St Ann’s Villas, W11

Road in/near Notting Hill, existing between 1843 and now

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Road · Notting Hill · W11 ·
FEBRUARY
12
2021

St Ann’s Villas, a tree-lined if busy road, leads into Royal Crescent from St Ann’s Road.

The Norland estate had been 52 acres of ground, bounded on the east by the streets now known as Portland Road and Pottery Lane, on the south by Holland Park Avenue. By the mid 1830s, Norland was looking attractive for speculative building.

In 1836, the incorporation of the Birmingham, Bristol and Thames Junction Railway occurred. The company proposed the construction of a line from Willesden to the Kensington Canal. The route authorised was north-south a few yards outside the western boundary of the Norland estate, across the Uxbridge Road at Shepherd’s Bush.

Drainage problems posed by the construction of the railway promoted the development of the Norland Estate. Between the Uxbridge and Hammersmith roads the railway was to extend along or very close to the course of the Counter’s Creek sewer, the natural open ditch which discharged surface water into the Kensington Canal. In 1837–8 the Westminster Commissioners of Sewers insisted that the railway company must divert Counter’s Creek and improve drainage.

The new sewer, as built by the railway company during 1838–9, extended along the line of the present Holland Road and Holland Villas Road, across the Uxbridge Road at the centre of Royal Crescent, and then across the present St Ann’s Villas.

The effect of this diversion was to provide landowner Benjamin Lewis Vulliamy with greatly improved drainage facilities for his estate, at no cost to himself. In September 1838, when discussions between the Commissioners of Sewers and the railway company were still proceeding, he was negotiating the sale of the Norland Estate. A solicitor, Charles Richardson, paid £19 990 to become the freehold owner of all fifty-two acres of the estate.

Richardson had no difficulty in raising capital for the development of his housing scheme. By 1844 his total liabilities amounted to about £45 000, much of the money being needed for loans to builders and for the construction of nearly three miles of sewers.

The layout plan of the southern part of the estate was the work of Robert Cantwell. Cantwell designed a large crescent facing the Uxbridge Road, broken in the centre by a north-south road, St Ann’s Villas and St Ann’s Road - an arrangement occasioned by the need for unobstructed passage for the recently diverted Counter’s Creek sewer. Without the needed access to the sewer, St Ann's Villas and St Ann's Road would not exist. Current residents are no doubt unaware that both a sewer runs underneath their wonderfully-designed houses and that their houses' existence is due to the wonders of effluence.

The developer of St Ann’s Villas itself was Charles Stewart, a wealthy barrister who had served as an MP in the early 1830s. Between 1840 and 1846 he took building leases from Richardson with his principal ventures being in Royal Crescent (where he had 43 houses) and St Ann’s Villas (34 houses). The Stewart Arms public house on Norland Road commemorates his name.

Charles Stewart put up terraces on either side of the street in 1843: Numbers 2-10 on the east side and numbers 1-9 on the west side. Each terrace contained five houses in a style of Tudor-Gothic and each house was four storeys high. Red and blue bricks were used with Bath stone for the quoins and window mullions. The section nearest Royal Crescent was called Darnley Road for a time.

In 1845 Stewart began work on the next section, between Queensdale Road and St James’s Gardens. Each side contained six pairs of houses: numbers 11-33 on the west and numbers 12-34 on the east side of the road.

St Ann’s Villas also contains some unusual three-storey detached houses, constructed in brown brick, of Victorian Gothic design.




Main source: Survey of London | British History Online
Further citations and sources


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 05:50 GMT   

Batham Family (1851 - 1921)
I start with William Batham 1786-1852 born in St.Martins Middlesex. From various sources I have found snippets of information concerning his early life. A soldier in 1814 he married Mary Champelovier of Huguenot descent By 1819 they were in Kensington where they raised 10 children. Apart from soldier his other occupations include whitesmith, bell hanger and pig breeder. I find my first record in the 1851 English sensus. No street address is given, just ’The Potteries’. He died 1853. Only one child at home then George Batham 1839-1923, my great grandfather. By 1861 he is living in Thomas St. Kensington with his mother. A bricklayer by trade 1871, married and still in Thomas St. 1881 finds him in 5,Martin St. Kensington. 1891 10,Manchester St. 1911, 44 Hunt St Hammersmith. Lastly 1921 Census 7, Mersey St. which has since been demolished.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

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Lived here
Tom Vague   
Added: 9 Sep 2020 14:02 GMT   

The Bedford family at 3 Acklam Road (1860 - 1965)
From the 19th century up until 1965, number 3 Acklam Road, near the Portobello Road junction, was occupied by the Bedford family.

