Lillington Gardens

Neighbourhood in/near Queen’s Park, existing between 1961 and now

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Lillington Gardens is an estate in the Pimlico area, constructed in phases between 1961 and 1980.

The estate was among the last of the high-density public housing schemes built in London during the postwar period, and is referred to as one of the most distinguished. Notably, seven years before the Ronan Point disaster ended the dominance of the tower block, Lillington Gardens looked ahead to a new standard that achieved high housing density within a medium rather than high-rise structure. It emphasised individuality in the grouping of dwellings, and provided for private gardens at ground and roof levels.

The estate’s high build quality, and particularly the planted gardens of its wide "roof streets", blend sympathetically with the surrounding Victorian terraces.

The estate’s high quality design was acknowledged by a Housing Design Award (1961), Ministry of Housing and Local Government Award for Good Design (1970), RIBA Award (1970) and RIBA Commendation (1973). Nikolaus Pevsner described it in 1973 as "the most interesting recent housing scheme in London".

The site surrounds the Grade I listed Church of St James the Less, built in 1859–61. The entire estate, including the church, was designated a conservation area in 1990.


Main source: Wikipedia
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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Lived here
Richard Roques   
Added: 21 Jan 2021 16:53 GMT   

Buckingham Street residents
Here in Buckingham Street lived Samuel Pepys the diarist, Charles Dickens and Rudyard Kipling

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Pauline jones   
Added: 16 Oct 2017 19:04 GMT   

Bessborough Place, SW1V
I grew up in bessborough place at the back of our house and Grosvenor road and bessborough gardens was a fantastic playground called trinity mews it had a paddling pool sandpit football area and various things to climb on, such as a train , slide also as Wendy house. There were plants surrounding this wonderful play area, two playground attendants ,also a shelter for when it rained. The children were constantly told off by the playground keepers for touching the plants or kicking the ball out of the permitted area, there was hopscotch as well, all these play items were brick apart from the slide. Pollock was the centre of my universe and I felt sorry and still do for anyone not being born there. To this day I miss it and constantly look for images of the streets around there, my sister and me often go back to take a clumped of our beloved London. The stucco houses were a feature and the backs of the houses enabled parents to see thier children playing.

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Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

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The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Dec 2020 00:24 GMT   

Othello takes a bow
On 1 November 1604, William Shakespeare’s tragedy Othello was presented for the first time, at The Palace of Whitehall. The palace was the main residence of the English monarchs in London from 1530 until 1698. Seven years to the day, Shakespeare’s romantic comedy The Tempest was also presented for the first time, and also at the Palace of Whitehall.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Born here
Ron Shepherd   
Added: 18 Sep 2021 17:28 GMT   

More Wisdom
Norman Joseph Wisdom was born in St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington, West London.

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Jonathan Penner   
Added: 11 Sep 2021 16:03 GMT   

Pennard Road, W12
My wife and I, young Canadians, lodged at 65 (?) Pennard Road with a fellow named Clive and his girlfriend, Melanie, for about 6 months in 1985. We loved the area and found it extremely convenient.

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Comment
   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 16:58 GMT   

Prefabs!
The "post-war detached houses" mentioned in the description were "prefabs" - self-contained single-storey pre-fabricated dwellings. Demolition of houses on the part that became Senegal Fields was complete by 1964 or 1965.

Source: Prefabs in the United Kingdom - Wikipedia

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Matthew Moggridge ([email protected])   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 10:38 GMT   

Lord Chatham’s Ride (does it even exist?)
Just to say that I cycled from my home in Sanderstead to Knockholt Pound at the weekend hoping to ride Lord Chatham’s Ride, but could I find it? No. I rode up Chevening Lane, just past the Three Horseshoes pub and when I reached the end of the road there was a gate and a sign reading "Private, No Entry". I assumed this was the back entrance to Chevening House, country retreat of the Foreign Secretary, and that Lord Chatham’s Ride was inside the grounds. At least that’s what I’m assuming as I ended up following a footpath that led me into some woods with loads of rooted pathways, all very annoying. Does Lord Chatham’s Ride exist and if so, can I ride it, or is it within the grounds of Chevening House and, therefore, out of bounds? Here’s an account of my weekend ride with images, see URL below.

