Poplar High Street, E14

Road in/near Poplar, existing until now.

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Road · Poplar · E14 ·
October
26
2020
Until the late nineteenth century Poplar High Street was the district’s principal street.

The commercial importance of Poplar High Street declined rapidly from the 1860s, and in the late 1880s it was reported that ’many shops have been empty for years’.

Nearly two-thirds of a mile in length, and on average only a little over 30ft in width, Poplar High Street contained 327 houses when it was renumbered in 1865. Most were narrow, with an average width of under 17ft. Extending along the southern edge of the river-terrace flood-plain gravel, it provided an indirect approach to Blackwall, and, perhaps as important, access to the ways which extended down from its south side into the rich pasture of the Isle of Dogs. The house-sites on this south side of the street sloped sharply downward and this was sometimes thought the less salubrious side. In 1863 the sewer behind the public house at No. 270 was still an open ditch of ’water carried away at every tide’. It was on this ill-drained south side, however, that a clear if discontinuous line of ’back lane’ developed, whereas there was nothing of the kind on the opposite side. The local medical men tended to live on the north side, which as early as 1623 produced a much higher yield from the rates than the south side.

In the nineteenth century the property of the manor of Poplar lay on the south side of the street, chiefly west of the workhouse. On the manor of Poplar in the years 1810–39 the lord’s property in the street (perhaps some 50 houses) brought him an income arising out of the ’fines’ or premiums on the renewal of holdings that was immensely variable but which averaged just under £100 per annum. (The most, in 1837, was £649.)

John Hale was a carpenter in the City, off Cannon Street. He seems to have acquired effective ownership from his relations and from him the property on both sides of the High Street descended by 1803 to his builder son, Thomas (in a trust with his mother). It was Thomas Hale, one of the first would-be developers, with Thomas Ashton of Blackwall, of the east end of East India Dock Road in 1807–8, who finally subjected the property to development in the first decade of the nineteenth century. This was chiefly in Hale Street and more humbly in Queen (later Bickmore) Street, and on their flank fronts to the High Street.

In the opening decade of the nineteenth century, when the great enclosed docks were made, there was a building boom of a kind in the High Street. The general London building boom of the mid–1820s is faintly reflected and in 1824 the parish authorities noted that several houses were about to be taken down. The up-to-date appearance of some of the replacements has been noticed. Among the houses built on the south side in the 1850s, though they were ’of no architectural merit’, some were professionally occupied, and this seems to signify a short time when the prospects for residential property in the street had some faint promise, with local poverty alleviated by the Crimean War boom in shipbuilding, a time when ’the whole Isle of Dogs rang with hammers from morning to night’. The Poplar Literary and Scientific Institution was here (behind Nos 186–188) in 1845–52, before moving to East India Dock Road. In Poplar generally far more new houses were built in 1845–55 than in 1871–91 and the High Street reflects this. There were 51 new houses built in the 11 years 1845–55, 18 in 1872–82, nine in 1883–93, nine again in 1894–1904, but none in 1905–15. Rather similarly, new shopfronts numbered 19 in 1845–55, three in 1872–82 and nine in 1883–93.

Since 1817 much of the street had lain within the metaphorical and some of it in the physical shadow of the big workhouse building on the south side. Nor were the attractions of the street enhanced by the trades pursued there, such as the 11 slaughterhouses in 1859, the cork-burner at No. 100 in 1899 and the haddock-dryer at No. 302 in 1881. At and behind No. 25 the nineteenth-century sawmill was succeeded by chain-makers and repairers whose ironworks continued there after the Second World War. The hold on ’amenity’ was very frail and by the end of the nineteenth century the street was thoroughly depressed, with ’several houses of ill-fame, frequented by common seamen’, on its south side. Will Crooks’s biographer spoke in 1907 of the ’now silent’ High Street, and the Inland Revenue’s valuation of 1909–15 shows the silence to have been one of decay and neglect.

