Tite Street, SW3

Road in/near Chelsea, existing between 1877 and now

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(51.48598 -0.16115, 51.485 -0.161) 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Road · * · SW3 ·
September
8
2021

Tite Street crosses Royal Hospital Road.

Tite Street was laid out from 1877 by the Metropolitan Board of Works to give access to the Chelsea Embankment. The street was named after William Tite who was a member of the Board of Works.

Gough House stood on the eastern side of the street, predating it being built around 1707. It became a school in 1830, then the Victoria Hospital for Children in 1866. The site is now occupied by St Wilfred’s convent and home for the elderly.

In the late 19th century, the street was a favoured and fashionable location for people of an artistic and literary disposition including Oscar Wilde, Gustav Pope (artist), John Singer Sargent (American portrait painter), James McNeill Whistler (artist), Wendela Boreel (artist) and Sir Wilfred Thesiger (explorer and travel writer).




Main source: Wikipedia
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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Lived here
   
Added: 1 May 2021 16:46 GMT   

Cheyne Place, SW3
Frances Faviell, author of the Blitz memoir, "A Chelsea Concerto", lived at 33, Cheyne Place, which was destroyed by a bomb. She survived, with her husband and unborn baby.

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Born here
Joyce Taylor   
Added: 5 Apr 2021 21:05 GMT   

Lavender Road, SW11
MyFather and Grand father lived at 100 Lavender Road many years .I was born here.

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Born here
www.violettrefusis.com   
Added: 17 Feb 2021 15:05 GMT   

Birth place
Violet Trefusis, writer, cosmopolitan intellectual and patron of the Arts was born at 2 Wilton Crescent SW1X.

Source: www.violettrefusis.com

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Comment
Peter H Davies   
Added: 17 Jun 2021 09:33 GMT   

Ethelburga Estate
The Ethelburga Estate - named after Ethelburga Road - was an LCC development dating between 1963–65. According to the Wikipedia, it has a "pleasant knitting together of a series of internal squares". I have to add that it’s extremely dull :)

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
roger morris   
Added: 16 Oct 2021 08:50 GMT   

Atherton Road, IG5 (1958 - 1980)
I moved to Atherton road in 1958 until 1980 from Finsbury Park. My father purchased the house from his brother Sydney Morris. My father continued to live there until his death in 1997, my mother having died in 1988.
I attended The Glade Primary School in Atherton Road from sept 1958 until 1964 when I went to Beal School. Have fond memories of the area and friends who lived at no2 (Michael Clark)and no11 (Brian Skelly)

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Lived here
margaret clark   
Added: 15 Oct 2021 22:23 GMT   

Margaret’s address when she married in 1938
^, Josepine House, Stepney is the address of my mother on her marriage certificate 1938. Her name was Margaret Irene Clark. Her father Basil Clark was a warehouse grocer.

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Comment
Martin Eaton    
Added: 14 Oct 2021 03:56 GMT   

Boundary Estate
Sunbury, Taplow House.

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Comment
Simon Chalton   
Added: 10 Oct 2021 21:52 GMT   

Duppas Hill Terrace 1963- 74
I’m 62 yrs old now but between the years 1963 and 1975 I lived at number 23 Duppas Hill Terrace. I had an absolutely idyllic childhood there and it broke my heart when the council ordered us out of our home to build the Ellis Davd flats there.The very large house overlooked the fire station and we used to watch them practice putting out fires in the blue tower which I believe is still there.
I’m asking for your help because I cannot find anything on the internet or anywhere else (pictures, history of the house, who lived there) and I have been searching for many, many years now.
Have you any idea where I might find any specific details or photos of Duppas Hill Terrace, number 23 and down the hill to where the subway was built. To this day it saddens me to know they knocked down this house, my extended family lived at the next house down which I think was number 25 and my best school friend John Childs the next and last house down at number 27.
I miss those years so terribly and to coin a quote it seems they just disappeared like "tears in rain".
Please, if you know of anywhere that might be able to help me in any way possible, would you be kind enough to get back to me. I would be eternally grateful.
With the greatest of hope and thanks,
Simon Harlow-Chalton.


