Barratt House, W1C

Block in/near Bond Street .

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Block · Bond Street · W1C ·
FEBRUARY
23
2001
Barratt House is a block on Oxford Street.





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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Emma Seif   
Added: 25 Jan 2022 19:06 GMT   

Birth of the Bluestocking Society
In about 1750, Elizabeth Montagu began hosting literary breakfasts in her home at 23 (now 31) Hill Street. These are considered the first meetings of the Bluestocking society.

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Fumblina   
Added: 21 Feb 2023 11:39 GMT   

Error on 1800 map numbering for John Street
The 1800 map of Whitfield Street (17 zoom) has an error in the numbering shown on the map. The houses are numbered up the right hand side of John Street and Upper John Street to #47 and then are numbered down the left hand side until #81 BUT then continue from 52-61 instead of 82-91.

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TUM   
Added: 27 Aug 2022 10:22 GMT   

The Underground Map
Michael Faraday successfully demonstrated the first electrical transformer at the Royal Institute, London.

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Reg Carr   
Added: 10 Feb 2021 12:11 GMT   

Campbellite Meeting
In 1848 the Campbellites (Disciples of Christ) met in Elstree Street, where their congregation was presided over by a pastor named John Black. Their appointed evangelist at the time was called David King, who later became the Editor of the British Millennial Harbinger. The meeting room was visited in July 1848 by Dr John Thomas, who spoke there twice on his two-year ’mission’ to Britain.

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Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:41 GMT   

Baker Street
Baker Street station opened on the Metropolitan Railway - the world’s first underground line.

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Born here
www.violettrefusis.com   
Added: 17 Feb 2021 15:05 GMT   

Birth place
Violet Trefusis, writer, cosmopolitan intellectual and patron of the Arts was born at 2 Wilton Crescent SW1X.

Source: www.violettrefusis.com

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Ray Ashby   
Added: 14 Aug 2023 17:22 GMT   

Greengrocers in Enford street
Greengrocer under new ownership by Mr Stanley Ashby, married to Mrs Lily Ashby

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Scott Hatton   
Added: 30 Jan 2023 11:28 GMT   

The Beatles on a London rooftop
The Beatles’ rooftop concert took place on the rooftop of the Apple Corps building in London. It was their final public performance as a band and was unannounced, attracting a crowd of onlookers. The concert lasted for 42 minutes and included nine songs. The concert is remembered as a seminal moment in the history of rock music and remains one of the most famous rock performances of all time.

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Lived here
Julian    
Added: 23 Mar 2021 10:11 GMT   

Dennis Potter
Author Dennis Potter lived in Collingwood House in the 1970’s

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Jessie Doring   
Added: 22 Feb 2021 04:33 GMT   

Tisbury Court Jazz Bar
Jazz Bar opened in Tisbury Court by 2 Australians. Situated in underground basement. Can not remember how long it opened for.

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Justin Russ   
Added: 15 Feb 2021 20:25 GMT   

Binney Street, W1K
Binney St was previously named Thomas Street before the 1950’s. Before the 1840’s (approx.) it was named Bird St both above and below Oxford St.

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Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

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BG   
Added: 20 Dec 2022 02:58 GMT   

Lancing Street, NW1
LANCING STREET

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Lynette beardwood   
Added: 29 Nov 2022 20:53 GMT   

Spy’s Club
Topham’s Hotel at 24-28 Ebury Street was called the Ebury Court Hotel. Its first proprietor was a Mrs Topham. In WW2 it was a favourite watering hole for the various intelligence organisations based in the Pimlico area. The first woman infiltrated into France in 1942, FANY Yvonne Rudellat, was recruited by the Special Operations Executive while working there. She died in Bergen Belsen in April 1945.

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P Cash   
Added: 19 Feb 2023 08:03 GMT   

Occupants of 19-29 Woburn Place
The Industrial Tribunals (later changed to Employment Tribunals) moved (from its former location on Ebury Bridge Road to 19-29 Woburn Place sometime in the late 1980s (I believe).

19-29 Woburn Place had nine floors in total (one in the basement and two in its mansard roof and most of the building was occupied by the Tribunals

The ’Head Office’ of the tribunals, occupied space on the 7th, 6th and 2nd floors, whilst one of the largest of the regional offices (London North but later called London Central) occupied space in the basement, ground and first floor.

