Walmer Road, W11

Road in/near Notting Hill, existing between the 1760s and now.

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(51.51257 -0.21245, 51.512 -0.212) 
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Road · * · W11 ·
December
21
2021
Walmer Road is the oldest street in the area, dating from the eighteenth century or before.

Walmer Road started as an established footpath called Greene’s Lane and appears as such on the 1800 map of the area. It connected the Uxbridge Road (Holland Park Avenue) with one of the only buildings north of this turnpike road - Notting Barns Farm.The soil was ideal for brickmaking and brickfields moved into the area in the first decades of the nineteenth century. Once hollowed out, these easily flooded.

Beside one such flooded brickfield, the settlement of Notting Dale was established. the main street of the small settlement, part of Greene’s Lane, became called James Street.

The manufacture of pottery appears to have been established here before 1827 by Ralph Adams (fn. 8) of Gray’s Inn Road, brick- and tilemaker, who between 1826 and 1831 was the building lessee for most of the houses in Holland Park Avenue between Ladbroke Grove and Portland Road, the earth for the bricks having been no doubt dug from the Potteries area. The ratebooks first refer to this locality as ’the Potteries’ in 1833. The tithe map of 1844 shows what appears to be a kiln on the east side of Pottery Lane near the present No. 34. The only kiln shown on the Ordnance Survey map surveyed in 1863 is that which still stands on the east side of Walmer Road opposite to Avondale Park.

James Street was renamed Walmer Road sometime in the 1850s. St. Andrew’s, was built at the corner of Walmer and Lancaster Roads in 1862.

Cholera was a constant companion. The only covered sewer in the area extended along the modern Walmer Road, but at too high a level to provide drainage for the houses there. The only possible outfall was to the main Counter’s Creek sewer, some 1,300 feet to the westward, and by September 1849 the building of a sewer was in progress.

There were improvements in other directions. As early as 1853 Mary Bayly had formed a Mothers’ Society in the Potteries, for the education of its members in the elements of hygiene, and between 1858 and 1863 the first makeshift schools in the area were replaced by permanent buildings—a ragged school, built under Lord Shaftesbury’s auspices, in Penzance Street in 1858, and St. James’s National Schools in Penzance Place in 1863. St. John’s Church was building a school on the west side of Walmer Road in 1861.

The streets were paved - Walmer Road was extending north - and taken over by the Vestry. By 1863 ’the Ocean’ (the flooded brickworks) had at last been filled in. Avondale Park was created in 1892 out of ’the Ocean’. This was part of a general clean-up of the area which had become known as the Potteries and Piggeries.

Despite the continued presence of pigs, a Dr Godrich felt able in 1869 to report that ’the Potteries are in a more cleanly and healthy condition, principally owing to the improved drainage afforded by the Metropolitan Board of Works’.



A demolished section of Walmer Road
(click image to enlarge)


This part of Notting Dale was designated in Charles Booth’s 1902 survey as amongst London’s poorest and was long been perceived by Kensington Council as a blot on the local landscape.

By mid century it was characterised as the centre of the infamous race riots of 1958, the horrific murders in nearby Rillington Place a couple of years earlier, along with a more recent shotgun killing in Walmer Road. Its houses were in poor repair without inside sanitation or hot water.

The West Cross Route was first mooted in the 1950s as part of a projected vital major arterial road into central London from the west. The main artery was to be a four lane dual carriageway extension of the A40 beginning where the Westway met Wood Lane and ending by merging into the start of the Marylebone Road in Paddington. The road would be elevated to carry it above existing buildings so as to keep demolition of such property to a minimum. This objective was generally achieved throughout its four mile length through the capital except in the area of Notting Dale around Walmer Road which was to be the site of an access point along its route.

