Shepperton Road, N1

Road in/near Dalston Kingsland, existing between the 1820s and now

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Road · Dalston Kingsland · N1 ·
JANUARY
1
2000

Shepperton Road runs south east from New North Road.

It was built early in the nineteenth century and followed the line of a field boundary. On the 1860s map, it is called Shepperton Cottages and before that, Shepperton Street.


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

Lived here
Katharina Logan   
Added: 9 Aug 2022 19:01 GMT   

Ely place existed in name in 1857
On 7th July 1857 John James Chase and Mary Ann Weekes were married at St John the Baptist Hoxton, he of full age and she a minor. Both parties list their place of residence as Ely Place, yet according to other information, this street was not named until 1861. He was a bricklayer, she had no occupation listed, but both were literate and able to sign their names on their marriage certificate.

Source: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSF7-Q9Y7?cc=3734475

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Marion James   
Added: 12 Mar 2021 17:43 GMT   

26 Edith Street Haggerston
On Monday 11th October 1880 Charlotte Alice Haynes was born at 26 Edith Street Haggerston the home address of her parents her father Francis Haynes a Gilder by trade and her mother Charlotte Alice Haynes and her two older siblings Francis & George who all welcomed the new born baby girl into the world as they lived in part of the small Victorian terraced house which was shared by another family had an outlook view onto the world of the Imperial Gas Works site - a very grey drab reality of the life they were living as an East End working class family - 26 Edith Street no longer stands in 2021 - the small rundown polluted terrace houses of Edith Street are long since gone along with the Gas Companies buildings to be replaced with green open parkland that is popular in 21st century by the trendy residents of today - Charlotte Alice Haynes (1880-1973) is the wife of my Great Grand Uncle Henry Pickett (1878-1930) As I research my family history I slowly begin to understand the life my descendants had to live and the hardships that they went through to survive - London is my home and there are many areas of this great city I find many of my descendants living working and dying in - I am yet to find the golden chalice! But in all truthfulness my family history is so much more than hobby its an understanding of who I am as I gather their stories. Did Charlotte Alice Pickett nee Haynes go on to live a wonderful life - no I do not think so as she became a widow in 1930 worked in a canteen and never remarried living her life in and around Haggerston & Hackney until her death in 1973 with her final resting place at Manor Park Cemetery - I think Charlotte most likely excepted her lot in life like many women from her day, having been born in the Victorian era where the woman had less choice and standing in society, which is a sad state of affairs - So I will endeavour to write about Charlotte and the many other women in my family history to give them the voice of a life they so richly deserve to be recorded !

Edith Street was well situated for the new public transport of two railway stations in 1880 :- Haggerston Railway Station opened in 1867 & Cambridge Heath Railway Station opened in 1872


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Jeff Owen   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 16:18 GMT   

Owen’s School
Owen Street is the site of Owen’s Boys’ School. The last school was built in 1881 and was demolished in the early 1990s to make way for the development which stand there today. It was a “Direct Grant” grammar school and was founded in 1613 by Dame Alice Owen. What is now “Owen’s Fields” was the playground between the old school and the new girls’ school (known then as “Dames Alice Owen’s School” or simply “DAOS”). The boys’ school had the top two floors of that building for their science labs. The school moved to Potters Bar in Hertfordshire in 1971 and is now one of the top State comprehensive schools in the country. The old building remained in use as an accountancy college and taxi-drivers’ “knowledge” school until it was demolished. The new building is now part of City and Islington College. Owen’s was a fine school. I should know because I attended there from 1961 to 1968.

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Born here
Bernard Miller   
Added: 12 Apr 2022 17:36 GMT   

My mother and her sister were born at 9 Windsor Terrace
My mother, Millie Haring (later Miller) and her sister Yetta Haring (later Freedman) were born here in 1922 and 1923. With their parents and older brother and sister, they lived in two rooms until they moved to Stoke Newington in 1929. She always said there were six rooms, six families, a shared sink on the first floor landing and a toilet in the backyard.

