Stepney Green Court, E1

Road in/near Shadwell

 HOME  ·  ARTICLE  ·  MAPS  ·  STREETS  BLOG 
(51.51892 -0.0612, 51.518 -0.061) 
MAP YEAR:175018001810182018301860190019502022Show map without markers
ZOOM:14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 18 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 18
TIP: Adjust the MAP YEAR and ZOOM to tweak historical maps
Road · Shadwell · E1 ·
JANUARY
1
2000

Stepney Green Court is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.





CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



The Underground Map   
Added: 20 Sep 2020 13:01 GMT   

Pepys starts diary
On 1 January 1659, Samuel Pepys started his famous daily diary and maintained it for ten years. The diary has become perhaps the most extensive source of information on this critical period of English history. Pepys never considered that his diary would be read by others. The original diary consisted of six volumes written in Shelton shorthand, which he had learned as an undergraduate on scholarship at Magdalene College, Cambridge. This shorthand was introduced in 1626, and was the same system Isaac Newton used when writing.

Reply
Comment
Tricia   
Added: 27 Apr 2021 12:05 GMT   

St George in the East Church
This Church was opened in 1729, designed by Hawksmore. Inside destroyed by incendrie bomb 16th April 1941. Rebuilt inside and finished in 1964. The building remained open most of the time in a temporary prefab.

Reply

Graham O’Connell   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 10:24 GMT   

Lloyd & Sons, Tin Box Manufacturers (1859 - 1982)
A Lloyd & Sons occupied the wharf (now known as Lloyds Wharf, Mill Street) from the mid 19th Century to the late 20th Century. Best known for making tin boxes they also produced a range of things from petrol canisters to collecting tins. They won a notorious libel case in 1915 when a local councillor criticised the working conditions which, in fairness, weren’t great. There was a major fire here in 1929 but the company survived at least until 1982 and probably a year or two after that.

Reply
Comment
Marion James   
Added: 12 Mar 2021 17:43 GMT   

26 Edith Street Haggerston
On Monday 11th October 1880 Charlotte Alice Haynes was born at 26 Edith Street Haggerston the home address of her parents her father Francis Haynes a Gilder by trade and her mother Charlotte Alice Haynes and her two older siblings Francis & George who all welcomed the new born baby girl into the world as they lived in part of the small Victorian terraced house which was shared by another family had an outlook view onto the world of the Imperial Gas Works site - a very grey drab reality of the life they were living as an East End working class family - 26 Edith Street no longer stands in 2021 - the small rundown polluted terrace houses of Edith Street are long since gone along with the Gas Companies buildings to be replaced with green open parkland that is popular in 21st century by the trendy residents of today - Charlotte Alice Haynes (1880-1973) is the wife of my Great Grand Uncle Henry Pickett (1878-1930) As I research my family history I slowly begin to understand the life my descendants had to live and the hardships that they went through to survive - London is my home and there are many areas of this great city I find many of my descendants living working and dying in - I am yet to find the golden chalice! But in all truthfulness my family history is so much more than hobby its an understanding of who I am as I gather their stories. Did Charlotte Alice Pickett nee Haynes go on to live a wonderful life - no I do not think so as she became a widow in 1930 worked in a canteen and never remarried living her life in and around Haggerston & Hackney until her death in 1973 with her final resting place at Manor Park Cemetery - I think Charlotte most likely excepted her lot in life like many women from her day, having been born in the Victorian era where the woman had less choice and standing in society, which is a sad state of affairs - So I will endeavour to write about Charlotte and the many other women in my family history to give them the voice of a life they so richly deserve to be recorded !

Edith Street was well situated for the new public transport of two railway stations in 1880 :- Haggerston Railway Station opened in 1867 & Cambridge Heath Railway Station opened in 1872


Reply
Born here
Beverly Sand   
Added: 3 Apr 2021 17:19 GMT   

Havering Street, E1
My mother was born at 48 Havering Street. That house no longer exists. It disappeared from the map by 1950. Family name Schneider, mother Ray and father Joe. Joe’s parents lived just up the road at 311 Cable Street

Reply
Born here
jack stevens   
Added: 26 Sep 2021 13:38 GMT   

Mothers birth place
Number 5 Whites Row which was built in around 1736 and still standing was the premises my now 93 year old mother was born in, her name at birth was Hilda Evelyne Shaw,

Reply
Lived here
margaret clark   
Added: 15 Oct 2021 22:23 GMT   

Margaret’s address when she married in 1938
^, Josepine House, Stepney is the address of my mother on her marriage certificate 1938. Her name was Margaret Irene Clark. Her father Basil Clark was a warehouse grocer.

