Long Lane, EC1M

Buildings in this area date from the nineteenth century or before

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(51.52088 -0.10203, 51.52 -0.102) 
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Road · Clerkenwell · EC1M ·
JANUARY
1
2000

Long Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.

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A lot of the street information research on this website is academic in nature - from university research, the Survey of London, British History Online, borough conservation areas and more. Occasionally, the Hive Mind comes up trumps - these derivations come from discoveries on the Wikipedia made during 2019 which is feeding into the project.

If we find derivations wanting here, we remove them. With that proviso, the TUM project provides them here for your enjoyment...

A-B-C D-E-F G-H-I J-K-L M-N-O P-Q-R S T-U-V W-X-Y-Z

Waithman Street – after Robert Waithman, Lord Mayor of London 1823-33 [City of London]
Wakefield Mews and Wakefield Street – after a former local pub, the Pindar of Wakefield [Bloomsbury]
Wakley Street – after 19th century surgeon and social reformer Thomas Wakley [Finsbury]
Walbrook and Walbrook Wharf – after the Walbrook stream which formerly flowed here, possibly with reference to the Anglo-Saxon 'wealh' meaning 'foreigner' (i.e. the native Britons, or 'Welsh') [City of London]
Walcot Square – after Edmund Walcot, 17th century owner of this land [Lambeth]
Walcott Street, SW1 – after Reverend MEC Walcott, curate of the St Margaret's, Westminster in the 1840s
Waldegrave Road, Teddington (and the nearby park and gardens) were named after Frances Waldegrave, wife of the 7th Earl Waldegrave who lived at Strawberry Hill House in the 19th century on the road.
Walker Close, N11 The Walkers of Southgate were a prominent local family who owned Arnos Grove (now Southgate Beaumont) on nearby Cannon Hill. The street is located near the better known Arnos Grove tube station.
Walnut Tree Walk – after the walnut tress formerly prominent here [Kennington/Lambeth]
Wandsworth Road – as it led to the south-west London area of this name [Vauxhall]
Wardour Mews – named after local 17th century landowners the Wardour family, and formerly called Colman Hedge Lane after a nearby field; the section south of Brewer Street was formerly Prince Street prior to 1878, in parallel with Rupert Street [Soho]
Wardour Street, W1 Archibald Wardour was the architect of several buildings on the street
Wardrobe Place and Wardrobe Terrace – after the Royal Wardrobe which formerly stood here until destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666 [City of London]
Warner Street and Warner Yard – after Robert Warner, local 18th century landowner [Clerkenwell]
Warren Mews – after Anne Warren, wife of local 18th century landowner Charles Fitzroy [Fitzrovia]
Warren Street, W1 Anne Warren was the wife of Charles FitzRoy, 1st Baron Southampton, the land owner responsible for the development of the area
Warwick Court – site of the townhouse of Gray’s Inn lawyer Robert Rich, Baron Rich who was created Earl of Warwick in 1618 [Holborn]
Warwick House Street – formerly approached Warwick House, built in the 17th century for Sir Philip Warwick [St James]
Warwick Lane, Warwick Passage and Warwick Square – after the Neville family, earls of Warwick, who owned a house near here in the 1400s; formerly Old Dean’s Lane, after a house here resided in by the Dean of St Paul’s [City of London]
Warwick Place North, Warwick Row, Warwick Square, Warwick Square Mews, Warwick Way, West Warwick Place – after Henry Wise, local 18th century landowner and gardener to William III, who owned land in Warwickshire [Pimlico/Victoria]
Warwick Row – after Henry Wise, local 18th century landowner and gardener to William III, who owned land in Warwickshire [Westminster]
Warwick Street – unknown; formerly Dog Lane, later Marrowbone/Marylebone Street [Soho]
Wat Tyler Road, SE10 Wat Tyler was the rebel who launched the Peasants' Revolt in 1381
Water Lane – after a former watergate that stood here by the Thames; formerly Spurrier Lane [City of London]
Water Street – formerly ran to the waterline of the Thames, prior to the building of the Thames Embankment [Holborn]
Watergate – after a watergate which stood here on the Thames [City of London]
Watergate Walk – after a former watergate built in 1626 for George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham as an entrance for the former York House [Strand]
Waterhouse Square – after Alfred Waterhouse, architect of Holborn Bars, also known as the Prudential Assurance Building, which surrounds the square [Hatton Garden]
Waterloo Bridge and Waterloo Road – the road was built in 1817 shortly after the British victory over Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo [Waterloo]
Waterloo Place – after the Battle of Waterloo which ended the Napoleonic Wars [St James]
Watling Court and Watling Street – corrupted from the old name of Athelingestrate (Saxon Prince Street), by association with the more famous Roman Watling Street [City of London]
Watson’s Mews – after John Watson, local 18th century leaseholder [Marylebone]
Waverton Street – after Waverton, Cheshire, where local landowners the Grosvenors also held land [Mayfair]
Weavers Lane – probably after weavers formerly working from here [Southwark]
Webbs Road Hillingdon Is one of a number of short roads in Yeading originally formed of social housing and named after Labour politicians. Sidney Webb and Beatrice Webb were prominent social reformers.
Wedgewood Mews – after Josiah Wedgewood, Georgian-era manufacturer of high-quality pottery and a campaigner for social reform, who owned a pottery near here [Soho]
Weighhouse Street – after the King’s Weigh House Chapel, which moved here its site above the King’s Weight House in the City in 1891; before this it was known as Robert Street, after Robert Grosvenor, 1st Marquess of Westminster, and before that as Chandler Street after the local chandler trade [Mayfair]
Welbeck Street – after Welbeck Abbey in Nottinghamshire, seat of William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland [Marylebone]
Welbeck Way – after Welbeck Abbey in Nottinghamshire, seat of William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland [Marylebone]
Well Court – after the numerous wells formerly located in this area [City of London]
Weller Street – after Sam Weller, a character in the novel The Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens, by association with Dickens Square [Southwark]
Wellington Road, St John's Wood Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington The road was developed from about 1816, following Wellington's victory at the Battle of Waterloo.
