Fletcher Buildings, WC2B

Block in/near Covent Garden .

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Block · Covent Garden · WC2B ·
FEBRUARY
23
2001
Fletcher Buildings is sited on Martlett Court.





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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Dec 2020 00:24 GMT   

Othello takes a bow
On 1 November 1604, William Shakespeare’s tragedy Othello was presented for the first time, at The Palace of Whitehall. The palace was the main residence of the English monarchs in London from 1530 until 1698. Seven years to the day, Shakespeare’s romantic comedy The Tempest was also presented for the first time, and also at the Palace of Whitehall.

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Linda Webb   
Added: 27 Sep 2021 05:51 GMT   

Hungerford Stairs
In 1794 my ancestor, George Webb, Clay Pipe Maker, lived in Hungerford Stairs, Strand. Source: Wakefields Merchant & Tradesmens General Directory London Westminster 1794

Source: Hungerford Stairs

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Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 21 Feb 2023 11:39 GMT   

Error on 1800 map numbering for John Street
The 1800 map of Whitfield Street (17 zoom) has an error in the numbering shown on the map. The houses are numbered up the right hand side of John Street and Upper John Street to #47 and then are numbered down the left hand side until #81 BUT then continue from 52-61 instead of 82-91.

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Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 07:17 GMT   

Smithy in Longacre
John Burris 1802-1848 Listed 1841 census as Burroughs was a blacksmith, address just given as Longacre.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

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Reg Carr   
Added: 10 Feb 2021 12:11 GMT   

Campbellite Meeting
In 1848 the Campbellites (Disciples of Christ) met in Elstree Street, where their congregation was presided over by a pastor named John Black. Their appointed evangelist at the time was called David King, who later became the Editor of the British Millennial Harbinger. The meeting room was visited in July 1848 by Dr John Thomas, who spoke there twice on his two-year ’mission’ to Britain.

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Jeff Owen   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 16:18 GMT   

Owen’s School
Owen Street is the site of Owen’s Boys’ School. The last school was built in 1881 and was demolished in the early 1990s to make way for the development which stand there today. It was a “Direct Grant” grammar school and was founded in 1613 by Dame Alice Owen. What is now “Owen’s Fields” was the playground between the old school and the new girls’ school (known then as “Dames Alice Owen’s School” or simply “DAOS”). The boys’ school had the top two floors of that building for their science labs. The school moved to Potters Bar in Hertfordshire in 1971 and is now one of the top State comprehensive schools in the country. The old building remained in use as an accountancy college and taxi-drivers’ “knowledge” school until it was demolished. The new building is now part of City and Islington College. Owen’s was a fine school. I should know because I attended there from 1961 to 1968.

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Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 19:47 GMT   

Millions Of Rats In Busy London
The Daily Mail on 14 April 1903 reported "MILLIONS OF RATS IN BUSY LONDON"

A rat plague, unprecedented in the annals of London, has broken out on the north side of the Strand. The streets principally infested are Catherine street, Drury lane, Blackmore street, Clare Market and Russell street. Something akin to a reign of terror prevails among the inhabitants after nightfall. Women refuse to pass along Blackmore street and the lower parts of Stanhope street after dusk, for droves of rats perambulate the roadways and pavements, and may be seen running along the window ledges of the empty houses awaiting demolition by the County Council in the Strand to Holborn improvement scheme.

The rats, indeed, have appeared in almost-incredible numbers. "There are millions of them," said one shopkeeper, and his statement was supported by other residents. The unwelcome visitors have been evicted from their old haunts by the County Council housebreakers, and are now busily in search of new homes. The Gaiety Restaurant has been the greatest sufferer. Rats have invaded the premises in such force that the managers have had to close the large dining room on the first floor and the grill rooms on the ground floor and in the basement. Those three spacious halls which have witnessed many as semblages of theatre-goers are now qui:e deserted. Behind the wainscot of the bandstand in the grillroom is a large mound of linen shreds. This represents 1728 serviettes carried theee by the rats.

In the bar the removal of a panel disclosed the astonishing fact that the rats have dragged for a distance of seven or eight yards some thirty or forty beer and wine bottles and stacked them in such a fashion as to make comfortable sleeping places. Mr Williams. the manager of the restaurant, estimates that the rats have destroyed L200 worth of linen. Formerly the Gaiety Restaurant dined 2000 persons daily; no business whatever is now done in this direction.