A new roundabout sited below the new road was necessary to facilitate vehicular access. As this roundabout was below the road a huge demolition programme was required to accommodate it which would decimate a large and densely populated part of Notting Dale completely destroying the community resident there. The roundabout was sited broadly in a square area bounded by Oldham Road to the west, Silchester Mews to the east, Walmer Road to the north and Silchester Road to the south. All these roads would disappear at least in part along with sections of Blechydon Street whilst Calverley Street, situated between Oldham Road and Silchester Mews, Silchester Terrace and Latimer Mews would disappear completely. Walmer Road was somewhat unique in that only the south side (nos 2-128) was to be demolished along with part of the north side (nos 3-49 and 103-121) leaving isolated in the middle almost an island of three blocks of the north side (nos 51-101) which would remain quite literally in the shadow of the elevated dual carriageway above.

Kensington Council viewed the construction of the West Cross Route as an ideal moment for some opportunist slum clearance though how much thought was given at the time to the fate of its occupants is extremely debatable. It may be worth noting that at this roundabout an exit was planned (and built and the spur still exists today) for a further dual carriageway to strike out northeastward to join the foot of the M1. This plan was by contrast floored by objections from residents of the adjoining St Quintins Estate and others.




Main source: It’s Your Colville
Further citations and sources


CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 05:50 GMT   

Batham Family (1851 - 1921)
I start with William Batham 1786-1852 born in St.Martins Middlesex. From various sources I have found snippets of information concerning his early life. A soldier in 1814 he married Mary Champelovier of Huguenot descent By 1819 they were in Kensington where they raised 10 children. Apart from soldier his other occupations include whitesmith, bell hanger and pig breeder. I find my first record in the 1851 English sensus. No street address is given, just ’The Potteries’. He died 1853. Only one child at home then George Batham 1839-1923, my great grandfather. By 1861 he is living in Thomas St. Kensington with his mother. A bricklayer by trade 1871, married and still in Thomas St. 1881 finds him in 5,Martin St. Kensington. 1891 10,Manchester St. 1911, 44 Hunt St Hammersmith. Lastly 1921 Census 7, Mersey St. which has since been demolished.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

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Born here
Susan Wright   
Added: 16 Sep 2017 22:42 GMT   

Ada Crowe, 9 Bramley Mews
My Great Grandmother Ada Crowe was born in 9 Bramley Mews in 1876.

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Joan Clarke   
Added: 2 Feb 2021 10:54 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens
My late aunt Ivy Clarke (nee Burridge) lived with her whole family at 19 Avondale Park Gardens, according to the 1911 census and she was still there in 1937.What was it like in those days, I wonder, if the housing was only built in 1920?


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ken gaston   
Added: 16 Jan 2021 11:04 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens
My grandmother Hilda Baker and a large family lived in number 18 . It was a close community and that reflected in the coronation celebration held on the central green . I grew up in that square and went to school at Sirdar Road then St. Clements it was a great place to grow up with a local park and we would also trek to Holland Park or Kensington Gardens .Even then the area was considered deprived and a kindergarden for criminals . My generation were the first to escape to the new towns and became the overspill from London to get decent housing and living standards .

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Lived here
Norman Norrington   
Added: 28 Dec 2020 08:31 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
I was born in Hammersmith Hospital (Ducane Rd) I lived at 40 Blecynden Street from birth in 1942 to 1967 when I moved due to oncoming demolition for the West way flyover.
A bomb fell locally during the war and cracked one of our windows, that crack was still there the day I left.
It was a great street to have grown up in I have very fond memories of living there.



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john ormandy   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 17:48 GMT   

Mary Place Workhouse
There was a lady called Ivy who lived in the corner she use to come out an tell us kids off for climbing over the fence to play football on the green. Those were the days.

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john ormandy   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 17:30 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
Went to school St Johns with someone named Barry Green who lived in that St. Use to wait for him on the corner take a slow walk an end up being late most days.

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Lived here
Norman Norrington   
Added: 8 Jun 2021 08:08 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
Lived here #40 1942-1967

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john ormandy   
Added: 14 Mar 2021 18:59 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens, W11
We moved to number 6 in 1950 an family still live there now. I think i remember a family name of Larter living in the house you mention also living in the Gdns were names Prior, Cannon, Parsons Clives at number 26 who i went to school with.


