield Street, bought her first “costume” at S Cohen’s in White Conduit Street. Would have probably been about 1936 or thereabouts. She said that he was a small man but an expert tailor. I hope that Islington Council preserve the shop front as it’s a piece of history of the area. Mum used to get her high heel shoes from an Italian shoe shop in Chapel Street. She had size 2 feet and they would let her know when a new consignment of size 2 shoes were in. I think she was a very good customer. She worked at Killingbacks artificial flower maker in Northampton Square and later at the Halifax bombers factory north of Edgware where she was a riveter.

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The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Dec 2020 00:24 GMT   

Othello takes a bow
On 1 November 1604, William Shakespeare’s tragedy Othello was presented for the first time, at The Palace of Whitehall. The palace was the main residence of the English monarchs in London from 1530 until 1698. Seven years to the day, Shakespeare’s romantic comedy The Tempest was also presented for the first time, and also at the Palace of Whitehall.

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Comment
Carol   
Added: 7 May 2021 18:44 GMT   

Nan
My nan lily,her sister Elizabeth and their parents Elizabeth and William lived here in1911

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Comment
Jeff Owen   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 16:18 GMT   

Owen’s School
Owen Street is the site of Owen’s Boys’ School. The last school was built in 1881 and was demolished in the early 1990s to make way for the development which stand there today. It was a “Direct Grant” grammar school and was founded in 1613 by Dame Alice Owen. What is now “Owen’s Fields” was the playground between the old school and the new girls’ school (known then as “Dames Alice Owen’s School” or simply “DAOS”). The boys’ school had the top two floors of that building for their science labs. The school moved to Potters Bar in Hertfordshire in 1971 and is now one of the top State comprehensive schools in the country. The old building remained in use as an accountancy college and taxi-drivers’ “knowledge” school until it was demolished. The new building is now part of City and Islington College. Owen’s was a fine school. I should know because I attended there from 1961 to 1968.

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Reg Carr   
Added: 10 Feb 2021 12:11 GMT   

Campbellite Meeting
In 1848 the Campbellites (Disciples of Christ) met in Elstree Street, where their congregation was presided over by a pastor named John Black. Their appointed evangelist at the time was called David King, who later became the Editor of the British Millennial Harbinger. The meeting room was visited in July 1848 by Dr John Thomas, who spoke there twice on his two-year ’mission’ to Britain.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
roger morris   
Added: 16 Oct 2021 08:50 GMT   

Atherton Road, IG5 (1958 - 1980)
I moved to Atherton road in 1958 until 1980 from Finsbury Park. My father purchased the house from his brother Sydney Morris. My father continued to live there until his death in 1997, my mother having died in 1988.
I attended The Glade Primary School in Atherton Road from sept 1958 until 1964 when I went to Beal School. Have fond memories of the area and friends who lived at no2 (Michael Clark)and no11 (Brian Skelly)

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Lived here
margaret clark   
Added: 15 Oct 2021 22:23 GMT   

Margaret’s address when she married in 1938
^, Josepine House, Stepney is the address of my mother on her marriage certificate 1938. Her name was Margaret Irene Clark. Her father Basil Clark was a warehouse grocer.

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Comment
Martin Eaton    
Added: 14 Oct 2021 03:56 GMT   

Boundary Estate
Sunbury, Taplow House.

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Comment
Simon Chalton   
Added: 10 Oct 2021 21:52 GMT   

Duppas Hill Terrace 1963- 74
I’m 62 yrs old now but between the years 1963 and 1975 I lived at number 23 Duppas Hill Terrace. I had an absolutely idyllic childhood there and it broke my heart when the council ordered us out of our home to build the Ellis Davd flats there.The very large house overlooked the fire station and we used to watch them practice putting out fires in the blue tower which I believe is still there.
I’m asking for your help because I cannot find anything on the internet or anywhere else (pictures, history of the house, who lived there) and I have been searching for many, many years now.
Have you any idea where I might find any specific details or photos of Duppas Hill Terrace, number 23 and down the hill to where the subway was built. To this day it saddens me to know they knocked down this house, my extended family lived at the next house down which I think was number 25 and my best school friend John Childs the next and last house down at number 27.
I miss those years so terribly and to coin a quote it seems they just disappeared like "tears in rain".
Please, if you know of anywhere that might be able to help me in any way possible, would you be kind enough to get back to me. I would be eternally grateful.
With the greatest of hope and thanks,
Simon Harlow-Chalton.