When the Westway construction work began the Bedfords sold up and moved to south London. In the early 1970s the house was taken over by the North Kensington Amenity Trust and became the Notting Hill Carnival office before its eventual demolition.

Anne Bedford (now McSweeney) has fond memories of living there, although she recalls: ‘I now know that the conditions were far from ideal but then I knew no different. There was no running hot water, inside toilet or bath, apart from the tin bath we used once a week in the large kitchen/dining room. Any hot water needed was heated in a kettle. I wasn’t aware that there were people not far away who were a lot worse off than us, living in poverty in houses just like mine but families renting one room. We did have a toilet/bathroom installed in 1959, which was ‘luxury’.

‘When the plans for the Westway were coming to light, we were still living in the house whilst all the houses opposite became empty and boarded up one by one. We watched all this going on and decided that it was not going to be a good place to be once the builders moved in to demolish all the houses and start work on the elevated road. Dad sold the house for a fraction of what it should have been worth but it needed too much doing to it to bring it to a good living standard. We were not rich by any means but we were not poor. My grandmother used to do her washing in the basement once a week by lighting a fire in a big concrete copper to heat the water, which would have been there until demolition.

‘When we moved from number 3, I remember the upright piano that my grandparents used to play ’ and me of sorts ’ being lowered out of the top floor and taken away, presumably to be sold. I used to play with balls up on the wall of the chemist shop on the corner of Acklam and Portobello. We would mark numbers on the pavement slabs in a grid and play hopscotch. At the Portobello corner, on one side there was the Duke of Sussex pub, on the other corner, a chemist, later owned by a Mr Fish, which I thought was amusing. When I was very young I remember every evening a man peddling along Acklam Road with a long thin stick with which he lit the streetlights.’ Michelle Active who lived at number 33 remembers: ‘6 of us lived in a one-bed basement flat on Acklam Road. When they demolished it we moved to a 4-bed maisonette on Silchester Estate and I thought it was a palace, two toilets inside, a separate bathroom that was not in the kitchen, absolute heaven.’



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Born here
Susan Wright   
Added: 16 Sep 2017 22:42 GMT   

Ada Crowe, 9 Bramley Mews
My Great Grandmother Ada Crowe was born in 9 Bramley Mews in 1876.

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Joan Clarke   
Added: 2 Feb 2021 10:54 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens
My late aunt Ivy Clarke (nee Burridge) lived with her whole family at 19 Avondale Park Gardens, according to the 1911 census and she was still there in 1937.What was it like in those days, I wonder, if the housing was only built in 1920?


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PETER FAIRCLOUGH   
Added: 10 May 2021 14:46 GMT   

We once lived here
My family resided at number 53 Brindley Street Paddington.
My grandparents George and Elizabeth Jenkinson (ne Fowler) had four children with my Mother Olive Fairclough (ne Jenkinson) being born in the house on 30/09/1935.
She died on 29/04/2021 aged 85 being the last surviving of the four siblings

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Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:17 GMT   

TV comes to Olympia
Over 7000 people queued to see the first high definition television pictures on sets at the Olympia Radio Show. The pictures were transmitted by the BBC from Alexandra Palace, introduced by Leslie Mitchell, their first announcer.

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Lived here
David Jones-Parry   
Added: 7 Sep 2017 12:13 GMT   

Mcgregor Road, W11 (1938 - 1957)
I was born n bred at 25 Mc Gregor Rd in 1938 and lived there until I joined the Royal Navy in 1957. It was a very interesting time what with air raid shelters,bombed houses,water tanks all sorts of areas for little boys to collect scrap and sell them on.no questions asked.A very happy boyhood -from there we could visit most areas of London by bus and tube and we did.

