Vigo Street, W1J

Buildings in this area date from the nineteenth century or before

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Road · Mayfair · W1J ·
JANUARY
1
2000

Vigo Street is a short street running west from Regent Street.





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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Dec 2020 00:24 GMT   

Othello takes a bow
On 1 November 1604, William Shakespeare’s tragedy Othello was presented for the first time, at The Palace of Whitehall. The palace was the main residence of the English monarchs in London from 1530 until 1698. Seven years to the day, Shakespeare’s romantic comedy The Tempest was also presented for the first time, and also at the Palace of Whitehall.

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Emma Seif   
Added: 25 Jan 2022 19:06 GMT   

Birth of the Bluestocking Society
In about 1750, Elizabeth Montagu began hosting literary breakfasts in her home at 23 (now 31) Hill Street. These are considered the first meetings of the Bluestocking society.

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Comment
Linda Webb   
Added: 27 Sep 2021 05:51 GMT   

Hungerford Stairs
In 1794 my ancestor, George Webb, Clay Pipe Maker, lived in Hungerford Stairs, Strand. Source: Wakefields Merchant & Tradesmens General Directory London Westminster 1794

Source: Hungerford Stairs

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TUM   
Added: 27 Aug 2022 10:22 GMT   

The Underground Map
Michael Faraday successfully demonstrated the first electrical transformer at the Royal Institute, London.

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Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 07:17 GMT   

Smithy in Longacre
John Burris 1802-1848 Listed 1841 census as Burroughs was a blacksmith, address just given as Longacre.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

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Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:41 GMT   

Baker Street
Baker Street station opened on the Metropolitan Railway - the world’s first underground line.

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Born here
www.violettrefusis.com   
Added: 17 Feb 2021 15:05 GMT   

Birth place
Violet Trefusis, writer, cosmopolitan intellectual and patron of the Arts was born at 2 Wilton Crescent SW1X.

Source: www.violettrefusis.com

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Lived here
Julian    
Added: 23 Mar 2021 10:11 GMT   

Dennis Potter
Author Dennis Potter lived in Collingwood House in the 1970’s

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Comment
Jessie Doring   
Added: 22 Feb 2021 04:33 GMT   

Tisbury Court Jazz Bar
Jazz Bar opened in Tisbury Court by 2 Australians. Situated in underground basement. Can not remember how long it opened for.

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Lived here
Richard Roques   
Added: 21 Jan 2021 16:53 GMT   

Buckingham Street residents
Here in Buckingham Street lived Samuel Pepys the diarist, Charles Dickens and Rudyard Kipling

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Justin Russ   
Added: 15 Feb 2021 20:25 GMT   

Binney Street, W1K
Binney St was previously named Thomas Street before the 1950’s. Before the 1840’s (approx.) it was named Bird St both above and below Oxford St.

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Comment
Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

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Lynette beardwood   
Added: 29 Nov 2022 20:53 GMT   

Spy’s Club
Topham’s Hotel at 24-28 Ebury Street was called the Ebury Court Hotel. Its first proprietor was a Mrs Topham. In WW2 it was a favourite watering hole for the various intelligence organisations based in the Pimlico area. The first woman infiltrated into France in 1942, FANY Yvonne Rudellat, was recruited by the Special Operations Executive while working there. She died in Bergen Belsen in April 1945.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

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danny currie   
Added: 30 Nov 2022 18:39 GMT   

dads yard
ron currie had a car breaking yard in millers yard back in the 60s good old days

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Born here
   
Added: 16 Nov 2022 12:39 GMT   

The Pearce family lived in Gardnor Road
The Pearce family moved into Gardnor Road around 1900 after living in Fairfax walk, my Great grandfather, wife and there children are recorded living in number 4 Gardnor road in the 1911 census, yet I have been told my grand father was born in number 4 in 1902, generations of the Pearce continue living in number 4 as well other houses in the road up until the 1980’s

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Lived here
Phil Stubbington   
Added: 14 Nov 2022 16:28 GMT   