The expansive ground floor entrance had white marble flooring and a security desk. Behind (on evey floor) lay a square (& uncluttered) lobby space, which was flanked on either side by lifts. On the rear side was an elegant staircase, with white marble steps, brass inlays and a shiny brass handrail which spiralled around an open well. Both staircase, stairwell and lifts ran the full height of the building. On all floors from 1st upwards, staff toilets were tucked on either side of the staircase (behind the lifts).

Basement Floor - Tribunal hearing rooms, dormant files store and secure basement space for Head Office. Public toilets.

Geound Floor - The ’post’ roon sat next to the entrance in the northern side, the rest of which was occupied by the private offices of the full time Tribunal judiciary. Thw largest office belonged to the Regional Chair and was situated on the far corner (overlooking Tavistock Square) The secretary to the Regional Chair occupied a small office next door.
The south side of this floor was occupied by the large open plan General Office for the administration, a staff kitchen & rest room and the private offices of the Regional Secretary (office manager) and their deputy.

First Dloor - Tribunal hearing rooms; separate public waiting rooms for Applicants & Respondents; two small rooms used by Counsel (on a ’whoever arrives first’ bases) and a small private rest room for use by tribunal lay members.

Second Floor - Tribunal Hearing Rooms; Tribunal Head Office - HR & Estate Depts & other tennants.

Third Floor - other tennants

Fourth Floor - other tennants

Fifth Floor - Other Tennants except for a large non-smoking room for staff, (which overlooked Tavistock Sqaure). It was seldom used, as a result of lacking any facities aside from a meagre collection of unwanted’ tatty seating. Next to it, (overlooking Tavistock Place) was a staff canteen.

Sixth Floor - Other tennants mostly except for a few offices on the northern side occupied by tribunal Head Office - IT Dept.

Seventh Floor - Other tenants in the northern side. The southern (front) side held the private offices of several senior managers (Secretariat, IT & Finance), private office of the Chief Accuntant; an office for two private secretaries and a stationary cupboard. On the rear side was a small kitchen; the private office of the Chief Executive and the private office of the President of the Tribunals for England & Wales. (From 1995 onwards, this became a conference room as the President was based elsewhere. The far end of this side contained an open plan office for Head Office staff - Secretariat, Finance & HR (staff training team) depts.

Eighth Floor - other tennants.


The Employment Tribunals (Regional & Head Offices) relocated to Vitory House, Kingsway in April 2005.






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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Born here
Michael   
Added: 20 Sep 2023 21:10 GMT   

Momentous Birth!
I was born in the upstairs front room of 28 Tyrrell Avenue in August 1938. I was a breach birth and quite heavy ( poor Mum!). My parents moved to that end of terrace house from another rental in St Mary Cray where my three year older brother had been born in 1935. The estate was quite new in 1938 and all the properties were rented. My Father was a Postman. I grew up at no 28 all through WWII and later went to Little Dansington School

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Mike Levy   
Added: 19 Sep 2023 18:10 GMT   

Bombing of Arbour Square in the Blitz
On the night of September 7, 1940. Hyman Lubosky (age 35), his wife Fay (or Fanny)(age 32) and their son Martin (age 17 months) died at 11 Arbour Square. They are buried together in Rainham Jewish Cemetery. Their grave stones read: "Killed by enemy action"

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Lady Townshend   
Added: 8 Sep 2023 16:02 GMT   

Tenant at Westbourne (1807 - 1811)
I think that the 3rd Marquess Townshend - at that time Lord Chartley - was a tenant living either at Westbourne Manor or at Bridge House. He undertook considerable building work there as well as creating gardens. I am trying to trace which house it was. Any ideas gratefully received

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Alex Britton   
Added: 30 Aug 2023 10:43 GMT   

Late opening
The tracks through Roding Valley were opened on 1 May 1903 by the Great Eastern Railway (GER) on its Woodford to Ilford line (the Fairlop Loop).

But the station was not opened until 3 February 1936 by the London and North Eastern Railway (LNER, successor to the GER).