Emslie’s views in the 1870s show how much the High Street was then a shopping street. But they probably show a street where retail prosperity was already in decline. Commentators attributed this to the departure of street-traders and costermongers to Chrisp Street, from the late 1860s onwards. The removal of the Poplar Railway Station to East India Dock Road in 1865–6 had probably made matters worse. By 1895 the City Press called it ’one of the worst paying thoroughfares in London’. From 1872 to 1900 few new shopfronts are noticed in the district surveyor’s returns. There was then some increase, to 1915. But the Inland Revenue’s valuer was driven to constant comment in his assessments of 1909–15 that this was ’a bad business street’. (ref. 83)

As for the shops themselves, by the 1930s they shared one predominant characteristic with the rest of London’s humbler shops: the division of the ground floor between the shop itself at the front and a separate ’shop parlour’ behind, whence the proprietor would emerge at the tinkle of the shop bell. Access to the shop parlour and the rooms above was usually via the shop not via a separate street-door. Some shops of this kind were of very simple design.




Main source: Poplar High Street: Introduction | British History Online
Further citations and sources


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

Born here
colin Passfield   
Added: 1 Jan 2021 15:28 GMT   

Dora Street, E14
My grandmother was born in 1904 at 34 Dora Street

Reply
Lived here
   
Added: 16 Feb 2021 13:41 GMT   

Giraud Street
I lived in Giraud St in 1938/1939. I lived with my Mother May Lillian Allen & my brother James Allen (Known as Lenny) My name is Tom Allen and was evacuated to Surrey from Giraud St. I am now 90 years of age.

Reply
Reply
   
Added: 14 Jul 2023 11:54 GMT   

Dora Street, E14
My grandmother and Grandfather moved into St Leonards Avenue in 1904 and and lived there until her death in 1966. I lived there for the first 7 years of my life, and I was born in Bromley by Bow hospital


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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT


Matthew Proctor   
Added: 7 Dec 2023 17:36 GMT   

Blackheath Grove, SE3
Road was originally known as The Avenue, then became "The Grove" in 1942.

From 1864 there was Blackheath Wesleyan Methodist Chapel on this street until it was destroyed by a V2 in 1944

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Comment
Peter   
Added: 4 Dec 2023 07:05 GMT   

Gambia Street, SE1
Gambia Street was previously known as William Street.

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Comment
Eileen   
Added: 10 Nov 2023 09:42 GMT   

Brecknock Road Pleating Company
My great grandparents ran the Brecknock Road pleating Company around 1910 to 1920 and my Grandmother worked there as a pleater until she was 16. I should like to know more about this. I know they had a beautiful Victorian house in Islington as I have photos of it & of them in their garden.

Source: Family history

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Comment
   
Added: 6 Nov 2023 16:59 GMT   

061123
Why do Thames Water not collect the 15 . Three meter lengths of blue plastic fencing, and old pipes etc. They left here for the last TWO Years, these cause an obstruction,as they halfway lying in the road,as no footpath down this road, and the cars going and exiting the park are getting damaged, also the public are in Grave Danger when trying to avoid your rubbish and the danger of your fences.

Source: Squirrels Lane. Buckhurst Hill, Essex. IG9. I want some action ,now, not Excuses.MK.

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Christian   
Added: 31 Oct 2023 10:34 GMT   

Cornwall Road, W11
Photo shows William Richard Hoare’s chemist shop at 121 Cornwall Road.

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Vik   
Added: 30 Oct 2023 18:48 GMT   

Old pub sign from the Rising Sun
Hi I have no connection to the area except that for the last 30+ years we’ve had an old pub sign hanging on our kitchen wall from the Rising Sun, Stanwell, which I believe was / is on the Oaks Rd. Happy to upload a photo if anyone can tell me how or where to do that!

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Comment
Phillip Martin   
Added: 16 Oct 2023 06:25 GMT   

16 Ashburnham Road
On 15 October 1874 George Frederick Martin was born in 16 Ashburnham Road Greenwich to George Henry Martin, a painter, and Mary Martin, formerly Southern.

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Lived here
Christine Bithrey   
Added: 15 Oct 2023 15:20 GMT   

The Hollies (1860 - 1900)
I lived in Holly Park Estate from 1969 I was 8 years old when we moved in until I left to get married, my mother still lives there now 84. I am wondering if there was ever a cemetery within The Hollies? And if so where? Was it near to the Blythwood Road end or much nearer to the old Methodist Church which is still standing although rather old looking. We spent most of our childhood playing along the old dis-used railway that run directly along Blythwood Road and opposite Holly Park Estate - top end which is where we live/ed. We now walk my mothers dog there twice a day. An elderly gentleman once told me when I was a child that there used to be a cemetery but I am not sure if he was trying to scare us children! I only thought about this recently when walking past the old Methodist Church and seeing the flag stone in the side of the wall with the inscription of when it was built late 1880