Wellington Street – after Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington [Covent Garden]
Wells Mews – after Joseph (or George) Wells, local 17th century farmer [Fitzrovia]
Wells Street – after Joseph (or George) Wells, local 17th century farmer [Fitzrovia]
Werrington Street - after Werrington, Cornwall, where local landowners the dukes of Bedford held land; formerly Clarendon Street [Somers Town]
Wesley Street – after Charles Wesley, hymn author, who is buried nearby [Marylebone]
West Central Street – named in 1894, after the recent innovation of postcodes (this being the boundary between WC1 and WC1) [Covent Garden]
West Eaton Place - after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), whose family seat is Eaton Hall, Cheshire [Belgravia]
West Halkin Street - after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), who owned Halkyn Castle in Wales [Belgravia]
West Halkin Street is named after Halkyn Castle, originally a Grosvenor family property in Flintshire. [Belgravia]
West Harding Street – after local 16th century property owner Agnes Harding, who bequeathed the surrounding area to the Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths for the upkeep of widows [City of London]
West Mews – a shortening of its pre-1936 name Warwick Place Mews West [Pimlico/Victoria]
West Poultry Avenue – after the meat trade here at Smithfield Market [City of London]
West Square – after its late 18th century owners the West family [Kennington/Lambeth]
West Square – after its late 18th century owners the West family [Lambeth]
West Street – unknown, possibly it was on the western boundary of St Gile's parish; formerly Hog Street [Covent Garden]
Westminster Bridge Road – as it leads to Westminster Bridge [Lambeth]
Westminster Bridge Road – as it leads to Westminster Bridge [Waterloo]
Westmoreland Place – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate; as the last of their lands to be developed they had seemingly run out of eponymous names from themselves, so they chose various pleasant-sounding aristocratic titles, of which this is one [Pimlico/Victoria]
Westmoreland Terrace – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate; as the last of their lands to be developed they had seemingly run out of eponymous names from themselves, so they chose various pleasant-sounding aristocratic titles, of which this is one [Pimlico/Victoria]
Weston Rise – after John Weston, who built this road in the 1790s [Clerkenwell]
Weston Street – after local 19th century property owner John Weston [Southwark]
Weymouth Mews and Weymouth Street – after Lady Elizabeth Bentinck, Viscountess Weymouth, daughter of William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland, who owned this estate [Marylebone]
Wheatley Street – after Francis Wheatley, Victorian artist who lived in the area [Marylebone]
Whetstone Park – built by William Whetstone in 1636 [Holborn]
Whidborne Street – possibly for directors of the East End Dwellings Company who developed these streets in the 1890s [Bloomsbury]
Whiskin Way – after John Whiskin, local landowner/builder in the 19th century [Clerkenwell]
Whitcomb Court - after William Whitcomb, 17th century brewer and property developer [Leicester Square]
Whitcomb Street - after William Whitcomb, 17th century brewer and property developer [Leicester Square]
White Hart Court – after a former inn of this name [City of London]
White Hart Street – by connection with local landowner Edward the Black Prince, son of Edward III, whose crest was a white hart [Kennington/Lambeth]
White Hart Yard – after a former inn here of this name [Southwark]
White Horse Street – after a former inn of this name at this site, named for the Royal emblem of the House of Hanover [Mayfair]
White Horse Yard – after a former inn of this name [City of London]
White Kennett Street, EC3 White Kennett Bishop of Peterborough (1707), was previously rector of the nearly St Botolph's Aldgate
White Lion Court – after a former inn of this name, destroyed by fire in 1765 [City of London]
White Lion Hill – this formerly led to White Lion Wharf, which is thought to have been named after a local inn [City of London]
Whitecross Street – after a white cross which stood near here in the 1200s [Finsbury]
Whitefriars Street – after the Carmelite order (known as the White friars), who were granted land here by Edward I [City of London]
Whitehall, Whitehall Court, Whitehall Gardens and Whitehall Place – after the former Palace of Whitehall on this site, destroyed by fire in 1698 [Westminster]
Whitehaven Street – Broadley Street near here was formerly Earl Street, and the surrounding streets were given earldom-related names in the early 19th century; this was named for the Earls of Carlise and was originally Little Carlisle Street, later changed after Whitehaven, Cumberland [Lisson Grove]
Whitfield Place – after George Whitefield, prominent 18th century religious figure, who founded a tabernacle near here in 1756 [Fitzrovia]
Whitfield Street, W1 George Whitefield Builder of Whitefield's Tabernacle, in the vicinity, in 1756
Whitgift Street – after John Whitgift, Archbishop of Canterbury 1583-1604, by connection with the nearby Lambeth Palace [Lambeth]
Whitgift Street, Croydon John Whitgift Archbishop of Canterbury (1583-1604)  lived at Croydon Palace, and is buried in Croydon Minster.
Whittaker Avenue, Richmond John Whittaker Ellis was the first Mayor of Richmond, who bought a building adjacent to the road which became the town hall
Whittaker Street – after its 1830 builder John Whittaker [Belgravia]
Whittington Avenue – after Richard Whittington, former Lord Mayor of London [City of London]
Wicklow Street – possibly from Wicklow in Ireland [Clerkenwell]
Widegate Street – thought to be after a gate that formerly stood on this street; formerly known as Whitegate Alley [City of London]
Wigmore Place – after Wigmore Castle in Herefordshire, seat of Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer [Marylebone]
Wigmore Street – after Wigmore Castle in Herefordshire, seat of Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer [Marylebone]
Wilberforce Road William Wilberforce British politician, a philanthropist and a leader of the movement to abolish the slave trade
Wilcox Place – after Francis Wilcox, local 19th century landowner [Westminster]
Wild Court – corruption of ‘Weld’, after Henry Weld who lived in Weld House on this site in the 17th century [Covent Garden]
Wild Street – corruption of ‘Weld’, after Henry Weld who lived in Weld House on this site in the 17th century [Covent Garden]
Wilfred Street – originally William Street, after Viscount Stafford, who lived in a house adjacent in the 17th century [Westminster]
