Galton Street, W10

Road in/near Queens Park Estate, existing between 1874 and now

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Road · Queens Park Estate · W10 ·
MARCH
6
2022

Galton Street lies within the Queen’s Park Estate, W10.

Because of its townscape and architectural quality and its historical interest, the Queen’s Park Estate was designed as a conservation area in 1978. A number of properties had been sold and many of them had already been "improved" in such an insensitive way that the visual unity of whole terraces was threatened.

The designation enabled the City Council to safeguard the character of the Estate and give guidance to owner-occupiers on suitable improvements. The conservation area was extended in 1991 to include parts of the Grand Union Canal and the Harrow Road Library (part of this extension was transferred to the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in 1994).




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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 05:50 GMT   

Batham Family (1851 - 1921)
I start with William Batham 1786-1852 born in St.Martins Middlesex. From various sources I have found snippets of information concerning his early life. A soldier in 1814 he married Mary Champelovier of Huguenot descent By 1819 they were in Kensington where they raised 10 children. Apart from soldier his other occupations include whitesmith, bell hanger and pig breeder. I find my first record in the 1851 English sensus. No street address is given, just ’The Potteries’. He died 1853. Only one child at home then George Batham 1839-1923, my great grandfather. By 1861 he is living in Thomas St. Kensington with his mother. A bricklayer by trade 1871, married and still in Thomas St. 1881 finds him in 5,Martin St. Kensington. 1891 10,Manchester St. 1911, 44 Hunt St Hammersmith. Lastly 1921 Census 7, Mersey St. which has since been demolished.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

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Lived here
Tom Vague   
Added: 9 Sep 2020 14:02 GMT   

The Bedford family at 3 Acklam Road (1860 - 1965)
From the 19th century up until 1965, number 3 Acklam Road, near the Portobello Road junction, was occupied by the Bedford family.

When the Westway construction work began the Bedfords sold up and moved to south London. In the early 1970s the house was taken over by the North Kensington Amenity Trust and became the Notting Hill Carnival office before its eventual demolition.

Anne Bedford (now McSweeney) has fond memories of living there, although she recalls: ‘I now know that the conditions were far from ideal but then I knew no different. There was no running hot water, inside toilet or bath, apart from the tin bath we used once a week in the large kitchen/dining room. Any hot water needed was heated in a kettle. I wasn’t aware that there were people not far away who were a lot worse off than us, living in poverty in houses just like mine but families renting one room. We did have a toilet/bathroom installed in 1959, which was ‘luxury’.

‘When the plans for the Westway were coming to light, we were still living in the house whilst all the houses opposite became empty and boarded up one by one. We watched all this going on and decided that it was not going to be a good place to be once the builders moved in to demolish all the houses and start work on the elevated road. Dad sold the house for a fraction of what it should have been worth but it needed too much doing to it to bring it to a good living standard. We were not rich by any means but we were not poor. My grandmother used to do her washing in the basement once a week by lighting a fire in a big concrete copper to heat the water, which would have been there until demolition.

‘When we moved from number 3, I remember the upright piano that my grandparents used to play ’ and me of sorts ’ being lowered out of the top floor and taken away, presumably to be sold. I used to play with balls up on the wall of the chemist shop on the corner of Acklam and Portobello. We would mark numbers on the pavement slabs in a grid and play hopscotch. At the Portobello corner, on one side there was the Duke of Sussex pub, on the other corner, a chemist, later owned by a Mr Fish, which I thought was amusing. When I was very young I remember every evening a man peddling along Acklam Road with a long thin stick with which he lit the streetlights.’ Michelle Active who lived at number 33 remembers: ‘6 of us lived in a one-bed basement flat on Acklam Road. When they demolished it we moved to a 4-bed maisonette on Silchester Estate and I thought it was a palace, two toilets inside, a separate bathroom that was not in the kitchen, absolute heaven.’



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Lived here
Brenda Jackson   
Added: 13 Aug 2017 21:39 GMT   

83 Pembroke Road
My Gt Gt grandparents lived at 83 Pembroke Road before it became Granville Road, They were married in 1874, John Tarrant and Maryann Tarrant nee Williamson.

Her brother George Samuel Williamson lived at 95 Pembroke Road with his wife Emily and children in the 1881 Census

Apparently the extended family also lived for many years in Alpha Place, Canterbury Road, Peel Road,

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Born here
Susan Wright   
Added: 16 Sep 2017 22:42 GMT   

Ada Crowe, 9 Bramley Mews
My Great Grandmother Ada Crowe was born in 9 Bramley Mews in 1876.

