Trafalgar Avenue, SE15

Road in/near Peckham, existing between the 1840s and now

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Road · Peckham · SE15 ·
MARCH
7
2022

This area of Peckham, close to the Old Kent Road, was developed from the 1840s onwards.

In the 1850s, north Peckham was developing as a handsome, middle-class suburb. Leading south from the Old Kent Road, Trafalgar Road (later Trafalgar Avenue) was laid out including an earlier bridge (the Trafalgar Bridge) over the Grand Surrey Canal. The canal was filled in during 1970.

On the corner of Trafalgar Avenue and Waite Street, a pub was built: "The Victory".

After the Second World War and its war damage, much of the southern part of Trafalgar Avenue was demolished to make way for parkland.




Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence

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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



Graham O’Connell   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 10:24 GMT   

Lloyd & Sons, Tin Box Manufacturers (1859 - 1982)
A Lloyd & Sons occupied the wharf (now known as Lloyds Wharf, Mill Street) from the mid 19th Century to the late 20th Century. Best known for making tin boxes they also produced a range of things from petrol canisters to collecting tins. They won a notorious libel case in 1915 when a local councillor criticised the working conditions which, in fairness, weren’t great. There was a major fire here in 1929 but the company survived at least until 1982 and probably a year or two after that.

Reply

fariba   
Added: 28 Jun 2021 00:48 GMT   

Tower Bridge Business Complex, S
need for my coursework

Source: university

Reply
Lived here
KJ   
Added: 11 Apr 2021 12:34 GMT   

Family
1900’s Cranmer family lived here at 105 (changed to 185 when road was re-numbered)
James Cranmer wife Louisa ( b.Logan)
They had 3 children one being my grandparent William (Bill) CRANMER married to grandmother “Nancy” He used to go to
Glengall Tavern in Bird in Bush Rd ,now been converted to flats.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 14:31 GMT   

correction
Chaucer did not write Pilgrims Progress. His stories were called the Canterbury Tales

Reply
Comment
rnorman345@aol.com   
Added: 6 Jul 2021 05:38 GMT   

Wren Road in the 1950s and 60s
Living in Grove Lane I knew Wren Road; my grandfather’s bank, Lloyds, was on the corner; the Scout District had their office in the Congregational Church and the entrance to the back of the Police station with the stables and horses was off it. Now very changed - smile.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
Katharina Logan   
Added: 9 Aug 2022 19:01 GMT   

Ely place existed in name in 1857
On 7th July 1857 John James Chase and Mary Ann Weekes were married at St John the Baptist Hoxton, he of full age and she a minor. Both parties list their place of residence as Ely Place, yet according to other information, this street was not named until 1861. He was a bricklayer, she had no occupation listed, but both were literate and able to sign their names on their marriage certificate.

Source: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSF7-Q9Y7?cc=3734475

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Comment
Reginald John Gregory   
Added: 8 Aug 2022 14:07 GMT   

Worked in the vicinity of my ancestor’s house,
Between the years 1982-1998 (unknown to me at the time) I worked in an office close to the site of my ancestors cottage. I discovered this when researching family history - the cottage was mentioned in the 1871 census for Colindeep Lane/Ancient Street coming up from the Hyde. The family lived in the ares betwen 1805 and 1912.

Reply

Barry J. Page   
Added: 27 Jul 2022 19:41 GMT   

Highbury Corner V1 Explosion
Grandma described the V1 explosion at Highbury Corner on many occasions. She was working in the scullery when the flying bomb landed. The blast shattered all the windows in the block of flats and blew off the bolt on her front door. As she looked out the front room window, people in various states of injury and shock were making their way along Highbury Station Road. One man in particular, who was bleeding profusely from glass shard wounds to his neck, insisted in getting home to see if his family was all right. Others were less fortunate. Len, the local newsagent, comforted a man, who had lost both legs caused by the blast, until the victim succumbed to his injuries. The entire area was ravaged and following are statistics. The flying bomb landed during lunch hour (12:46 p.m.) on June 27th 1944. 26 people lost their lives, 84 were seriously injured and 71 slightly injured.

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Comment
ANON   
Added: 20 Jul 2022 13:36 GMT   

The Square & Ashmore park
The Square and Ashmore park was the place to be 2000-2005. Those were the greatest times on the estate. everyday people were playing out. the park was full of kids just being kids and having fun, now everyone is grown up and only bump into eachother when heading to the shops or work. I miss the good days( Im 25yrs old as im writing this)

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Spotted here
   
Added: 18 Jul 2022 13:56 GMT   

Map of Thornsett Road Esrlsfield


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Born here
Carolyn Hirst   
Added: 16 Jul 2022 15:21 GMT   

Henry James Hirst
My second great grandfather Henry James Hirst was born at 18 New Road on 11 February 1861. He was the eighth of the eleven children of Rowland and Isabella Hirst. I think that this part of New Road was also known at the time as Gloucester Terrace.