William IV Street – named after William IV, reigning king when the street was laid out by John Nash in 1831 [Covent Garden]
William Barefoot Drive, SE9 Named for a prominent local politician, who was Mayor of Woolwich three times
William Morris Close, E17 William Morris spent his childhood at the nearby Water House, which is now the William Morris Gallery
William Mews and William Street – after William Lowndes of the local landowning Lowndes family [Belgravia]
William Road – after the later William IV, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [Regent’s Park]
Willoughby Highwalk – presumably after Sir Francis Willoughby, who is buried in the nearby St Giles-without-Cripplegate Church [City of London]
Willoughby Street – after GP Willoughy, mayor of Holborn Borough in the 1910s [Bloomsbury]
Willow Place – after the willow trees that were formerly common here [Westminster]
Wilmington Square and Wilmington Street – after local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton, who also had the title Baron Wilmington [Clerkenwell]
Wilton Crescent Mews, Wilton Place, Wilton Row, Wilton Street and Wilton Terrace - after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave); Eleanor Egerton was the wife of Robert Grosvenor, 1st Marquess of Westminster [Belgravia]
Wilton Crescent, SW1 Thomas Egerton, 2nd Earl of Wilton Second son of Robert Grosvenor, 1st Marquess of Westminster; the road forms part of the Grosvenor estate.
Wilton Road – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family Estate; Robert Grosvenor, 1st Marquess of Westminster married Eleanor Egerton, daughter of Thomas Egerton, 1st Earl of Wilton [Pimlico/Victoria]
Wimpole Mews – after Wimpole Hall in Cambridgeshire, seat of Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer [Marylebone]
Wimpole Street – after Wimpole Hall in Cambridgeshire, seat of Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer [Marylebone]
Winchester Square – after Winchester House, formerly the London house of the Bishop of Winchester [Southwark]
Winchester Street – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate; as the last of their lands to be developed they had seemingly run out of eponymous names from themselves, so they Winchester Walk – after Winchester House, formerly the London house of the Bishop of Winchester [Southwark]
chose various pleasant-sounding aristocratic titles, of which this is one [Pimlico/Victoria]
Windmill Street – after the windmill that formerly stood near here in the 18th century [Fitzrovia]
Windmill Walk – after the windmills formerly located here when it was countryside; formerly Windmill Street [Waterloo]
Windsor Place, SW1 - after the Windsor Castle pub located near to here
Wine Office Court – after an office here that granted licenses to sell wine in the 17th century [City of London]
Winnett Street – named after local business owner William Winnett in 1935; prior to this it was Upper Rupert Street [Soho]
Withers Place – after William Withers, 18th century property owner [Finsbury]
Woburn Place, Woburn Square, Woburn Walk and Upper Woburn Place – after Woburn Abbey, principal seat of local landowners the dukes of Bedford [Bloomsbury]
Woffington Close, KT1 Peg Woffington was ab 18th-century actress who performed in Teddington, near where the road is located.
Wood Street – as wood and fire logs were sold here as part of the Cheapside market [City of London]
Woodbridge Street – after Thomas Seckford, Elizabethan court official, who left land nearby in his will for the building of an almshouse; Sekford was born in Woodbridge, Suffolk [Clerkenwell/Finsbury]
Wood's Mews – after Richard Wood, who built this street in 1731 [Mayfair]
Woodstock Mews – after William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland, Viscount Woodstock [Marylebone]
Woodstock Street – after either Woodstock, Oxfordshire, location of to Blenheim Palace, home of John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough, 17th – 18th century general [23] or Thomas Woodstock, 18th century builder [Mayfair]
Woolf Mews – presumably after the author and local resident Virginia Woolf [Bloomsbury]
Wormwood Street – after the wormwood formerly grown here for medicine [City of London]
Wren Road, SE5 The road was built on the grounds of a former house said to have been occupied by Sir Christopher Wren
Wren Street – after prominent architect Sir Christopher Wren [Clerkenwell/Finsbury]
Wrestler’s Court – after a former Tudor-era house here of this name [City of London]
Wyclif Street – after John Wycliffe, noted 14th century religious reformer; by association with the former nearby Smithfield Martyrs’ Memorial Church [Clerkenwell/Finsbury]
Wyndham Mews, Wyndham Street and Wyndham Yard – after Anne Wyndham, wife of local landowner Henry Portman [Marylebone]
Wynyatt Street – corruption of ‘Wynyates’; after local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton, who owned land at Compton Wynyates in Northamptonshire [Clerkenwell/Finsbury]
Wythburn Place – after Wythburn Fells, Cumberland, by association with the nearby Great Cumberland Place [Marylebone]
Yardley Street – after local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton, one of whom was born at Yardley Hastings, Northamptonshire [Clerkenwell/Finsbury]
Yarmouth Place – after Francis Charles Seymour-Conway, 3rd Marquess of Hertford, Earl of Yarmouth who lived near here in the 19th century [Mayfair]
York Bridge - after Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [Regent’s Park]
York Buildings – a house was built on this site in the 14th century for the bishops of Norwich – in the reign of Queen Mary it was acquired by the archbishops of York and named ‘York House’; York Place was formerly ‘Of Alley’, after George Villiers [Strand]
York Gate - after Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [Regent’s Park]
York Place – a house was built on this site in the 14th century for the bishops of Norwich – in the reign of Queen Mary it was acquired by the archbishops of York and named ‘York House’; York Place was formerly ‘Of Alley’, after George Villiers [Strand]
York Terrace East - after Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [Regent’s Park]
York Terrace West - after Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [Regent’s Park]
York Street – after Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany, brother of King George IV [Marylebone]
Yorkshire Grey Yard – named after a local inn of this name in the 18th century, presumably referring to the breed of horse [Holborn]
Young Street, W8 - Named for Thomas Young, developer of the area
Young's Buildings, EC1 – after Francis Young, local 18th century property owner
Zoar Street, SE1 – after the former Zoar Chapel here, named for the Biblical Zoara