If anyone has any answers please email me [email protected]

Reply


NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
All Saints’ Church All Saints’ is a church in Newby Place, Poplar.
Canary Wharf Canary Wharf is a large business development on the Isle of Dogs, centred on the old West India Docks.
Chrisp Street Market Chrisp Street Market is the central marketplace and town centre of Poplar.
La Trompette Poplar Baths is a former public bath house dating from 1933.
Museum of London Docklands The Museum of London Docklands, based in an 1802 warehouse, tells the history of London’s River Thames and the growth of the Docklands.
Railway Tavern The Railway Tavern was generally known as Charlie Brown’s.
St Matthias Old Church St Matthias Old Church is the modern name given to the Poplar Chapel built by the East India Company in 1654.
Tower Hamlets College Tower Hamlets College is a large further education and a constituent college of New City College.
West India Quay West India Quay is a leisure complex on the Isle of Dogs.

NEARBY STREETS
, E14 Holmsdale House is a block on Poplar High Street.
1 Cabot Square, E14 1 Cabot Square (also known as the Credit Suisse building) is a 21 floor office building occupied by Credit Suisse in the Canary Wharf development.
1 West India Quay, E14 1 West India Quay is a skyscraper designed by HOK in the Docklands area which was completed in 2004.
Abbot House, E14 Abbot House is a block on Smythe Street.
Adams Place, E14 Adams Place is a road in the E14 postcode area
Adderley Street, E14 Adderley Street is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
Amoy Place, E14 Amoy Place is a road in the E14 postcode area
Annabel Close, E14 Annabel Close is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
Arborfield House, E14 Arborfield House is a building on East India Dock Road.
Astoria Way, E14 Astoria Way is a location in London.
Balsam House, E14 Balsam House is sited on East India Dock Road.
Bazely Street, E14 Bazely Street was originally Bow Lane.
Berber Place, E14 Berber Place is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
Billingsgate Market, E14 Billingsgate Market is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
Birchfield House, E14 Birchfield House can be found on Pinefield Close.
Birchfield Street, E14 Birchfield Street was once called Drill Place.
Blomfield House, E14 Blomfield House is a block on Hale Street.
Boardwalk Place, E14 Boardwalk Place is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
Boardwalk, E14 Sophia Street was built in 1823 and demolished in 1939.
Broadway Walk, E14 Broadway Walk is a road in the E14 postcode area
Brownfield Street, E14 Brownfield Street is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
Bygrove Street, E14 Bygrove Street is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
Cabot Place East, E14 Cabot Place East is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
Cabot Place West, E14 Cabot Place West is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
Cabot Place, E14 Cabot Place is a retail area.
Cabot Square, E14 Cabot Square is one of the central squares of the Canary Wharf Development.
Canary Wharf, E14 Canary Wharf is a location rather than a road but one which has addresses assigned to it.
Cannon Drive, E14 Cannon Drive connects Hertsmere Road with the Cannon Workshops.
Cannon House, E14 Cannon House is sited on Hertsmere Road West.
Canton Street, E14 Canton Street is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
Carmichael House, E14 Carmichael House is a block on Poplar High Street.
Casson Apartments, E14 Casson Apartments is a block on Upper North Street.
Castor Lane, E14 Castor Lane is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
Castor Street, E14 Castor Street existed between the 1810s and 1960s.
Chancellor Passage, E14 Chancellor Passage is in the Canary Wharf area behind West India Quay.
Chilcot Close, E14 A street within the E14 postcode
Colborne House, E14 Colborne House is a block on Nankin Street.
Collins House, E14 Collins House is located on Newby Place.
Columbus Courtyard, E14 Columbus Courtyard is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
Commodore House, E14 Commodore House is a block on Poplar High Street.
Cooks Close, E14 A street within the E14 postcode
Corry House, E14 Corry House is a block on Shirbutt Street.
Cottage Street, E14 Cottage Street is a road in the E14 postcode area