Source: Roding Valley tube station - Wikipedia

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Kevin Pont   
Added: 30 Aug 2023 09:52 GMT   

Shhh....
Roding Valley is the quietest tube station, each year transporting the same number of passengers as Waterloo does in one day.

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Kevin Pont   
Added: 30 Aug 2023 09:47 GMT   

The connection with Bletchley Park
The code-breaking computer used at Bletchley Park was built in Dollis Hill.

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Kevin Pont   
Added: 29 Aug 2023 15:25 GMT   

The deepest station
At 58m below ground, Hampstead is as deep as Nelson’s Column is tall.

Source: Hampstead tube station - Wikipedia

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Kevin Pont   
Added: 29 Aug 2023 15:15 GMT   

Not as Central as advertised...
Hendon Central was by no means the centre of Hendon when built, being a green field site. It was built at the same time as both the North Circular Road and the A41 were built as major truck roads �’ an early example of joined up London transport planning.

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
All Souls Church All Souls Church is an evangelical Anglican church situated at the north end of Regent Street.
Hanover Square Rooms The Hanover Square Rooms (also called the Queen’s Concert Rooms) were assembly rooms principally for musical performances.
Orchard Court Orchard Court is an apartment block off of Portman Square in London. Known in French as Le Verger, it was used during the Second World War as the London base of F section of the Special Operations Executive (SOE).
Oxford Circus Oxford Circus, designed by John Nash in 1811.