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Brian Lucas   
Added: 15 Mar 2021 16:02 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens, W11
I also lived here at No. 15 1854 then move to No. 23 The Lucas Family

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john ormandy   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 17:21 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens, W11
Remember the Lucas family think the eldest was about same age as me cant remember his name though seem to rember had several younger sisters may have been twins!!

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john ormandy   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 18:02 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens, W11
Went to that coranation party with my two younger brothers who both went to St Clements along with Alan Mullery the footballer. I went to St James before moving on to St Johns along with Alan who lived in Mary Place where we were both in the same class.

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Lived here
David James Bloomfield   
Added: 13 Jul 2021 11:54 GMT   

Hurstway Street, W10
Jimmy Bloomfield who played for Arsenal in the 1950s was brought up on this street. He was a QPR supporter as a child, as many locals would be at the time, as a teen he was rejected by them as being too small. They’d made a mistake

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Lived here
Richard   
Added: 12 Jul 2022 21:36 GMT   

Elgin Crescent, W11
Richard Laitner (1955-1983), a barrister training to be a doctor at UCL, lived here in 1983. He was murdered aged 28 with both his parents after attending his sister’s wedding in Sheffield in 1983. The Richard Laitner Memorial Fund maintains bursaries in his memory at UCL Medical School

Source: Ancestry Library Edition

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Richard   
Added: 12 Jul 2022 21:39 GMT   

Elgin Crescent, W11
Richard Laitner lived at 24 Elgin Crescent

Source: Ancestry Library Edition

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

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Gillian   
Added: 17 Feb 2024 00:08 GMT   

No 36 Upper East Smithfield
My great great grandfather was born at No 36 Upper East Smithfield and spent his early years staring out at a "dead wall" of St Katharine’s Docks. His father was an outfitter and sold clothing for sailors. He describes the place as being backed by tenements in terrible condition and most of the people living there were Irish.

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Kevin Pont   
Added: 16 Feb 2024 20:32 GMT   

Name origin
Interestingly South Lambeth derives its name from the same source as Lambeth itself - a landing place for lambs.

But South Lambeth has no landing place - it is not on the River Thames

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C Hobbs   
Added: 31 Jan 2024 23:53 GMT   

George Gut (1853 - 1861)
George Gut, Master Baker lived with his family in Long Lane.
George was born in Bernbach, Hesse, Germany and came to the UK sometime in the 1840s. In 1849, George married an Englishwoman called Matilda Baker and became a nauralized Englishman. He was given the Freedom of the City of London (by Redemption in the Company of Bakers), in 1853 and was at that time, recorded as living at 3 Long Lane. In the 1861 census, George Gut was living at 11 Long Lane.

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Emma Beach   
Added: 18 Jan 2024 04:33 GMT   

William Sutton Thwaites
William Sutton Thwaites was the father of Frances Lydia Alice Knorr nee Thwaites�’�’she was executed in 1894 in Melbourne, Victoria Australia for infanticide. In the year prior to his marriage, to her mother Frances Jeanette Thwaites nee Robin, William Sutton was working as a tailor for Mr Orchard who employed four tailors in the hamlet of Mile End Old Town on at Crombies Row, Commercial Road East.

Source: 1861 England Census Class: Rg 9; Piece: 293; Folio: 20; Page: 2; GSU roll: 542608

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Simon   
Added: 15 Jan 2024 15:44 GMT   

Simon De Charmes, clockmaker
De Charmes (or Des Charmes), Simon, of French Huguenot extraction. Recorded 1688 and Free of the Clockmakers’ Company 1691-1730. In London until 1704 at least at ’his House, the Sign of the Clock, the Corner of Warwick St, Charing Cross’. See Brian Loomes The Early Clockmakers of Great Britain, NAG Press, 1981, p.188

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Born here
Jacqueline Mico   
Added: 14 Jan 2024 07:29 GMT   

Robert Bolam
This is where my grandad was born, he went on to be a beautiful man, he became a shop owner, a father, and grandfather, he lost a leg when he was a milkman and the horse kicked him, then opened a shop in New Cross and then moved to Lewisham where he had a Newsagents and tobacconists.