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Born here
jack stevens   
Added: 26 Sep 2021 13:38 GMT   

Mothers birth place
Number 5 Whites Row which was built in around 1736 and still standing was the premises my now 93 year old mother was born in, her name at birth was Hilda Evelyne Shaw,

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Comment
   
Added: 6 Nov 2021 15:03 GMT   

Old Nichol Street, E2
Information about my grandfather’s tobacconist shop

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Barry J. Page   
Added: 27 Jul 2022 19:41 GMT   

Highbury Corner V1 Explosion
Grandma described the V1 explosion at Highbury Corner on many occasions. She was working in the scullery when the flying bomb landed. The blast shattered all the windows in the block of flats and blew off the bolt on her front door. As she looked out the front room window, people in various states of injury and shock were making their way along Highbury Station Road. One man in particular, who was bleeding profusely from glass shard wounds to his neck, insisted in getting home to see if his family was all right. Others were less fortunate. Len, the local newsagent, comforted a man, who had lost both legs caused by the blast, until the victim succumbed to his injuries. The entire area was ravaged and following are statistics. The flying bomb landed during lunch hour (12:46 p.m.) on June 27th 1944. 26 people lost their lives, 84 were seriously injured and 71 slightly injured.

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Steven Shepherd   
Added: 4 Feb 2021 14:20 GMT   

Our House
I and my three brothers were born at 178 Pitfield Street. All of my Mothers Family (ADAMS) Lived in the area. There was an area behind the house where the Hoxton Stall holders would keep the barrows. The house was classed as a slum but was a large house with a basement. The basement had 2 rooms that must have been unchanged for many years it contained a ’copper’ used to boil and clean clothes and bedlinen and a large ’range’ a cast iron coal/log fired oven. Coal was delivered through a ’coal hole’ in the street which dropped through to the basement. The front of the house used to be a shop but unused while we lived there. I have many more happy memories of the house too many to put here.

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Jeff Owen   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 15:44 GMT   

Memories of "The Londesborough"
I lived in Sandbrook Road from 1956 until 1964 and then in Harcombe Road until 1994. “The Londesborough” was my local in my formative drinking years.

It was a pub typical of its time. Clean and tidy and well run by a proper guv’nor who stood no nonsense. It had a single island bartop serving three separate bars. The Public Bar had its door on the corner of Londesborough Road and had a dart board. The other two shared a single entrance on the right as you look at the pub. The Saloon bar formed the majority of the pub and was the most plush. It extended to the back of the premises with the back portion ’ at a slightly lower level ’ housing a full size snooker table. The small Private bar was between the other two. I recall that prices were a penny or two more in the Saloon bar.

The first landlord I remember was Bob Baker. He and his wife Else ran the pub until about 1969-ish. Bob was a retired coalminer from Leicester. He had two daughters - Penny and Jane ’ who would very occasionally work behind the bar. Bob had a full time live-in barman/cellarman by the name of Gwyn Evans, who could be a bit temperamental at times! My Dad also worked there from time to time and I recall being invited upstairs to watch the 1961 FA Cup Final between Spurs and Leicester City. Following Bob’s retirement Lou Levine and his wife Pearl took the helm. Lou was a fine guv’nor and the pub flourished under his tenancy. When I left the area I believe Lou still had the tenancy but had put a manager, whose name I cannot recall, in overall charge.

Saturday evening and Sunday lunchtimes the pub was packed. But it also had a good patronage during the week. Among the occasional visitors was Eric Bristow, the late world champion darts player. Eric would challenge the locals to a game and would even things up a bit by throwing his darts from the kneeling position! Footballer and former England manager Terry Venables could also be found there from time to time as one of his pals was the son of Lou’s business partner.

The pub has certainly gone upmarket (as has that small area) but I will take issue with one claim made on its website: “In the 1960’s, the Londesborough was one of the pubs that the notorious Kray Twins took a drink in.” My Dad knew just about everybody who “took a drink” in the Londesborough in the 1960s and Bob Baker knew absolutely everybody. We often spoke about the Kray twins (their “manor” was the other side of Stoke Newington High Street). No mention of them visiting the pub was ever made by them or any other of the locals. One other slight correction: the map on this website is slightly incorrect. The pub is on the corner of Londesborough Road and Barbauld Road, and not as indicated.

The pub had one big drawback. It was a "Watneys" Pub. But you can’t have everything!

Source: The Londesborough

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Martin Eaton    
Added: 14 Oct 2021 03:56 GMT   

Boundary Estate
Sunbury, Taplow House.

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STEPHEN JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:25 GMT   

Fellows Court, E2
my family moved into the tower block 13th floor (maisonette), in 1967 after our street Lenthall rd e8 was demolished, we were one of the first families in the new block. A number of families from our street were rehoused in this and the adjoining flats. Inside toilet and central heating, all very modern at the time, plus eventually a tarmac football pitch in the grounds,(the cage), with a goal painted by the kids on the brick wall of the railway.