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Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:13 GMT   

St Jude’s Church, Lancefield Street
Saint Jude’s was constructed in 1878, while the parish was assigned in 1879 from the parish of Saint John, Kensal Green (P87/JNE2). The parish was united with the parishes of Saint Luke (P87/LUK1) and Saint Simon (P87/SIM) in 1952. The church was used as a chapel of ease for a few years, but in 1959 it was closed and later demolished.

The church is visible on the 1900 map for the street on the right hand side above the junction with Mozart Street.

Source: SAINT JUDE, KENSAL GREEN: LANCEFIELD STREET, WESTMINSTER | Londo

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The Underground Map   
Added: 24 Nov 2020 14:25 GMT   

The 1879 Agricultural Show
The 1879 Royal Agricultural Society of England’s annual show was held on an area which later became Queen’s Park and opened on 30 June 1879.

The show ran for a week but the poor weather meant people had to struggle through deep mud and attendances fell disastrously. The visit to the show by Queen Victoria on the fifth day rallied visitors and nearly half the people who visited the show went on that day.

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Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:08 GMT   

Wedding at St Jude’s Church
On 9th November 1884 Charles Selby and Johanna Hanlon got married in St Jude’s Church on Lancefield Street. They lived together close by at 103 Lancefield Street.
Charles was a Lather, so worked in construction. He was only 21 but was already a widower.
Johanna is not shown as having a profession but this is common in the records and elsewhere she is shown as being an Ironer or a Laundress. It is possible that she worked at the large laundry shown at the top of Lancefield Road on the 1900 map. She was also 21. She was not literate as her signature on the record is a cross.
The ceremony was carried out by William Hugh Wood and was witnessed by Charles H Hudson and Caroline Hudson.

Source: https://www.ancestry.co.uk/imageviewer/collections/1623/images/31280_197456-00100?pId=6694792

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Joan Clarke   
Added: 2 Feb 2021 10:54 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens
My late aunt Ivy Clarke (nee Burridge) lived with her whole family at 19 Avondale Park Gardens, according to the 1911 census and she was still there in 1937.What was it like in those days, I wonder, if the housing was only built in 1920?


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The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 14:30 GMT   

Kilburn Park - opened 1915
Kilburn Park station was opened at the height of the First World War

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PETER FAIRCLOUGH   
Added: 10 May 2021 14:46 GMT   

We once lived here
My family resided at number 53 Brindley Street Paddington.
My grandparents George and Elizabeth Jenkinson (ne Fowler) had four children with my Mother Olive Fairclough (ne Jenkinson) being born in the house on 30/09/1935.
She died on 29/04/2021 aged 85 being the last surviving of the four siblings

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Lived here
David Jones-Parry   
Added: 7 Sep 2017 12:13 GMT   

Mcgregor Road, W11 (1938 - 1957)
I was born n bred at 25 Mc Gregor Rd in 1938 and lived there until I joined the Royal Navy in 1957. It was a very interesting time what with air raid shelters,bombed houses,water tanks all sorts of areas for little boys to collect scrap and sell them on.no questions asked.A very happy boyhood -from there we could visit most areas of London by bus and tube and we did.

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Dave Fahey   
Added: 6 Jan 2021 02:40 GMT   

Bombing of the Jack O Newberry
My maternal grandfather, Archie Greatorex, was the licensee of the Earl of Warwick during the Second World War. My late mother Vera often told the story of the bombing of the Jack. The morning after the pub was bombed, the landlord’s son appeared at the Warwick with the pub’s till on an old pram; he asked my grandfather to pay the money into the bank for him. The poor soul was obviously in shock. The previous night, his parents had taken their baby down to the pub cellar to shelter from the air raids. The son, my mother never knew his name, opted to stay in his bedroom at the top of the building. He was the only survivor. I often wondered what became of him.

