Alsatia

Neighbourhood in/near Queen’s Park, existed between 1665 and 1723

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2016

Alsatia was the name given to an area lying north of the River Thames covered by the Whitefriars monastery.

Between the fifteenth and seventeenth centuries it had the privilege of a sanctuary and as a result it was the refuge of the perpetrators of every grade of crime, debauchery, and offence against the laws.

The execution of a warrant there, if at any time practicable, was attended with great danger, as all united in a maintenance in common of the immunity of the place. It was one of the last places of sanctuary used in England, abolished by Act of Parliament named The Escape from Prison Act in 1697 and a further Act in 1723.

Eleven other places in London were named in the Acts (The Minories, The Mint, Salisbury Court, Whitefriars[disambiguation needed], Fulwoods Rents, Mitre Court, Baldwins Gardens, The Savoy, The Clink, Deadmans Place, Montague Close, and Stepney).

Alsatia was named after the ancient name for Alsace, Europe, which was itself outside legislative and juridical lines, and, therefore, they were literally places without law. The name is thought to be a cant term for the area and is first known in print in the title of The Squire of Alsatia, a 1688 play written by Thomas Shadwell.

The name was used into the 20th century as a term for a ramshackle marketplace, protected by ancient custom and the independence of their patrons.


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
MCNALLY    
Added: 17 May 2021 09:42 GMT   

Blackfriars (1959 - 1965)
I lived in Upper Ground from 1959 to 1964 I was 6 years old my parents Vince and Kitty run the Pub The Angel on the corner of Upper Ground and Bodies Bridge. I remember the ceiling of the cellar was very low and almost stretched the length of Bodies Bridge. The underground trains run directly underneath the pub. If you were down in the cellar when a train was coming it was quite frightening

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Reply
Tom   
Added: 21 May 2021 23:07 GMT   

Blackfriars
What is, or was, Bodies Bridge?

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Comment
Bruce McTavish   
Added: 11 Mar 2021 11:37 GMT   

Kennington Road
Lambeth North station was opened as Kennington Road and then Westminster Bridge Road before settling on its final name. It has a wonderful Leslie Green design.

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Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 19:47 GMT   

Millions Of Rats In Busy London
The Daily Mail on 14 April 1903 reported "MILLIONS OF RATS IN BUSY LONDON"

A rat plague, unprecedented in the annals of London, has broken out on the north side of the Strand. The streets principally infested are Catherine street, Drury lane, Blackmore street, Clare Market and Russell street. Something akin to a reign of terror prevails among the inhabitants after nightfall. Women refuse to pass along Blackmore street and the lower parts of Stanhope street after dusk, for droves of rats perambulate the roadways and pavements, and may be seen running along the window ledges of the empty houses awaiting demolition by the County Council in the Strand to Holborn improvement scheme.

The rats, indeed, have appeared in almost-incredible numbers. "There are millions of them," said one shopkeeper, and his statement was supported by other residents. The unwelcome visitors have been evicted from their old haunts by the County Council housebreakers, and are now busily in search of new homes. The Gaiety Restaurant has been the greatest sufferer. Rats have invaded the premises in such force that the managers have had to close the large dining room on the first floor and the grill rooms on the ground floor and in the basement. Those three spacious halls which have witnessed many as semblages of theatre-goers are now qui:e deserted. Behind the wainscot of the bandstand in the grillroom is a large mound of linen shreds. This represents 1728 serviettes carried theee by the rats.

In the bar the removal of a panel disclosed the astonishing fact that the rats have dragged for a distance of seven or eight yards some thirty or forty beer and wine bottles and stacked them in such a fashion as to make comfortable sleeping places. Mr Williams. the manager of the restaurant, estimates that the rats have destroyed L200 worth of linen. Formerly the Gaiety Restaurant dined 2000 persons daily; no business whatever is now done in this direction.