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Lena    
Added: 18 Mar 2021 13:08 GMT   

White Conduit Street, N1
My mum, Rosina Wade of the Wade and Hannam family in the area of Chapel Street and Parkfield Street, bought her first “costume” at S Cohen’s in White Conduit Street. Would have probably been about 1936 or thereabouts. She said that he was a small man but an expert tailor. I hope that Islington Council preserve the shop front as it’s a piece of history of the area. Mum used to get her high heel shoes from an Italian shoe shop in Chapel Street. She had size 2 feet and they would let her know when a new consignment of size 2 shoes were in. I think she was a very good customer. She worked at Killingbacks artificial flower maker in Northampton Square and later at the Halifax bombers factory north of Edgware where she was a riveter.

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STEPHEN ARTHUR JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:12 GMT   

Lynedoch Street, E2
my father Arthur Jackson was born in lynedoch street in 1929 and lived with mm grandparents and siblings, until they were relocated to Pamela house Haggerston rd when the street was to be demolished

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Jack Wilson   
Added: 21 Jun 2022 21:40 GMT   

Penfold Printers
I am seeking the location of Penfold Printers Offices in Dt Albans place - probably about 1870 or so

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Erin   
Added: 2 May 2022 01:33 GMT   

Windsor Terrace, N1
hello

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

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danny currie   
Added: 30 Nov 2022 18:39 GMT   

dads yard
ron currie had a car breaking yard in millers yard back in the 60s good old days

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Lynette beardwood   
Added: 29 Nov 2022 20:53 GMT   

Spy’s Club
Topham’s Hotel at 24-28 Ebury Street was called the Ebury Court Hotel. Its first proprietor was a Mrs Topham. In WW2 it was a favourite watering hole for the various intelligence organisations based in the Pimlico area. The first woman infiltrated into France in 1942, FANY Yvonne Rudellat, was recruited by the Special Operations Executive while working there. She died in Bergen Belsen in April 1945.

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Born here
   
Added: 16 Nov 2022 12:39 GMT   

The Pearce family lived in Gardnor Road
The Pearce family moved into Gardnor Road around 1900 after living in Fairfax walk, my Great grandfather, wife and there children are recorded living in number 4 Gardnor road in the 1911 census, yet I have been told my grand father was born in number 4 in 1902, generations of the Pearce continue living in number 4 as well other houses in the road up until the 1980’s

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Born here
   
Added: 16 Nov 2022 12:38 GMT   

The Pearce family lived in Gardnor Road
The Pearce family moved into Gardnor Road around 1900 after living in Fairfax walk, my Great grandfather, wife and there children are recorded living in number 4 Gardnor road in the 1911 census, yet I have been told my grand father was born in number 4 in 1902, generations of the Pearce continue living in number 4 as well other houses in the road up until the 1980’s

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Lived here
Phil Stubbington   
Added: 14 Nov 2022 16:28 GMT   

Numbers 60 to 70 (1901 - 1939)
A builder, Robert Maeers (1842-1919), applied to build six houses on plots 134 to 139 on the Lincoln House Estate on 5 October 1901. He received approval on 8 October 1901. These would become numbers 60 to 70 Rodenhurst Road (60 is plot 139). Robert Maeers was born in Northleigh, Devon. In 1901 he was living in 118 Elms Road with his wife Georgina, nee Bagwell. They had four children, Allan, Edwin, Alice, and Harriet, born between 1863 and 1873.
Alice Maeers was married to John Rawlins. Harriet Maeers was married to William Street.
Three of the six houses first appear on the electoral register in 1904:
Daniel Mescal “Ferncroft”
William Francis Street “Hillsboro”
Henry Elkin “Montrose”

By the 1905 electoral register all six are occupied:

Daniel Mescal “St Senans”
Henry Robert Honeywood “Grasmere”
John Rawlins “Iveydene”
William Francis Street “Hillsboro”
Walter Ernest Manning “St Hilda”
Henry Elkin “Montrose”

By 1906 house numbers replace names:

Daniel Mescal 70
Henry Robert Honeywood 68
John Rawlins 66
William Francis Street 64
Walter Ernest Manning 62
Henry Elkin 60

It’s not clear whether number 70 changed from “Ferncroft” to “St Senans” or possibly Daniel Mescal moved houses.