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Bruce McTavish   
Added: 11 Mar 2021 11:37 GMT   

Kennington Road
Lambeth North station was opened as Kennington Road and then Westminster Bridge Road before settling on its final name. It has a wonderful Leslie Green design.

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Mike   
Added: 28 Feb 2023 18:09 GMT   

6 Elia Street
When I was young I lived in 6 Elia Street. At the end of the garden there was a garage owned by Initial Laundries which ran from an access in Quick Street all the way up to the back of our garden. The fire exit to the garage was a window leading into our garden. 6 Elia Street was owned by Initial Laundry.

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MCNALLY    
Added: 17 May 2021 09:42 GMT   

Blackfriars (1959 - 1965)
I lived in Upper Ground from 1959 to 1964 I was 6 years old my parents Vince and Kitty run the Pub The Angel on the corner of Upper Ground and Bodies Bridge. I remember the ceiling of the cellar was very low and almost stretched the length of Bodies Bridge. The underground trains run directly underneath the pub. If you were down in the cellar when a train was coming it was quite frightening

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Scott Hatton   
Added: 30 Jan 2023 11:28 GMT   

The Beatles on a London rooftop
The Beatles’ rooftop concert took place on the rooftop of the Apple Corps building in London. It was their final public performance as a band and was unannounced, attracting a crowd of onlookers. The concert lasted for 42 minutes and included nine songs. The concert is remembered as a seminal moment in the history of rock music and remains one of the most famous rock performances of all time.

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Jessie Doring   
Added: 22 Feb 2021 04:33 GMT   

Tisbury Court Jazz Bar
Jazz Bar opened in Tisbury Court by 2 Australians. Situated in underground basement. Can not remember how long it opened for.

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Tom   
Added: 21 May 2021 23:07 GMT   

Blackfriars
What is, or was, Bodies Bridge?

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Lived here
Richard Roques   
Added: 21 Jan 2021 16:53 GMT   

Buckingham Street residents
Here in Buckingham Street lived Samuel Pepys the diarist, Charles Dickens and Rudyard Kipling

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Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT


Matthew Proctor   
Added: 7 Dec 2023 17:36 GMT   

Blackheath Grove, SE3
Road was originally known as The Avenue, then became "The Grove" in 1942.

From 1864 there was Blackheath Wesleyan Methodist Chapel on this street until it was destroyed by a V2 in 1944

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Peter   
Added: 4 Dec 2023 07:05 GMT   

Gambia Street, SE1
Gambia Street was previously known as William Street.

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Eileen   
Added: 10 Nov 2023 09:42 GMT   

Brecknock Road Pleating Company
My great grandparents ran the Brecknock Road pleating Company around 1910 to 1920 and my Grandmother worked there as a pleater until she was 16. I should like to know more about this. I know they had a beautiful Victorian house in Islington as I have photos of it & of them in their garden.

Source: Family history

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Comment
   
Added: 6 Nov 2023 16:59 GMT   

061123
Why do Thames Water not collect the 15 . Three meter lengths of blue plastic fencing, and old pipes etc. They left here for the last TWO Years, these cause an obstruction,as they halfway lying in the road,as no footpath down this road, and the cars going and exiting the park are getting damaged, also the public are in Grave Danger when trying to avoid your rubbish and the danger of your fences.

Source: Squirrels Lane. Buckhurst Hill, Essex. IG9. I want some action ,now, not Excuses.MK.

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Christian   
Added: 31 Oct 2023 10:34 GMT   

Cornwall Road, W11
Photo shows William Richard Hoare’s chemist shop at 121 Cornwall Road.

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Vik   
Added: 30 Oct 2023 18:48 GMT   

Old pub sign from the Rising Sun
Hi I have no connection to the area except that for the last 30+ years we’ve had an old pub sign hanging on our kitchen wall from the Rising Sun, Stanwell, which I believe was / is on the Oaks Rd. Happy to upload a photo if anyone can tell me how or where to do that!

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Phillip Martin   
Added: 16 Oct 2023 06:25 GMT   

16 Ashburnham Road
On 15 October 1874 George Frederick Martin was born in 16 Ashburnham Road Greenwich to George Henry Martin, a painter, and Mary Martin, formerly Southern.