Numbers 60 to 70 (1901 - 1939)
A builder, Robert Maeers (1842-1919), applied to build six houses on plots 134 to 139 on the Lincoln House Estate on 5 October 1901. He received approval on 8 October 1901. These would become numbers 60 to 70 Rodenhurst Road (60 is plot 139). Robert Maeers was born in Northleigh, Devon. In 1901 he was living in 118 Elms Road with his wife Georgina, nee Bagwell. They had four children, Allan, Edwin, Alice, and Harriet, born between 1863 and 1873.
Alice Maeers was married to John Rawlins. Harriet Maeers was married to William Street.
Three of the six houses first appear on the electoral register in 1904:
Daniel Mescal “Ferncroft”
William Francis Street “Hillsboro”
Henry Elkin “Montrose”

By the 1905 electoral register all six are occupied:

Daniel Mescal “St Senans”
Henry Robert Honeywood “Grasmere”
John Rawlins “Iveydene”
William Francis Street “Hillsboro”
Walter Ernest Manning “St Hilda”
Henry Elkin “Montrose”

By 1906 house numbers replace names:

Daniel Mescal 70
Henry Robert Honeywood 68
John Rawlins 66
William Francis Street 64
Walter Ernest Manning 62
Henry Elkin 60

It’s not clear whether number 70 changed from “Ferncroft” to “St Senans” or possibly Daniel Mescal moved houses.

In any event, it can be seen that Robert Maeers’ two daughters are living in numbers 64 and 66, with, according to local information, an interconnecting door. In the 1911 census William Street is shown as a banker’s clerk. John Rawlins is a chartering clerk in shipping. Robert Maeers and his wife are also living at this address, Robert being shown as a retired builder.

By 1939 all the houses are in different ownership except number 60, where the Elkins are still in residence.


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Comment
stephen garraway   
Added: 13 Nov 2022 13:56 GMT   

Martin Street, Latimer Road
I was born at St Charlottes and lived at 14, Martin Street, Latimer Road W10 until I was 4 years old when we moved to the east end. It was my Nan Grant’s House and she was the widow of George Frederick Grant. She had two sons, George and Frederick, and one daughter, my mother Margaret Patricia.
The downstairs flat where we lived had two floors, the basement and the ground floor. The upper two floors were rented to a Scot and his family, the Smiths. He had red hair. The lights and cooker were gas and there was one cold tap over a Belfast sink. A tin bath hung on the wall. The toilet was outside in the yard. This was concreted over and faced the the rear of the opposite terraces. All the yards were segregated by high brick walls. The basement had the a "best" room with a large , dark fireplace with two painted metal Alsation ornaments and it was very dark, cold and little used.
The street lights were gas and a man came round twice daily to turn them on and off using a large pole with a hook and a lighted torch on the end. I remember men coming round the streets with carts selling hot chestnuts and muffins and also the hurdy gurdy man with his instrument and a monkey in a red jacket. I also remember the first time I saw a black man and my mother pulling me away from him. He had a Trilby and pale Mackintosh so he must of been one of the first of the Windrush people. I seem to recall he had a thin moustache.
Uncle George had a small delivery lorry but mum lost touch with him and his family. Uncle Fred went to Peabody Buildings near ST.Pauls.
My Nan was moved to a maisonette in White City around 1966, and couldn’t cope with electric lights, cookers and heating and she lost all of her neighbourhood friends. Within six months she had extreme dementia and died in a horrible ward in Tooting Bec hospital a year or so later. An awful way to end her life, being moved out of her lifelong neighbourhood even though it was slums.

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Comment
   
Added: 31 Oct 2022 18:47 GMT   

Memories
I lived at 7 Conder Street in a prefab from roughly 1965 to 1971 approx - happy memories- sad to see it is no more ?

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Eve Glover   
Added: 22 Oct 2022 09:28 GMT   

Shenley Road
Shenley Road is the main street in Borehamwood where the Job Centre and Blue Arrow were located

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Comment
Richard Lake   
Added: 28 Sep 2022 09:37 GMT   

Trade Union Official
John William Lake snr moved with his family to 22 De Laune Street in 1936. He was the London Branch Secretary for the Street Masons, Paviours and Road Makers Union. He had previously lived in Orange St now Copperfield St Southwark but had been forced to move because the landlord didn’t like him working from home and said it broke his lease.
John William snr died in 1940. His son John William Lake jnr also became a stone mason and at the end of World War two he was responsible for the engraving of the dates of WW2 onto the Cenotaph in Whitehall.