In any event, it can be seen that Robert Maeers’ two daughters are living in numbers 64 and 66, with, according to local information, an interconnecting door. In the 1911 census William Street is shown as a banker’s clerk. John Rawlins is a chartering clerk in shipping. Robert Maeers and his wife are also living at this address, Robert being shown as a retired builder.

By 1939 all the houses are in different ownership except number 60, where the Elkins are still in residence.


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stephen garraway   
Added: 13 Nov 2022 13:56 GMT   

Martin Street, Latimer Road
I was born at St Charlottes and lived at 14, Martin Street, Latimer Road W10 until I was 4 years old when we moved to the east end. It was my Nan Grant’s House and she was the widow of George Frederick Grant. She had two sons, George and Frederick, and one daughter, my mother Margaret Patricia.
The downstairs flat where we lived had two floors, the basement and the ground floor. The upper two floors were rented to a Scot and his family, the Smiths. He had red hair. The lights and cooker were gas and there was one cold tap over a Belfast sink. A tin bath hung on the wall. The toilet was outside in the yard. This was concreted over and faced the the rear of the opposite terraces. All the yards were segregated by high brick walls. The basement had the a "best" room with a large , dark fireplace with two painted metal Alsation ornaments and it was very dark, cold and little used.
The street lights were gas and a man came round twice daily to turn them on and off using a large pole with a hook and a lighted torch on the end. I remember men coming round the streets with carts selling hot chestnuts and muffins and also the hurdy gurdy man with his instrument and a monkey in a red jacket. I also remember the first time I saw a black man and my mother pulling me away from him. He had a Trilby and pale Mackintosh so he must of been one of the first of the Windrush people. I seem to recall he had a thin moustache.
Uncle George had a small delivery lorry but mum lost touch with him and his family. Uncle Fred went to Peabody Buildings near ST.Pauls.
My Nan was moved to a maisonette in White City around 1966, and couldn’t cope with electric lights, cookers and heating and she lost all of her neighbourhood friends. Within six months she had extreme dementia and died in a horrible ward in Tooting Bec hospital a year or so later. An awful way to end her life, being moved out of her lifelong neighbourhood even though it was slums.

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Comment
   
Added: 31 Oct 2022 18:47 GMT   

Memories
I lived at 7 Conder Street in a prefab from roughly 1965 to 1971 approx - happy memories- sad to see it is no more ?

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Eve Glover   
Added: 22 Oct 2022 09:28 GMT   

Shenley Road
Shenley Road is the main street in Borehamwood where the Job Centre and Blue Arrow were located

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Dalston Kingsland

Kingsland railway station was first opened on this site in 1850, but was replaced by Dalston Junction in 1865. The current station was opened in 1983.

Kingsland gets its name from the hunting grounds of a Tudor-era royal residence at Newington Green – "King’s Lands".

It was originally a small roadside settlement centred on the Old North Road near to the junction with Dalston Lane.

In 1672, Kingsland had 28 householders assessed for hearth tax. It expanded in the 18th century along Kingsland Road and by 1724 had five inns. The local parishes lobbied Parliament in 1713 for the right to set up a Turnpike Trust, to pay for the necessary maintenance to the North Road. Gates were installed at Kingsland and Stamford Hill to collect the tolls. Larger scale development began in 1807, and a new estate was created on Lamb Farm, to the south and west of the Dalston Lane junction.

The ’Lock Hospital’ for lepers was founded in 1280 by the City of London, as one of ten located on the main roads from the City. From 1549, the hospital was administered by St Bartholomew’s Hospital, and treated infectious diseases. By 1669, there were six wards for women only since male patients were sent to Southwark. The hospital was rebuilt in 1720, but closed in 1760. At the closure of the hospital, local people petitioned to keep the hospital chapel open. In poor condition, it was demolished in 1846.

Since the opening of Dalston Junction station, the area has become known as Dalston, which was originally further east.


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In the neighbourhood...

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Colville Estate, Shoreditch (2019) The Colville Estate is situated between the Regents Canal to the North and Shoreditch Park to the South. It was designed in the early 1950s by Shoreditch Metropolitan Borough Council and since 2009 has undergone ’regeneration’.
Credit: Municipal Dreams
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Pitfield Street (1896)
Old London postcard
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Rotherfield Street (c.1905) View from the junction of Ecclesbourne Road, along Rotherfield Street to Essex Road and St Matthews church.
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Looking down Bookham Street from the New North Road (1956) Bookham Street disappeared from the map just after the photo was taken
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