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Comment
Linda Webb   
Added: 27 Sep 2021 05:51 GMT   

Hungerford Stairs
In 1794 my ancestor, George Webb, Clay Pipe Maker, lived in Hungerford Stairs, Strand. Source: Wakefields Merchant & Tradesmens General Directory London Westminster 1794

Source: Hungerford Stairs

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Lived here
Richard Roques   
Added: 21 Jan 2021 16:53 GMT   

Buckingham Street residents
Here in Buckingham Street lived Samuel Pepys the diarist, Charles Dickens and Rudyard Kipling

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Comment
   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 14:31 GMT   

correction
Chaucer did not write Pilgrims Progress. His stories were called the Canterbury Tales

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The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Dec 2020 00:24 GMT   

Othello takes a bow
On 1 November 1604, William Shakespeare’s tragedy Othello was presented for the first time, at The Palace of Whitehall. The palace was the main residence of the English monarchs in London from 1530 until 1698. Seven years to the day, Shakespeare’s romantic comedy The Tempest was also presented for the first time, and also at the Palace of Whitehall.

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Comment
Jeff Owen   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 16:18 GMT   

Owen’s School
Owen Street is the site of Owen’s Boys’ School. The last school was built in 1881 and was demolished in the early 1990s to make way for the development which stand there today. It was a “Direct Grant” grammar school and was founded in 1613 by Dame Alice Owen. What is now “Owen’s Fields” was the playground between the old school and the new girls’ school (known then as “Dames Alice Owen’s School” or simply “DAOS”). The boys’ school had the top two floors of that building for their science labs. The school moved to Potters Bar in Hertfordshire in 1971 and is now one of the top State comprehensive schools in the country. The old building remained in use as an accountancy college and taxi-drivers’ “knowledge” school until it was demolished. The new building is now part of City and Islington College. Owen’s was a fine school. I should know because I attended there from 1961 to 1968.

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Added: 3 Jun 2021 15:50 GMT   

All Bar One
The capitalisation is wrong

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
roger morris   
Added: 16 Oct 2021 08:50 GMT   

Atherton Road, IG5 (1958 - 1980)
I moved to Atherton road in 1958 until 1980 from Finsbury Park. My father purchased the house from his brother Sydney Morris. My father continued to live there until his death in 1997, my mother having died in 1988.
I attended The Glade Primary School in Atherton Road from sept 1958 until 1964 when I went to Beal School. Have fond memories of the area and friends who lived at no2 (Michael Clark)and no11 (Brian Skelly)

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Lived here
margaret clark   
Added: 15 Oct 2021 22:23 GMT   

Margaret’s address when she married in 1938
^, Josepine House, Stepney is the address of my mother on her marriage certificate 1938. Her name was Margaret Irene Clark. Her father Basil Clark was a warehouse grocer.

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Comment
Martin Eaton    
Added: 14 Oct 2021 03:56 GMT   

Boundary Estate
Sunbury, Taplow House.

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Comment
Simon Chalton   
Added: 10 Oct 2021 21:52 GMT   

Duppas Hill Terrace 1963- 74
I’m 62 yrs old now but between the years 1963 and 1975 I lived at number 23 Duppas Hill Terrace. I had an absolutely idyllic childhood there and it broke my heart when the council ordered us out of our home to build the Ellis Davd flats there.The very large house overlooked the fire station and we used to watch them practice putting out fires in the blue tower which I believe is still there.
I’m asking for your help because I cannot find anything on the internet or anywhere else (pictures, history of the house, who lived there) and I have been searching for many, many years now.
Have you any idea where I might find any specific details or photos of Duppas Hill Terrace, number 23 and down the hill to where the subway was built. To this day it saddens me to know they knocked down this house, my extended family lived at the next house down which I think was number 25 and my best school friend John Childs the next and last house down at number 27.
I miss those years so terribly and to coin a quote it seems they just disappeared like "tears in rain".
Please, if you know of anywhere that might be able to help me in any way possible, would you be kind enough to get back to me. I would be eternally grateful.
With the greatest of hope and thanks,
Simon Harlow-Chalton.