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Lived here
Julie   
Added: 22 Sep 2022 18:30 GMT   

Well Walk, NW3 (1817 - 1818)
The home of Benthy, the Postman, with whom poet John Keats and his brother Tom lodged from early 1817 to Dec., 1818. They occupied the first floor up. Here Tom died Dec. 1, 1818. It was next door to the Welles Tavern then called ’The Green Man’."

From collected papers and photos re: No. 1 Well Walk at the library of Harvard University.

Source: No. 1, Well Walk, Hampstead. | HOLLIS for

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Admiral Duncan The Admiral Duncan is well-known as one of Soho’s oldest gay pubs.
Piccadilly Circus Piccadilly Circus was built in 1819 to connect Regent Street with the major shopping street of Piccadilly.
Queen’s Theatre The Queen’s Theatre is located in Shaftesbury Avenue on the corner of Wardour Street.
Royal Institution The Royal Institution of Great Britain (Royal Institution) is an organisation for scientific education and research, based in the City of Westminster.
Shepherd Market Shepherd Market was described by Arthur Bingham Walkley in 1925 as one of the oddest incongruities in London.

NEARBY STREETS
Air Street, SW1Y Air Street was the most westerly street in London when newly built in 1658.
Air Street, W1B Air Street’s name is believed to be a corruption of ‘Ayres’, after Thomas Ayre, a local brewer and resident in the 17th century.
Albany Courtyard, SW1Y The courtyard is named after Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany, who in 1791 purchased Melbourne House which stood on this site.
Albany, W1B The Albany is an apartment complex in Piccadilly, established in 1802.
Albemarle Street, W1S Albemarle Street takes its name from the second Duke of Albermarle, son of General Monk.
Angel Court, SW1Y Angel Court is named after a long demolished inn of this name.
Apple Tree Yard, SW1Y Apple Tree Yard is thought named after the apple trees formerly to be found here.
Archer Street, W1D Archer Street was Arch Street in 1675, Orchard Street in 1720 and Archer Street by 1746.
Arlington House, SW1A Arlington House is now part of an exclusive residential development.
Arlington Street, SW1A Arlington Street is named after Henry Bennet, 1st Earl of Arlington, 17th century statesman and local landowner.
Ashburton Place, W1J Ashburton Place connects Clarges Street and Bolton Street.
Avery Row, W1K Avery Row was probably named after Henry Avery, an 18th century bricklayer who built this street over the Tyburn Brook.
Babmaes Street, SW1Y Babmaes Street was originally called Wells Street.
Barlow Place, W1S This is a street in the W1J postcode area
Bateman Street, W1D Bateman Street was named for Sir James Bateman, local landowner and Lord Mayor of London in the 1670s.
Beak Street, W1B Beak Street runs roughly east-west between Regent Street and Lexington Street.
Beak Street, W1F Beak Street is named after Thomas Beake, one of the Queen’s messengers.
Bennet Street, SW1A Bennet Street lies off St James’s Street.
Berkeley Square House, W1J Berkeley Square House is a building on Berkeley Square
Berkeley Square, W1J Berkeley Square was originally laid out in the mid 18th century by architect William Kent.
Berkeley Street, W1J Berkeley Street runs from Piccadilly to Berkeley Square.
Blenheim Street, W1S Blenheim Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Bolton Street, W1J Bolton Street runs from Curzon Street in the north to Piccadilly in the south.
Bourchier Street, W1D Bourchier Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Bourdon Place, W1J Bourdon Place is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Bourdon Street, W1J Bourdon Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Boyle Street, W1S Boyle Street was built on a piece of land called the Ten Acres to discharge some Boyle family debts.
Brewer Street, W1D Brewer Street runs west to east from Glasshouse Street to Wardour Street.
Brewer Street, W1F Brewer Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Bridle Lane, W1F Bridle Lane is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Broadwick Street, W1F Broadwick Street runs west-east between Marshall Street and Wardour Street, crossing Berwick Street.
Brooks Mews, W1K Brooks Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Bruton Lane, W1S Bruton Lane is a road in the W1S postcode area
Bruton Place, W1J Bruton Place is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Bruton Street, W1S Bruton Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Burlington Arcade, SW1Y Burlington Arcade is a covered shopping arcade, 179 metres in length, that runs from Piccadilly to Burlington Gardens.
Burlington Gardens, W1J Burlington Gardens, with houses dating from 1725, was laid out on land that was once part of the Burlington Estate.