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
MCNALLY    
Added: 17 May 2021 09:42 GMT   

Blackfriars (1959 - 1965)
I lived in Upper Ground from 1959 to 1964 I was 6 years old my parents Vince and Kitty run the Pub The Angel on the corner of Upper Ground and Bodies Bridge. I remember the ceiling of the cellar was very low and almost stretched the length of Bodies Bridge. The underground trains run directly underneath the pub. If you were down in the cellar when a train was coming it was quite frightening

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Reply
Tom   
Added: 21 May 2021 23:07 GMT   

Blackfriars
What is, or was, Bodies Bridge?

Reply

Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 19:47 GMT   

Millions Of Rats In Busy London
The Daily Mail on 14 April 1903 reported "MILLIONS OF RATS IN BUSY LONDON"

A rat plague, unprecedented in the annals of London, has broken out on the north side of the Strand. The streets principally infested are Catherine street, Drury lane, Blackmore street, Clare Market and Russell street. Something akin to a reign of terror prevails among the inhabitants after nightfall. Women refuse to pass along Blackmore street and the lower parts of Stanhope street after dusk, for droves of rats perambulate the roadways and pavements, and may be seen running along the window ledges of the empty houses awaiting demolition by the County Council in the Strand to Holborn improvement scheme.

The rats, indeed, have appeared in almost-incredible numbers. "There are millions of them," said one shopkeeper, and his statement was supported by other residents. The unwelcome visitors have been evicted from their old haunts by the County Council housebreakers, and are now busily in search of new homes. The Gaiety Restaurant has been the greatest sufferer. Rats have invaded the premises in such force that the managers have had to close the large dining room on the first floor and the grill rooms on the ground floor and in the basement. Those three spacious halls which have witnessed many as semblages of theatre-goers are now qui:e deserted. Behind the wainscot of the bandstand in the grillroom is a large mound of linen shreds. This represents 1728 serviettes carried theee by the rats.

In the bar the removal of a panel disclosed the astonishing fact that the rats have dragged for a distance of seven or eight yards some thirty or forty beer and wine bottles and stacked them in such a fashion as to make comfortable sleeping places. Mr Williams. the manager of the restaurant, estimates that the rats have destroyed L200 worth of linen. Formerly the Gaiety Restaurant dined 2000 persons daily; no business whatever is now done in this direction.