Reply
Comment
Linda Webb   
Added: 27 Sep 2021 05:51 GMT   

Hungerford Stairs
In 1794 my ancestor, George Webb, Clay Pipe Maker, lived in Hungerford Stairs, Strand. Source: Wakefields Merchant & Tradesmens General Directory London Westminster 1794

Source: Hungerford Stairs

Reply
Born here
jack stevens   
Added: 26 Sep 2021 13:38 GMT   

Mothers birth place
Number 5 Whites Row which was built in around 1736 and still standing was the premises my now 93 year old mother was born in, her name at birth was Hilda Evelyne Shaw,

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Born here
Ron Shepherd   
Added: 18 Sep 2021 17:28 GMT   

More Wisdom
Norman Joseph Wisdom was born in St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington, West London.

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Comment
Jonathan Penner   
Added: 11 Sep 2021 16:03 GMT   

Pennard Road, W12
My wife and I, young Canadians, lodged at 65 (?) Pennard Road with a fellow named Clive and his girlfriend, Melanie, for about 6 months in 1985. We loved the area and found it extremely convenient.

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Alsatia Alsatia was the name given to an area lying north of the River Thames covered by the Whitefriars monastery.
City Thameslink City Thameslink is a central London railway station within the City of London, with entrances on Ludgate Hill and Holborn Viaduct.
Fleet Market The Fleet Market was a market erected in 1736 on the newly culverted River Fleet.
Old and New London: Temple Bar Temple Bar was rebuilt by Sir Christopher Wren, in 1670–72.
St Gregory by St Paul’s St Gregory’s by St Paul’s was a parish church in the Castle Baynard ward of the City of London.
Temple Bar Temple Bar is the point in London where Fleet Street, City of London, becomes the Strand, Westminster, and where the City of London traditionally erected a barrier to regulate trade into the city.