Bury Street, SW1A Bury Street runs north-to-south from Jermyn Street to King Street, crossing Ryder Street.
Cape Yard, W1D A street within the W1D postcode
Carlton Gardens, SW1Y Carlton Gardens was developed before 1832.
Carnaby Street, W1F Carnaby Street became the heart of Swinging London.
Carrington Street, W1J Carrington Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Charles II Street, SW1Y Charles II Street is named for the ’Merry Monarch’.
Charles Street, W1J Charles Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Chesham House, W1B Chesham House is a block on Regent Street
Church Place, SW1Y Church Place was named after the adjacent St James’s Church, Piccadilly.
Clarges Mews, W1J Clarges Mews is a mews at the top of Clarges Street.
Clarges Street, W1J Clarges Street runs north from Piccadilly.
Cleveland Yard, SW1Y Cleveland Yard is now the site of Cleveland Place.
Clifford Street, W1S Clifford Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Coach And Horses Yard, W1S Coach And Horses Yard is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Conduit Street, W1S Conduit Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Cork Street, W1S Cork Street, on the Burlington Estate, was named after Richard Boyle, 3rd Earl of Burlington and 4th Earl of Cork.
Coventry Street, W1D Coventry Street is a short street connecting Piccadilly Circus to Leicester Square. On the London Monopoly board, it was named after the politician Henry Coventry, secretary of state to Charles II.
Dalmeny Court, SW1Y Dalmeny Court is a block on Duke Street.
Dansey Place, W1D Dansey Place is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Dean Street, W1D Dean Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Denman Street, W1D Denman Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Dover Street, W1J Dover Street is notable for its Georgian architecture as well as the location of historic London clubs and hotels.
Duck Lane, W1F Duck Lane is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Dudley House, SW1A Dudley House is situated at 169 Piccadilly.
Dufours Place, W1F Dufours Place is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Duke Of York Street, SW1Y Duke Of York Street runs between Jermyn Street and St James’s Square.
Duke Street St James’s, SW1Y Duke Street St James’s is named after James II, Duke of York when the street was built and brother to Charles II, king at the time.
Eagle Place, SW1Y Eagle Place lies off Piccadilly.
Fitzmaurice Place, W1J Fitzmaurice Place is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Foubert’s Place, W1F This is a street in the W1F postcode area
Fouberts Place, W1F Fouberts Place is named after a Frenchman who had a riding school here in the reign of Charles II.
French Railway House, SW1Y French Railway House occupies 178-180 Piccadilly.
Frith Street, W1D Frith Street is named after Richard Frith, a local builder.
Ganton Street, W1F Ganton Street runs across Carnaby Street.
Glasshouse Street, W1B Glasshouse Street is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Golden Square, W1B Golden Square is a historic Soho square, dating from the 1670s.
Grafton Street, W1S Grafton Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Great Marlborough Street, W1B Great Marlborough Street runs east of Regent Street past Carnaby Street towards Noel Street.
Great Pulteney Street, W1F Great Pulteney Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Great Windmill Street, W1F Great Windmill Street has had a long association with music and entertainment, most notably the Windmill Theatre.
Greens Court, W1D Greens Court is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Grosvenor Hill, W1K Grosvenor Hill is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Grosvenor Street, W1K Grosvenor Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Half Moon Street, W1J Half Moon Street runs between Piccadilly and Curzon Street.
Ham Yard, W1D Ham Yard is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Hanover Square, W1S Hanover Square was created as the ’Whig’ square with Cavendish Square being the ’Tory’ square.
Hanover Street, W1S Hanover Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Haunch Of Venison Yard, W1K Haunch Of Venison Yard is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Hay Hill, W1S Hay Hill is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Haymarket, SW1Y Haymarket – site of a former market selling hay until the 1830s.
Heddon Street, W1B Heddon Street is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Heddon Street, W1B Heddon Street is a road in the W1S postcode area
Holland Street, W1F Holland Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Hopkins Street, W1F Hopkins Street is a road in the W1F postcode area