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Comment
Steven Shepherd   
Added: 4 Feb 2021 14:20 GMT   

Our House
I and my three brothers were born at 178 Pitfield Street. All of my Mothers Family (ADAMS) Lived in the area. There was an area behind the house where the Hoxton Stall holders would keep the barrows. The house was classed as a slum but was a large house with a basement. The basement had 2 rooms that must have been unchanged for many years it contained a ’copper’ used to boil and clean clothes and bedlinen and a large ’range’ a cast iron coal/log fired oven. Coal was delivered through a ’coal hole’ in the street which dropped through to the basement. The front of the house used to be a shop but unused while we lived there. I have many more happy memories of the house too many to put here.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 14:31 GMT   

correction
Chaucer did not write Pilgrims Progress. His stories were called the Canterbury Tales

Reply
Comment
Lena    
Added: 18 Mar 2021 13:08 GMT   

White Conduit Street, N1
My mum, Rosina Wade of the Wade and Hannam family in the area of Chapel Street and Parkfield Street, bought her first “costume” at S Cohen’s in White Conduit Street. Would have probably been about 1936 or thereabouts. She said that he was a small man but an expert tailor. I hope that Islington Council preserve the shop front as it’s a piece of history of the area. Mum used to get her high heel shoes from an Italian shoe shop in Chapel Street. She had size 2 feet and they would let her know when a new consignment of size 2 shoes were in. I think she was a very good customer. She worked at Killingbacks artificial flower maker in Northampton Square and later at the Halifax bombers factory north of Edgware where she was a riveter.

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Comment
Jeff Owen   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 16:18 GMT   

Owen’s School
Owen Street is the site of Owen’s Boys’ School. The last school was built in 1881 and was demolished in the early 1990s to make way for the development which stand there today. It was a “Direct Grant” grammar school and was founded in 1613 by Dame Alice Owen. What is now “Owen’s Fields” was the playground between the old school and the new girls’ school (known then as “Dames Alice Owen’s School” or simply “DAOS”). The boys’ school had the top two floors of that building for their science labs. The school moved to Potters Bar in Hertfordshire in 1971 and is now one of the top State comprehensive schools in the country. The old building remained in use as an accountancy college and taxi-drivers’ “knowledge” school until it was demolished. The new building is now part of City and Islington College. Owen’s was a fine school. I should know because I attended there from 1961 to 1968.

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Added: 3 Jun 2021 15:50 GMT   

All Bar One
The capitalisation is wrong

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

Reply
Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 09:12 GMT   

Dunloe Avenue, N17
I was born in 1951,my grandparents lived at 5 Dunloe Avenue.I had photos of the coronation decorations in the area for 1953.The houses were rented out by Rowleys,their ’workers yard’ was at the top of Dunloe Avenue.The house was fairly big 3 bedroom with bath and toilet upstairs,and kitchenette downstairs -a fairly big garden.My Grandmother died 1980 and the house was taken back to be rented again

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Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 08:59 GMT   

Spigurnell Road, N17
I was born and lived in Spigurnell Road no 32 from 1951.My father George lived in Spigurnell Road from 1930’s.When he died in’76 we moved to number 3 until I got married in 1982 and moved to Edmonton.Spigurnell Road was a great place to live.Number 32 was 2 up 2 down toilet out the back council house in those days

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Comment
Lewis   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 20:48 GMT   

Ploy
Allotment

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Comment
   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 14:31 GMT   

correction
Chaucer did not write Pilgrims Progress. His stories were called the Canterbury Tales

Reply
Comment
old lady   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 11:58 GMT   

mis information
Cheltenham road was originally
Hall road not Hill rd
original street name printed on house still standing

Reply
Comment
Patricia Bridges   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 10:57 GMT   

Lancefield Coachworks
My grandfather Tom Murray worked here

Reply
Lived here
Former Philbeach Gardens Resident   
Added: 14 Jul 2021 00:44 GMT   

Philbeach Gardens Resident (Al Stewart)
Al Stewart, who had huts in the 70s with the sings ’Year of the Cat’ and ’On The Borders’, lived in Philbeach Gdns for a while and referenced Earl’s Court in a couple of his songs.
I lived in Philbeach Gardens from a child until my late teens. For a few years, on one evening in the midst of Summer, you could hear Al Stewart songs ringing out across Philbeach Gardens, particularly from his album ’Time Passages". I don’t think Al was living there at the time but perhaps he came back to see some pals. Or perhaps the broadcasters were just his fans,like me.
Either way, it was a wonderful treat to hear!