Reply
Comment
Boo Horton    
Added: 31 May 2021 13:39 GMT   

Angel & Trumpet, Stepney Green
The Angel & Trumpet Public House in Stepney Green was run by my ancestors in the 1930’s. Unfortunately, it was a victim on WWII and was badly damaged and subsequently demolished. I have one photograph that I believe to bethe pub, but it doesn’t show much more that my Great Aunt cleaning the steps.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 6 Nov 2021 15:03 GMT   

Old Nichol Street, E2
Information about my grandfather’s tobacconist shop

Reply
Comment
Martin Eaton    
Added: 14 Oct 2021 03:56 GMT   

Boundary Estate
Sunbury, Taplow House.

Reply
Comment
STEPHEN JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:25 GMT   

Fellows Court, E2
my family moved into the tower block 13th floor (maisonette), in 1967 after our street Lenthall rd e8 was demolished, we were one of the first families in the new block. A number of families from our street were rehoused in this and the adjoining flats. Inside toilet and central heating, all very modern at the time, plus eventually a tarmac football pitch in the grounds,(the cage), with a goal painted by the kids on the brick wall of the railway.

Reply
Comment
The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 15:05 GMT   

A plague on all your houses
Aldgate station is built directly on top of a vast plague pit, where thousands of bodies are apparently buried. No-one knows quite how many.

Reply

STEPHEN ARTHUR JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:12 GMT   

Lynedoch Street, E2
my father Arthur Jackson was born in lynedoch street in 1929 and lived with mm grandparents and siblings, until they were relocated to Pamela house Haggerston rd when the street was to be demolished

Reply
Lived here
Linda    
Added: 18 Feb 2021 22:03 GMT   

Pereira Street, E1
My grandfather Charles Suett lived in Periera Street & married a widowed neighbour there. They later moved to 33 Bullen House, Collingwood Street where my father was born.

Reply
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT


   
Added: 25 Apr 2022 22:11 GMT   

Southover, N12
Everyone knows Central Woodside is the place to be. Ever since kdog moved from finchtown, Woodside has been thriving.

Reply
Born here
Bernard Miller   
Added: 12 Apr 2022 17:36 GMT   

My mother and her sister were born at 9 Windsor Terrace
My mother, Millie Haring (later Miller) and her sister Yetta Haring (later Freedman) were born here in 1922 and 1923. With their parents and older brother and sister, they lived in two rooms until they moved to Stoke Newington in 1929. She always said there were six rooms, six families, a shared sink on the first floor landing and a toilet in the backyard.

Reply

Brian Lynch   
Added: 10 Apr 2022 13:38 GMT   

Staples Mattress Factory
An architect’s design of the Staples Mattress Factory
An image found on the website of Dalzell’s Beds, in Armagh Northern Ireland.

Reply
Lived here
   
Added: 19 Feb 2022 16:21 GMT   

Harmondsworth (1939 - 1965)
I lived in a house (Lostwithiel) on the Bath Road opposite the junction with Tythe Barn Lane, now a hotel site. Initially, aircraft used one of the diagonal runways directly in line with our house. I attended Sipson Primary School opposite the Three Magpies and celebrated my 21st birthday at The Peggy Bedford in 1959.

Reply

Emma Seif   
Added: 25 Jan 2022 19:06 GMT   

Birth of the Bluestocking Society
In about 1750, Elizabeth Montagu began hosting literary breakfasts in her home at 23 (now 31) Hill Street. These are considered the first meetings of the Bluestocking society.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 14 Jan 2022 03:06 GMT   

Goldbourne Gardens W 10
I lived in Goldbourne Gardens in the 50,s very happy big bomb site

Reply

Chris Nash   
Added: 10 Jan 2022 22:54 GMT   

Shortlands Close, DA17
Shortlands Close and the flats along it were constructed in the mid-1990s. Prior to this, the area was occupied by semi-detached houses with large gardens, which dated from the post-war period and were built on the site of Railway Farm. The farm and its buildings spanned the length of Abbey Road, on the south side of the North Kent Line railway tracks.

Reply

Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 07:17 GMT   

Smithy in Longacre
John Burris 1802-1848 Listed 1841 census as Burroughs was a blacksmith, address just given as Longacre.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Altab Ali Park Altab Ali Park is a small park on Adler Street, White Church Lane and Whitechapel Road.
Pavilion Theatre The Pavilion Theatre at 191–193 Whitechapel Road was the first major theatre to open in the East End.
St Mary Matfelon St Mary Matfelon church was popularly known as St Mary’s, Whitechapel.