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Comment
Linda Webb   
Added: 27 Sep 2021 05:51 GMT   

Hungerford Stairs
In 1794 my ancestor, George Webb, Clay Pipe Maker, lived in Hungerford Stairs, Strand. Source: Wakefields Merchant & Tradesmens General Directory London Westminster 1794

Source: Hungerford Stairs

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Born here
jack stevens   
Added: 26 Sep 2021 13:38 GMT   

Mothers birth place
Number 5 Whites Row which was built in around 1736 and still standing was the premises my now 93 year old mother was born in, her name at birth was Hilda Evelyne Shaw,

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Born here
Ron Shepherd   
Added: 18 Sep 2021 17:28 GMT   

More Wisdom
Norman Joseph Wisdom was born in St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington, West London.

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Comment
Jonathan Penner   
Added: 11 Sep 2021 16:03 GMT   

Pennard Road, W12
My wife and I, young Canadians, lodged at 65 (?) Pennard Road with a fellow named Clive and his girlfriend, Melanie, for about 6 months in 1985. We loved the area and found it extremely convenient.

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Foundling Hospital The Foundling Hospital in London was founded in 1741 by the philanthropic sea captain Thomas Coram.
Horse Hospital Built as stabling for cabby’s sick horses, The Horse Hospital is now a unique Grade II listed arts venue in Bloomsbury WC1
Russell Square Russell Square station, now on London’s Piccadilly Line, was opened by the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway on 15 December 1906.