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Brenda Newton   
Added: 5 Jun 2021 07:17 GMT   

Hewer Street W10
John Nodes Undertakers Hewer Street W10

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Comment
   
Added: 30 Dec 2022 21:41 GMT   

Southam Street, W10
do any one remember J&A DEMOLITON at harrow rd kensal green my dad work for them in a aec 6 wheel tipper got a photo of him in it

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ken gaston   
Added: 16 Jan 2021 11:04 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens
My grandmother Hilda Baker and a large family lived in number 18 . It was a close community and that reflected in the coronation celebration held on the central green . I grew up in that square and went to school at Sirdar Road then St. Clements it was a great place to grow up with a local park and we would also trek to Holland Park or Kensington Gardens .Even then the area was considered deprived and a kindergarden for criminals . My generation were the first to escape to the new towns and became the overspill from London to get decent housing and living standards .

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

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Christine D Elliott   
Added: 20 Mar 2023 15:52 GMT   

The Blute Family
My grandparents, Frederick William Blute & Alice Elizabeth Blute nee: Warnham lived at 89 Blockhouse Street Deptford from around 1917.They had six children. 1. Alice Maragret Blute (my mother) 2. Frederick William Blute 3. Charles Adrian Blute 4. Violet Lillian Blute 5. Donald Blute 6. Stanley Vincent Blute (Lived 15 months). I lived there with my family from 1954 (Birth) until 1965 when we were re-housed for regeneration to the area.
I attended Ilderton Road School.
Very happy memories of that time.

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Pearl Foster   
Added: 20 Mar 2023 12:22 GMT   

Dukes Place, EC3A
Until his death in 1767, Daniel Nunes de Lara worked from his home in Dukes Street as a Pastry Cook. It was not until much later the street was renamed Dukes Place. Daniel and his family attended the nearby Bevis Marks synagogue for Sephardic Jews. The Ashkenazi Great Synagogue was established in Duke Street, which meant Daniel’s business perfectly situated for his occupation as it allowed him to cater for both congregations.

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Dr Paul Flewers   
Added: 9 Mar 2023 18:12 GMT   

Some Brief Notes on Hawthorne Close / Hawthorne Street
My great-grandparents lived in the last house on the south side of Hawthorne Street, no 13, and my grandmother Alice Knopp and her brothers and sisters grew up there. Alice Knopp married Charles Flewers, from nearby Hayling Road, and moved to Richmond, Surrey, where I was born. Leonard Knopp married Esther Gutenberg and lived there until the street was demolished in the mid-1960s, moving on to Tottenham. Uncle Len worked in the fur trade, then ran a pet shop in, I think, the Kingsland Road.

From the back garden, one could see the almshouses in the Balls Pond Road. There was an ink factory at the end of the street, which I recall as rather malodorous.

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KJH   
Added: 7 Mar 2023 17:14 GMT   

Andover Road, N7 (1939 - 1957)
My aunt, Doris nee Curtis (aka Jo) and her husband John Hawkins (aka Jack) ran a small general stores at 92 Andover Road (N7). I have found details in the 1939 register but don’t know how long before that it was opened.He died in 1957. In the 1939 register he is noted as being an ARP warden for Islington warden

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Added: 2 Mar 2023 13:50 GMT   

The Queens Head
Queens Head demolished and a NISA supermarket and flats built in its place.

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Mike   
Added: 28 Feb 2023 18:09 GMT   

6 Elia Street
When I was young I lived in 6 Elia Street. At the end of the garden there was a garage owned by Initial Laundries which ran from an access in Quick Street all the way up to the back of our garden. The fire exit to the garage was a window leading into our garden. 6 Elia Street was owned by Initial Laundry.

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Fumblina   
Added: 21 Feb 2023 11:39 GMT   

Error on 1800 map numbering for John Street
The 1800 map of Whitfield Street (17 zoom) has an error in the numbering shown on the map. The houses are numbered up the right hand side of John Street and Upper John Street to #47 and then are numbered down the left hand side until #81 BUT then continue from 52-61 instead of 82-91.

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P Cash   
Added: 19 Feb 2023 08:03 GMT   

Occupants of 19-29 Woburn Place
The Industrial Tribunals (later changed to Employment Tribunals) moved (from its former location on Ebury Bridge Road to 19-29 Woburn Place sometime in the late 1980s (I believe).

19-29 Woburn Place had nine floors in total (one in the basement and two in its mansard roof and most of the building was occupied by the Tribunals

The ’Head Office’ of the tribunals, occupied space on the 7th, 6th and 2nd floors, whilst one of the largest of the regional offices (London North but later called London Central) occupied space in the basement, ground and first floor.