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Dave Fahey   
Added: 6 Jan 2021 02:40 GMT   

Bombing of the Jack O Newberry
My maternal grandfather, Archie Greatorex, was the licensee of the Earl of Warwick during the Second World War. My late mother Vera often told the story of the bombing of the Jack. The morning after the pub was bombed, the landlord’s son appeared at the Warwick with the pub’s till on an old pram; he asked my grandfather to pay the money into the bank for him. The poor soul was obviously in shock. The previous night, his parents had taken their baby down to the pub cellar to shelter from the air raids. The son, my mother never knew his name, opted to stay in his bedroom at the top of the building. He was the only survivor. I often wondered what became of him.

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Brenda Newton   
Added: 5 Jun 2021 07:17 GMT   

Hewer Street W10
John Nodes Undertakers Hewer Street W10

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Comment
   
Added: 30 Dec 2022 21:41 GMT   

Southam Street, W10
do any one remember J&A DEMOLITON at harrow rd kensal green my dad work for them in a aec 6 wheel tipper got a photo of him in it

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ken gaston   
Added: 16 Jan 2021 11:04 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens
My grandmother Hilda Baker and a large family lived in number 18 . It was a close community and that reflected in the coronation celebration held on the central green . I grew up in that square and went to school at Sirdar Road then St. Clements it was a great place to grow up with a local park and we would also trek to Holland Park or Kensington Gardens .Even then the area was considered deprived and a kindergarden for criminals . My generation were the first to escape to the new towns and became the overspill from London to get decent housing and living standards .

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Lived here
Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 15:38 GMT   

6 East Row (1960 - 1960)
We lived at 6 East Row just before it was demolished.

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danny currie   
Added: 30 Nov 2022 18:39 GMT   

dads yard
ron currie had a car breaking yard in millers yard back in the 60s good old days

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Comment
   
Added: 4 Sep 2022 15:42 GMT   

Superman 2
I worked here in 1977. The scene in the prison laundry in Superman 2 was filmed here.

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Jonathan Penner   
Added: 11 Sep 2021 16:03 GMT   

Pennard Road, W12
My wife and I, young Canadians, lodged at 65 (?) Pennard Road with a fellow named Clive and his girlfriend, Melanie, for about 6 months in 1985. We loved the area and found it extremely convenient.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

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Christine D Elliott   
Added: 20 Mar 2023 15:52 GMT   

The Blute Family
My grandparents, Frederick William Blute & Alice Elizabeth Blute nee: Warnham lived at 89 Blockhouse Street Deptford from around 1917.They had six children. 1. Alice Maragret Blute (my mother) 2. Frederick William Blute 3. Charles Adrian Blute 4. Violet Lillian Blute 5. Donald Blute 6. Stanley Vincent Blute (Lived 15 months). I lived there with my family from 1954 (Birth) until 1965 when we were re-housed for regeneration to the area.
I attended Ilderton Road School.
Very happy memories of that time.

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Pearl Foster   
Added: 20 Mar 2023 12:22 GMT   

Dukes Place, EC3A
Until his death in 1767, Daniel Nunes de Lara worked from his home in Dukes Street as a Pastry Cook. It was not until much later the street was renamed Dukes Place. Daniel and his family attended the nearby Bevis Marks synagogue for Sephardic Jews. The Ashkenazi Great Synagogue was established in Duke Street, which meant Daniel’s business perfectly situated for his occupation as it allowed him to cater for both congregations.

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Dr Paul Flewers   
Added: 9 Mar 2023 18:12 GMT   

Some Brief Notes on Hawthorne Close / Hawthorne Street
My great-grandparents lived in the last house on the south side of Hawthorne Street, no 13, and my grandmother Alice Knopp and her brothers and sisters grew up there. Alice Knopp married Charles Flewers, from nearby Hayling Road, and moved to Richmond, Surrey, where I was born. Leonard Knopp married Esther Gutenberg and lived there until the street was demolished in the mid-1960s, moving on to Tottenham. Uncle Len worked in the fur trade, then ran a pet shop in, I think, the Kingsland Road.

From the back garden, one could see the almshouses in the Balls Pond Road. There was an ink factory at the end of the street, which I recall as rather malodorous.