Crossrail Place, E14 A street within the E14 postcode
Crossrail Walk, E14 A street within the E14 postcode
Cruse House, E14 Cruse House is located on Poplar High Street.
Cygnet House, E14 Cygnet House is a block on Chrisp Street.
Devitt House, E14 Devitt House is a block on Wade’s Place.
Dingle Gardens, E14 Dingle Gardens is a road in the E14 postcode area
Discovery House, E14 Discovery House can be found on Newby Place.
Dockmasters House, E14 Dockmasters House is a block on Hertsmere Road.
Dolphin Lane, E14 A street within the E14 postcode
Duff Street, E14 A street within the E14 postcode
Duke Of York House, E14 Duke Of York House is a block on East India Dock Road.
East India Dock Road, E14 East India Dock Road is an important artery connecting the City of London to Essex, and partly serves as the high street of Poplar
East Quay, E14 A street within the E14 postcode
Eldersfield House, E14 Eldersfield House is sited on Pennyfields.
Elizabeth Close, E14 A street within the E14 postcode
Ennis House, E14 Ennis House is a block on Vesey Path.
Epstein Square, E14 A street within the E14 postcode
Finchs Court Mews, E14 A street within the E14 postcode
Finchs Court, E14 Finchs Court is a block on Finchs Court.
Fishermans Place, E14 Fishermans Place is a road in the W4 postcode area
Fishermans Walk, E14 Fishermans Walk is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
Fitzgerald House, E14 Fitzgerald House is a block on East India Dock Road.
Fonda Court, E14 Fonda Court is a building on Premiere Place.
Fusion Building, E14 Fusion Building is a block on East India Dock Road.
Garford Street, E14 Garford Street is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
Good Hope House, E14 Good Hope House is a block on Poplar High Street.
Goodfaith House, E14 Goodfaith House is a block on Simpson’s Road.
Goodspeed House, E14 Goodspeed House is a block on Simpson’s Road.
Goodwill House, E14 Goodwill House is a block on Simpson’s Road.
Gorsefield House, E14 Gorsefield House is sited on East India Dock Road.
Grundy Street, E14 Grundy Street is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
Hale Street, E14 Hale Street is a road in the E14 postcode area
Harbour Way, E14 A street within the E14 postcode
Harrow Lane, E14 Harrow Lane is a road in the E14 postcode area
Heckford House, E14 Heckford House is a block on Grundy Street.
Hertsmere Road, E14 Hertsmere Road - a 1980s-era road - curves around the back of the Museum of London Docklands.
Hopkins House, E14 Hopkins House is located on Canton Street.
Horizon Building, E14 The Horizon Building
Jeremiah House, E14 Jeremiah House is sited on Jeremiah Street.
Jeremiah Street, E14 A street within the E14 postcode
Kemps Drive, E14 A street within the E14 postcode
Kerbey Street, E14 Kerbey Street is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
Kildare Walk, E14 Kildare Walk is a road in the E14 postcode area
Kilmore House, E14 Kilmore House is a block on East India Dock Road.
Landon Walk, E14 Landon Walk is a small walkway.
Lawless House, E14 Lawless House is a block on Bazely Street.
Ledger Building, E14 Ledger Building is a block on Hertsmere Road.
Leyland House, E14 Leyland House is a block on Hale Street.
Lubbock House, E14 Lubbock House is a block on Simpson’s Road.
Mackrow Walk, E14 Mackrow Walk is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
Malam Gardens, E14 Malam Gardens is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
Market Square, E14 A street within the E14 postcode
Martindale House, E14 Martindale House is a block on Simpsons Road.
Mary Jones Court, E14 Mary Jones Court is a block on Garford Street.
Meridian House, E14 Meridian House is a block on Poplar High Street.
Ming Street, E14 Ming Street - the former King Street - was renamed in recognition of the then local Chinese community
Morant Street, E14 Morant Street is a road in the E14 postcode area
Moro Apartments, E14 Moro Apartments is a block on Edward Mills Way.
Mountague Place, E14 This is a street in the E14 postcode area
New Festival Avenue, E14 New Festival Avenue is a road in the E14 postcode area
Newby Place, E14 Newby Place is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
North Colonnade, E14 North Colonnade is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