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Tom Hughes   
Added: 5 Jan 2024 14:11 GMT   

4 Edwardes Terrace
In 1871, Mrs. Blake, widow of Gen. Blake, died in her home at 4 Edwardes Terrace, leaving a fortune of 140,000 pounds, something like 20 million quid today. She left no will. The exact fortune may have been exaggerated but for years claimants sought their share of the "Blake millions" which eventually went to "the Crown."

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Matthew Proctor   
Added: 7 Dec 2023 17:36 GMT   

Blackheath Grove, SE3
Road was originally known as The Avenue, then became "The Grove" in 1942.

From 1864 there was Blackheath Wesleyan Methodist Chapel on this street until it was destroyed by a V2 in 1944

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Earl of Zetland The Earl of Zetland - a pub in the Potteries
Horbury Chapel (Kensington Temple) In September 1849, the Horbury Chapel, Notting Hill was officially opened.
Kensington Hippodrome The Kensington Hippodrome was a racecourse built in Notting Hill, London, in 1837, by entrepreneur John Whyte.
Ladbroke Square Garden Ladbroke Square communal garden lies in Notting Hill.
Mercury Theatre The Mercury Theatre was situated at 2a Ladbroke Road, next to the Kensington Temple.
Notting Dale From Pigs and bricks to Posh and Becks...
Notting Hill in Bygone Days Notting Hill in Bygone Days by Florence Gladstone, was originally published in 1924 by T. Fisher Unwin.
St John’s Notting Hill St John’s Notting Hill is a Victorian Anglican church built in 1845 in Lansdowne Crescent, Notting Hill.
St John’s Hill St John’s Hill is the highest point in the area.
The Brittania The Brittania was situated on the corner of Clarendon Road and Portland Road, W11.
The Crown The Crown was situated at 57 Princedale Road.