NEARBY STREETS
Admiral Court, W1U Admiral Court is a road in the W1U postcode area
Aldburgh Mews, W1U Aldburgh Mews is a road in the W1U postcode area
Allan House, W1G Allan House is a block on John Princes Street.
Argyll Street, W1F Argyll Street was named after John Campbell, 2nd Duke of Argyll, owner of the land in the 18th century.
Audley House, W1K Audley House can be found on North Audley Street.
Avery Row, W1K Avery Row was probably named after Henry Avery, an 18th century bricklayer who built this street over the Tyburn Brook.
Baker’s Mews, W1H Baker’s Mews, like nearby Baker Street is named after Edward Baker, friend and business partner of the landowning Portman family.
Balderton Flats, W1K Balderton Flats is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Balderton Street, W1K Balderton Street was named after local landowners the Grosvenors, who also owned land in Balderton, Cheshire
Balfour House, W1W Balfour House is a block on Great Titchfield Street.
Barlow Place, W1S This is a street in the W1J postcode area
Barrett Street, W1U Barrett Street is one of the streets of London in the W1U postal area.
Bentinck Mansions, W1U Bentinck Mansions is one of the streets of London in the W1U postal area.
Bentinck Mews, W1U Bentinck Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1U postal area.
Bentinck Street, W1U Bentinck Street is one of the streets of London in the W1U postal area.
Binney Street, W1K Binney Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Bird Street, W1U Bird Street is one of the streets of London in the W1U postal area.
Blandford Street, W1U Blandford Street is one of the streets of London in the W1U postal area.
Blenheim House, W1C Blenheim House can be found on Woodstock Street.
Blenheim Street, W1S Blenheim Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Bloomfield Court, W1K Bloomfield Court is located on Bourdon Street.
Bond House, W1C Bond House is a block on Woodstock Street.
Bourdon Place, W1J Bourdon Place is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Bourdon Street, W1J Bourdon Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Boyle Street, W1S Boyle Street was built on a piece of land called the Ten Acres to discharge some Boyle family debts.
Brook Street, W1K Brook Street was named after the Tyburn Brook that formerly ran nearby,
Brookfield House, W1K Brookfield House is a block on Davies Street.
Brooks Mews, W1K Brooks Mews is a small road on the Grosvenor Estate, laid out in the 1720s.
Brown Hart Gardens, W1K Brown Hart Gardens is a road in the W1K postcode area
Bruton Place, W1J Bruton Place is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Bruton Street, W1S Bruton Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Bulstrode Place, W1U Bulstrode Place is one of the streets of London in the W1U postal area.
Bulstrode Street, W1U Bulstrode Street runs from Welbeck Street in the east to Thayer Street in the west.
Burlian House, W1C Burlian House can be found on Oxford Street.
Bywell Place, W1W Bywell Place is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Carlos Place, W1 Carlos Place is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Cashel House, W1U Cashel House is a building on Thayer Street.
Cavendish Buildings, W1K Red Lion Yard was renamed to Cavendish Buildings in 1882.
Cavendish Place, W1G Cavendish Place is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
Cavendish Square, W1G Cavendish Square was laid out in 1717–18 at the beginning of the transformation of Harley family lands in Marylebone.
Cavendish Street, W1G Cavendish Street is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
Chandos Street, W1G Chandos Street is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
Clifford Street, W1S Clifford Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Coach And Horses Yard, W1S Coach And Horses Yard is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Coin House, W1C Coin House is located on Gee’s Place.
Conduit Street, W1S Conduit Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Connaught House, W1K Connaught House is sited on Davies Street.
Cork Street, W1S Cork Street, on the Burlington Estate, was named after Richard Boyle, 3rd Earl of Burlington and 4th Earl of Cork.
Creata House, W1C Creata House is a block on Stratford Place.
Culross Street, W1K Culross Street is a road in the W1K postcode area
Cumberland Gate, W1C Cumberland Gate is one of the streets of London in the W1C postal area.
Davies Mews, W1K Davies Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Davies Street, W1K Davies Street is a north-south street in Mayfair.
Davis Street, W1K Davis Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Dean’s Mews, W1G This is a street in the W1G postcode area
Dering Street, W1S Dering Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Duke Street, W1K Duke Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Duke Street, W1U Duke Street is one of the streets of London in the W1U postal area.
Dukes Mews, W1U Dukes Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1U postal area.
Edwards Mews, W1U Edwards Mews is a road in the W1U postcode area
Fitzhardinge Street, W1U Fitzhardinge Street is one of the streets of London in the W1H postal area.
Flanders House, W1G Flanders House is sited on Cavendish Square.
Foley House, W1B Foley House is a block on Maddox Street.
Foubert’s Place, W1B Foubert’s Place is named after a Frenchman who had a riding school here in the reign of Charles II.
Gee’s Court, W1C Gee’s Court runs north from Oxford Street.
Gee’s Court, W1U Gee’s Court is a building on Gee’s Court.
George Street, W1U George Street is one of the streets of London in the W1U postal area.
Gilbert Street, W1K Gilbert Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Gossard House, W1S Gossard House is a building on Savile Row.
Granville Place, W1C Granville Place is one of the streets of London in the W1H postal area.
Great Castle Street, W1B Great Castle Street was begun in 1722.
Great Castle Street, W1W Great Castle Street was one of the main streets of the Harley Estate.
Great Marlborough Street, W1B Great Marlborough Street runs east of Regent Street past Carnaby Street towards Noel Street.
Green Street, E7 Green Street is a location in London.
Green Street, W1K Green Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Greybrook House, W1K Greybrook House can be found on Brook Street.
Grosvenor Hill Court, W1K Grosvenor Hill Court is a block on Bourdon Street.