Source: No Visible Lycra: Lord Chatham’s ride: a big disappointmen

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norma brown   
Added: 20 Aug 2021 21:12 GMT   

my grandparents lived there as well as 2 further generations
my home

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Ruth   
Added: 6 Aug 2021 13:31 GMT   

Cheltenham Road, SE15
Harris Girls’ Academy, in Homestall Road, just off Cheltenham Road, was formerly Waverley School. Before that it was built as Honor Oak Girls’ Grammar School. It was also the South London Emergency School during WW2,taking girls from various schools in the vicinity, including those returning from being evacuated.

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Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

Reply
Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 09:12 GMT   

Dunloe Avenue, N17
I was born in 1951,my grandparents lived at 5 Dunloe Avenue.I had photos of the coronation decorations in the area for 1953.The houses were rented out by Rowleys,their ’workers yard’ was at the top of Dunloe Avenue.The house was fairly big 3 bedroom with bath and toilet upstairs,and kitchenette downstairs -a fairly big garden.My Grandmother died 1980 and the house was taken back to be rented again

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Chelsea College of Art and Design Chelsea College of Arts is a constituent college of the University of the Arts London.
Lillington Gardens Lillington Gardens is an estate in the Pimlico area, constructed in phases between 1961 and 1980.
Pimlico Pimlico is known for its garden squares and Regency architecture.
Pimlico Academy Pimlico Academy (formerly Pimlico School) is a mixed-sex education secondary school and sixth form with academy status.
St James the Less St James the Less is an Anglican church built by George Edmund Street in the Gothic Revival style.
St Mary’s Church, Vincent Square St Mary’s was established in 1837 and closed in 1923.
St Saviour’s St Saviour’s is an Anglo-Catholic church in Pimlico.
Westminster Under School Westminster Under School is an independent school and preparatory school for boys aged 7 to 13 and is attached to Westminster School.