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Comment
Linda Webb   
Added: 27 Sep 2021 05:51 GMT   

Hungerford Stairs
In 1794 my ancestor, George Webb, Clay Pipe Maker, lived in Hungerford Stairs, Strand. Source: Wakefields Merchant & Tradesmens General Directory London Westminster 1794

Source: Hungerford Stairs

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Born here
jack stevens   
Added: 26 Sep 2021 13:38 GMT   

Mothers birth place
Number 5 Whites Row which was built in around 1736 and still standing was the premises my now 93 year old mother was born in, her name at birth was Hilda Evelyne Shaw,

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Born here
Ron Shepherd   
Added: 18 Sep 2021 17:28 GMT   

More Wisdom
Norman Joseph Wisdom was born in St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington, West London.

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Comment
Jonathan Penner   
Added: 11 Sep 2021 16:03 GMT   

Pennard Road, W12
My wife and I, young Canadians, lodged at 65 (?) Pennard Road with a fellow named Clive and his girlfriend, Melanie, for about 6 months in 1985. We loved the area and found it extremely convenient.

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
River Westbourne outflow The River Westbourne flowed into the Thames at this point.
The Fascination of Chelsea The Fascination of Chelsea was a book published in 1902.

NEARBY STREETS
Alpha Place, SW3 Alpha Place was probably so called because it was the first turning to be built out of the old lane now named Flood Street.
Antiquarius, SW3 Antiquarius is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Burnsall Street, SW3 Burnsall Street is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Cadogan Pier, SW3 Cadogan Pier is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Caversham Street, SW3 Caversham Street is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Charles II Place, SW3 Charles II Place is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Chelsea Embankment, SW3 Chelsea Embankment is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Chelsea Manor Gardens, SW3 Chelsea Manor Gardens is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Chelsea Manor Street, SW3 Chelsea Manor Street is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Chelsea Manor Studios, SW3 Chelsea Manor Studios is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Chelsea Towers, SW3 Chelsea Towers is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Cheyne Court, SW3 Cheyne Court is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Cheyne Mews, SW3 Cheyne Mews is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Cheyne Place, SW3 Cheyne Place is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Cheyne Walk, SW3 Cheyne Walk is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Christchurch Street, SW3 Christchurch Street is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Christchurch Terrace, SW3 Christchurch Terrace is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Clover Mews, SW3 Clover Mews is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Dilke Street, SW3 Dilke Street is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
East Road, SW3 East Road is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Embankment Gardens, SW3 Embankment Gardens is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Flood Street, SW3 Flood Street commemorates Luke Thomas Flood (d.1860) a major Chelsea land owner and a benefactor of the poor.
Flood Walk, SW3 Flood Walk is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Franklins Row, SW3 Franklins Row is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Godfrey Street, SW3 Godfrey Street is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Grove Cottages, SW3 Grove Cottages is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Honiton Mansions, SW3 Honiton Mansions is a location in London.
Joubert Mansions, SW3 Joubert Mansions is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Jubilee Place, SW3 Jubilee Place is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Kensington And Chelsea, SW3 Kensington And Chelsea is a location in London.
King’s Road, SW3 This is a street in the SW3 postcode area
Kings Road, SW3 Kings Road is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Margaretta Terrace, SW3 Margaretta Terrace is a location in London.
Markham Square, SW3 Markham Square is a garden square laid out in 1836.
Markham Street, SW3 Markham Street is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Markham Street, SW3 A street within the SW3 postcode
Oakley Gardens, SW3 Oakley Gardens is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Oakley Street, SW3 Oakley Street arrived in 1830 following the demolition of Chelsea Manor House in 1822.
Ormonde Gate, SW3 Ormonde Gate is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Paradise Walk, SW3 Paradise Walk is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Peabody Estate, SW3 Peabody Estate is a location in London.
Phene Street, SW3 Phene Street is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Pier House, SW3 Residential block
Porters Lodge, SW3 Porters Lodge is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Radnor Walk, SW3 Radnor Walk was previously called Radnor Street until renamed in 1937.
Ralston Street, SW3 Ralston Street is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Redburn Street, SW3 Redburn Street is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Redesdale Street, SW3 Redesdale Street is a location in London.
Resedale Street, SW3 Resedale Street is a location in London.
Robinson Street, SW3 Robinson Street is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Rosetti Studios, SW3 Rosetti Studios is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Rossetti Studios, SW3 Rossetti Studios is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Royal Avenue, SW3 Royal Avenue This was laid out for William III as part of a proposed triumphal way leading from Wren’s Royal Hospital to the south right to Kensington Palace in the north.
Royal Hospital Road, SW3 Royal Hospital Road is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Shawfield Street, SW3 Shawfield Street is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Sloane Court West, SW3 This is a street in the SW3 postcode area
Smith Street, SW3 Smith Street was built between 1794 and 1807 by a vintner named Thomas Smith.
Smith Terrace, SW3 Smith Terrace is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
St Leonard’s Terrace, SW3 St. Leonard’s Terrace is situated at the end of Royal Avenue.
St Loo Avenue, SW3 St Loo Avenue was named after William St Loo, the third husband of Bess of Hardwick.
St Lukes Street, SW3 St Lukes Street is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Swan Walk, SW3 Swan Walk is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Tedworth Gardens, SW3 Tedworth Gardens is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Tedworth Square, SW3 Tedworth Square is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Terrace Walk, SW3 Terrace Walk is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Terrace Walk, SW3 Terrace Walk is a pathway within Battersea Park.
Turks Row, SW3 Turks Row is a location in London.
Walpole Street, SW3 Walpole Street is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Wellington Square, SW3 Wellington Square was laid out in the 1850s by Francis Edwards though the terraces on either side of the square were built some ten years earlier.
West Road, SW3 West Road is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Whistler Square, SW1W Whistler Square is a location in London.
Woodfall Street, SW3 Woodfall Street is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.