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Central School of Ballet Central School of Ballet is a classical ballet school based in London, with students from countries all over the world.
City Temple The City Temple is a Nonconformist church on Holborn Viaduct.
Clerkenwell Preceptory The following is a list of monastic houses in Greater London, England.
Clerkenwell Priory Clerkenwell Priory was a priory of the Monastic Order of the Knights Hospitallers of St John of Jerusalem, located in Clerkenwell, London.
Golden Lane Estate, EC1Y The Golden Lane Housing Estate is a 1950s council housing complex in the City of London.
Half Moon Court, EC1A Halfmoon Court is the southern most of five passages leading eastward from Kinghorn Street.
Hicks Hall Hicks Hall (1611 - 1778) was a building in St John Street, Clerkenwell.
Hockley-in-the-Hole Hockley-in-the-Hole was an area where bear-baiting and duelling took place in the 18th century.
Maison Novelli Maison Novelli was a restaurant in Clerkenwell, Central London, located opposite the Old Session House.
Marx Memorial Library The Marx Memorial Library in London holds more than 43,000 books, pamphlets and newspapers on Marxism, Scientific Socialism and Working class history.
Middlesex Sessions House The Former Middlesex Session(s) House or the Old Sessions House is a large building on Clerkenwell Green.
Museum of the Order of St John The Museum of the Order of St John in Clerkenwell, London, tells the story of the Venerable Order of Saint John.
Old Dick Whittington The Dick Whittington Inn at 24 Cloth Fair was a sixteenth century building and once part of a row of medieval buildings lining the street.
Smithfield Smithfield is a locality in the ward of Farringdon Without situated at the City of London’s northwest corner.
St Andrew The Church of St Andrew, Holborn stands within the Ward of Farringdon Without.
St Bartholomew’s Hospital St Bartholomew’s Hospital, also known simply as Barts and later more formally as The Royal Hospital of St Bartholomew, is a hospital located at Smithfield in the City of London and founded in 1123.
St Etheldreda’s Church St Etheldreda’s Church is in Ely Place, off Charterhouse Street in Holborn, London.
St James’s Church, Clerkenwell St James Church, Clerkenwell, is an Anglican parish church.
St John Clerkenwell St John Clerkenwell is a former parish church in Clerkenwell, now used as the chapel of the modern Order of St John.
St John’s Gate, Clerkenwell St John’s Gate is one of the few tangible remains from Clerkenwell’s monastic past; it was built in 1504 by Prior Thomas Docwra as the south entrance to the inner precinct of Clerkenwell Priory, the priory of the Knights of Saint John - the Knights Hospitallers.
St Peter’s Italian Church St. Peter’s Italian Church is a Basilica-style church located in Holborn.
Thavie’s Inn Thavie’s Inn was a former Inn of Chancery, associated with Lincoln’s Inn, established at Holborn, near the site of the present side street and office block still known as Thavies Inn Buildings.