The expansive ground floor entrance had white marble flooring and a security desk. Behind (on evey floor) lay a square (& uncluttered) lobby space, which was flanked on either side by lifts. On the rear side was an elegant staircase, with white marble steps, brass inlays and a shiny brass handrail which spiralled around an open well. Both staircase, stairwell and lifts ran the full height of the building. On all floors from 1st upwards, staff toilets were tucked on either side of the staircase (behind the lifts).

Basement Floor - Tribunal hearing rooms, dormant files store and secure basement space for Head Office. Public toilets.

Geound Floor - The ’post’ roon sat next to the entrance in the northern side, the rest of which was occupied by the private offices of the full time Tribunal judiciary. Thw largest office belonged to the Regional Chair and was situated on the far corner (overlooking Tavistock Square) The secretary to the Regional Chair occupied a small office next door.
The south side of this floor was occupied by the large open plan General Office for the administration, a staff kitchen & rest room and the private offices of the Regional Secretary (office manager) and their deputy.

First Dloor - Tribunal hearing rooms; separate public waiting rooms for Applicants & Respondents; two small rooms used by Counsel (on a ’whoever arrives first’ bases) and a small private rest room for use by tribunal lay members.

Second Floor - Tribunal Hearing Rooms; Tribunal Head Office - HR & Estate Depts & other tennants.

Third Floor - other tennants

Fourth Floor - other tennants

Fifth Floor - Other Tennants except for a large non-smoking room for staff, (which overlooked Tavistock Sqaure). It was seldom used, as a result of lacking any facities aside from a meagre collection of unwanted’ tatty seating. Next to it, (overlooking Tavistock Place) was a staff canteen.

Sixth Floor - Other tennants mostly except for a few offices on the northern side occupied by tribunal Head Office - IT Dept.

Seventh Floor - Other tenants in the northern side. The southern (front) side held the private offices of several senior managers (Secretariat, IT & Finance), private office of the Chief Accuntant; an office for two private secretaries and a stationary cupboard. On the rear side was a small kitchen; the private office of the Chief Executive and the private office of the President of the Tribunals for England & Wales. (From 1995 onwards, this became a conference room as the President was based elsewhere. The far end of this side contained an open plan office for Head Office staff - Secretariat, Finance & HR (staff training team) depts.

Eighth Floor - other tennants.


The Employment Tribunals (Regional & Head Offices) relocated to Vitory House, Kingsway in April 2005.






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V:2

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Adair Road before redevelopment (1964) A photo showing Adair Road’s junction with Golborne Gardens in March 1964.
Beethoven Street School Beethoven Street School was opened in 1881 to serve the community of the newly-built Queen's Park Estate.
Chamberlayne Farm Chamberlain (Wood) Farm developed out of the manor of Chambers, named after Richard de Camera, an early 13th century cleric.
Clayton Arms A pub which was situated halfway down West Row in Kensal Town.
Corner of Caird Street and Lancefield Street (1910) The corner of Caird Street with Lancefield Street.
Emslie Horniman’s Pleasance Emslie Horniman’s Pleasance is the traditional starting point for the Notting Hill Carnival.
Gas Light and Coke Company The gasometers of the Gas Light and Coke company dominated North Kensington until demolition in the late 20th century.
Harrow Road (1920s) Harrow Road in the 1920s, looking south east towards the Prince of Wales pub and the Emmanuel Church spire.
Hudson’s the chemist (1906) Hudson's, a chemist shop, stood on the corner of Ilbert Street and Third Avenue in the Queen's Park estate.
Jack of Newbury The Jack of Newbury stood at the corner of East Row and Kensal Road until it was bombed on 2 October 1940.
Kensal House There are two Kensal Houses in London W10 - this was the original
Ladbroke Grove railway bridge Looking north over Bartle Bridge in the 1950s
Lads of the Village One of the signature public houses along Kensal Road.
Lancefield Coachworks Lancefield Coachworks was a builder of bespoke bodies for expensive car chassis always introducing sporting elements into designs.
Lothrop Street (1907) Postcard of a "street on the Queen’s Park Estate".
Middle Row School Middle Row School was established in the late 19th century to provide education to the children of Kensal New Town.
Portobello Arms The Portobello Arms was a former pub in Kensal Town, established in 1842.
Queen’s Park Library Queen’s Park Library was built to improve the minds of the new Queen’s Park Estate residents.
The Flora The Flora is situated on Harrow Road, W10.
The Foresters The Foresters - a lost pub of London W10
The Plough From the sixteenth century onwards, the Plough stood beside the Harrow Road.
The Victoria (Narrow Boat) The Victoria later became the Narrow Boat before it burned down.
Wedlake Street Baths In a time when most had somewhere to live but few had somewhere to wash at home, public baths were the place to go...
Western Arms The Western Arms was a pub situated on the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Kensal Road.
William Miller’s Yard William Miller's Yard stood in Chapel Place, West Row.