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Lived here
Christine Bithrey   
Added: 15 Oct 2023 15:20 GMT   

The Hollies (1860 - 1900)
I lived in Holly Park Estate from 1969 I was 8 years old when we moved in until I left to get married, my mother still lives there now 84. I am wondering if there was ever a cemetery within The Hollies? And if so where? Was it near to the Blythwood Road end or much nearer to the old Methodist Church which is still standing although rather old looking. We spent most of our childhood playing along the old dis-used railway that run directly along Blythwood Road and opposite Holly Park Estate - top end which is where we live/ed. We now walk my mothers dog there twice a day. An elderly gentleman once told me when I was a child that there used to be a cemetery but I am not sure if he was trying to scare us children! I only thought about this recently when walking past the old Methodist Church and seeing the flag stone in the side of the wall with the inscription of when it was built late 1880

If anyone has any answers please email me [email protected]

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
101 The Strand was an art school from 1750 until 1806.
101 Strand, WC2R This shop was one of the first in London to have gas lighting fitted.
Ackermann’s Rudolph Ackermann (20 April 1764 in Stollberg, Saxony – 30 March 1834 in Finchley) was an Anglo-German bookseller, inventor, lithographer, publisher and businessman.
British Museum British Museum was a station on the Central line, located in Holborn and taking its name from the nearby British Museum in Great Russell Street.
Houghton Street (1906) A greengrocer’s on the corner of Houghton Street and Clare Market (behind The Strand) in 1906 just before demolition.
Leicester Square Leicester Square, while indeed a square, is also the name for a tube station.
Lisle’s Tennis Court Lisle’s Tennis Court was a building off Portugal Street in Lincoln’s Inn Fields in London.
St Giles St Giles is a district of central London, at the southern tip of the London Borough of Camden.
The 1860s map of London "Stanford’s Library Map of London and its Suburbs" was published in 1862
Weston’s Music Hall Weston’s Music Hall was a music hall and theatre that opened in 1857. In 1906, the theatre became known as the Holborn Empire.