North Quay, E14 The North Quay development - approximately 3.28 hectares - was previously used as a construction laydown area for the Canary Wharf Elizabeth line station.
North Quay-Blood Alley, E14 This part of North Quay was known as Blood Alley when this was a docklands area.
Northcote House, E14 Northcote House is a building on Saracen Street.
Norwood House, E14 Norwood House is a block on Poplar High Street.
Ontario Way, E14 Ontario Way is a road in the E14 postcode area
Overstone House, E14 Overstone House is a block on East India Dock Road.
Park Row, E14 Park Row is a road in the E14 postcode area
Pasmore Court, E14 Pasmore Court is a block on Canton Street.
Pekin Close, E14 A street within the E14 postcode
Pekin Street, E14 Pekin Street is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
Pennyfields, E14 Pennyfields is the western extension of Poplar High Street.
Pigott Street, E14 When the Lansbury Estate was built, Pigott Street was the final part of the plan, hosting a block of flats from 1982.
Pinefield Close, E14 A street within the E14 postcode
Playfair House, E14 Playfair House is a block on Nankin Street.
Plimsoll Close, E14 Plimsoll Close is a road in the E14 postcode area
Pusey House, E14 Pusey House is located on Saracen Street.
Ricardo Street, E14 Ricardo Street is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
Rigden Street, E14 A street within the E14 postcode
Rogers Court, E14 Rogers Court is a block on Limehouse Link.
Rook Street, E14 Rook Street - at first called Mary Street - ran between Poplar High Street and East India Road.
Rosefield Gardens, E14 Rosefield Gardens is a road in the E14 postcode area
Russell House, E14 Russell House is a block on Saracen Street.
Saltwell Street, E14 Saltwell Street is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
Saracen Street, E14 Saracen Street was a new street formed when the Lansbury Estate was built.
Scott Russell Place, E14 Scott Russell Place is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
Shepherd Court, E14 Shepherd Court can be found on Annabel Close.
Shirbutt Street, E14 Shirbutt Street is a road in the E14 postcode area
Simpson’s Road, E14 Simpson’s Road is a road in the E14 postcode area
Skysail Building, E14 Skysail Building is located on Poplar High Street.
Smythe Street, E14 A street within the E14 postcode
Spearman House, E14 Spearman House is a block on Nankin Street.
Stoneyard Lane, E14 A street within the E14 postcode
Storehouse Mews, E14 A street within the E14 postcode
Storey House, E14 Storey House is located on Lawless Street.
Sturry Street, E14 A street within the E14 postcode
Susannah Street, E14 Susannah Street is a road in the E14 postcode area
Taylor House, E14 Taylor House is a block on Stonehouse Mews.
The Arcade, E14 A street within the E14 postcode
The Port East Building, E14 The Port East Building is a block on Hertsmere Road.
The Warehouse, E14 A street within the E14 postcode
Thompson House, E14 Thompson House is a block on Pekin Street.
Thornfield House, E14 Thornfield House is a block on Rosefield Gardens.
Trafalgar Way, E14 Trafalgar Way is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
Turner’s Buildings, E14 Turner’s Buildings was a small close off Pennyfields.
Ulmar Place, E14 Ulmar Place was a small turning off King Street.
Vesey Path, E14 A street within the E14 postcode
Virginia House, E14 Virginia House is a block on Mountague Place.
Wades Place, E14 Wades Place is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
Welles Court, E14 Welles Court is a block on Limehouse Link.
West India Avenue, E14 West India Avenue is a road in the E14 postcode area
West India Dock Road, E14 West India Dock Road is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
Westcott House, E14 Westcott House is sited on East India Dock Road.
Wickes House, E14 Wickes House is a block on Poplar High Street.
Wigram House, E14 Wigram House is located on Wade’s Place.
William Lax House, E14 William Lax House is a block on East India Dock Road.
Williamsburg Plaza, E14 A street within the E14 postcode
Willis House, E14 Willis House is a block on Poplar High Street.
Winant House, E14 Winant House is a block on Simpson’s Road.
Woodall Close, E14 Woodall Close is a road in the E14 postcode area
Woodstock Terrace, E14 Woodstock Terrace is a road in the E14 postcode area
Wren Landing, E14 Wren Landing is an open area between Cabot Square and the footbridge over to the Museum of London Docklands.