NEARBY STREETS
Absalom Road, W10 Absalom Road was the former name for the western section of Golborne Gardens.
Adair Tower, W10 Adair Tower is a post-war tower block on the corner of Adair Road and Appleford Road, W10.
Adela Street, W10 Adela Street is a small cul-de-sac in Kensal Town.
Admiral Mews, W10 Admiral Mews is a small road off Barlby Road, W10.
Alderson Street, W10 Alderson Street is a side street north of Kensal Road.
Alperton Street, W10 Alperton Street is the first alphabetically named street in the Queen’s Park Estate, W10.
Appleford House, W10 Appleford House is a residential block along Appleford Road.
Ash House, W10 Ash House is a block on Heather Walk.
Banister House, W10 Banister House is a block on Bruckner Street.
Banister Road, W10 Banister Road just scrapes being classed as belonging to the Queen’s Park Estate.
Bantock House, W10 Bantock House is located on Third Avenue.
Barfett Street, W10 Barfett Street is a street on the Queen’s Park Estate, W10
Beethoven Street, W10 Beethoven Street is a street in the Queen’s Park Estate.
Birch House, W10 Birch House is a block on Droop Street.
Bosworth Road, W10 Bosworth Road was the first street built as Kensal New Town started to expand to the east.
Boyce House, W10 Boyce House is located on Bruckner Street.
Bravington Road, W9 Bravington Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Briar Walk, W10 Briar Walk lies on the Queen's Park Estate
Bruckner Street, W10 Bruckner Street is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Brunel Mews, W10 Brunel Mews, a tiny cul-de-sac, is the northern extension of Sixth Avenue.
Buller Road, W10 Buller Road is a small residential road on the west side of Kilburn Lane.
Caird Street, W10 Caird Street is the ’C’ street on the Queen’s Park Estate
Canal Close, W10 Canal Close was built over the former gas works site at the top of Ladbroke Grove.
Canal Way, W10 Canal Way was built on the site of the Kensal Gas Works.
Cherry Tree House, W10 Cherry Tree House is a block on Droop Street.
Clifford House, W10 Clifford House is a block on Droop Street.
Compton Road, NW10 Compton Road is a street in Willesden.
Conlan Street, W10 Conlan Street is one of the newer roads of Kensal Town.
Coomassie Road, W9 Coomassie Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Courtville House, W10 Courtville House is a block on Parry Road.
Croft House, W10 Croft House is a block on Parry Road.
Danby House, W10 Danby House is a block on Bruckner Street.
Dart Street, W10 Dart Street runs eastwards from Third Avenue and becomes Marban Road.
Dowland Street, W10 Dowland Street is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Droop House, W10 Droop House is a block on Droop Street.
Droop Street, W10 Droop Street is one of the main east-west streets of the Queen’s Park Estate.
East Row, W10 East Row is a road with a long history within Kensal Town.
Elm House, W10 Elm House can be found on Briar Walk.
Enbrook Street, W10 Enbrook Street is another street north of Harrow Road, W10 without a pub.
Farnaby House, W10 Farnaby House is a block on Lancefield Street.
Farrant Street, W10 Farrant Street is the missing link in the alphabetti spaghetti of the streetnames of the Queen’s Park Estate
Fermoy Road, W9 Fermoy Road was named in 1883 and partly built up by 1884
Fifth Avenue, W10 Fifth Avenue is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Fir House, W10 Fir House can be found on Droop Street.
First Avenue, W10 First Avenue is street number one in the Queen's Park Estate
Fourth Avenue, W10 Fourth Avenue runs south from Ilbert Street.
Golborne Gardens, W10 Golborne Gardens is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Halstow Road, NW10 Halstow Road was laid out in the 1890s.
Harrington Court, W10 Harrington Court can be found on Dart Street.
Harrow Road, NW10 Harrow Road is a location in London.
Harrow Road, W10 Harrow Road is a main road through London W10.
Harvist Road, NW10 Harvist Road is a street in Willesden.
Hawthorn Walk, W10 Queen's Park Estate
Hazlewood Crescent, W10 Hazlewood Crescent, much altered by 1970s redevelopment, is an original road of the area.
Hazlewood Tower, W10 Hazlewood Tower is a skyscraper in North Kensington, London W10.
Heather Walk, W10 Heather Walk lies in the Queen’s Park Estate
Herries Street, W10 Herries Street is a street in the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Holly House, W10 Holly House is a block on Hawthorn Walk.
Huxley Street, W10 Huxley Street is the only street beginning with an H on the Queen’s Park Estate.
Ilbert Street, W10 Ilbert Street is the ’I’ street on the Queen’s Park Estate, W10
James Collins Close, W9 James Collins Close is a street in Maida Vale.