NEARBY STREETS
Adam Street, WC2N Adam Street is named after John and Robert Adam, who built the Adelphi development in the 1760s.
Africa House, WC2A Residential block
Africa House, WC2B Africa House is a block on Kingsway.
Agar Street, WC2N Agar Street is named after George Agar, who built the street in the 1830s with John Ponsonby, Earl of Bessborough
Aldwych House, WC2B Aldwych House is located on Aldwych.
Aldwych, WC2B The name Aldwych derives from the Old English eald and wic meaning ’old trading town’ or ’old marketplace’; the name was later applied to the street and district.
Arab Press House, WC1V Arab Press House is located on High Holborn.
Aria House, WC1V Aria House is located on Newton Street.
Arne Street, WC2E Arne Street was named after the 18th century composer Thomas Arne, who was born near here.
Artist House, WC1A Artist House is sited on Little Russell Street.
Arundel Street, WC2R Arundel Street runs from the Strand to Temple Place.
Australia House, WC2B Australia House can be found on Strand.
Aviation House, WC2B Aviation House is a building on Kingsway.
Bainbridge Street, WC2H Bainbridge Street takes its name from Henry Bainbridge, a local resident in the 17th century.
Banbury Court, WC2E Banbury Court is named for Nicholas Knollys, 3rd Earl of Banbury, who owned a house here called Banbury House.
Barter Street, WC1A Barter Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Beacon House, WC2B Beacon House is a block on Kingsway.
Bear Street, WC2H Bear Street is a streetname with two possible derivations.
Beaumont Buildings, WC2B Beaumont Buildings is located on Martlett Court.
Beaumont Buildings, WC2E Beaumont Buildings is one of the streets of London in the WC2B postal area.
Bedford Chambers, WC2E Bedford Chambers is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Bedford Street, WC2E Bedford Street was named after local 18th century landowners the Russell family, earls/dukes of Bedford.
Bedfordbury, WC2N Bedfordbury is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Betterton House, WC2H Betterton House is located on Betterton Street.
Betterton Street, WC2E Betterton Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Blackmoor Street, WC2B Blackmoor Street was in the Drury Lane slum.
Bloomsbury Street, WC1A Bloomsbury Street runs from Gower Street in the north to the junction of New Oxford Street and Shaftesbury Avenue in the south.
Bow Street, WC2B Bow Street was built in the shape of a bow between 1633 and 1677.
Bow Street, WC2E Bow Street was first developed by Francis Russell, 4th Earl of Bedford in 1633.
Brettenham House, WC2R Brettenham House is a block on Savoy Street.
Broad Court, WC2E Broad Court is an alleyway parallel with Long Acre.
Bruce House, WC2B Bruce House is sited on Kemble Street.
Brydges Place, WC2N Brydges Place replaced Taylor’s Buildings in 1904 when the Colloseum was built.
Bucknall Street, WC2H Bucknall Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Bull Inn Court, WC2R Bull Inn Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2R postal area.
Burleigh Street, WC2R Burleigh Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Cambridge Circus, WC2H Cambridge Circus is the intersection of Shaftesbury Avenue and Charing Cross Road.
Carey Street, WC2A Carey Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Carriage Hall, WC2E Carriage Hall is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Carting Lane, WC2R Carting Lane is thought to be named after the carts that brought goods to and from the wharf formerly located here.
Castlewood House, WC1A Residential block
Catherine Street, WC2B Catherine Street runs from Russell Street in the north to Aldwych in the south.
Cecil Court, WC2N Cecil Court is a pedestrian street with Victorian shop-frontages.
Central Arcade, WC2E Central Arcade is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Centre Point, WC2H Centre Point is a controversial 1960s-built tower block.
Chandos Place, WC2R Chandos Place is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Charing Cross Mansions, WC2H Charing Cross Mansions is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Charing Cross Road, WC2H Charing Cross Road is a street running immediately north of St Martin-in-the-Fields to St Giles Circus.
Ching Court, WC2H Ching Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Clare Market, WC2A Clare Market is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Clare Market, WC2E This is a street in the WC2E postcode area
Clement House, WC2B Clement House is located on Aldwych.
Clement House, WC2R Clement House is a block on Strand.
Clement’s Inn, WC2R Clement’s Inn is a road in the WC2R postcode area
Columbia House, WC2B Columbia House is a block on Aldwych.
Commonwealth House, WC1V Commonwealth House is a block on New Oxford Street.
Congress House, WC1B Congress House can be found on Great Russell Street.
Connaught House, WC2A Connaught House can be found on Aldwych.
Connaught House, WC2B Connaught House is located on Aldwych.
Coptic Street, WC2H Coptic Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Covent Garden, WC2E Covent Garden, is the name of a district, but also the name of the central square which formerly hosted a fruit-and-vegetable market.
Cowdray House, WC2A Cowdray House is a building on Portugal Street.
Cranbourn Street, WC2H Cranbourne Street was named after local landowner the Earl of Salisbury, Viscount Cranbourn (Cranbourne) after the town in Dorset.
