The Steelyard

The Steelyard was the main trading base (kontor) of the Hanseatic League in London during 15th and 16th centuries.

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December
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2020

The Steelyard was the main trading base (kontor) of the Hanseatic League in London during 15th and 16th centuries.

The word ’Steelyard’ derived from the Middle Low German Stalhof / Dutch Staalhof.

The Steelyard was located on the north bank of the Thames beside the outflow of the Walbrook, in the Dowgate ward of the City of London. The site is now covered by Cannon Street station and commemorated in the name of Steelyard Passage.

The first mention of a Hansa Almaniae (a "German Hansa") in English records is in 1282, concerning merely the community of the London trading post, only later to be made official as the Steelyard and confirmed in tax and customs concessions granted by Edward I, in a Carta Mercatoria ("merchant charter") of 1303.

The true power of the Hanse in English trade came much later, in the 15th century, as the German merchants, led by those of Cologne expanded their premises and extended their reach into the cloth-making industry of England. This led to constant friction over the legal position of English merchants in the Hanseatic towns and Hanseatic privileges in England, which repeatedly ended in acts of violence. Not only English wool but finished cloth was exported through the Hansa, who controlled the trade in Colchester and other cloth-making centres.

When the Steelyard was finally destroyed in 1469, the merchants of Cologne were exempted by Edward IV, which served to foment dissension among Hansards when the Hanse cities went to war with England, and Cologne was temporarily expelled from the League. But England, in the throes of the Wars of the Roses, was in a weak bargaining position, so despite several heavy defeats suffered by the Hanseatic fleet[citation needed], the Hanseatic forces, consisting mainly of ships from only two cities (Lubeck and Gdansk), with the help of formidable ships like the Peter von Danzig won the Anglo-Hanseatic War and achieved a very favourable peace from the English commissioners in Utrecht in 1474. In 1475 the Hanseatic League finally purchased the London site outright and it became universally known as the Steelyard, but this was the last outstanding success of the Hansa. In exchange for the privileges the German merchants had to maintain Bishopsgate, one of the originally seven gates of the city, from where the roads led to their interests in Boston and Lynn.

Members of the Steelyard, normally stationed in London for only a few years, sat for a famous series of portraits by Hans Holbein the Younger in the 1530s, portraits which were so successful that the Steelyard Merchants commissioned from Holbein the allegorical paintings The Triumph of Riches and The Triumph of Poverty for their Hall. Both were destroyed by a fire, but there are copies in the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford. Later merchants of the Steelyard were portrayed by Cornelis Ketel.

The prosperity of the Hanse merchants, who were in direct competition with those of the City of London, induced Queen Elizabeth to suppress the Steelyard and rescind its privileges in 1598. James I reopened the Steelyard, but it never again carried the weight it formerly had in London. Most of the buildings were destroyed during the Great Fire of London in 1666. The land and buildings remained the property of the Hanseatic League, and were subsequently let as warehouses to merchants.

The Hanseatic League was never officially dissolved however; consulates of the Hanseatic League cities provided indirect communication between Northern Germany and Whitehall during the European blockade of the Napoleonic wars. Patrick Colquhoun was appointed as Resident Minister and Consul general by the Hanseatic cities of Hamburg in 1804 and by Bremen and Lübeck shortly after as the successor of Henry Heymann, who was also Stalhofmeister, "master of the Steelyard". Colquhoun was valuable to those cities through their occupation by the French since he provided indirect communication between Northern Germany and Whitehall, especially in 1808, when the three cities considered their membership in the Confederation of the Rhine. His son James Colquhoun was his successor as Consul of the Hanseatic cities in London.

Lübeck, Bremen and Hamburg only sold their common property, the London Steelyard, to the South Eastern Railway in 1852. Cannon Street station was built on the site and opened in 1866.

The Steelyard, like other Hansa stations, was a separate walled community with its own warehouses on the river, its own weighing house, chapel, counting houses and residential quarters. In 1988 remains of the former Hanseatic trading house, once the largest medieval trading complex in Britain, were uncovered by archaeologists during maintenance work on Cannon Street Station.

As a church the Germans used former All-Hallows-the-Great, since there was only a small chapel on their own premises.




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The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 15:05 GMT   

A plague on all your houses
Aldgate station is built directly on top of a vast plague pit, where thousands of bodies are apparently buried. No-one knows quite how many.