NEARBY STREETS
Addle Hill, EC4V Addle Hill, formerly Addle Street, originally ran from Upper Thames Street from Carter Lane.
Amen Corner, EC4M Originally called Amen Lane, this short path forms the approach road to Amen Court.
Amen Court, EC4M Many of the highways and byways around the precincts of St Paul’s Cathedral bear names which have ecclesiastical origins.
Andrews Crosse, EC4A Andrews Crosse stood on the site of the courtyard of the former Andrews Crosse Inn.
Apothecary Street, EC4V Apothecary Street - the Worshipful Society of Apothecaries is nearby.
Arundel Street, WC2R Arundel Street runs from the Strand to Temple Place.
Ashentree Court, EC4Y Ashentree Court was named after the ashen trees formerly located here at the Whitefriars’ monastery.
Ave Maria Lane, EC4M Ave Maria Lane is the southern extension of Warwick Lane, between Amen Corner and Ludgate Hill.
Bartlett’s Buildings, EC4A Bartlett’s Buildings was the name of a street situated off of Holborn Circus
Bear Alley, EC4A Bear Alley is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Bell Yard, EC4A Bell Yard is a small lane off the Strand where the Bell hostel once stood.
Bishop’s Court, EC4M Bishop?s Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
Black Friars Lane, EC4V Black Friars Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Blackfriars Bridge, EC4V Blackfriars Bridge is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Blackfriars Lane, EC4V Blackfriars Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Blackfriars Underpass, EC4V Blackfriars Underpass is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Blackfriars Underpass, EC4Y Blackfriars Underpass is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Bolt Court, EC4A Bolt Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Bouverie Street, EC4Y Bouverie Street is named for the Pleydell-Bouveries, Earls of Radnor, who were landowners in this area.
Breams Buildings, EC4A Breams Buildings is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Brick Court, EC4Y Brick Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Bride Court, EC4Y Bride Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Bride Lane, EC4Y Bride Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Bridewell Place, EC4V Bridewell Place is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Burgon Street, EC4V Burgon Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Carey Street, WC2A Carey Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Carmelite Street, EC4Y Carmelite Street continues south from Whitefriars Street, which itself is just off Fleet Street.
Carter Lane, EC4V Carter Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Chancery Lane, WC2A Chancery Lane has formed the western boundary of the City of London since 1994, having previously been divided between the London boroughs of Westminster and Camden.
Chichester Rents, WC2A Chichester Rents is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Church Entry, EC4V Church Entry is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Clement’s Inn, WC2R Clement’s Inn is a road in the WC2R postcode area
Clements Inn, WC2B Clements Inn is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Cliffords Inn Passage, EC4Y Cliffords Inn Passage is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Cliffords Inn, EC4A Cliffords Inn is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Crane Court, EC4Y Crane Court lay beside the Two Crane Inn Tavern.
Creed Court, EC4M Creed Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
Creed Lane, EC4V Creed Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Crown Office Row, EC4Y Crown Office Row is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Cursitor Street, EC4A Cursitor Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Deans Court, EC4V Deans Court is directly opposite the south west corner of St Paul’s Cathedral, on the south side of St Paul’s Churchyard.
Devereux Court, EC4Y Devereux Court lies on the south side of the Strand, opposite the Law Courts.
Devereux Court, WC2R Devereux Court is a location in London.
Doctor Johnsons Buildings, EC4Y Doctor Johnsons Buildings is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Dorset Rise, EC4Y Dorset Rise is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Drive Johnsons Buildings, EC4Y Drive Johnsons Buildings is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
East Harding Street, EC4A This is a street in the EC4A postcode area
Essex Court, EC4Y Essex Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Essex Street, EC4Y Essex Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2R postal area.
Essex Street, WC2R Essex Street is a location in London.
Falcon Court, EC4Y Falcon Court is a courtyard off the south side of Fleet Street between Chancery Lane and Fetter Lane.
Farringdon Road, EC1A Farringdon Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Farringdon Road, EC4V Farringdon Road is a road in the EC4P postcode area
Farringdon Road, EC4V Farringdon Road is a road in the EC4A postcode area
Farringdon Street, EC1A The building of Farringdon Street is considered one of the greatest urban engineering achievements of the 19th century.
Farringdon Street, EC4M Farringdon Street was constructed over the Fleet river.
Fetter Lane, EC4A Fetter Lane is corrupted from ’Fautre’ which was the name for a spear rest - spears were made close by.
Fleet Place, EC4M Fleet Place is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
Fleet Street, EC4A Fleet Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Fleet Street, EC4Y Fleet Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Fountain Court, EC4Y Fountain Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Garden Court, EC4Y Garden Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Giltspur Street, EC1A Giltspur Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Godliman Street, EC4M Godliman Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Gough Square, EC4A Gough Square is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Great New Street, EC4A Great New Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Groveland Court, EC4M Groveland Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
Gunpowder Square, EC4A Gunpowder Square is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Harcourt Buildings, EC4Y Harcourt Buildings is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Hardwicke Building, WC2A Hardwicke Building is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Hare Court, EC4Y Hare Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Hare Place, EC4Y Hare Place is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Harmsworth House, EC4Y Harmsworth House lies near the Inner Temple
Hat and Mitre Court, EC4Y Hat and Mitre Court is a road in the EC1M postcode area
Hind Court, EC4Y Hind Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Hood Court, EC4Y Hood Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Howard Street, WC2R Howard Street ran from Surrey Street to Arundel Street until 1974.
Inner Temple Lane, EC4Y Inner Temple Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Inner Temple, EC4A Inner Temple is a location in London.
Ireland Yard, EC4V Ireland Yard is an alleyway leading off of Playhouse Yard.
John Carpenter Street, EC4Y John Carpenter was town clerk of the City of London in the fifteenth century, and founder of the City of London School.
King’s Bench Walk Temple, EC4Y A street within the EC4Y postcode
King’s Bench Walk, EC4Y King?s Bench Walk is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Kings Bench Walk, EC4Y Kings Bench Walk is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Knightrider Court, EC4V Knightrider Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Knightrider Street, EC4V Knightrider Street was supposedly a route that knights would take from the Tower of London to Smithfield, where jousts were held.
Lamb Building, EC4Y Lamb Building is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Limeburner Lane, EC4M Limeburner Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