NEARBY PUBS
Railway Tavern The Railway Tavern was generally known as Charlie Brown’s.


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Poplar

Poplar - site of the first air raids.

Poplar is a historic, mainly residential area of East London. The district became the Metropolitan Borough of Poplar in 1900 - abolished in 1965 and absorbed into Tower Hamlets. The district centre is Chrisp Street Market. Poplar contains notable examples of public housing including the Lansbury Estate and Balfron Tower.

Although many people associate wartime bombing with The Blitz during World War II, the first airborne terror campaign in Britain took place during the First World War.

Air raids in World War One caused significant damage and took many lives. WWI German raids on Britain caused 1413 deaths and 3409 injuries. Air raids provided an unprecedented means of striking at resources vital to an enemy’s war effort. Many of the novel features of the war in the air between 1914 and 1918—the lighting restrictions and blackouts, the air raid warnings and the improvised shelters—became central aspects of the Second World War less than 30 years later.

The East End of London was one of the most heavily targeted places. Poplar, in particular, was struck badly by some of the air raids during the First World War. Initially these were at night by Zeppelins which bombed the area indiscriminately, leading to the death of innocent civilians.

The first daylight bombing attack on London by a fixed-wing aircraft took place on 13 June 1917. Fourteen German Gotha G bombers led by Squadron Commander Hauptmann Ernst Brandenberg flew over Essex and began dropping their bombs. It was a hot day and the sky was hazy; nevertheless, onlookers in London’s East End were able to see ’a dozen or so big aeroplanes scintillating like so many huge silver dragonflies’. These three-seater bombers were carrying shrapnel bombs which were dropped just before noon. Numerous bombs fell in rapid succession in various districts. In the East End alone 104 people were killed, 154 seriously injured and 269 slightly injured.

The gravest incident that day was a direct hit on a primary school in Poplar. In the Upper North Street School at the time were a girls’ class on the top floor, a boys’ class on the middle floor and an infant class of about 50 students on the ground floor. The bomb fell through the roof into the girls’ class; it then proceeded to fall through the boys’ classroom before finally exploding in the infant class. Eighteen students were killed, of whom sixteen were aged from 4 to 6 years old. The tragedy shocked the British public at the time.

* * *

Poplar DLR station was opened on 21 August 1987, originally with just two platforms, being served only by the Stratford-Island Gardens branch of the DLR. As the DLR was expanded eastwards, the station was extensively remodelled, given two extra platforms and expanded.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Poplar (1910)
TUM image id: 1556886600
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Poplar Baths (2005)
Credit: Gordon Joly
TUM image id: 1582639714
Licence: CC BY 2.0
1 Cabot Square
Credit: Jack8080
TUM image id: 1481482264
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Pennyfields, Poplar (around 1900)
TUM image id: 1605021763
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

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Poplar (1910)
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Poplar Baths (2005)
Credit: Gordon Joly
Licence: CC BY 2.0


1 Cabot Square
Credit: Jack8080
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Two Men on a Bench is one of two sculptures in Canary Wharf by Giles Penny.
Credit: www.walkmeblog.com
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The River Thames looking west as photographed from the restaurant at One Canada Place (2018)
Credit: The Underground Map
Licence: CC BY 2.0


’Old Clo’ Women on Chrisp Street: Ashkenazi Jewish women working with shoddy and other old cloth ply their trade in Poplar
Credit: ’KY’ (unknown early twentieth century photographer)
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East India Road, Poplar It takes it name from the former East India Docks and its route was constructed between 1806 and 1812 as a branch of the Commercial Road. The road begins in the west at Burdett Road and continues to the River Lea bridge in the east in Canning Town.
Old London postcard
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Pennyfields, Poplar (around 1900)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


’Blood Alley’ in the West India Docks, circa 1930. This photograph was taken at the North Quay shows a gang of dockers trucking bags of sugar beneath an awning of washed sacks that are hung out for drying at. ‘Blood Alley’ was the nickname given to roadway between the transit sheds and sugar warehouses because handling the sacks of sticky West Indian sugar badly chafed and cracked the dockers’ skin. This quay is now home to the Museum of London Docklands
Credit: PLA collection/Museum of London
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Canary Wharf: West India Dock North Floating Footbridge (2018) The footbridge joins Wren’s Landing on Canary Wharf, from which this photograph was taken, with the North Quay of the West India Dock North. The footbridge was opened in 1996 and floats on a series of pontoons. The footbridge is about 94 metres long, covering an open water span of about 84 metres, and narrows towards its centre.
Credit: Geograph/Nigel Cox
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