NEARBY STREETS
Acklam Road, W10 Acklam Road was the centre of much action during the building of the Westway (Notting Hill)
Agauana House, W11 Agauana House is located on Westbourne Grove (Notting Hill)
Alba Place, W11 Alba Place is part of the Colville Conservation Area (Notting Hill)
All Saints Road, W11 Built between 1852-61, All Saints Road is named after All Saints Church on Talbot Road (Notting Hill)
Archer House, W11 Archer House is a block on Westbourne Grove (Notting Hill)
Archer Street, W11 Archer Street was renamed Westbourne Grove in 1938 (Notting Hill)
Artesian House, W2 Artesian House is a block on Artesian Road (Notting Hill)
Artesian Road, W2 Artesian Road lies just over the boundary into Paddington from Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Arundel Gardens, W11 Arundel Gardens was built towards the end of the development of the Ladbroke Estate, in the early 1860s (Notting Hill)
Aston House, W11 Aston House is a building on Portobello Road (Notting Hill)
Avondale Park Road, W11 Avondale Park Road is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Dale)
Bangor Street, W11 Bangor Street was situated on the site of the modern Henry Dickens Court (Notting Hill)
Basing Street, W11 Basing Street was originally Basing Road between 1867 and 1939 (Notting Hill)
Blagrove Road, W10 This is a street in the W10 postcode (Notting Hill)
Blenheim Crescent, W11 Blenheim Crescent one of the major thoroughfares in Notting Hill - indeed it features in the eponymous film (Notting Hill)
Bomore Road, W11 Bomore Road survived post-war redevelopment with a slight change in alignment (Notting Dale)
Boxmoor House, W11 Boxmoor House is a block on Queensdale Crescent (Notting Hill)
Buckingham Court, W11 Buckingham Court is a block on Kensington Park Road (Notting Hill)
Callcott Street, W8 Callcott Street is a small street between Uxbridge Street and Hillgate Place (Notting Hill Gate)
Camelford Walk, W11 Camelford Walk is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Campden Hill Place, W11 Campden Hill Place is a road in the W11 postcode area (Notting Hill Gate)
Campden Hill Towers, W11 Campden Hill Towers is a block (Notting Hill Gate)
Chepstow Court, W11 Chepstow Court is a block on Chepstow Villas (Notting Hill)
Chepstow Crescent, W11 Chepstow Crescent is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Chepstow Villas, W11 Chepstow Villas is a road in W11 with a chequered history (Notting Hill)
Clarendon Cross, W11 Clarendon Cross is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Dale)
Clarendon Road, W11 Clarendon Road is one of the W11’s longest streets, running from Holland Park Avenue in the south to Dulford Street in the north (Notting Hill)
Clarendon Walk, W11 Clarendon Walk is a walkway in a recent Notting Dale development (Notting Dale)
Clydesdale Road, W11 Clydesdale Road is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Codrington Mews, W11 This attractive L-shaped mews lies off Blenheim Crescent between Kensington Park Road and Ladbroke Grove (Notting Hill)
Colville Gardens, W11 Colville Gardens was laid out in the 1870s by the builder George Frederick Tippett, who developed much of the rest of the neighbourhood (Notting Hill)
Colville Houses, W11 Colville Houses is part of the Colville Conservation Area (Notting Hill)
Colville Mews, W11 Colville Mews is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Colville Road, W11 Colville Road is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Colville Square, W11 Colville Square is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Colville Terrace, W11 Colville Terrace, W11 has strong movie connnections (Notting Hill)
Convent Gardens, W11 Convent Gardens is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Cornwall Crescent, W11 Cornwall Crescent belongs to the third and final period of building on the Ladbroke estate (Notting Hill)
Cornwall Road, W11 Cornwall Road was once the name for the westernmost part of Westbourne Park Road (Notting Hill)
Dale Row, W11 Dale Row is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Daley Thompson House, W11 Daley Thompson House is a block on Colville Square (Notting Hill)
Darnley Terrace, W11 Darnley Terrace is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Denbigh Close, W11 Denbigh Close is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Denbigh Road, W11 Denbigh Road is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Denbigh Terrace, W11 Denbigh Terrace is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Dulford Street, W11 Dulford Street survived the mass demolitions of the late 1960s (Notting Dale)