NEARBY STREETS
Adelina Grove, E1 This is a street in the E1 postcode area
Adler Street, E1 Adler Street runs between the Whitechapel Road and the Commercial Road.
Ashfield Street, E1 Ashfield Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Assam Street, E1 Assam Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Benjamin Truman Close, E1 Benjamin Truman Close is a location in London.
Black Lion Yard, E1 Black Lion Yard was a narrow thoroughfare running north-south from Old Montague Street (where it was accessible via a set of steps) to Whitechapel Road.
Booth House, E1 Booth House is a block on Whitechapel Road.
Brady Street, E1 Brady Street is a road running north-south from Three Colts Lane to Whitechapel Road.
Buckhurst Street, E1 Buckhurst Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Buxton Street, E1 Buxton Street developed in the early and mid-nineteenth century.
Cambridge Heath Road, E1 Cambridge Heath Road was originally Cambridge Road.
Carillon Court, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Casson Street, E1 Casson Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Castlemain Street, E1 Castlemain Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Cavell Street, E1 Cavell Street is a road in the E1W postcode area
Clark Street, E1 Clark Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Coburg Dwellings, E1 Coburg Dwellings is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Collingwood Street, E1 Collingwood Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Court Street, E1 Court Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Coverley Close, E1 Coverley Close is a road in the E1 postcode area
Damien Street, E1 Damien Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Darling Row, E1 Darling Row is a road in the E1 postcode area
Davenant Street, E1 Davenant Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Deal Street, E1 Deal Street dates from the mid 1840s.
Durward Street, E1 Durward Street is a narrow thoroughfare running east-west from Brady Street to Baker’s Row (today’s Vallance Road).
Durwaroad Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
East Cross Centre, E1 East Cross Centre is one of the streets of London in the E15 postal area.
East Mount Street, E1 East Mount Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Education Square, E1 Education Square is a location in London.
Edwards Passage, E1 Edwards Passage is a location in London.
Fakruddin Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Fieldgate Street, E1 Fieldgate Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Ford Square, E1 Ford Square is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Fordham Street, E1 Fordham Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Fulbourne Street, E1 Fulbourne Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Granary Road, E1 Granary Road is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Greatorex Street, E1 Greatorex Street was formerly called High Street.
Greenfield Road, E1 Greenfield Road is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Grindall House, E1 Residential block
Halcrow Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Hanbury Street, E1 Hanbury Street is a long road running west-east from Commercial Street to Vallance Road.
Headlam Street, E1 Headlam Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Hobsons Place, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Hunton Street, E1 Hunton Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Jarman House, E1 Residential block
Key Close, E1 Key Close is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Kings Arms Court, E1 Kings Arms Court lies off Old Montague Street.
Lindley Street, E1 Lindley Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Lomas Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Maples Place, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Merceron Street, E1 Merceron Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Mile End Road, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Milward Street, E1 Milward Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Monthope Road, E1 This is a street in the E1 postcode area
Moss Close, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Mount Terrace, E1 Mount Terrace is a road in the E1 postcode area
Mulberry Street, E1 Mulberry Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Myrdle Street, E1 Myrdle Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Nelson Street, E1 Nelson Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
New Road, E1 New Road is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Newark Street, E1 Newark Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Newbold Cottages, E1 Newbold Cottages is a road in the E1 postcode area
O’Leary Square, E1 O’Leary Square is a road in the E1 postcode area
Old Montague Street, E1 Old Montague Street is a thoroughfare running east-west from Baker’s Row (now Vallance Road) to Brick Lane.
Orion House, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Parfett Street, E1 Parfett Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Pedley Street, E1 Pedley Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Pereira Street, E1 Pereira Street ran north/south in Bethnal Green.
Philpot Street, E1 Philpot Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Plumbers Row, E1 Plumbers Row is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Raven Row, E1 Raven Row is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Regal Close, E1 Regal Close is a road in the E1 postcode area
Romford Street, E1 Romford Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Scott Street, E1 Scott Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Selby Street, E1 Selby Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Settles Street, E1 Settles Street links Fieldgate Street with Commercial Road.
Sidney Square, E1 Sidney Square is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Sidney Street, E1 Sidney Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Spring Walk, E1 Spring Walk is a road in the E1 postcode area
Surma Close, E1 Surma Close is a road in the E1 postcode area
Technology Centre, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Trahorn Close, E1 Trahorn Close is a road in the E1 postcode area
Trinity Green, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Turner Street, E1 Turner Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Turning Street, E20 Turning Street is a location in London.
Underwood Road, E1 Underwood Road is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Vallance Road, E1 Vallance Road is a significant road running north-south from Bethnal Green Road to Whitechapel Road.
Varden Street, E1 Varden Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Vawdrey Close, E1 Vawdrey Close is a road in the E1 postcode area
Vine Court, E1 Vine Court is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Walden Street, E1 Walden Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Weaver Street, E1 Weaver Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
White Church Lane, E1 White Church Lane is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Whitechapel Market, E1 Whitechapel Market is a road in the E1 postcode area
Whitechapel Road, E1 Whitechapel Road is a major arterial road in East London.
Whitechapel Technology Centre, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Winthrop Street, E1 Winthrop Street was formerly a narrow street running east-west from Brady Street to Durward Street.
Wodeham Gardens, E1 Wodeham Gardens is a road in the E1 postcode area
Wolsey Street, E1 Wolsey Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Woodseer Street, E1 Woodseer Street was formerly known as Pelham Street and part of the Halifax Estate.
Wyllen Close, E1 Wyllen Close is a road in the E1 postcode area


Shadwell

Shadwell is a district in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, and located on the north bank of the Thames between Wapping and Ratcliff.