John Fearon Walk, W10 This is a street in the W10 postcode area
Kensal House, W10 Kensal House was designed in 1936 to show off the power of gas and originally had no electricity at all.
Kensal Road, W10 Kensal Road, originally called Albert Road, is the heart of Kensal Town.
Kilburn Lane, W10 Kilburn Lane runs around the edge of the Queen’s Park Estate in London W10.
Kilravock Street, W10 Kilravock Street is a street on the Queen’s Park Estate, London W10
Kingisholt Court, NW10 Kingisholt Court is sited on Harrow Road.
Kings Holt Mews, W10 Kings Holt Mews runs behind Kilburn Lane.
Lancefield Street, W10 Lancefield Street runs from Caird Street to Bruckner Street.
Larch House, W10 Larch House is a block on Rowan Walk.
Lawes House, W10 Lawes House is a block on Bruckner Street.
Lothrop Street, W10 Lothrop Street is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Manchester Drive, W10 Manchester Drive is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Maple Walk, W10 Post war development on the Queen’s Park Estate created some plant-based street names.
Marban Road, W9 Marban Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Marne Street, W10 Marne Street is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Middle Row, W10 Middle Row is one of the original streets laid out as Kensal New Town.
Mounsey House, W10 Mounsey House is a block on Parry Road.
Mozart Street, W10 Mozart Street was part of the second wave of development of the Queen’s Park Estate.
Nautilus House, W10 Nautilus House is a block on West Row.
Nutbourne Street, W10 Nutbourne Street is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, W10
Oak House, W10 Oak House is sited on Sycamore Walk.
Octavia House, W10 Octavia House on Southern Row was built in the late 1930s.
Oliphant Street, W10 Oliphant Street was the final alphabetical street on the original Queen’s Park Estate naming scheme.
Onslow Close, W10 Onslow Close is in the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Parry Road, W10 Parry Road is on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Peach Road, W10 Peach Road is one of the newer streets of the Queen’s Park Estate.
Pember House, NW10 Pember House is a block on Pember Road.
Pember Road, NW10 Pember Road is one of the side streets to the west of Kilburn Lane, NW10
Pine House, W10 Pine House is a block on Droop Street.
Portnall House, W9 Portnall House is located on Portnall Road.
Portnall Road, W9 Portnall Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Purday House, W10 Purday House is a block on Bruckner Street.
Queen’s Park Court, W10 Queen’s Park Court is a block on Ilbert Street.
Regent Street, NW10 Regent Street, otherwise an obscure side street is one of the oldest roads in Kensal Green.
Ronan Walk, W10 Ronan Walk was one of the streets constructed in a 1970s build parallel to the Harrow Road.
Second Avenue, W10 Second Avenue is one of the streets of the Queen's Park Estate, W10
Selby Square, W10 Selby Square is a walkway in the Queen’s Park Estate
Severn Avenue, W10 Severn Avenue is a newer thoroughfare in the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Sixth Avenue, W10 Sixth Avenue is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Southern Row, W10 Southern Row was originally South Row to match the other streets in the neighbourhood.
St Johns Terrace, W10 St Johns Terrace is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Stansbury Square, W10 This is a street in the W10 postcode area
Steve Biko Court, W10 Steve Biko Court is a block on St John’s Terrace.
Sycamore Walk, W10 Queen's Park Estate
Symphony Mews, W10 Symphony Mews is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
The Quadrant, W10 The Quadrant is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Third Avenue, W10 Third Avenue is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Tolhurst Drive, W10 Tolhurst Drive is a street in the Queen's Park Estate
Tollbridge Close, W10 This is a street in the W10 postcode area
Tropical Court, W10 Tropical Court is a block on Kilburn Lane.
Wakeman House, NW10 Wakeman House is a block on Wakeman Road.
Warfield Road, NW10 Warfield Road is a street in Willesden.
Wedlake Street, W10 Wedlake Street arrived as the second wave of building in Kensal Town was completed.
Wellington Road, NW10 Wellington Road commemorates the Duke of Wellington.
West Row, W10 West Row, W10 began its life in the early 1840s.
Western Dwellings Western Dwellings were a row of houses, opposite the Western Gas Works, housing some of the workers.
Westfield Court, NW10 Westfield Court is a block on Chamberlayne Road.
Willow House, W10 Willow House can be found on Maple Walk.