Crown Court, WC2E Crown Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2B postal area.
Crystal Wharf, WC2B A street within the WC2B postcode
Denmark Street, WC2H Denmark Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Devereux Court, WC2R Devereux Court is a location in London.
Drury Lane, WC2B Named from Sir William Drury, Knight of the Garter in Queen Elizabeth’s reign, who owned land on its site.
Dryden Street, WC2B Dryden Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Dudley Court, WC2H Dudley Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Dyott Street, WC1A Dyott Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Earlham Street, WC2H Earlham Street is one of the spokes leading off of Seven Dials.
Earnshaw Street, WC2H Earnshaw Street was at first called Arthur Street.
Endeavour House, WC2H Endeavour House is a block on Shaftesbury Avenue.
Endell Street, WC2H Endell Street, originally known as Belton Street, is a street that runs from High Holborn in the north to Long Acre and Bow Street in the south.
Essex Street, WC2R Essex Street is a location in London.
Excel Court, WC2H Excel Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Exchange Court, WC2R Exchange Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2R postal area.
Exeter Street, WC2R Exeter Street is a road in the WC2R postcode area
Fairgate House, WC1A Fairgate House is a block on New Oxford Street.
Flichcroft Street, WC2H Flichcroft Street is a road in the WC2H postcode area
Flitcroft Street, WC2H Flitcroft Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Floral Court, WC2E Floral Court is a location in London.
Floral Street, WC2E Floral Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Garrick Street, WC2N Garrick Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Garrick Yard, WC2E Garrick Yard, together with the more familiar Garrick Street to the northeast of here, both took their names from the Garrick Club which commemorates the famous 18th century actor, David Garrick.
Gate Street, WC2A Gate Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Gibraltar House, WC2R Gibraltar House is a block on Strand.
Gladstone House, WC2R Gladstone House is a block on Arundel Street.
Grape Street, WC2H Grape Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Great Newport Street, WC2H Great Newport Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Great Queen Street, WC2B Great Queen Street is a continuation of Long Acre from Drury Lane to Kingsway.
Green Dragon House, WC2B Green Dragon House is a block on Stukeley Street.
Hanover Place, WC2E Hanover Place is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Heathcock Court, WC2E Heathcock Court runs north off Strand.
Henrietta Street, WC2E Henrietta Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
High Holborn, WC2B High Holborn is a road which is the highest point in the City of London - 22 metres above sea level.
Holborn Tower, WC1V Holborn Tower is a building on High Holborn.
Hop Gardens, WC2N Hop Gardens is a small courtyard.
Houghton Square, WC2B Houghton Square is a road in the SW9 postcode area
Houghton Street, WC2A Houghton Street is a street which has been ’demoted’ over time.
Howard Street, WC2R Howard Street ran from Surrey Street to Arundel Street until 1974.
Hudson House, WC2E Hudson House is a block on Tavistock Street.
Imperial House, WC2B Imperial House is a block on Kingsway.
India House, WC2B India House is a block on Aldwych.
India Place, WC2B India Place is a small alleyway leading from Aldwych.
Irving Street, WC2H Irving Street is named after Henry Irving, the popular Victorian actor.
Isis House, WC1A Isis House is a building on New Oxford Street.
James Street, WC2E James Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Jebsen House, WC2H Jebsen House is a block on Mercer Street.
Jubilee Market, WC2E Jubilee Market is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Kean Street, WC2B Kean Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2B postal area.
Keeley Street, WC2B Keeley Street has a dual history
Kemble Street, WC2B Kemble Street is a road in the WC2B postcode area
King Street, WC2E King Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
King’s Building, WC2R King’s Building is a block on Strand.
Kingsway, WC2A Kingsway is one of the streets of London in the WC2B postal area.
Lakatos Building, WC2A Lakatos Building is a block on Portugal Street.
Lancaster Place, WC2R Lancaster Place is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Langley Court, WC2E Langley Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Langley House, WC2E Langley House is a building on Long Acre.
Langley Street, WC2H Langley Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Leicester Court, WC2A Ryders Court was renamed to Leicester Court in 1936.
Lincoln’s Inn Fields, WC2A Lincoln’s Inn Fields is the largest public square in London, laid out in the 1630s under the initiative of the speculative builder William Newton.
Lionel Robbins Building, WC2A Lionel Robbins Building is sited on Portugal Street.
Litchfield Street, WC2H Litchfield Street is possibly named after Edward Lee, 1st Earl of Lichfield, who was brother-in-law of Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Grafton and son of Charles II.
Little Newport Street, WC2H Little Newport Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Little Turnstile, WC2A Little Turnstile is one of the streets of London in the WC1V postal area.