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KJH   
Added: 7 Mar 2023 17:14 GMT   

Andover Road, N7 (1939 - 1957)
My aunt, Doris nee Curtis (aka Jo) and her husband John Hawkins (aka Jack) ran a small general stores at 92 Andover Road (N7). I have found details in the 1939 register but don’t know how long before that it was opened.He died in 1957. In the 1939 register he is noted as being an ARP warden for Islington warden

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Added: 2 Mar 2023 13:50 GMT   

The Queens Head
Queens Head demolished and a NISA supermarket and flats built in its place.

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Mike   
Added: 28 Feb 2023 18:09 GMT   

6 Elia Street
When I was young I lived in 6 Elia Street. At the end of the garden there was a garage owned by Initial Laundries which ran from an access in Quick Street all the way up to the back of our garden. The fire exit to the garage was a window leading into our garden. 6 Elia Street was owned by Initial Laundry.

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Fumblina   
Added: 21 Feb 2023 11:39 GMT   

Error on 1800 map numbering for John Street
The 1800 map of Whitfield Street (17 zoom) has an error in the numbering shown on the map. The houses are numbered up the right hand side of John Street and Upper John Street to #47 and then are numbered down the left hand side until #81 BUT then continue from 52-61 instead of 82-91.

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P Cash   
Added: 19 Feb 2023 08:03 GMT   

Occupants of 19-29 Woburn Place
The Industrial Tribunals (later changed to Employment Tribunals) moved (from its former location on Ebury Bridge Road to 19-29 Woburn Place sometime in the late 1980s (I believe).

19-29 Woburn Place had nine floors in total (one in the basement and two in its mansard roof and most of the building was occupied by the Tribunals

The ’Head Office’ of the tribunals, occupied space on the 7th, 6th and 2nd floors, whilst one of the largest of the regional offices (London North but later called London Central) occupied space in the basement, ground and first floor.

The expansive ground floor entrance had white marble flooring and a security desk. Behind (on evey floor) lay a square (& uncluttered) lobby space, which was flanked on either side by lifts. On the rear side was an elegant staircase, with white marble steps, brass inlays and a shiny brass handrail which spiralled around an open well. Both staircase, stairwell and lifts ran the full height of the building. On all floors from 1st upwards, staff toilets were tucked on either side of the staircase (behind the lifts).

Basement Floor - Tribunal hearing rooms, dormant files store and secure basement space for Head Office. Public toilets.

Geound Floor - The ’post’ roon sat next to the entrance in the northern side, the rest of which was occupied by the private offices of the full time Tribunal judiciary. Thw largest office belonged to the Regional Chair and was situated on the far corner (overlooking Tavistock Square) The secretary to the Regional Chair occupied a small office next door.
The south side of this floor was occupied by the large open plan General Office for the administration, a staff kitchen & rest room and the private offices of the Regional Secretary (office manager) and their deputy.

First Dloor - Tribunal hearing rooms; separate public waiting rooms for Applicants & Respondents; two small rooms used by Counsel (on a ’whoever arrives first’ bases) and a small private rest room for use by tribunal lay members.

Second Floor - Tribunal Hearing Rooms; Tribunal Head Office - HR & Estate Depts & other tennants.

Third Floor - other tennants

Fourth Floor - other tennants

Fifth Floor - Other Tennants except for a large non-smoking room for staff, (which overlooked Tavistock Sqaure). It was seldom used, as a result of lacking any facities aside from a meagre collection of unwanted’ tatty seating. Next to it, (overlooking Tavistock Place) was a staff canteen.

Sixth Floor - Other tennants mostly except for a few offices on the northern side occupied by tribunal Head Office - IT Dept.

Seventh Floor - Other tenants in the northern side. The southern (front) side held the private offices of several senior managers (Secretariat, IT & Finance), private office of the Chief Accuntant; an office for two private secretaries and a stationary cupboard. On the rear side was a small kitchen; the private office of the Chief Executive and the private office of the President of the Tribunals for England & Wales. (From 1995 onwards, this became a conference room as the President was based elsewhere. The far end of this side contained an open plan office for Head Office staff - Secretariat, Finance & HR (staff training team) depts.

Eighth Floor - other tennants.