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MCNALLY    
Added: 17 May 2021 09:42 GMT   

Blackfriars (1959 - 1965)
I lived in Upper Ground from 1959 to 1964 I was 6 years old my parents Vince and Kitty run the Pub The Angel on the corner of Upper Ground and Bodies Bridge. I remember the ceiling of the cellar was very low and almost stretched the length of Bodies Bridge. The underground trains run directly underneath the pub. If you were down in the cellar when a train was coming it was quite frightening

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Tom   
Added: 21 May 2021 23:07 GMT   

Blackfriars
What is, or was, Bodies Bridge?

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Comment
   
Added: 21 Apr 2021 16:21 GMT   

Liverpool Street
the Bishopsgate station has existed since 1840 as a passenger station, but does not appear in the site’s cartography. Evidently, the 1860 map is in fact much earlier than that date.

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Johnshort   
Added: 7 Oct 2017 21:07 GMT   

Hurley Road, SE11
There were stables in the road mid way - also Danny reading had a coal delivery lorry.

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Graham O’Connell   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 10:24 GMT   

Lloyd & Sons, Tin Box Manufacturers (1859 - 1982)
A Lloyd & Sons occupied the wharf (now known as Lloyds Wharf, Mill Street) from the mid 19th Century to the late 20th Century. Best known for making tin boxes they also produced a range of things from petrol canisters to collecting tins. They won a notorious libel case in 1915 when a local councillor criticised the working conditions which, in fairness, weren’t great. There was a major fire here in 1929 but the company survived at least until 1982 and probably a year or two after that.

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The Underground Map   
Added: 20 Sep 2020 13:01 GMT   

Pepys starts diary
On 1 January 1659, Samuel Pepys started his famous daily diary and maintained it for ten years. The diary has become perhaps the most extensive source of information on this critical period of English history. Pepys never considered that his diary would be read by others. The original diary consisted of six volumes written in Shelton shorthand, which he had learned as an undergraduate on scholarship at Magdalene College, Cambridge. This shorthand was introduced in 1626, and was the same system Isaac Newton used when writing.

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Comment
   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 14:31 GMT   

correction
Chaucer did not write Pilgrims Progress. His stories were called the Canterbury Tales

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Added: 3 Jun 2021 15:50 GMT   

All Bar One
The capitalisation is wrong

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Born here
Ron Shepherd   
Added: 18 Sep 2021 17:28 GMT   

More Wisdom
Norman Joseph Wisdom was born in St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington, West London.

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Jonathan Penner   
Added: 11 Sep 2021 16:03 GMT   

Pennard Road, W12
My wife and I, young Canadians, lodged at 65 (?) Pennard Road with a fellow named Clive and his girlfriend, Melanie, for about 6 months in 1985. We loved the area and found it extremely convenient.

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Comment
   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 16:58 GMT   

Prefabs!
The "post-war detached houses" mentioned in the description were "prefabs" - self-contained single-storey pre-fabricated dwellings. Demolition of houses on the part that became Senegal Fields was complete by 1964 or 1965.

Source: Prefabs in the United Kingdom - Wikipedia

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Matthew Moggridge ([email protected])   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 10:38 GMT   

Lord Chatham’s Ride (does it even exist?)
Just to say that I cycled from my home in Sanderstead to Knockholt Pound at the weekend hoping to ride Lord Chatham’s Ride, but could I find it? No. I rode up Chevening Lane, just past the Three Horseshoes pub and when I reached the end of the road there was a gate and a sign reading "Private, No Entry". I assumed this was the back entrance to Chevening House, country retreat of the Foreign Secretary, and that Lord Chatham’s Ride was inside the grounds. At least that’s what I’m assuming as I ended up following a footpath that led me into some woods with loads of rooted pathways, all very annoying. Does Lord Chatham’s Ride exist and if so, can I ride it, or is it within the grounds of Chevening House and, therefore, out of bounds? Here’s an account of my weekend ride with images, see URL below.

Source: No Visible Lycra: Lord Chatham’s ride: a big disappointmen

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norma brown   
Added: 20 Aug 2021 21:12 GMT   

my grandparents lived there as well as 2 further generations
my home

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Ruth   
Added: 6 Aug 2021 13:31 GMT   

Cheltenham Road, SE15
Harris Girls’ Academy, in Homestall Road, just off Cheltenham Road, was formerly Waverley School. Before that it was built as Honor Oak Girls’ Grammar School. It was also the South London Emergency School during WW2,taking girls from various schools in the vicinity, including those returning from being evacuated.