Little Essex Street, EC4Y Little Essex Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2R postal area.
Little Essex Street, WC2R Little Essex Street is a location in London.
Little New Street, EC4A Little New Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Ludgate Broadway, EC4M Ludgate Broadway is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Ludgate Circus, EC4M Ludgate Circus is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
Ludgate Hill, EC4M Ludgate Hill is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
Ludgate Square, EC4M Ludgate Square is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
Magpie Alley, EC4Y Magpie Alley marks the position occupied by the dorter (dormitory) of the Friary of the Blessed Virgin of Mount Carmel, commonly called the Whitefriars Monastery
Maltravers Street, WC2R Maltravers Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2R postal area.
Masters House Temple Church, EC4Y Masters House Temple Church is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Middle Temple Lane, EC4Y Middle Temple Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Milford Lane, WC2R Milford Lane is one of the streets of London in the WC2R postal area.
Mitre Court Buildings, EC4Y Mitre Court Buildings is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
New Bridge Street, EC4V New Bridge Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
New Court, EC4V New Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
New Fetter Lane, EC4A New Fetter Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
New Square Passage, WC2A This is a street in the WC2A postcode area
New Square, WC2A New Square is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
New Street Square, EC4A New Street Square is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Newgate Street, EC1A Newgate Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Norfolk Street, WC2R Norfolk Street ran from the Strand in the north to the River Thames and, after the Victoria Embankment was built (1865–1870), to what is now Temple Place.
Norwich Street, EC4A Norwich Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Old Bailey, EC1A Old Bailey is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Old Bailey, EC4M Old Bailey is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
Old Buildings, WC2A Old Buildings is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Old Mitre Court, EC4Y Old Mitre Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Old Seacoal Lane, EC4M Old Seacoal Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
Old Square, WC2A Old Square is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Outer Temple, EC4Y Outer Temple is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Pageantmaster Court, EC4M Pageantmaster Court was Ludgate Court and renamed in the summer of 1993.
Paper Buildings Temple, EC4Y Paper Buildings Temple is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Paper Buildings, EC4Y Paper Buildings is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Paul’s Walk, EC4V Paul’s Walk is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Pemberton Row, EC4A Sir James Pemberton was Lord Mayor of London in 1611, and a member of the Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths.
Pilgrim Street, EC4M Pilgrim Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Playhouse Yard, EC4V Playhouse Yard is named after the Blackfriars theatre which stood here in Shakespeare’s time and where his play’s were performed.
Pleydell Street, EC4Y Pleydell Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Plough Place, EC4A Plough Place is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Ploughs Place, EC4A Ploughs Place is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Plowden Buildings, EC4Y Plowden Buildings is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Plumtree Court, EC4A Plumtree Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Poppins Court, EC4A Poppins Court is an historic alley off Fleet Street.
Priory Court, EC4M Priory Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Puddle Dock, EC4V Puddle Dock is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Pump Court, EC4Y Pump Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Quadrant Court, EC4M A street within the EC4M postcode
Quadrant Court, EC4M A street within the EC4M postcode
Quality Court, WC2A Quality Court is a courtyard, built around 1700.
Red Lion Court, EC4A Red Lion Court forms part of labyrinth of little passages behind the shops on the north side of Fleet Street.
Rolls Buildings, EC4A Rolls Buildings is a road in the WC2A postcode area
Rolls Passage, WC2A Rolls Passage is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Rose Street, EC4M Rose Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
Salisbury Court, EC4Y Salisbury Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Salisbury Square, EC4Y Salisbury Square is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Serjeants Inn, EC4Y Serjeants Inn is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Serle Street, WC2A Serle Street is a road in the WC2A postcode area
Shoe Lane, EC4A Shoe Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
St Andrew Street, EC4A St Andrew Street is the northern extension of Shoe Lane.
St Andrews Hill, EC4V St Andrews Hill is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
St Bride Street, EC4A St Bride Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
St Brides Avenue, EC4Y St Brides Avenue is a narrow alley which leaves Fleet Street almost opposite Shoe Lane.
St. Bride Street, EC4A A street within the EC4A postcode
Star Yard, WC2A Star Yard is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Stationers Hall Court, EC4M Stationers Hall Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
Stonecutter Street, EC4A Stonecutter Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Strand, EC4A This is a street in the EC4A postcode area
Tallis House 2 Tallis Street, EC4Y Tallis House 2 Tallis Street is a location in London.
Tallis Street, EC4Y This street honours Thomas Tallis, composer whose name is engraved on the façade of the nearby former building of the Guildhall School of Music and Drama.
Temple Avenue, EC4Y Temple Avenue is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Temple Chambers, EC4Y Temple Chambers is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Temple Gardens, EC4Y Temple Gardens is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Temple Pier, WC2R Temple Pier is one of the streets of London in the WC2R postal area.
Temple, EC4Y A street within the EC4Y postcode
Three Barrels Walk, EC4V Three Barrels Walk is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Tudor Street, EC4Y Tudor Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Tweezer’s Alley, WC2R Tweezer’s Alley probably got its name after the tweezers used by smiths to heat items in the forge that stood there.
Upper Thames Street, EC4V Upper Thames Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Victoria Embankment, EC4Y Victoria Embankment is part of the Thames Embankment scheme of 19th-century civil engineering that reclaimed land next to the River Thames.
Wardrobe Place, EC4V Wardrobe Place is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Warwick Lane, EC1A Warwick Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
Warwick Lane, EC4M This is a street in the EC4P postcode area
Warwick Square, EC4M Warwick Square is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
Water Street, WC2R This is a street in the WC2R postcode area
Watergate, EC4Y Watergate is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
White Lion Hill, EC4V White Lion Hill is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Whitefriars Street, EC4Y Whitefriars Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4Y postal area.
Wine Office Court, EC4A Wine Office Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.