Ingestre Court, W1F Ingestre Court is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Ingestre Place, W1F Ingestre Place is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
International House, W1S Residential block
Jermyn Street, SW1Y Jermyn Street is the main east-west road of St James’s.
John Street, W1F John Street is a road in the SE11 postcode area
Kemp’s Court, W1F Kemp’s Court is situated in the heart of Berwick Street Market where a line of stalls stretch down both sides of the road.
King Street, SW1Y King Street leads from St James’s Street to St James’s Square.
Kingly Court, W1B Kingly Court is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Kingly Street, W1F Kingly Street is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Lancashire Court, W1K Lancashire Court is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Landsdowne Row, W1J Landsdowne Row is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Lansdowne House, W1J Lansdowne House is a block on Berkeley Square
Lansdowne Row, W1J Lansdowne Row is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Lexington Street Cos, W1F Lexington Street Cos is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Lexington Street, W1F Lexington Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Linen Hall, W1B Linen Hall is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Little Marlborough Street, W1B Little Marlborough Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Livonia Street, W1F Livonia Street was originally Bentinck Street, family name of owner the Duke of Portland.
Lower James Street, W1F Lower James Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Lower John Street, W1F Lower John Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Lower Regent Street, SW1Y Lower Regent Street is the name for the part of Regent Street which lies south of Piccadilly Circus.
Lowndes Court, W1F Lowndes Court is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Macclesfield Street, W1D Macclesfield Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Maddox Street, W1S Maddox Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Marlborough Court, W1F Marlborough Court is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Marshall Street, W1F Marshall Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Masons Yard, SW1Y Mason’s Yard was named for the local 18th century victualler Henry Mason.
Mason’s Arms Mews, W1S Mason’s Arms Mews is a road in the W1S postcode area
Mayfair Mews, W1K A street within the W1S postcode
Mayfair Place, W1J Mayfair Place runs behind Devonshire House.
Meard Street, W1D John Meard, the younger was a carpenter, later a landowner, who developed the street.
Medici Courtyard, W1S Medici Courtyard is a location in London.
Mews Yard, W1K Mews Yard is a road in the WC2H postcode area
Mill Street, W1S Mill Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
New Bond Street, W1J New Bond Street is the northernmost section of what is simply known as ’Bond Street’ in general use.
New Burlington Mews, W1B New Burlington Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
New Burlington Place, W1S New Burlington Place is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
New Burlington Street, W1B New Burlington Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
New Burlington Street, W1B New Burlington Street is a road in the W1B postcode area
New Zealand House, SW1Y New Zealand House is a block on Haymarket
Newburg Road, W1F Newburg Road is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Newburgh Street, W1F Newburgh Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Norris Street, SW1Y Norris Street – after Godfrye Norris, local leaseholder in the 17th century.
Old Bond Street, W1J Old Bond Street was named for Sir Thomas Bond, a property developer from Peckham who laid out a number of streets in this part of the West End.
Old Burlington Street, W1J Old Burlington Street connects Burlington Gardens and Clifford Street.
Old Compton Street, W1D Old Compton Street is a road that runs east–west through Soho.
Ormond Yard, SW1Y Ormond Yard was named after James Butler, 1st Duke of Ormonde, who owned a house next to this yard in the 17th century.
Oxendon Street, W1D Oxendon Street, after Sir Henry Oxendon, husband of Mary Baker, daughter of Robert Baker who built the former Piccadilly House nearby.
Pall Mall, SW1Y Pall Mall was laid out as grounds for playing pall mall in the 17th century.
Panton Street, W1D Panton Street was named after Colonel Thomas Panton, local property dealer of the 17th century.
Park Place, SW1A Park Place is named after nearby Green Park.