The Employment Tribunals (Regional & Head Offices) relocated to Vitory House, Kingsway in April 2005.






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V:8

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Bangor Street (1911) Bangor Street was a street in Notting Dale which disappeared after the Second World War.
Bangor Street (turn of 20th century) The St Agnes soup kitchen was situated on the corner of Bangor Street that this photo was taken from.
Cape Nursery The Cape Nursery once lay along the south side of Shepherd’s Bush Green.
Corner of Bangor Street and Sirdar Road The location became the Dolphin Pub.
Counters Creek sewer The effluent society
Earl of Zetland The Earl of Zetland - a pub in the Potteries
Kenilworth Castle The Kenilworth Castle was a post-war pub in Notting Dale.
Shepherds Bush Shepherd’s Bush is an area of west London in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham.
The Crown The Crown was situated at 57 Princedale Road.

NEARBY STREETS
Addison Avenue, W11 Addison Avenue runs north from Holland Park Avenue and was originally called Addison Road North.
Addison Place, W11 In the nineteenth century, Addison Place was known by two names - Crescent Mews East and Phoenix Place.
Addison Road, W14 Addison Road stretches from Holland Park Avenue to Kensington High Street.
Aldine Street, W12 This is a street in the W12 postcode area
Ariel Way, W12 Ariel Way connects White City bus station with Shephard’s Bush.
Bangor Street, W11 Bangor Street, W11 was situated on the site of the modern Henry Dickens Court.
Bourbon Lane, W12 Bourbon Lane is a road in the W12 postcode area
Boxmoor House, W11 Boxmoor House is a block on Queensdale Crescent.
Boxmoor Street, W11 Boxmoor Street was also known as Henry Place and Beaumont Street during its brief life.
Bush Court, W12 Bush Court is a block on Shepherd’s Bush Green.
Carlton Mansions, W14 Carlton Mansions is a street in West Kensington.
Caxton Road, W12 Caxton Road is a road in the W12 postcode area
Charecroft Way, W14 Charecroft Way is a street in West Kensington.
Clarendon Cross, W11 Clarendon Cross is a street in Notting Hill.
Darnley Terrace, W11 Darnley Terrace is a street in Notting Hill.
Frederick Dobson House, W11 Frederick Dobson House is a block on Cowling Close.
Freston Road, W11 The southern end of Freston Road stretches over into the W11 postcode.
Frog Island, W12 Frog Island was the name of a lane leading north from the Uxbridge Road.
Hippodrome Mews, W11 Hippodrome Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Hippodrome Place, W11 Hippodrome Place was named after a lost racecourse of London.
Holland Park Avenue, W11 Holland Park Avenue is one of London’s most ancient thoroughfares.
Holland Park Gardens, W14 Holland Park Gardens is a street in West Kensington.
Holland Park Terrace, W11 Holland Park Terrace is a street in Notting Hill.
Holland Road, W11 Holland Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Hume Road, W11 Hume Road ran from Norland Gardens to Norland Road.
Hunt Close, W11 Hunt Close is a street in Notting Hill.
Kenilworth Street, W11 Kenilworth Street was demolished just after the Second World War.
Kenley Street, W11 Kenley Street, W11 was originally William Street before it disappeared.
Kenley Walk, W11 Kenley Walk is a street in Notting Hill.
Kingsdale Gardens, W11 Kingsdale Gardens is a street in Notting Hill.
Ladbroke Mews, W11 Ladbroke Mews runs off Ladbroke Road.
Lansdowne Road, W11 Lansdowne Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Lorne Gardens, W11 Lorne Gardens is a street in Notting Hill.
Lower Addison Gardens, W14 Lower Addison Gardens runs between Holland Road and Holland Villas Road.
Millers Way, W14 Millers Way is a street in Hammersmith.
Mortimer House, W11 Mortimer House is located on Rifle Place.
Mortimer Square, W11 Mortimer Square is a street in Notting Hill.
Nicholas Road, W11 This is a street in the W11 postcode area
Norland Place, W11 Norland Place began its life as Norland Stables.
Norland Road, W11 Norland Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Norland Square, W11 Norland Square is a street in Notting Hill.