NEARBY STREETS
Alderney Street, SW1V Alderney Street was originally Stanley Street, after George Stanley, local landowner.
Antrobus Street, SW1V Antrobus Street, now demolished, was long called Rutland Street.
Atterbury Street, SW1P Atterbury Street is named after Francis Atterbury, Dean of Westminster in 1713.
Balniel Gate, SW1V Balniel Gate is a road of Pimlico.
Balvaird Place, SW1V Balvaird Place is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Belgrave Road, SW1V Belgrave Road is a street in the Pimlico area of London.
Bessborough Gardens, SW1V Bessborough Gardens is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Bessborough Place, SW1V Bessborough Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Bessborough Street, SW1V Bessborough Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Bloomberg Street, SW1V Bloomberg Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Bloomburg Street, SW1V Bloomburg Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Bridge Place, SW1V Bridge Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Cambridge Street, SW1V Cambridge Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Carey Place, SW1V Carey Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Causton Street, SW1P Causton Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Chapter Chambers, SW1P Chapter Chambers is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Chapter Street, SW1P Chapter Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Charlwood Place, SW1V Charlwood Place is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Charlwood Street, SW1V Charlwood Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Chichester Street, SW1V Chichester Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Churton Place, SW1V Churton Place is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Churton Street, SW1V Churton Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Clarendon Street, SW1V Clarendon Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Coburg Close, SW1P Coburg Close is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Crown Reach Riverside Walk, SW1V Crown Reach Riverside Walk is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Dalkeith Court, SW1P Dalkeith Court is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Dells Mews, SW1V Dells Mews is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Denbigh Mews, SW1V Denbigh Mews is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Denbigh Place, SW1V Denbigh Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Denbigh Street, SW1V Denbigh Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Douglas Street, SW1P Douglas Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Drummond Gate, SW1V Drummond Gate is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Duncan House, SW1V Residential block
Eccleston Square Mews, SW1V Eccleston Square Mews is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Egerton House, SW1V Residential block
Elverton Street, SW1P Elverton Street is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Erasmus Street, SW1P Erasmus Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Esterbrooke Street, SW1P Esterbrooke Street is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Garden Terrace, SW1V Garden Terrace is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Gillingham Row, SW1V This is a street in the SW1V postcode area
Gillingham Street, SW1V Gillingham Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Gloucester Street, SW1V Gloucester Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Guildhouse Street, SW1V Guildhouse Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Hatherley Street, SW1V Hatherley Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Herrick Street, SW1P Herrick Street is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Hide Place, SW1P Hide Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Horseferry Road, SW1P Horseferry Road is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Hudsons Place, SW1V Hudsons Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Johnson’s Place, SW1V Johnson’s Place is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Joseph Conrad House, SW1V Residential block
King’s Scholars’ Passage, SW1V King’s Scholars’ Passage is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Lindsay Square, SW1V Lindsay Square is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Longmoore Street, SW1V Longmoore Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Lupus Street, SW1V Lupus Street was named after Hugh Lupus, Earl of Chester.
Marsham Street, SW1P Marsham Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Moreton Place, SW1 Moreton Place is a road in the SW1 postcode area
Moreton Street, SW1V Moreton Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Moreton Terrace Mews North, SW1V Moreton Terrace Mews North is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Neat House Place, SW1V Neat House Place is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Neate House, SW1V Residential block
Neathouse Place, SW1V Neathouse Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Page Street, SW1P Page Street runs from Regency Street in the west to the junction of John Islip Street and Dean Ryle Street in the east.
Ponsonby Place, SW1V Ponsonby Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Ponsonby Terrace, SW1V Ponsonby Terrace is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Pulford Street, SW1V Pulford Street was a street between its construction in 1848 and demolition after the Second World War.
Rampayne Street, SW1V Rampayne Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Ranelagh Road, SW1V Ranelagh Road is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Regency Place, SW1P Regency Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Regency Street, SW1P Regency Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Rivermill, SW1V Rivermill is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Rochester Row, SW1P Rochester Row was home to the Bishop of Rochester in 1666.
Rutherford Street, SW1P Rutherford Street is a road in the SW1P postcode area
St George’s Square, SW1V St Georges Square is a long narrow space reaching to the river with an enclosed garden in the centre.
St Georges Drive, SW1V St Georges Drive is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
St Saviours Hall, SW1V St Saviours Hall is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Stillington Street, SW1P Stillington Street is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Tachbrook Mews, SW1V Tachbrook Mews is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Tachbrook Street, SW1V Tachbrook Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
The Arcade, SW1V The Arcade is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Thorndike Street, SW1V Thorndike Street is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Udall Street, SW1V Udall Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Upper Tachbrook Street, SW1V Upper Tachbrook Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Vauxhall Bridge Road, SW1V Vauxhall Bridge Road is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Vauxhall Bridge, SW1V Vauxhall Bridge is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Vincent Square, SW1P Vincent Square is a large grass-covered square which provides playing fields for Westminster School, which owns it.
Vincent Street, SW1P Vincent Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Walcott Street, SW1P Walcott Street was named after Reverend MEC Walcott, curate of the St Margaret’s, Westminster in the 1840s.
Warwick Place North, SW1V Warwick Place North is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Warwick Square Mews, SW1V Warwick Square Mews is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Warwick Square, SW1V Warwick Square is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Warwick Way, SW1V Warwick Way is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
West Mews, SW1V West Mews is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Willow Place, SW1P Willow Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Willow Place, SW1P Willow Place is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Wilton Road, SW1V Wilton Road is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Winchester Street, SW1V Winchester Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.


Queen’s Park

Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen’s Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen’s Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen’s Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen’s Park ’proper’ formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen’s Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen’s Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett’s wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen’s Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queen’s Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen’s Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen’s Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen’s Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR.


LOCAL PHOTOS
The 52 bus
TUM image id: 1556876554
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Broadway SW1
TUM image id: 1530117235
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Antrobus Street sign
TUM image id: 1601897046
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Wood engraving showing mothers, with their children, exercising at Tothill Fields Prison, London. Shelfmark: Crime 9 (64)
Credit: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=9228986
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

The sign for the "Stage Door", formerly a pub in Allington Street, SW1
Credit: GoArt/The Underground Map
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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Victoria coach station’s temporary base, 1929, where the Tachbrook Estate is now. The King’s Scholar Pond sewer is on the left.
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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Pulford Street being demolished
Credit: Peabody Trust
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Antrobus Street sign
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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"A Sunset with a View of Nine Elms" (c.1755)
Credit: Samuel Scott/Tate Britain
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