NEARBY STREETS
Abbey Place, WC1H Abbey Place was in the centre of Bloomsbury, off what was originally the west side of Little Coram Street and directly behind the Russell Institution on Great Coram Street.
Acton Street, WC1X Acton Street is found on the east side of Gray’s Inn Road and connects it with King’s Cross Road.
Ampton Place, WC1X Ampton Place was previously called Frederick Place.
Ampton Street, WC1X Ampton Street was named after its builder, the 3rd Lord Calthorpe who owned land at Ampton, Suffolk.
Argyle Street, WC1H Argyle Street, originally Manchester Street, was named after the former Argyle House.
Argyle Walk, WC1H Argyle Walk is named for Argyll in Scotland.
Barbon Close, WC1N Barbon Close is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Bedford Way, WC1H Bedford Way is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Bernard Street, WC1N Bernard Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Bidborough Street, NW1 Bidborough Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Boswell Street, WC1N Boswell Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Brownlow Mews, WC1N Brownlow Mews is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Brunswick Centre, WC1N The Brunswick Centre is a grade II listed residential and shopping centre in Bloomsbury.
Brunswick Shopping Centre, WC1N Brunswick Shopping Centre is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Brunswick Square, WC1N Brunswick Square is the result of a sale of land by the Foundling Hospital.
Burton Street, WC1H Burton Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Calthorpe Street, WC1X Calthorpe Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Cartwright Gardens, WC1H Cartwright Gardens is a crescent-shaped park and street located in Bloomsbury.
Clare Court, WC1H Clare Court is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Cockpit Yard, WC1X Cockpit Yard leads off Northington Street.
Colonnade, WC1N Colonnade is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Compton Place, WC1H Compton Place is a road in the WC1H postcode area
Coram Street, WC1N Coram Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Cosmo Place, WC1B Cosmo Place is a road in the WC1B postcode area
Cromer Street, WC1H Cromer Street originally gave access from Gray’s Inn Road to Greenland Place and a bowling green.
Cubitt Street, WC1X Cubitt Street was formerly called Arthur Street.
Dombey Street, WC1N Dombey Street is a road in the WC1N postcode area
Doughty Mews, WC1N Doughty Mews is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Doughty Street, WC1N Doughty Street is a broad tree lined street in the Holborn district.
Elm Street, WC1X Elm Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Emerald Street, WC1N Emerald Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Fleet Square, WC1X Fleet Square is a road in the WC1X postcode area
Foundling Court, WC1N Foundling Court is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Frederick Street, WC1X Frederick Street is a road in the WC1X postcode area
Gough Street, WC1X Gough Street is a road in the WC1X postcode area
Granville Square, WC1X Granville Square is a road in the WC1X postcode area
Granville Street, WC1X Granville Street is a road in the WC1X postcode area
Grays Inn Road, WC1X Grays Inn Road is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Great James Street, WC1N Great James Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Great Ormond Street, WC1N Great Ormond Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Grenville Street, WC1N Grenville Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Gresham Street, EC2V Gresham Street is a location in London.
Guildhall North Wing, SE1 Guildhall North Wing is a location in London.
Guilford Street, WC1B Guilford Street is a road in the WC1B postcode area
Guilford Street, WC1N Guilford Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Hamilton House, WC1H Residential block
Handel Street, WC1N Handel Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Harrison Street, WC1H Harrison Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Hastings Street, WC1H Hastings Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Heathcote Street, WC1N Heathcote Street is in the north-east corner of the Foundling Hospital estate, leading from St George’s Gardens to Gray’s Inn Road.
Henrietta Mews, WC1N Henrietta Mews is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Herbrand Street, WC1N Herbrand Street is in the east of Bloomsbury, running south from Tavistock Place to Guilford Street.
Holsworthy Square, WC1X This is a street in the WC1X postcode area
Hunter Street, WC1N Hunter Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Jenner House, WC1N Residential block
John Street, WC1N John Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Johns Mews, WC1N Johns Mews is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Judd Street, WC1H Judd Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Kenton Street, WC1H Kenton Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
King’s Cross Road, WC1X This is a street in the WC1X postcode area
Kings Cross Road, WC1X Kings Cross Road is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Kings Mews, WC1X Kings Mews is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Kingsgate Est, WC1B A street within the WC1B postcode
Kirk Street, WC1N Kirk Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Lamb’s Conduit Street, WC1N This is a street in the WC1N postcode area
Lamb’s Mews, WC1N Lamb’s Mews is a road in the N1 postcode area
Lamp Office Court, WC1N Lamp Office Court is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Langton Close, WC1X Langton Close is a road in the WC1X postcode area
Leigh Street, WC1H Leigh Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Little Guildford Street, WC1N Little Guildford Street was the middle part of what is now Herbrand Street, between Great Coram Street and Bernard Street, on the western edge of the Foundling estate.
Lloyd Baker Street, WC1X Lloyd Baker Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Long Yard, WC1N Long Yard is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Mabledon Place, WC1H Mabledon Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Marchmont Street, WC1N Marchmont Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Mecklenburgh Place, WC1N Mecklenburgh Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Mecklenburgh Square, WC1N Mecklenburgh Square was originally laid out by S P Cockerell.
Mecklenburgh Street, WC1X This is a street in the WC1N postcode area
Medway Court, WC1H Medway Court is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Midhope Street, WC1H Midhope Street was once known as Wood Street.
Millman Place, WC1N Millman Place is a road in the WC1N postcode area
Millman Street, WC1N Millman Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Mount Pleasant, EC1R Mount Pleasant gained its ironic name in the 1730s after locals had begun to dump refuse there.
Mount Plesant, EC1R Mount Plesant is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Neals Yard, WC1N Neals Yard is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
New North Street, WC1N New North Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
North Mews, WC1N North Mews is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Northington Street, WC1N Northington Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Odonnell Court, WC1N Odonnell Court is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Orde Hall Street, WC1N Orde Hall Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Ormond Close, WC1N Ormond Close is a road in the WC1N postcode area
Pakenham Street, WC1X Pakenham Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Peabody Buildings, WC1N Peabody Buildings is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Phoenix Place, EC3N Phoenix Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Phoenix Place, WC1X Phoenix Place is a location in London.
Pooles Buildings, WC1X Pooles Buildings is a road in the EC1R postcode area
Powis Place, WC1N Powis Place is a road in the WC1N postcode area
Queen Annes Square, WC1N Queen Annes Square is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Queen Square, WC1N Queen Square was laid out by speculator Nicholas Barbon.
Regent Square, WC1H Regent Square was laid out from 1822, with houses being built up to circa 1829.
Regent Square, WC1N Regent Square is a road in the WC1N postcode area
Richbell Place, WC1N Richbell Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Roger Street, WC1N Roger Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Rugby Chambers, WC1N Rugby Chambers is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Rugby Street, WC1N Rugby Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Russell Court, WC1B Russell Court is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Russell Square House, WC1B Residential block
Russell Square, WC1B Russell Square is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Russell Square, WC1B Russell Square was laid out from 1800 by James Burton following the demolition of Bedford House, which originally stood on the site surrounded by gardens and fields.
Sandwich House, WC1H Residential block
Sandwich Street, WC1H Sandwich Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Seaford Street, WC1H Seaford Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Sidmouth Street, WC1H Sidmouth Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Sidmouth Street, WC1X Sidmouth Street is a road in the WC1X postcode area
Sinclair House, WC1H Residential block
Speedy Place, WC1H Speedy Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
St. Georges Road, WC1H A street within the WC1H postcode
Tankerton Street, WC1H Tankerton Street is a road in the WC1H postcode area
Tavistock Place, WC1H Tavistock Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Tavistock Place, WC1H Tavistock Place is a road in the WC1N postcode area
Tavistock Square, WC1H Tavistock Square was built by property developer James Burton and the master builder Thomas Cubitt for Francis Russell, 5th Duke of Bedford.
Thanet Street, WC1H Thanet Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Tiger House, WC1H Residential block
Tonbridge Street, WC1H Tonbridge Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Tybalds Close, WC1N Tybalds Close is a location in London.
Wakefield Street, WC1H Wakefield Street is a road in the WC1H postcode area
Wakefield Street, WC1N Wakefield Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Wells Square, WC1X Wells Square is a road in the WC1X postcode area
Westking Place, WC1H Westking Place runs north from Heathcote Street to Sidmouth Street.
Wharton Street, WC1X Wharton Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Whidborne Street, WC1H Whidborne Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Witley Court, WC1H Witley Court is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Woburn Mews, WC1H Woburn Mews ran parallel between Woburn Place and Upper Bedford Place to the west of Woburn Place.
Woburn Place, WC1H Woburn Place is situated on the Bedford estate, running north from the east of Russell Square to the east of Tavistock Square.
Woolf Mews, WC1H Woolf Mews is a road in the WC1H postcode area
Wren Street, WC1X Wren Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1Xpostal area.