In the 13th century, the area was known as Scadflet and Shatfliet – derived from the Anglo-Saxon fleot, meaning a shallow creek or bay – the land was a low lying marsh, until drained (by order of Act of Parliament, after 1587) by Cornelius Vanderdelf. A spring, issuing from near the south wall of the churchyard was dedicated to St Chad, and filled a nearby well. The origin of the name is therefore confused, being associated with both the earlier use and the later well.

In the 17th century, Thomas Neale became a local landowner, and built a mill and established a waterworks on large ponds, left by the draining of the marsh. The area had been virtually uninhabited and he developed the waterfront, with houses behind as a speculation. Shadwell became a maritime hamlet with roperies, tanneries, breweries, wharves, smiths, and numerous taverns, built around the chapel of St Paul's. Seventy-five sea captains are buried in its churchyard; Captain James Cook had his son baptised there.

By the mid-eighteenth century, Shadwell Spa was established, producing sulphurous waters, in Sun Tavern fields. As well as medicinal purposes, salts were extracted from the waters; and used by local calicoprinters to fix their dyes.

In the 19th century, Shadwell was home to a large community of foreign South Asian lascar seamen, brought over from British India by the East India Company. There were also Anglo-Indians, from intermarriage and cohabitation between lascar seamen and local girls. There were also smaller communities of Chinese and Greek seamen, who also intermarried and cohabited with locals.

The modern area is dominated by the enclosed former dock, Shadwell Basin, whose construction destroyed much of the earlier settlement – by this time degenerated into slums. The basin once formed the eastern entrance to the then London Docks, with a channel leading west to St Katharine Docks. It is actually two dock basins - the south basin was constructed in 1828-32 and the north basin in 1854-8.

Unlike nearby Limehouse Basin, few craft larger than canoes can be seen on Shadwell Basin, which is largely used for fishing and watersports - and as a scenic backdrop to the modern residential developments that line it. The basin, however, is still connected to the Thames and the channel is spanned by a bascule bridge.

The original Shadwell station was one of the oldest on the network, and was built over a spring. First opened by the East London Railway on 10 April 1876, it was first served by the Metropolitan District Railway and Metropolitan Railway on 1 October 1884. It was renamed Shadwell & St. George-in-the-East on 1 July 1900 but reverted to its original name in 1918. In 1983, a new ticket hall was built on Cable Street, replacing the original building in Watney Street.

Shadwell DLR station opened on 31 August 1987 as part of the first tranche of DLR stations. Initially designed for one-car DLR trains, Shadwell's platform underwent extension to two-car operation in 1991. The station underwent further refurbishment in 2009, which extended the platforms to accommodate three-car trains, revamped the station entrance at ground level, and added an emergency exit at the east end of the platforms.

Shadwell station closed on 22 December 2007, reopened on 27 April 2010 for a preview service to New Cross and New Cross Gate, and from 23 May 2010, the latter service extended to West Croydon / Crystal Palace operated within the London Overground network.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Click here to see map view of nearby Creative Commons images
Click here to see Creative Commons images near to this postcode
Click here to see Creative Commons images tagged with this road (if applicable)
Buck's Row (Durward Street) in 1938.
TUM image id: 1490922288
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Hanbury Street c.1918, looking east
TUM image id: 1490921501
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Bethnal Green railway station entrance, some distance away from its namesake Central line tube station. The photo was taken on 25 October 2008
Credit: Wiki Commons/Sunil060902
Licence: CC BY 2.0


A view east along Whitechapel Road including the Pavilion Theatre. The Pavilion was the first major theatre to open in the East End. It opened in 1827 and closed in 1935.
Licence:


Brady Street looking toward the junction with Durward Street, 1979.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Victoria and Albert Cottages take the form of two ranges of modest two-storey houses built along Deal Street, Spitalfields between 1857 and 1865
Credit: Spitalfields Trust
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Buck's Row (Durward Street) in 1938.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Berner Street, April 1909. The cartwheel indicates the entrance to Dutfield's Yard.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Whitechapel Workhouse Mortuary - contemporary press illustration
Licence:


Settles Street, E1 (1940) This photo shows a fine old school sign which featured a torch. A direction sign to a Second World War shelter is on the wall.
Licence:


Whitechapel Road
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Black Lion Yard looking north, 1961.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Print-friendly version of this page

  Contact us · Copyright policy · Privacy policy