Long Acre, WC2E Long Acre is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Macklin Street, WC2B Macklin Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2B postal area.
Maiden Lane, WC2E Maiden Lane runs from Bedford Street in the west to Southampton Street in the east.
Maidstone House, WC2H Maidstone House is sited on Mercer Street.
Maple Leaf Walk, WC2R Maple Leaf Walk is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Market Building, WC2E Market Building is a block on Covent Garden Piazza.
Marlborough House, WC2H Marlborough House is a block on Earlham Street.
Martlett Court, WC2E Martlett Court is a road in the WC2B postcode area
May’s Court, WC2N May’s Court is a road in the WC2N postcode area
Melbourne Place, WC2B Melbourne Place is a road in the WC2B postcode area
Mercer Street, WC2H Mercer Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Monmouth Street, WC2H Monmouth Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Montreal Place, WC2R Montreal Place is a road in the WC2R postcode area
Museum House, WC1A Museum House is a block on Museum Street.
Museum Street, WC1A Museum Street is so-named since it approaches the main entrance of the British Museum.
Neal Street, WC2H Neal Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Neal’s Yard, WC2H Neals Yard is one of the most photographed places of London.
New Academic Building, WC2A New Academic Building is located on Lincoln’s Inn Fields.
New Compton Street, WC2H New Compton Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
New Oxford Street, WC1A New Oxford Street was built in 1840 to ease congestion in St Giles High Street.
New Oxford Street, WC2H New Oxford Street is a road in the WC2H postcode area
New Row, WC2E New Row is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
New Square Passage, WC2A This is a street in the WC2A postcode area
Newport Court, WC2H Newport Court was laid out approximately on the site of the courtyard of Newport House.
Newport Place, W1D Newport Place was named after Mountjoy Blount, Earl of Newport (Isle of Wight), who owned a house on Newport Street in the 17th century.
Newton Street, WC1V Newton Street is named for Isaac Newton, scientist and mathematician.
Norfolk Street, WC2R Norfolk Street ran from the Strand in the north to the River Thames and, after the Victoria Embankment was built (1865–1870), to what is now Temple Place.
Norman House, WC2R Norman House can be found on Strand.
Nottingham Court, WC2H Nottingham Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Odhams Walk, WC2H Odhams Walk is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Old Building, WC2A Old Building is a building on Houghton Street.
Orion House, WC2H Orion House is a block on Upper St Martin’s Lane.
Parker Mews, WC2B Parker Mews is one of the streets of London in the WC2B postal area.
Parker Street, WC2B Parker Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2B postal area.
Parker Tower, WC2B Parker Tower is a block on Parker Street.
Parnell House, WC1 Parnell House is a block on Streatham Street.
Parnell House, WC1A Parnell House is a block on Streatham Street.
Penley Court, WC2R Angel Court was renamed as Penley Court in 1937.
Phoenix House, WC2H Phoenix House is sited on Phoenix Street.
Phoenix Street, WC2H Phoenix Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Portsmouth Street, WC2A Portsmouth Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Portugal Street, WC2A Portugal Street was named in honour of Charles II’s Portuguese queen Catherine of Braganza.
Queen’s Building, WC2R Queen’s Building is sited on Grange Court.
Queens House, WC2A Queens House is a block on Lincoln’s Inn Fields.
Rose Street, WC2N Rose Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Royal Opera House, WC2E Royal Opera House is a block on Bow Street.
Russell Chambers, WC2E Russell Chambers is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Russell Street, WC2E Russell Street is a road in the WC2E postcode area
Sardinia House, WC2A Sardinia House can be found on Lincoln’s Inn Fields.
Sardinia Street, WC2A Sardinia Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Sardinia Street, WC2B Sardinia Street, formerly Duke Street, was a street that ran from Prince’s Street in the south to the western side of Lincoln’s Inn Fields in the north.
Savoy Court, WC2R Savoy Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2R postal area.
Savoy Hill, WC2R Savoy Hill is located at a site originally called Savoy Manor.
Savoy House, WC2R Savoy House is a block on Tweezers Alley.
Savoy Street, WC2R Savoy Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Savoy Street, WC2R Savoy Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2R postal area.
Savoy Way, WC2R Savoy Way is located on the former site of the Savoy Palace, built for Peter II, Count of Savoy in 1245.
Serle Street, WC2A Serle Street is a road in the WC2A postcode area
Seven Dials, WC2H Seven Dials was built on the site of the Cock-and-Pie Fields, named for a nearby inn.
Shaftesbury Avenue, WC2H Shaftesbury Avenue was named after Anthony Ashley Cooper, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury, Victorian politician and philanthropist.
Sheffield Street, WC2A Sheffield Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Shelton Street, WC2E Shelton Street is a road in the WC2B postcode area
Shelton Street, WC2H Shelton Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Sheridan Buildings, WC2B Sheridan Buildings is a block on Martlett Court.