Olaf Street, W11 Olaf Street is a street in Notting Hill.
Penzance Place, W11 Penzance Place is a street in Notting Hill.
Pickwick House, W11 Pickwick House can be found on St Anns Road.
Portland Road, W11 Portland Road is a street in Notting Hill, rich at one end and poor at the other.
Pottery Lane, W11 Pottery Lane takes its name from the brickfields which were situated at the northern end of the street.
Poynter House, W11 Poynter House is sited on Swanscombe Road.
Prince’s Yard, W11 This is a small cul-de-sac off of Princes Road.
Princedale Road, W11 Princedale Road was formerly Princes Road.
Princes Place, W11 Princes Place is a street in Notting Hill.
Queensdale Crescent, W11 Queensdale Crescent is a street in Notting Hill.
Queensdale Place, W11 Queensdale Place is a cul-de-sac which runs just off Queensdale Road.
Queensdale Road, W11 Queensdale Road is a long road stretching from west to east, containing terraces of Victorian houses.
Queensdale Walk, W11 Queensdale Walk is a small cul-de-sac with 2-storey cottages running south off Queensdale Road.
Relay Road, W12 Relay Road is a road in the W12 postcode area
Richmond Way, W12 Richmond Way runs south from Shepherd’s Bush.
Rifle Place, W11 Rifle Place is a road in the W11 postcode area
Rockley Court, W12 Rockley Court is a road in the W14 postcode area
Romilly House, W11 Romilly House is located on Wilsham Street.
Romney Court, W12 Romney Court is a block on Millers Way.
Royal Crescent Mews, W11 Royal Crescent Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Royal Crescent, W11 The Royal Crescent is a Grade II* listed street in Holland Park.
Saunders Grove, W11 Saunders Grove ran east from Norland Gardens.
Shepherd’s Bush Green, W14 Shepherds Bush Green is the southern section of road lining Shepherd’s Bush Green itself.
Shepherd’s Bush Place, W12 Shepherd’s Bush Place was formerly known as Providence Place.
Silver Road, W12 Silver Road is a road in the W12 postcode area
Sirdar Road, W11 Sirdar Road is a street in Notting Hill.
St Ann’s Road, W11 St Ann’s Road, along with St Ann’s Villas, runs north from Royal Crescent.
St James’s Gardens, W11 St James’s Gardens is an attractive garden square with St James Church in the middle of the communal garden.
St John’s Gardens, W11 St John’s Gardens runs around St John’s church.
Stebbing House, W11 Stebbing House is sited on Queensdale Crescent.
Sterne Street, W12 Sterne Street is a road in the W12 postcode area
Swanscombe House, W11 Residential block
Swanscombe Road, W11 Swanscombe Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Tadmor Street, W12 Tadmor Street is a road in the W12 postcode area
The Little House, W11 The Little House is a block on Holland Park.
The Yellow Building, W11 The Yellow Building is sited on Nicholas Road.
Upper Addison Gardens, W14 Upper Addison Gardens runs between Holland Road and Holland Villas Road.
Waterden Court, W11 Waterden Court is located on Waterden Court.
West Cross Route, W11 The West Cross Route is a 1.21 km-long dual carriageway running north-south between the northern elevated roundabout junction with the western end of Westway (A40) and the southern Holland Park Roundabout.
Westfield London Shopping Centre, W12 Westfield London Shopping Centre is a location in London.
Westfield Way, W12 Westfield Way is a road in the W12 postcode area
Wilsham Street, W11 Wilsham Street was formerly known as St Katherine’s Road.
Woodsford Square, W14 Woodsford Square is a 1970s development consisting of a series of interconnecting squares hidden away on the eastern side of Addison Road.
Woodstock Grove, W12 Woodstock Grove is a road in the W12 postcode area

NEARBY PUBS
Earl of Zetland The Earl of Zetland - a pub in the Potteries
Kenilworth Castle The Kenilworth Castle was a post-war pub in Notting Dale.
Latimer Arms The Latimer Arms was situated at 79 Norland Road.
The Crown The Crown was situated at 57 Princedale Road.
The Wellington The Wellington Arms was situated at 96-102 Uxbridge Road.


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Notting Hill

Notting Hill: A place whose fortunes have come, gone and come again...