NEARBY STREETS
Albemarle Way, EC1M Albemarle Way was named after Elizabeth, Dowager Duchess of Albermarle, who lived at Newcastle House nearby in the 18th century.
Albion Courtyard, EC1A Albion Courtyard is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Albion Place, EC1M Albion Place was formerly George Court.
Albion Way, EC1A Albion Way is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Aldersgate Street, EC2Y Aldersgate Street is located on the west side of the Barbican Estate.
Amias Place, EC1Y Amias Place was formerly George Yard.
Anchor Yard, EC1Y Anchor Yard is named after a former inn here of this name.
Aylesbury Street, EC1V Aylesbury Street - after the earl of Aylesbury who owned a house near here in the 17th century.
Back Hill, EC1N Back Hill is simply named as it lies off (or to the ’back’) of a main road.
Baker’s Row, EC1R Bakers Row was named after Richard Baker, a local 18th century carpenter.
Baltic Street East, EC1Y Baltic Street East was built by a timber merchant around 1810 who named local streets after trade-related activities.
Baltic Street West, EC1Y Baltic Street is split into east and west halves.
Barnard’s Inn, EC4A Barnard’s Inn lies near Holborn Circus.
Bartholomew Close, EC1A Bartholomew Close is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Bartholomew Passage, EC1A Bartholomew Passage is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Bartholomew Place, EC1A Bartholomew Place is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Bartlett’s Buildings, EC4A Bartlett’s Buildings was the name of a street situated off of Holborn Circus
Bastwick Street, EC1V Bastwick Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Beech Street, EC1Y Beech Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Benjamin Street, EC1M Benjamin Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Berkeley Court, EC1M Berkeley Court ran south out of Berkley Street (now Briset Street).
Berry Street, EC1M Berry Street is a road in the EC1M postcode area
Bleeding Heart Yard, EC1N Bleeding Heart Yard is a courtyard off of Greville Street.
Bowling Green Lane, EC1R Bowling Green Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Brewery Square, EC1V Brewery Square is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Brewhouse Yard, EC1V Brewhouse Yard is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Bridgewater Square, EC2Y Bridgewater Square is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Briset Street, EC1M Briset Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Britton Street, EC1M Britton Street was named after Thomas Britten, a 17th century coalman.
Broad Yard, EC1M Broad Yard is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Bryer Court, EC2Y Bryer Court is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Carthusian Street, EC1A Carthusian Street is a road in the EC1A postcode area
Catherine Griffiths Court, EC1R Catherine Griffiths Court is a road in the EC1R postcode area
Central Markets, EC1A Central Markets is the address of traders within Smithfield Market.
Charterhouse Buildings, EC1A Charterhouse Buildings is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Charterhouse Mews, EC1A Charterhouse Mews is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Charterhouse Square, EC1M Charterhouse Square is the largest courtyard associated with London Charterhouse, mostly formed of Tudor and Stuart architecture restored after the Blitz.
Charterhouse Street, EC1A Charterhouse Street is a street on the northern boundary of the City of London.
Clerkenwell Close, EC1R Clerkenwell Close is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Clerkenwell Green, EC1M Clerkenwell Green is the street named after the historical green.
Clerkenwell Road, EC1M Clerkenwell Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Cloth Court, EC1M Cloth Court is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Cloth Fair, EC1A Cloth Fair stands where the original Bartholomew Fair was held in medieval times.
Cloth Street, EC1M Cloth Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Cock Lane, EC1A Cock Lane leads from Giltspur Street in the east to Snow Hill in the west.
Cornwell House, EC1M Residential block
Cowcross Street, EC1M Cowcross Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Crawford Passage, EC1R Crawford Passage is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Crescent Row, EC1Y Crescent Row is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Cripplegate Street, EC1Y Cripplegate Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Dallington Street, EC1V Dallington Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Defoe House, EC2Y Residential block
Domingo Street, EC1Y Domingo Street links Old Street with Baltic Street East.
Eagle Court, EC1M Eagle Court is a courtyard situated off of Benjamin Street.
East Central Markets, EC1A East Central Markets is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
East Market, EC2Y East Market is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
East Passage, EC1A East Passage is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
East Poultry Avenue, EC1A East Poultry Avenue is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Eldons Passage, EC1N A street within the EC1N postcode
Ely Court, EC1N Ely Court is one of the streets of London in the EC1N postal area.
Ely Place, EC1N Ely Place is a gated road at the southern tip of the London Borough of Camden.
Fann Street, EC1Y Fann Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Farringdon Lane, EC1R Farringdon Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Farringdon Road, EC4A Farringdon Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Faulkners Alley, EC1M Faulkners Alley is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Ferroners House, EC2Y Ferroners House
Florin Court, EC1M Florin Court is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Garrett Street, EC1Y Garrett Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Gate House, EC1M Residential block
Gee Street, EC1V Gee Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Glasshouse Yard, EC2Y Glasshouse Yard is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Golden Lane, EC1Y Golden Lane connects Old Street and Beech Street.
Golden Lane, EC2Y Golden Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Goswell Road, EC1A Goswell Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Goswell Road, EC1Y Goswell Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Grand Avenue, EC1A Grand Avenue runs through the centre of Smithfield Market.
Gravel Street, EC1N Gravel Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1N postal area.
Great Sutton Street, EC1M Great Sutton Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Greenhills Rents, EC1A Greenhills Rents is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Greville Street, EC1N Greville Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1N postal area.
Hatton Garden, EC1N Hatton Garden is a street and area noted as London’s jewellery quarter and centre of the UK diamond trade.
Hatton Place, EC1N Hatton Place is one of the streets of London in the EC1N postal area.
Hatton Square, EC1N Hatton Square is one of the streets of London in the EC1N postal area.
Hatton Wall, EC1N Hatton Wall is one of the streets of London in the EC1N postal area.
Haven Road, RM13 Haven Road is a location in London.
Hayne Street, EC1A Hayne Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Haywards Place, EC1V Haywards Place is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Herbal Hill, EC1N This is a street in the EC1R postcode area
Holborn Circus, EC1N Holborn Circus is a junction of five highways in the City of London, on the boundary between Holborn, Hatton Garden and Smithfield.
Holborn Viaduct, EC1A Holborn Viaduct is a road bridge in London and the name of the street which crosses it.
Holborn, EC1N Holborn commemorates the River Fleet, also known as the Holbourne stream.
Honduras Street, EC1Y Honduras Street dates from the 1810s.
Hosier Lane, EC1A Hosier Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Jerusalem Passage, EC1V Jerusalem Passage was named for an old public house, St. John of Jerusalem, which stood at the northeast corner until 1760.
Kinghorn Street, EC1A Kinghorn Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Kirby Street, EC1N Kirby Street was named for Christopher Hatton’s Kirby House in Northamptonshire.
Lauderdale Tower, EC2Y Lauderdale Tower is the westernmost tower in the Barbican, facing onto Lauderdale Place.
Leather Lane, EC1N Leather Lane is a street one block west of Hatton Garden, in the Holborn area of London.
Lindsey Street, EC1A Lindsey Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Little Britain, EC1A Little Britain is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Little Britain, EC1M Little Britain is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
London Central Markets, EC4A London Central Markets is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Long Lane, EC1A Long Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Memel Street, EC1Y Memel Street was built over the site of a former brewery in the 1810s.
Middle Street, EC1A Middle Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Middlesex Passage, EC1A Middlesex Passage is a location in London.
Monkwell Square, EC2Y Monkwell Square is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
New Fetter Lane, EC1N New Fetter Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC1N postal area.
New House, EC1N Residential block
Newbury Street, EC1A Newbury Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Northburgh Street, EC1M Northburgh Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Northburgh Street, EC1M Northburgh Street in the EC1V postcode is a western extension of the main part of the street.
Pardon Street, EC1V Pardon Street was named after Pardon Chapel, founded in the wake of the Black Death in 1348.
Passing Alley, EC1M Passing Alley is a road in the EC1M postcode area
Pear Tree Court, EC1R Pear Tree Court is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Penny Bank Chambers, EC1M Penny Bank Chambers is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Peter’s Lane, EC1M Peter’s Lane is named after the church which once stood close to the Cross Keys tavern.
Pickax Street, EC2Y Pickax Street once ran from Long Lane to Goswell Road (which before 1864 was called Goswell Street).
Plumtree Court, EC4A Plumtree Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4A postal area.
Ray Street, EC1R Ray Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Saffron Hill, EC1N Saffron Hill’s name derives the time that it was part of an estate on which saffron grew.
Saint John Street, EC1M This is a street in the EC1M postcode area
Sans Walk, EC1R Sans Walk was named after Edward Sans in 1893, who was then the oldest member of the local parish vestry.
Scotswood Street, EC1R Scotswood Street is a road in the EC1R postcode area
Sekforde Street, EC1R Sekforde Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Smithfield Street, EC1A Smithfield Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Smokehouse Yard, EC1M Smokehouse Yard is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Snow Hill, EC1A Snow Hill is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
St Andrew Street, EC4A St Andrew Street is the northern extension of Shoe Lane.
St Cross Street, EC1N St Cross Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1N postal area.
St Jamess Walk, EC1R St Jamess Walk is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
St John Street, EC1V St John Street runs from Finsbury to Farringdon.
St John’s Square, EC1M St John’s Square, south of Clerkenwell Road, is in the EC1M postal area.
St John’s Square, EC1M St John’s Square is split into two sections, north and south of Clerkenwell Road.
St Johns House, EC1M Residential block
St Johns Lane, EC1M St Johns Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
St Johns Path, EC1M St Johns Path is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
St Johns Place, EC1M St Johns Place is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
St John’s Gate, EC1M St John’s Gate is a road in the EC1M postcode area
St. Giles Terrace, EC2Y St Giles Terrace lies alongside St Giles Cripplegate church.
Summers Street, EC1N Summers Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Sutton Lane, EC1M Sutton Lane is a road in the EC1M postcode area
Sutton Road, EC1M Sutton Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Sycamore Street, EC1Y Sycamore Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
The Charterhouse, EC1M Residential block
The Horseshoe Path, EC1R The Horseshoe Path runs around the back of the Horseshoe pub.
Timber Street, EC1Y Timber Street was formerly called Norway Street.
Turnmill Street, EC1 Turnmill Street appears in the works of Shakespeare.
Vestry House, EC1A Residential block
Warner Street, EC1R Warner Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
West Smithfield, EC1A West Smithfield is the oldest street of the Smithfield area.
White Bear Yard, EC1R White Bear Yard is location of London.
Woodbridge Street, EC1R Woodbridge Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Young’s Buildings, EC1Y Young’s Buildings was named after Francis Young, a local 18th century property owner