Shorts Gardens, WC2H Shorts Gardens is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Slingsby Place, WC2E Slingsby Place is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Somerset House, WC2R Somerset House is a block on Strand.
Sounding Alley, WC2H Sounding Alley is a road in the E3 postcode area
Southampton Row, WC1V Southampton Row is a road in the WC1V postcode area
Southampton Street, WC2E Southampton Street - named for Thomas Wriothesley, 4th Earl of Southampton and landowner.
Southampton Street, WC2E Southampton Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2R postal area.
St Clement’s Building, WC2A St Clement’s Building is a block on Clare Market.
St Clement’s Passage, WC2A St Clement’s Passage is a road in the WC2A postcode area
St Clements Lane, WC2A St Clements Lane is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
St George’s House, WC1A St George’s House is a block on Coptic Street.
St Giles High Street, WC2H St Giles High Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
St Giles House, WC2B Residential block
St Giles Square, WC2H St Giles Square is a modern piazza-style development.
St Martins Court, WC2H St Martins Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
St Martins Lane, WC2N St Martins Lane runs up to Seven Dials from St Martin’s-in-the-Fields.
St. Giles Square, WC2H St. Giles Square is a location in London.
Stacey Street, WC2H Stacey Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Stedham Place, WC2H Stedham Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Strand Bridge House, WC2 Strand Bridge House is a block on Strand.
Strand Bridge House, WC2R Strand Bridge House is a block on Strand.
Strand Building, WC2R Strand Building is a block on Strand.
Strand Lane, WC2R Strand Lane is a road in the WC2R postcode area
Strand Underpass, WC2R Strand Underpass is a road in the WC2R postcode area
Strand, WC2R Strand is one of the streets of London in the WC2B postal area.
Strand, WC2R Strand, as it nears the Aldwych, is home to many London theatres.
Streatham Street, WC1A Streatham Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Stukeley Street, WC2B Stukeley Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2B postal area.
Surrey Street, WC2R Surrey Street was built on land once occupied by Arundel House and its gardens.
Tavistock Street, WC2B Tavistock Street is a road in the WC2B postcode area
Temple House, WC2R Temple House is sited on Tweezers Alley.
Temple Place, WC2R Temple Place forms a crescent behind the Embankment Gardens.
The Arcade, WC2B The Arcade is one of the streets of London in the WC2B postal area.
The Australia Centre, WC2B The Australia Centre is one of the streets of London in the WC2B postal area.
The Edmund J. Safra Fountain Court, WC2R The Edmund J. Safra Fountain Court is a road in the WC2R postcode area
The Macadam Building Street, WC2R The Macadam Building Street is a location in London.
The Market Piazza, WC2E The Market Piazza is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
The Market The Piazza, WC2E The Market The Piazza is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
The Market, WC2E The Market is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
The Piazza, WC2E The Piazza is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Thomas More Building, WC2A Thomas More Building is a building on Strand.
Thomas Neal Centre, WC2H Thomas Neal Centre is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Tonbridge House, WC2H Tonbridge House is a block on Mercer Street.
Tower Court, WC2H Tower Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Tower House, WC2E Tower House is a block on Southampton Street.
Tower House, WC2R Tower House is located on Southampton Street.
Tower Street, WC2H Tower Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Upper St Martin’s Lane, WC2H This is a street in the WC2H postcode area
Vale Royal House, WC2H Vale Royal House is a block on Charing Cross Road.
Vere Street, WC2B Vere Street was a street in the Lincoln’s Inn Fields area
Victoria Embankment, WC2R Victoria Embankment runs from the Houses of Parliament to Blackfriars Bridge.
Victoria House, WC2B Victoria House is a block on Strand.
Waterman House, WC2 Waterman House is a block on Kingsway.
Waterman House, WC2B Waterman House is sited on Kingsway.
Wellington House, WC2R Wellington House is a block on Strand.
Wellington Street, WC2E Wellington Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Wellington Terrace, WC2E Wellington Terrace is a street in Paddington.
West Central Street, WC2H West Central Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
West Street, WC2H West Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Weston House, WC1V Weston House is located on High Holborn.
Whetstone Park, WC2A Whetstone Park is a road in the WC2A postcode area
Wild Court, WC2B Wild Court leads west from the Kingsway.
Wild Street, WC2B Wild Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2B postal area.
Willoughby Street, WC1B Willoughby Street was formerly known as both Vine Street and Wooburn Street.
Wren House, Wren House is a building on Milford Lane
Wren House, WC2 Wren House is a block on Milford Lane.
Wren House, WC2R Wren House is a building on Milford Lane.
Wych Street, WC2R Wych Street was near where Australia House now stands on Aldwych - it ran west from the church of St Clement Danes on the Strand to a point at the southern end of Drury Lane.