Dunworth Mews, W11 This is a street in the W11 postcode area (Notting Hill)
Elgin Crescent, W11 Elgin Crescent runs from Portobello Road west across Ladbroke Grove and then curls round to the south to join Clarendon Road (Notting Hill)
Elgin Mews, W11 Elgin Mews lies in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Evesham Street, W11 Evesham Street now runs west from Freston Road (Notting Hill)
Folly Mews, W11 Folly Mews is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Frederick Dobson House, W11 Frederick Dobson House is a block on Cowling Close (Notting Hill)
Freston Road, W11 The southern end of Freston Road stretches over into the W11 postcode (Notting Hill)
Gate Hill Court, W11 Gate Hill Court is a block on Notting Hill Gate (Notting Hill Gate)
Golden Mews, W11 Golden Mews was a tiny mews off of Basing Street, W11 (Notting Hill)
Gorham Place, W11 Gorham Place is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Dale)
Hayden’s Place, W11 Haydens Place is a small cul-de-sac off of the Portobello Road (Notting Hill)
Heathfield Street, W11 Heathfield Street was a side turning off of Portland Road (Notting Hill)
Hedgegate Court, W11 Hedgegate Court is a block on Powis Terrace (Notting Hill)
Hesketh Place, W11 Hesketh Place runs between Walmer Road and Avondale Park Road (Notting Dale)
Hippodrome Mews, W11 Hippodrome Mews is a turning off Portland Road, commemorating a lost racecourse (Notting Dale)
Hippodrome Place, W11 Hippodrome Place was named after a lost racecourse of London (Notting Dale)
Horbury Crescent, W11 Horbury Crescent is a short half-moon shaped street between Ladbroke Road and Kensington Park Road (Notting Hill)
Horbury Mews, W11 Horbury Mews is a T-shaped mews in Notting Hill (Notting Hill Gate)
Hume Road, W11 Hume Road ran from Norland Gardens to Norland Road (Notting Hill)
Hunt Close, W11 Hunt Close is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Kenley Street, W11 Kenley Street, W11 was originally William Street before it disappeared (Notting Hill)
Kenley Walk, W11 Kenley Walk is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Kensington Park Gardens, W11 Kensington Park Gardens is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Kensington Park Mews, W11 Kensington Park Mews lies off of Kensington Park Road (Notting Hill)
Kensington Park Road, W11 Kensington Park Road is one of the main streets in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Ladbroke Crescent, W11 Ladbroke Crescent belongs to the third and final great period of building on the Ladbroke estate and the houses were constructed in the 1860s. (Notting Hill)
Ladbroke Gardens, W11 Ladbroke Gardens runs between Ladbroke Grove and Kensington Park Road (Notting Hill)
Ladbroke Grove, W11 Ladbroke Grove is the main street in London W11 (Notting Hill)
Ladbroke Road, W11 Ladbroke Road is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Ladbroke Square, W11 The huge Ladbroke Square communal garden is part communal garden accessed from the backs of the houses lining it and part traditional London Square with roads between the houses and the square. (Notting Hill)
Ladbroke Terrace, W11 Ladbroke Terrace was one of the first streets to be created on the Ladbroke estate (Notting Hill)
Ladbroke Walk, W11 Ladbroke Walk, W11 is part of the Ladbroke Conversation Area (Notting Hill)
Lambton Place, W11 Lambton Place is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Lancaster Road, W11 Lancaster Road has been called London’s most Instagrammable street (Notting Hill)
Lansdowne Crescent, W11 Lansdowne Crescent has some of the most interesting and varied houses on the Ladbroke estate, as architects and builders experimented with different styles (Notting Hill)
Lansdowne Rise, W11 Lansdowne Rise, W11 was originally called Montpelier Road (Notting Hill)
Lansdowne Road, W11 Lansdowne Road is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Lansdowne Walk, W11 Lansdowne Walk was named after the Lansdowne area of Cheltenham (Notting Hill)
Ledbury Mews North, W11 Ledbury Mews North is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Ledbury Mews West, W11 This is a street in the W11 postcode area (Notting Hill)
Ledbury Road, W11 Ledbury Road is split between W2 and W11, the postal line intersecting the street (Notting Hill)