NEARBY PUBS
Callaghans This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Calthorpe Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
George Birkbeck Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Hare & Tortoise This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
London Pub This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Lord John Russell P.H. This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Lucas Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Mabel’s Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Marquis Cornwallis This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
McGlynn Freehouse This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
New Bloomsbury Set This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Night and Day Bar Imperial Hotel This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Norfolk Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Pakenham Arms Ltd This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Queen’s Head This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Resident’s Club Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Skinners Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Blue Lion This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Boot This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Carpenters Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Duke of York This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Euston Flyer This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Griffin This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Harrison This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Home Park This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Lady Ottoline This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Lamb This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Perseverance This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Queens Larder This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Rugby Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Swan This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Yorkshire Grey This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Union Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Queen’s Park

Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen’s Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen’s Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen’s Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen’s Park ’proper’ formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen’s Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen’s Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett’s wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen’s Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queen’s Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen’s Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen’s Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen’s Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR.


LOCAL PHOTOS
The British Library
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Cromer Street
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Goods Way - old sign
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Percy Circus from above
Credit: Unknown
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Risinghill Street, N1
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Yorkshire Grey Yard street sign
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In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
The British Library
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Cromer Street
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Doughty Street is a broad tree lined street in the Holborn district.
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Percy Circus from above
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Red Lion Street c. 1900, looking north to Javens Chambers and Clerkenwell Road
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Cab shelter, Russell Square
Credit: The Underground Map
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The Brill Market in Somers Town (1858) Centre stage in this engraving of a busy market scene is the Brill Tavern itself, situated at the end of Brill Row.
Credit: Illustrated News of the World, London
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Yorkshire Grey Yard street sign
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