NEARBY PUBS
Cella Karaoke Lounge This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Corney & Barrow Wine Bars This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
El Vino Blackfriars This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
El Vino Fleet Street El Vino Fleet Street
Grand Union This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Harrild and Sons This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Harry’s Bar & Pizzeria This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Jamie’s Wine Bar and Restaurant This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Jamies This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Jamies This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Kanaloa This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Knights Templar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Magpie & Stump This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Mermaid Theatre This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Patch This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Pegasus Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Punch Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Quarter Jacks, Grange St Pauls Hotel This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Rudd’s This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Shaws Booksellers This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Slug and Lettuce This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
St Brides Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Albion This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Blackfriar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Bridewell Theatre This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Cockpit This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Crown and Sugar Loaf This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Draft House This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Duke and Duchess This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Fable This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Hack & Hop This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Harrow This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Hoop & Grapes This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Old Bell Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Rising Sun This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Saint This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Seven Stars This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The White Swan This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Tipperary This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Viaduct Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Voltaire, Crowne Plaza Hotel This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Ye Olde Cock Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Ye Olde London This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Queen’s Park

Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen’s Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen’s Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen’s Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen’s Park ’proper’ formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen’s Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen’s Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett’s wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen’s Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queen’s Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen’s Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen’s Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen’s Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Smithfield Market
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Amen Court, EC4M
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Farringdon Street, EC4M
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Hopton’s Almshouses
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Kirby Street sign
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In the neighbourhood...

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Smithfield Market
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The old wooden Temple Bar
Credit: Walter Thornbury
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Hopton’s Almshouses, Hopton Street, Bankside (1957).
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Illustration of Fleet Market
Credit: William Henry Prior
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Amen Court, EC4M
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At the southern end of Carmelite Street in the City of London stood the Victorian-era Whitefriars Fire Station.
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Farringdon Street, EC4M
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Hopton’s Almshouses
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Poppins Court EC4
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Postcard of the then-new Victoria Embankment (1890s) The Victoria Embankment was primarily designed by Sir Joseph Bazalgette. It incorporates the main low level interceptor sewer and the underground District Line over which a wide road and riverside walkway were built.
Old London postcard
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