Lonsdale Road, W11 Lonsdale Road is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Lowerwood Court, W11 Lowerwood Court is a block on Westbourne Park Road (Notting Hill)
Mary Place, W11 Mary Place connects Walmer Road with Sirdar Road (Notting Dale)
Matlock Court, W11 Matlock Court can be found on Kensington Park Road (Notting Hill)
McGregor Road, W11 McGregor Road runs between St Luke’s Road and All Saints Road (Notting Hill)
Mortimer House, W11 Mortimer House is located on Rifle Place (Notting Hill)
Needham Road, W11 Needham Road was formerly Norfolk Road (Notting Hill)
Nicholas Road, W11 This is a street in the W11 postcode area (Notting Hill)
Norland Road, W11 Norland Road is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Olaf Street, W11 Olaf Street was once part of ’Frestonia’ (Notting Hill)
Pembridge Crescent, W11 Pembridge Crescent is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Pembridge Mews, W11 Pembridge Mews is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Pembridge Road, W2 Pembridge Road is the former southern end of Portobello Lane. (Notting Hill)
Pembridge Villas, W11 Pembridge Villas is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Pencombe Mews, W11 Pencombe Mews is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Penzance Place, W11 Penzance Place is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Pickwick House, W11 Pickwick House can be found on St Anns Road (Notting Hill)
Pinehurst Court, W11 Pinehurst Court is a mansion block at 1-9 Colville Gardens (Notting Hill)
Portland Road, W11 Portland Road is a street in Notting Hill, rich at one end and poor at the other (Notting Hill)
Portobello Court, W11 Portobello Court is a block on Portobello Court (Notting Hill)
Portobello Road, W11 Portobello Road is internationally famous for its market (Notting Hill)
Pottery Lane, W11 Pottery Lane takes its name from the brickfields which were situated at the northern end of the street (Notting Hill)
Powis Gardens, W11 Powis Gardens is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Powis Square, W11 Powis Square is a square between Talbot Road and Colville Terrace (Notting Hill)
Powis Terrace, W11 Powis Terrace is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Poynter House, W11 Poynter House is sited on Swanscombe Road (Notting Hill)
Princedale Road, W11 Princedale Road was formerly Princes Road (Notting Hill)
Princes House, W11 Princes House is a block on Kensington Park Road (Notting Hill)
Princes Place, W11 Princes Place is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Queensdale Crescent, W11 Queensdale Crescent is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Queensdale Place, W11 Queensdale Place is a cul-de-sac which runs just off Queensdale Road (Notting Hill)
Raddington Road, W10 Raddington Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10 (Notting Hill)
Rifle Place, W11 Rifle Place is a road in the W11 postcode area (Notting Hill)
Romilly House, W11 Romilly House is located on Wilsham Street (Notting Hill)
Rosehart Mews, W11 Rosehart Mews is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Roseland Place, W11 Roseland Place was a short mews located at what is now 224/226 Portobello Road (Notting Hill)
Rosmead Road, W11 Rosmead Road, W11 was originally called Chichester Road (Notting Hill)
Runcorn Place, W11 Runcorn Place was once Thomas Place, and before even that ’The Mews’ (Notting Hill)
Sarum House, W11 Sarum House is a block on Portobello Road (Notting Hill)
Saunders Grove, W11 Saunders Grove ran east from Norland Gardens (Notting Hill)
Silvester Mews, W11 Silvester Mews was a mews off of Basing Street, W11 (Notting Hill)
Simon Close, W11 Simon Close is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
St Ann’s Road, W11 St Ann’s Road, along with St Ann’s Villas, runs north from Royal Crescent (Notting Hill)
St Ann’s Villas, W11 St Ann’s Villas, a tree-lined if busy road, leads into Royal Crescent from St Ann’s Road (Notting Hill)
St James’s Gardens, W11 St James’s Gardens is an attractive garden square with St James Church in the middle of the communal garden (Notting Hill)
St John’s Gardens, W11 St John’s Gardens runs around St John’s church (Notting Hill)
St John’s Mews, W11 St John’s Mews is a redeveloped mews off of Ledbury Road (Notting Hill)
St Lukes Mews, W11 St Lukes Mews is a mews off of All Saints Road, W11 (Notting Hill)
St Mark’s Road, W11 St Mark’s Road is a street in the Ladbroke conservation area (Notting Dale)
St Mark’s Close, W11 St Mark’s Close runs off St Mark’s Road (Notting Dale)