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Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

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Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 09:12 GMT   

Dunloe Avenue, N17
I was born in 1951,my grandparents lived at 5 Dunloe Avenue.I had photos of the coronation decorations in the area for 1953.The houses were rented out by Rowleys,their ’workers yard’ was at the top of Dunloe Avenue.The house was fairly big 3 bedroom with bath and toilet upstairs,and kitchenette downstairs -a fairly big garden.My Grandmother died 1980 and the house was taken back to be rented again

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The Terrace, SE1 The Terrace is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Three Cranes Wharf, EC4R Three Cranes Wharf is one of the streets of London in the EC4R postal area.
Three Crown Square Borough Market, SE1 Three Crown Square Borough Market is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Trig Lane, EC4V A street within the EC4V postcode
Two London Bridge, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Upper Thames Street, EC4R Upper Thames Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4R postal area.
Vestry House, EC4R Residential block
Victor Wharf, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Walbrook, EC4N Walbrook is one of the streets of the Bank area.
Watling Street, EC4M Watling Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
Watling Street, EC4N Watling Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4N postal area.
Well Court, EC4N Well Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
Whittington Avenue, EC3V Whittington Avenue is one of the streets of London in the EC3V postal area.
Winchester Square, SE1 Winchester Square is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Winchester Walk, SE1 Winchester Walk is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Winchester Wharf, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode

NEARBY PUBS
All Bar One Cannon Street This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Bar 20 This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Barrow boy & banker This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Be At One Monument This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Bedales Wine Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Brokers Wine Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Cannick Tapps This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Core This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Crosse Keys This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Dirty Martini Monument This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Forge Bar & Club This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Harry’s Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Jamaica Wine House This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Jamies This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Jamies St Mary At Hill This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Loose Cannon This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Merchant House This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Mermaid Tavern The Mermaid Tavern was a notable tavern during the Elizabethan era.
Number 25 This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Old Swan The Old Swan Inn was one of the most well-known in the City of London.
Old thameside inn This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
One Under Lime This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Oyster Shed This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Planet Of The Grapes This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Planet of the Grapes Ltd This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Reflex This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Salotto 31 This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Sir John Hawkshaw This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Steam Wine Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The anchor bankside This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Banker This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Bell This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Bootlegger’s Club Ltd This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Britannia This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Bunch Of Grapes This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Counting House This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Folly This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Four Sisters Townhouse This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The globe tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Golden Fleece This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Green Man This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The horniman at hays This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Hydrant, Equitable House This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Monument This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The mudlark This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The mug house This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The New Moon This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Olde Wine Shades This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Pelt Trader, Arch 3 This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Pepys This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The rake This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Ship This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Sugarloaf This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Swan This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Three Cranes This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Walrus & The Carpenter This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Vinopolis city of wine This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Ye Olde Watling This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Zorita’s Kitchen This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Queen’s Park

Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen’s Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen’s Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen’s Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen’s Park ’proper’ formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen’s Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen’s Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett’s wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen’s Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queen’s Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen’s Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen’s Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen’s Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Postal area SE1
TUM image id: 1483541461
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Hopton Street, Borough, 1977.
TUM image id: 1557142131
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Ayres Street
TUM image id: 1544924072
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
"Cheapside and Bow Church" engraved by W. Albutt, 1837 steel engraved print after a picture by T.H. Shepherd, first published in The History of London: Illustrated by Views in London and Westminster.
Credit: W. Albutt
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

Walbrook Wharf is an operating freight wharf located in the City of London adjacent to Cannon Street station.
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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"London Bridge from the Old Swan" by the Irish painter Hubert Pugh (1780) Shooting the tidal rapids at old London Bridge was dangerous; many passengers preferred to get off at the Old Swan, and walk. Immediately across the river in the painting is St Saviour’s Church, now Southwark Cathedral.
Credit: Hubert Pugh (Bank of England Museum)
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The Church of All Hallows Lombard Street as seen from Ball Alley in the 1820s. All Hallows was a rare City of London church not demolished due to the Great Fire or the Blitz but to falling attendances. Taken from ’The Churches of London’ by George Godwin (1839)
Credit: Robert William Billings and John Le Keux
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Adelaide House from above
Credit: https://manchesterhistory.net/
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Anchor Terrace, SE1 A large symmetrical building on Southwark Bridge Road, Anchor Terrace was built in 1834 for senior employees of the nearby Anchor Brewery. The building was converted into luxury flats in the late 1990s.
Credit: Wiki Commons/Jwslubbock
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Ayres Street
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The shoemaker was a 1907 London comedy drama, a play "full of tears and laughter."
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At the south end of Philpot Lane, at its junction with Eastcheap in the City, is 23 Eastcheap, built between 1861 and 1862, as offices and warehousing for the spice-merchants Messrs.’ Hunt and Crombie. A curious feature adorns its facade - a carving of two brown mice, each of which is engaged in a struggle to wrest a large chunk of cheese from the jaws of the other.
Credit: GoArt/The Underground Map
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Lombard Court EC3
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