Peter Street, W1F Peter Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Piccadilly Arcade, SW1Y Piccadilly Arcade was named after Piccadilly Hall, home of local tailor Robert Baker in the 17th century.
Piccadilly Circus, W1J Piccadilly Circus was laid out by John Nash in 1819.
Piccadilly Place, SW1Y Piccadilly Place is an alleyway leading to Vine Street.
Piccadilly, SW1Y Piccadilly is one of the main London streets.
Piccadilly, W1J Piccadilly is a major road in the West End.
Pollen Street, W1S Pollen Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Portland Mews, W1F Portland Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Princes Arcade, SW1Y Princes Arcade, built 1929–33, was named after the former Prince’s Hotel, which stood here.
Queen Street, W1J Queen Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Regent Place, W1B Regent Place is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Regent Street, W1B Regent Street dates from the 1810s and was named after the Prince Regent, later George IV.
Richmond Mews, W1D Richmond Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Rose and Crown Yard, SW1Y Rose and Crown Yard was probably named after a former inn of this name.
Royal Arcade, W1S Royal Arcade is an alleyway of exclusive shops.
Royal Opera Arcade, SW1Y Royal Opera Arcade was originally part of an opera house theatre, built by John Nash.
Royalty Mews, W1D Royalty Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Rupert Court, W1D Rupert Court was named for Prince Rupert of the Rhine, the First Lord of the Admiralty when the court was built in 1676.
Rupert Street, W1D Rupert Street – after Prince Rupert of the Rhine, noted 17th century general and son of Elizabeth Stuart, daughter of King James I.
Ryder Street, SW1A Ryder Street was named after Richard Rider, Master Carpenter to Charles II.
Sackville Street, W1B Sackville Street runs north from Piccadilly.
Sandringham Court, W1F Sandringham Court can be found on Dufour’s Place
Savile Row, W1S Savile Row is known worldwide for gentlemen’s tailoring.
Shepherd Market, W1J Shepherd Market was developed between 1735 and 1746 by Edward Shepherd from an open area called Brook Field
Sherwood Street, W1F Sherwood Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Silver Place, W1F Silver Place is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Smiths Court, W1D Smiths Court is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
South Molton Street, W1K South Molton Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
St Albans Street, SW1Y St Albans Street was named after Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of Saint Albans, 17th century politician and local landowner.
St George Street, W1S St George Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
St Georges Square, W1S St Georges Square is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
St James’s Chambers, SW1Y St James’s Chambers is a block located at 9 Ryder Street.
St James’s Market, SW1Y St James’s Market was part of the site of St James’s leper hospital in the Middle Ages, named after James, son of Zebedee.
St James’s Square, SW1Y St James’s Square is the only square in the district of St James’s.
St James’s Street, SW1A St James’s Street is a main road of the West End running from Pall Mall to Piccadilly.
Stafford Street, W1S Stafford Street is named after Margaret Stafford, partner of developer Sir Thomas Bond who built on this site in the seventeenth century.
Stratton Street, W1J Stratton Street forms an L shape between Piccadilly and Berkeley Street.
Swallow Street, SW1Y Swallow Street honours Thomas Swallow, lessee in 1540 of the pastures on which the road was built.
The London Pavillion, SW1Y The London Pavilion is a building on Piccadilly Circus.
The Ritz Arcade, SW1A The Ritz Arcade lies outside The Ritz Hotel.
Tisbury Court, W1D Tisbury Court is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Trebeck Street, W1J Trebeck Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Upper James Street, W1F Upper James Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Upper John Street, W1F Upper John Street is a road in the W1F postcode area
Walkers Court, Walkers Court lies within the postcode.
Walker’s Court, W1D Walker’s Court is one of the many passageways which in past years was known as ’Paved Alley’.
Wardour Street, W1D The W1D part of Wardour Street south of Shaftesbury Avenue runs through London’s Chinatown.
Warwick Street, W1B Warwick Street is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Waterloo Place, SW1Y Waterloo Place, an extension of Regent Street, is awash with statues and monuments that honour heroes of the British Empire.
Wilder Walk, W1F This is a street in the W1B postcode area
Winnett Street, W1D Winnett Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.