Notting Hill is a cosmopolitan district known as the location for the annual Notting Hill Carnival, and for being home to the Portobello Road Market.

The word Notting might originate from a Saxon called Cnotta with the =ing part indicating "the place inhibited by the people of" - i.e. where Cnotta’s tribe lived. There was a farm called variously "Knotting-Bernes,", "Knutting-Barnes" or "Nutting-barns" and this name was transferred to the hill above it.

The area remained rural until the westward expansion of London reached Bayswater in the early 19th century. The main landowner in Notting Hill was the Ladbroke family, and from the 1820s James Weller Ladbroke began to undertake the development of the Ladbroke Estate. Working with the architect and surveyor Thomas Allason, Ladbroke began to lay out streets and houses, with a view to turning the area into a fashionable suburb of the capital (although the development did not get seriously under way until the 1840s). Many of these streets bear the Ladbroke name, including Ladbroke Grove, the main north-south axis of the area, and Ladbroke Square, the largest private garden square in London.

The original idea was to call the district Kensington Park, and other roads (notably Kensington Park Road and Kensington Park Gardens) are reminders of this. The local telephone prefix 7727 (originally 727) is based on the old telephone exchange name of PARk.

The reputation of the district altered over the course of the 20th century. As middle class households ceased to employ servants, the large Notting Hill houses lost their market and were increasingly split into multiple occupation.

For much of the 20th century the large houses were subdivided into multi-occupancy rentals. Caribbean immigrants were drawn to the area in the 1950s, partly because of the cheap rents, but were exploited by slum landlords like Peter Rachman, and also became the target of white racist Teddy Boys in the 1958 Notting Hill race riots.

Notting Hill was slowly gentrified from the 1980s onwards now has a contemporary reputation as an affluent and fashionable area; known for attractive terraces of large Victorian townhouses, and high-end shopping and restaurants (particularly around Westbourne Grove and Clarendon Cross).

A Daily Telegraph article in 2004 used the phrase the ’Notting Hill Set’ to refer to a group of emerging Conservative politicians, such as David Cameron and George Osborne, who were once based in Notting Hill.

Since it was first developed in the 1830s, Notting Hill has had an association with artists and ’alternative’ culture.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Children of Ruston Close
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Martin Street, looking west (1960s)
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Addison Place
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Ansleigh Place, W11
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Arundel Gardens
Credit: Barbara Avis
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In the neighbourhood...

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The St Agnes soup kitchen was situated on the corner of Bangor Street, W11 that this photo was taken from. Bangor Street disappeared from the streetscene of Notting Dale after the Second World War.
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HM Queen Elizabeth, Queen Mother, with Lady Petrie, opening Henry Dickens Court, W11 (1953) The Queen Mother is greeted by large crowds and is accompanied by Lady Petrie, Mayor of Kensington. Henry Dickens Court was built by the Council on a bomb site as part of the borough’s post war redevelopment plan. It was named after Henry Dickens, grandson of Charles Dickens, an Alderman on the Council and an active advocate of municipal housing.
Credit: Kensington Libraries
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Corner of Bangor Street and Sirdar Road, W11 (1911) This became the Dolphin Pub. The location was demolished to make way for the Henry Dickens Estate.
Credit: London City Mission magazine
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Local resident Trevor who grew tomatoes in compost made from Frestonian residents’ waste. Frestonia was the name adopted by the residents of Freston Road, London W11, when they attempted to secede from the United Kingdom in 1977 to form the Free and Independent Republic of Frestonia. Many residents eventually set up a housing co-op in negotiation with Notting Hill Housing Trust, and included artists, musicians, writers, actors and activists. Actor David Rappaport was the Frestonia Foreign Minister while playwright Heathcote Williams served as Ambassador to the United Kingdom.
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Guy Fawkes and friends in Addison Avenue, W11 (around 1960)
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Addison Gardens, W14
Old London postcard
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Addison Place
Credit: Google Maps
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Addison Road, W14 (1909) Addison Road takes its name from the essayist Joseph Addison who lived nearby at Holland House.
Old London postcard
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Ansleigh Place, W11
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Hippodrome Place street sign
Licence: CC BY 2.0


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