NEARBY PUBS
Builders Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Chelsea Pensioners Club This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Coopers Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Phene This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Phoenix Pub and Dining Room This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Surprise This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Sydney Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Trafalgar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Unknown as yet The Chelsea Potter was originally called ‘The Commercial Tavern’ and dates from 1842.


Chelsea

Chelsea is an affluent area, bounded to the south by the River Thames.

Its eastern boundary was once defined by the River Westbourne, which is now in a pipe above Sloane Square tube station. The modern eastern boundary is Chelsea Bridge Road and the lower half of Sloane Street, including Sloane Square, along with parts of Belgravia. To the north and northwest, the area fades into Knightsbridge and South Kensington, but it is safe to say that the area north of King’s Road as far northwest as Fulham Road is part of Chelsea.

The word Chelsea originates from the Old English term for chalk and landing place on the river. The first record of the Manor of Chelsea precedes the Domesday Book and records the fact that Thurstan, governor of the King’s Palace during the reign of Edward the Confessor (1042–1066), gave the land to the Abbot and Convent of Westminster. Abbot Gervace subsequently assigned the manor to his mother, and it passed into private ownership. The modern-day Chelsea hosted the Synod of Chelsea in 787 AD.

Chelsea once had a reputation for the manufacture of Chelsea buns (made from a long strip of sweet dough tightly coiled, with currants trapped between the layers, and topped with sugar).

King Henry VIII acquired the manor of Chelsea from Lord Sandys in 1536; Chelsea Manor Street is still extant. Two of King Henry’s wives, Catherine Parr and Anne of Cleves, lived in the Manor House; Princess Elizabeth – the future Queen Elizabeth I – resided there; and Thomas More lived more or less next door at Beaufort House. In 1609 James I established a theological college on the site of the future Chelsea Royal Hospital, which Charles II founded in 1682.

By 1694, Chelsea – always a popular location for the wealthy, and once described as ’a village of palaces’ – had a population of 3000. Even so, Chelsea remained rural and served London to the east as a market garden, a trade that continued until the 19th-century development boom which caused the final absorption of the district into the metropolis.

Chelsea shone, brightly but briefly, in the 1960s Swinging London period and the early 1970s. The Swinging Sixties was defined on King’s Road, which runs the length of the area. The Western end of Chelsea featured boutiques Granny Takes a Trip and The Sweet Shop, the latter of which sold medieval silk velvet caftans, tabards and floor cushions, with many of the cultural cognoscenti of the time being customers, including Keith Richards, Twiggy and many others.

The exclusivity of Chelsea as a result of its high property prices has historically resulted in the term Sloane Ranger to be used to describe its residents. From 2011, Channel 4 broadcast a reality television show called Made in Chelsea, documenting the ’glitzy’ lives of several young people living in Chelsea. Moreover, Chelsea is home to one of the largest communities of Americans living outside of the United States, with 6.53% of Chelsea-residents being born in the United States.


LOCAL PHOTOS
The Fascination of Chelsea
TUM image id: 1524258115
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Royal Hospital, Chelsea
TUM image id: 1524258791
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Boscobel Place
TUM image id: 1546446783
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Albert Bridge opened in 1873 and was immediately designated as a dangerous structure. It was noticed early on that vibrations could threaten the structural integrity of the bridge.
Credit: The Underground Map
Licence:
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The Fascination of Chelsea
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

Royal Hospital, Chelsea
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

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