NEARBY PUBS
Admiral Duncan The Admiral Duncan is well-known as one of Soho’s oldest gay pubs.
Coach & Horses The Coach & Horses is at the top of Bruton Lane.
Dog and Duck The Dog and Duck is on the corner of Frith Street and Bateman Street.
Graphic Bar This bar used to be known as the Midas Touch.
The Clarence The Clarence is located diagonally opposite the Ritz.
The Kings Head The Kings Head dates from 1710.


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Mayfair

Mayfair (originally called The May Fair) is an area of central London, by the east edge of Hyde Park. Mayfair boasts some of the capital’s most exclusive property of all types.

Mayfair is named after the annual fortnight-long May Fair that took place on the site that is Shepherd Market today. In 1764, the May Fair was banned at Shepherd Market because the well-to-do residents of the area disliked the fair’s disorderliness, and it moved to Fair Field in Bow in the East End of London.

The district is now mainly commercial, with many former homes converted into offices for major corporations headquarters, embassies and also hedge funds and real estate businesses. There remains a substantial quantity of residential property as well as some exclusive shopping and London’s largest concentration of luxury hotels and many restaurants. Rents are among the highest in London and the world.

The freehold of a large section of Mayfair also belongs to the Crown Estate.

The renown and prestige of Mayfair could have grown in the popular mind because it is the most expensive property on the British Monopoly set. Victor Watson, the head of Waddingtons at the time, and his secretary Marjory Phillips, chose the London place names for the British version — Ms Phillips apparently went for a walk around London to choose suitable sites.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Transmission
TUM image id: 1509553463
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Tottenham Court Road (1927)
TUM image id: 1556973109
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Trident Studios was located at 17 St Anne’s Court, Soho between 1968 and 1981. "My Name is Jack" by Manfred Mann was recorded at Trident in March 1968, and helped launch the studio’s reputation. Later that year, the Beatles recorded their song "Hey Jude" there and part of their self-titled double album (also known as the "White Album"). Other well-known albums and songs recorded at Trident include Elton John’s "Your Song", David Bowie’s The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars, Lou Reed’s Transformer, Carly Simon’s No Secrets, and Queen’s albums Queen, Queen II and Sheer Heart Attack. Other artists recorded at Trident included the Bee Gees, Chris de Burgh, Frank Zappa, Genesis, Brand X, James Taylor, Joan Armatrading, Joe Cocker, Golden Earring, Harry Nilsson, Kiss, Tygers of Pan Tang, Lou Reed, Peter Gabriel, Marc Almond, Marc and the Mambas, Soft Cell, Rick Springfield, the Rolling Stones, Rush, Free, Thin Lizzy, Tina Turner, T.Rex, Van der Graaf Generator, Yes and John Entwistle.
Credit: The Underground Map
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In the neighbourhood...

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Transmission
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Piccadilly Theatre (2007)
Credit: Turquoisefish
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A Friday Evening Discourse at the Royal Institution; Sir James Dewar on Liquid Hydrogen (1904)
Credit: Henry Jamyn Brooks
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Swears & Wells Ltd at 192 Regent Street, ’Ladies Modes’ (1925) Originally in Regent Street, the store moved to Oxford Street in the 1930s and became a national chain of furriers. This original Regent Street location became Hamleys. Swear and Wells is a department store in Terry Pratchett’s Discworld novels - a rival to Crumley’s and Horrids. It is renowned for its upmarket food hall which boasts an unparalleled selection of imported Überwaldean food and drink.
Credit: Bishopsgate Institute
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London Library, 14 St James’s Square. The London Library is a self-supporting, independent institution. It is a registered charity whose sole aim is the advancement of education, learning and knowledge. The adjacent building (13 St James’s Square) is the High Commission of Cyprus.
Credit: Wiki Commons/GrindtXX
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Marie Antoinette Suite at the Ritz Hotel, Piccadilly (1914)
Credit: Architectural Record Company, New York
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Royal Academy of Arts, Burlington House, Piccadilly
Credit: Simon Gunzinger
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Trident Studios was located at 17 St Anne’s Court, Soho between 1968 and 1981. "My Name is Jack" by Manfred Mann was recorded at Trident in March 1968, and helped launch the studio’s reputation. Later that year, the Beatles recorded their song "Hey Jude" there and part of their self-titled double album (also known as the "White Album"). Other well-known albums and songs recorded at Trident include Elton John’s "Your Song", David Bowie’s The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars, Lou Reed’s Transformer, Carly Simon’s No Secrets, and Queen’s albums Queen, Queen II and Sheer Heart Attack. Other artists recorded at Trident included the Bee Gees, Chris de Burgh, Frank Zappa, Genesis, Brand X, James Taylor, Joan Armatrading, Joe Cocker, Golden Earring, Harry Nilsson, Kiss, Tygers of Pan Tang, Lou Reed, Peter Gabriel, Marc Almond, Marc and the Mambas, Soft Cell, Rick Springfield, the Rolling Stones, Rush, Free, Thin Lizzy, Tina Turner, T.Rex, Van der Graaf Generator, Yes and John Entwistle.
Credit: The Underground Map
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Street view of St George’s Hanover Square (1787). An aquatint, by T. Malton.
Credit: British Library
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Queen’s Theatre in the West End (2011), then showing the musical "Les Misérables"
Credit: Andreas Praefcke
Licence: CC BY 2.0


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