St Mark’s Place, W11 St Mark’s Place is situated on the site of the former Kensington Hippodrome (Notting Hill)
Stanley Crescent, W11 Stanley Crescent was named after Edward Stanley (Notting Hill)
Stanley Gardens Mews, W11 Stanley Gardens Mews existed between 1861 and the mid 1970s (Notting Hill)
Stanley Gardens, W11 Stanley Gardens was built in the 1850s. (Notting Hill)
Stebbing House, W11 Stebbing House is sited on Queensdale Crescent (Notting Hill)
Swanscombe House, W11 Residential block (Notting Hill)
Swanscombe Road, W11 Swanscombe Road is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Talbot Mews, W11 Talbot Mews seems to have disappeared just after the Second Worid War (Notting Dale)
Talbot Road, W11 The oldest part of Talbot Road lies in London, W11 (Notting Hill)
Tavistock Crescent, W11 Tavistock Crescent was where the first Notting Hill Carnival procession began on 18 September 1966. (Notting Hill)
Tavistock Mews, W11 Tavistock Mews, W11 lies off of the Portobello Road (Notting Hill)
Tavistock Road, W11 Tavistock Road was developed in the late 1860s alongside the Hammersmith and City railway line from Westbourne Park station (Notting Hill)
Testerton Walk, W11 Testerton Walk is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
The White Building, W11 The White Building is sited on Evesham Street (Notting Hill)
The Yellow Building, W11 The Yellow Building is sited on Nicholas Road (Notting Hill)
Thornbury Court, W11 Thornbury Court is a block on Chepstow Villas (Notting Hill)
Threshers Place, W11 Threshers Place is a quiet street with a long story (Notting Hill)
Twisaday House, W11 Twisaday House is a block on Colville Square (Notting Hill)
Uxbridge Street, W8 Uxbridge Street is a street in Kensington (Notting Hill Gate)
Verity Close, W11 Verity Close is a street in W11 (Notting Dale)
Vernon Yard, W11 Vernon Yard is a mews off of Portobello Road (Notting Hill)
Victoria Gardens, W11 Victoria Gardens is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill Gate)
Victoria Mews, W11 Victoria Mews is a location in London (Notting Hill Gate)
Walmer Road, W11 Walmer Road is the oldest street in the area, dating from the eighteenth century or before (Notting Hill)
Waterden Court, W11 Waterden Court is located on Waterden Court (Notting Hill)
Wellington Close, W11 Wellington Close is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Wesley Square, W11 Wesley Square lies behind Notting Hill Methodist Church (Notting Dale)
West Cross Route, W11 The West Cross Route is a 1.21 km-long dual carriageway running north-south between the northern elevated roundabout junction with the western end of Westway (A40) and the southern Holland Park Roundabout (Notting Hill)
Westbourne Grove Mews, W11 Westbourne Grove Mews is a street in Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Westbourne Grove, W11 Westbourne Grove is one of the main roads of Notting Hill (Notting Hill)
Westfield Way, W12 Westfield Way is a road in the W12 postcode area (Notting Hill)
Westway, W10 Westway is the A40(M) motorway which runs on an elevated section along the W10/W11 border (Notting Hill)
Wilby Mews, W11 Wilby Mews was maybe named after Benjamin Wilby who was involved in several 19th century development schemes (Notting Hill)
Wilsham Street, W11 Wilsham Street was formerly known as St Katherine’s Road (Notting Hill)
Wilton Yard, W11 Wilton Yard once ran off Latimer Road (Notting Hill)

NEARBY PUBS





The Elgin is a Grade II listed public house at 96 Ladbroke Grove.

Albert Hotel The Albert Hotel stood on the corner of All Saints Road and Westbourne Park Road.
Duke of Cornwall The Duke of Cornwall pub morphed into the uber-trendy "The Ledbury" restaurant.
Earl of Zetland The Earl of Zetland - a pub in the Potteries
Grasshopper The Grasshopper was located at 216-218 Kensington Park Road.
Kensington Park Hotel The KPH is a landmark pub on Ladbroke Grove.
Latimer Arms The Latimer Arms was situated at 79 Norland Road.
Portobello Tavern The Portobello Tavern was located at 138 Portobello Road.
The Apollo The Apollo pub was located at 18 All Saints Road, on the southeast corner of the Lancaster Road junction.
The Brittania The Brittania was situated on the corner of Clarendon Road and Portland Road, W11.
The Crown The Crown was situated at 57 Princedale Road.
The Oxford The Oxford was located at 90-92 Portobello Road.
Warwick Castle The (Warwick) Castle is located on the corner of Portobello Road and Westbourne Park Road.


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