NEARBY PUBS
BarSmith This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Be At One This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Best Mangal Bar & Restaurant This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Bishops Finger This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Charterhouse Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
City Pride This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Clerkenwell & Social This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Clerkenwell house This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Club Gascon This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Craft Beer Company This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Crown Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Dado 54 This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Enoteca Rabezzana This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Grand Union Farringdon This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Hand & Shears This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Hat & Tun This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Karaoke Box This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Lazybones This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Le Paris Grill This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Ninth Ward London This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Nomad Club This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Old Dick Whittington The Dick Whittington Inn at 24 Cloth Fair was a sixteenth century building and once part of a row of medieval buildings lining the street.
Old Red Cow This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Oriole This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Piano Smithfield This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Sir Chrisptopher Hatton This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Sir John Oldcastle This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
St Peters Italian Social Club This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Sutton Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Sutton Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Argyle This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Artisan This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Betsey Trotwood This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Bleeding Heart Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Bowler This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Butcher’s Hook and Cleaver This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Castle This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Fable This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Fence This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Fox and Anchor This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Green This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Grill on the Market This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Horseshoe This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The One Tun This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Rising Sun This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Shakespeare This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Slaughtered Lamb This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Well This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Three Kings This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Vino & Vino This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
White Bear This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Ye Olde Mitre This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Queen’s Park

Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen’s Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen’s Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen’s Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen’s Park ’proper’ formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen’s Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen’s Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett’s wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen’s Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queen’s Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen’s Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen’s Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen’s Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Smithfield Market
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Amen Court, EC4M
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Farringdon Street, EC4M
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Kirby Street sign
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In the neighbourhood...

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Smithfield Market
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Saint John’s Gate, Clerkenwell, the main gateway to the Priory of Saint John of Jerusalem. The church was founded in the 12th century by Jordan de Briset, a Norman knight. Prior Docwra completed the gatehouse shown in this photograph in 1504. The gateway served as the main entry to the Priory, which was the center of the Order of St John of Jerusalem (the Knights Hospitallers).
Credit: Henry Dixon (1880)
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Illustration of Fleet Market
Credit: William Henry Prior
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Amen Court, EC4M
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Clerkenwell Green (1898) The water fountain shown here became public toilets.
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View of Cloth Fair in 1884 showing the side entrance to St Bartholomew’s Priory, Smithfield.
Credit: John Crowther
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Farringdon Street, EC4M
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Great Arthur House, at the centre of the Golden Lane Estate, was the tallest residential building in Britain at the time of its construction.
Credit: Steve F/Wiki commons
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Kirby Street sign
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Pardon Street
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