Reply
Lived here
Richard   
Added: 12 Jul 2022 21:36 GMT   

Elgin Crescent, W11
Richard Laitner (1955-1983), a barrister training to be a doctor at UCL, lived here in 1983. He was murdered aged 28 with both his parents after attending his sister’s wedding in Sheffield in 1983. The Richard Laitner Memorial Fund maintains bursaries in his memory at UCL Medical School

Source: Ancestry Library Edition

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Comment
Anthony Mckay   
Added: 11 Jul 2022 00:12 GMT   

Bankfield Cottages, Ass House Lane, Harrow Weald
Bankfield Cottages (now demolished) at the end of Ass House Lane, appear twice in ’The Cheaters’ televison series (made 1960) in the episodes ’The Fine Print’ and ’Tine to Kill’

Source: THE CHEATERS: Episode Index

Reply

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NEARBY PUBS
Club favour This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Dun Cow The Dun Cow stood at 279 Old Kent Road.
The lord nelson This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Peckham

Peckham is a district located in the London Borough of Southwark. It is situated 3.5 miles south-east of Charing Cross.

Peckham is a Saxon place name meaning the village of the River Peck, a small stream that ran through the district until it was enclosed in 1823. Archaeological evidence indicates earlier Roman occupation in the area, although the name of this settlement is lost.

Peckham appears in Domesday Book of 1086 as Pecheham. It was held by the Bishop of Lisieux from the Bishop of Bayeux. The manor was owned by King Henry I who gave it to his son Robert, Earl of Gloucester. When Robert married the heiress to Camberwell the two manors were united under royal ownership.

Peckham became popular as a wealthy residential area by the 16th century. By the 18th century the area was a more commercial centre and attracted industrialists who wanted to avoid paying the expensive rents in central London. Peckham also boasted extensive market gardens and orchards growing produce for the nearby markets of London.

The village was the last stopping point for many cattle drovers taking their livestock for sale in London. The drovers stayed in the local inns (such as The Red Cow) while the cattle were safely secured overnight in holding pens. Most of the villagers were agricultural or horticultural workers but with the early growth of the suburbs an increasing number worked in the brick industry that exploited the local London Clay.

At the beginning of the 19th century Peckham was a 'small, quiet, retired village surrounded by fields'. Since 1744 stagecoaches had travelled with an armed guard between Peckham and London to give protection from highwaymen. The rough roads constrained traffic so a branch of the Grand Surrey Canal was proposed as a route from the Thames to Portsmouth. The canal was built from Surrey Commercial Docks to Peckham before the builders ran out of funds in 1826.

Before Peckham Rye railway station was opened in 1865 the area had developed around two centres: north and south. In the north, housing spread out to the south of the Old Kent Road including Peckham New Town built on land owned by the Hill family (from whom the name Peckham Hill Street derives). In the south, large houses were built to the west of the common land called Peckham Rye and the lane that led to it.

North Peckham was heavily redeveloped in the 1960s, consisting mainly of high-rise flats to rehouse people from dilapidated old houses. It was popular on its completion for offering a high quality and modern standing of living. However, high unemployment and a lack of economic opportunities led to urban decay and a period of decline in the late 1970s. The North Peckham Estate became one of the most deprived residential areas in Western Europe. Vandalism, graffiti, arson attacks, burglaries, robberies and muggings were commonplace, and the area became an archetypal London sink estate. As a result, the area was subjected to a £290 million regeneration programme in the late 1990s and early 2000s. By 2002, 90% of the redevelopment was complete. The new homes were better laid out and offered improved security.

Since the 1990s the European Union has invested heavily in the regeneration of the area; partly funding the futuristic, award-winning Peckham Library, a new town square and swathes of new housing to replace the North Peckham Estate. Throughout the area state funding is being provided to improve the housing stock and renovate the streets. This includes funding for public arts projects like the Tom Phillips mosaics on the wall of the Peckham Experiment restaurant and the South London Gallery.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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TUM image id: 1630363665
Licence:
The Dun Cow at 279 Old Kent Road.
TUM image id: 1607620929
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

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Burgess Park being created (1973)
Credit: Greater London Council
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Dun Cow at 279 Old Kent Road.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


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