NEARBY PUBS


Albion The Albion stopped being a pub early.
Clayton Arms A pub which was situated halfway down West Row in Kensal Town.
Jack of Newbury The Jack of Newbury stood at the corner of East Row and Kensal Road until it was bombed on 2 October 1940.
Lads of the Village One of the signature public houses along Kensal Road.
Portobello Arms The Portobello Arms was a former pub in Kensal Town, established in 1842.
The Earl Derby The Earl Derby stood on the corner of Southern Row and Bosworth Road.
The Flora The Flora is situated on Harrow Road, W10.
The Foresters The Foresters - a lost pub of London W10
The Plough From the sixteenth century onwards, the Plough stood beside the Harrow Road.
The Prince of Wales A pub in Kensal Town
The Victoria (Narrow Boat) The Victoria later became the Narrow Boat before it burned down.
Western Arms The Western Arms was a pub situated on the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Kensal Road.


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Queens Park Estate

The part of Queen's Park which is in the W10 postcode and City of Westminster, is known as the Queens Park Estate.

It was built from 1874 by the Artisans, Labourers & General Dwellings Company. The architecture of that estate of some 2000 small houses is distinctively Gothic-revival, with polychrome brickwork, pinnacles and turrets along the bigger roads.

It retains First Avenue, Second Avenue etc up to Sixth Avenue, and originally had streets A-P. The street names have been made into full words, (Alperton Street, Barfett Street, Caird Street, Droop Street, Embrook Street, Farrant Street, Galton Street, Huxley Street, Ilbert Street, Kilravock Street, Lothrop Street, Marne Street, Nutbourne Street, Oliphant Street, Peach Street).

It was on this estate that the first QPR footballers had their homes.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Coronation street party, 1953.
TUM image id: 1545250697
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The "Western"
TUM image id: 1489498043
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Clayton Arms
TUM image id: 1453029104
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Foresters
TUM image id: 1453071112
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Lads of the Village pub
TUM image id: 1556874496
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Prince of Wales
TUM image id: 1556874951
Licence: CC BY 2.0
1879 Royal Agricultural Society Show
TUM image id: 1557317518
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Albion, now in residential use.
TUM image id: 1556404154
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

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Coronation street party, 1953.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The "Western"
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Clayton Arms
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The Earl Derby stood on the corner of Southern Row and Bosworth Road. The Earl Derby himself was Thomas Stanley, 1st Earl of Derby who fought at the battle of Bosworth.
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The Foresters
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The Lads of the Village pub
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The Prince of Wales
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Admiral Blake (The Cowshed) Adjacent Admiral Mews was occupied by a series of sheds for cows. Drovers bringing their cattle to the London markets would house them in these sheds for the night, whilst they themselves found shelter and refreshment in the neighbouring tavern, which received a nickname alongside its official one. The exterior of the pub was featured in the early 2000s pub-based sitcom, "Time Gentlemen Please", written by Richard Herring and Al Murray.
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Photographed just after the Second World War, this is the bombed-out Rackham Street, London W10 looking down from the junction with Exmoor Street. Rackham Street ran off Ladbroke Grove, roughly along the line of the modern Bruce Close.
Credit: Kensington and Chelsea library
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Middle Row School was constructed to provide education for the children of Kensal New Town. In 1877, an application was made to the Chelsea Vestry "to build a School House and premises. to be known as Middle Row Schools. Kensal Road by Messrs. Hook & Oldrey, builders..." The official opening took place on 19 August 1878.
Credit: Wiki Commons
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