NEARBY PUBS
All Bar One Holborn This is a bar which was still existing in 2018.
Circus (restaurant) Circus is a restaurant on Endell Street.


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Covent Garden

From fruit and veg to Froo Tan Vetch

Covent Garden is a district in London on the eastern fringes of the West End, between St. Martin’s Lane and Drury Lane.

It is associated with the former fruit and vegetable market in the central square, now a popular shopping and tourist site, and the Royal Opera House, which is also known as Covent Garden. The district is divided by the main thoroughfare of Long Acre, north of which is given over to independent shops centred on Neal’s Yard and Seven Dials, while the south contains the central square with its street performers and most of the elegant buildings, theatres and entertainment facilities, including the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, and the London Transport Museum.

Though mainly fields until the 16th century, the area was briefly settled when it became the heart of the Anglo-Saxon trading town of Lundenwic. After the town was abandoned, part of the area was walled off by 1200 for use as arable land and orchards by Westminster Abbey, and was referred to as ’the garden of the Abbey and Convent’. The land, now called the Covent Garden, was seized by Henry VIII, and granted to the Earls of Bedford in 1552. The 4th Earl commissioned Inigo Jones to build some fine houses to attract wealthy tenants. Jones designed the Italianate arcaded square along with the church of St Paul’s. The design of the square was new to London, and had a significant influence on modern town planning, acting as the prototype for the laying-out of new estates as London grew.

A small open-air fruit and vegetable market had developed on the south side of the fashionable square by 1654. Gradually, both the market and the surrounding area fell into disrepute, as taverns, theatres, coffee-houses and brothels opened up; the gentry moved away, and rakes, wits and playwrights moved in.

By the 18th century it had become a well-known red-light district, attracting notable prostitutes. An Act of Parliament was drawn up to control the area, and Charles Fowler’s neo-classical building was erected in 1830 to cover and help organise the market. The area declined as a pleasure-ground as the market grew and further buildings were added: the Floral Hall, Charter Market, and in 1904 the Jubilee Market. By the end of the 1960s traffic congestion was causing problems, and in 1974 the market relocated to the New Covent Garden Market about three miles (5 km) south-west at Nine Elms. The central building re-opened as a shopping centre in 1980, and is now a tourist location containing cafes, pubs, small shops, and a craft market called the Apple Market, along with another market held in the Jubilee Hall.

Covent Garden tube station is a Grade II listed building and was opened by Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway on 11 April 1907, four months after services on the rest of the line began operating on 15 December 1906.

Like the rest of the original GNP&BR stations, the street level station building and platform tiling was designed by Leslie Green. The station building is a classic red ’Oxblood’ building which has two elevations fronting onto the end of James Street and Long Acre. The platform wall was tiled with two shades of yellow and white tiling which formed geometric shapes along with three blank spaces to incorporate the station name. As part of TFL’s investment programme, the ageing tiling dating back from the station’s opening was replaced in 2010 in a like-for-like basis, retaining the look and feel of the platforms.

Covent Garden station is one of the few stations in Central London for which platform access is only by lift or stairs and often becomes congested due to the Covent Garden area’s popularity with tourists. To control congestion on Saturday afternoons, when the surrounding shopping areas are at their busiest, the station was previously exit only to avoid the risk of dangerous overcrowding of the platforms, but following replacement of the lifts, this restriction has been lifted. There are four lifts which give access to street level, although a final flight of stairs from the lifts to the platforms means that the station is wheelchair inaccessible. Alternatively, there is an emergency spiral staircase of 193 steps (The equivalent to a 15 storey building). During the lift journey a recorded announcement is played asking passengers to have their tickets/passes ready as they exit the lifts and advising where to turn for Covent Garden’s market.

Image: Chris Ross


LOCAL PHOTOS
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William Shakespeare
TUM image id: 1509551019
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Hungerford Stairs circa 1828
TUM image id: 1557403389
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Trafalgar Square was a former station on the Bakerloo Line before it combined with Strand station on the Northern Line to become the new Charing Cross underground station.
Credit: The Underground Map
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Strand stretches along the River Thames between Trafalgar Square and Aldwych
Credit: The Underground Map
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Waterloo Bridge on an 1810 map.
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Hungerford Stairs circa 1828
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Royal Opera House, Bow Street frontage, with the statue of Dame Ninette de Valois in the foreground
Credit: Russ London
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London Hippodrome in 2017
Credit: Ethan Doyle White
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Trafalgar Square (1905) The steeplejack firm of W. Larkins Co Ltd. are at work cleaning Nelson’s Column for the first time since it was erected in 1843. The firm had been founded by Willliam Larkins in 1897 and he is pictured at the top next to Lord Nelson.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Strand frontage of Northumberland House (1752) The Percy Lion is atop the central façade and the statue of Charles I at right survives to this day The pedestrianised area in the foreground became the site of Trafalgar Square - back then it was the Royal Mews
Credit: Giovanni Canaletto
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British Museum station
Credit: London Transport Museum
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The Adelphi Building on Savoy Place, looking north from Victoria Embankment Gardens (2018)
Credit: Wiki Commons/Acabashi
Licence: CC BY 2.0


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