Grosvenor Hill, W1K Grosvenor Hill is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Grosvenor Square, W1K Grosvenor Square is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Grosvenor Square, W1K Grosvenor Square was developed by Sir Richard Grosvenor from 1721 onwards.
Grosvenor Street, W1K Grosvenor Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Hampden House, W1K Hampden House is a building on Green Street.
Hanover Court, W1S Hanover Court is a building on Hanover Square.
Hanover House, W1S Hanover House can be found on Harewood Place.
Hanover Square, W1S Hanover Square was created as the ’Whig’ square with Cavendish Square being the ’Tory’ square.
Hanover Street, W1S Hanover Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Harcourt House, W1G Harcourt House is a block on Cavendish Square.
Harewood Place, W1C Harewood Place is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Harmont House, W1G Residential block
Haunch Of Venison Yard, W1K Haunch Of Venison Yard is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Heathcoat House, W1S Heathcoat House is a block on Savile Row.
Heddon House, W1B Heddon House is a block on Regent Street.
Heddon Street, W1B Heddon Street is a road in the W1S postcode area
Henrietta Place, W1G Henrietta Place is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
Henry Wood House, W1B Henry Wood House is a block on Langham Place.
Heron House, W1G Heron House is a block on Bentinck Street.
Hertford House, W1U Residential block
Highlight House, W1W Highlight House is a block on Margaret Street.
Hills Place, W1F Hills Place is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Hinde Mews, W1U Hinde Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1U postal area.
Hinde Street, W1U Hinde Street was built from 1777 by Samuel Adams and named after Jacob Hinde who was the son-in-law of the landwoner Thomas Thayer.
Holles Street, W1C Holles Street runs north from Oxford Street, on the east side of the John Lewis store.
Holmes Place, W1U Holmes Place is one of the streets of London in the W1U postal area.
International House, W1S Residential block
Jacobs Well Mews, W1U Jacobs Well Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1U postal area.
James Street, W1U James Street is one of the streets of London in the W1U postal area.
Jammal House, W1S Jammal House is a block on Hanover Street.
Jason Court, W1U Jason Court was part of the ancient village of Marylebone.
John Prince’s Street, W1G This is a street in the W1G postcode area
Jones Street, W1K Jones Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Jubilee House, W1 Jubilee House is located on Oxford Street.
Kendall Place, W1U Kendall Place is a road in the W1U postcode area
Kent House, W1W Kent House is a block on Market place.
Keysign House, W1C Keysign House is a block on Oxford Street.
King House, W1S King House can be found on Maddox Street.
Lancashire Court, W1 Lancashire Court can be found on Lancashire Court.
Lancashire Court, W1K Lancashire Court runs off New Bond Street.
Lancashire Court, W1S Lancashire Court is a block on Lancashire Court.
Langham House, W1B Residential block
Langham Place, W1B Langham Place is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Lees Court, W1K Lees Court is a block on Lees Place.
Lees Place, W1K Lees Place is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Lister House, W1 Lister House is a block on Wimpole Street.
Little Marlborough Street, W1B Little Marlborough Street was named after John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough, an 18th century general.
Little Portland Street, W1W Little Portland Street is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Little Titchfield Street, W1W Little Titchfield Street is a road in the W1W postcode area
Lowstock Road, W1U Lowstock Road is one of the streets of London in the W1U postal area.
Lumina House, W1S Lumina House is a block on New Bond Street.
Lumley Street, W1K Lumley Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Luxborough Towers, W1U Luxborough Towers is one of the streets of London in the W1U postal area.
Maddox Street, W1S Maddox Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Manchester Mews, W1U Manchester Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1U postal area.
Manchester Square, W1U Manchester Square is a small but well-preserved Georgian square in Marylebone.
Mandeville Place, W1U Mandeville Place is one of the streets of London in the W1U postal area.
Mandeville Place, W1U Mandeville Place is a road in the E15 postcode area
Margaret Court, W1W Margaret Court is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Margaret Street, W1B Margaret Street is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Margaret Street, W1W Margaret Street is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Mark House, W1B Mark House is a block on Maddox Street.
Market Place, W1W Market Place is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Marylebone Lane, W1C Marylebone Lane is a road in the W1C postcode area
Marylebone Lane, W1U Marylebone Lane is one of the streets of London in the W1U postal area.
Mason’s Arms Mews, W1S Mason’s Arms Mews is a road in the W1S postcode area
Mayfair House, W1K Mayfair House can be found on Carlos Place.
Mayfair Mews, W1K A street within the W1S postcode
Media House, W1C Media House is a block on Stratford Place.
Medici Courtyard, W1S Medici Courtyard is a location in London.
Mews Yard, W1K Mews Yard is a road in the WC2H postcode area
Milford House, W1G Residential block
Mill Street, W1S Mill Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Mimosa House, W1B Mimosa House can be found on Princes Street.
Morley House, W1B Morley House is a block on Regent Street.
Morley House, W1W Residential block
Mortimer Street, W1T A street within the W1W postcode
Mortimer Street, W1W Mortimer Street is one of the streets of London in the W1 postal area.
Moss House, W1K Moss House is a block on Brook’s Mews.
Mount Row, W1K Mount Row was formed from two stable yards.
Nash House, W1S Nash House is a building on St George Street.
Nations House, W1U Nations House is a block on Wigmore Street.
New Bond Street, W1J New Bond Street is the northernmost section of what is simply known as ’Bond Street’ in general use.
New Burlington Mews, W1B New Burlington Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
New Burlington Place, W1S New Burlington Place is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
New Burlington Street, W1B New Burlington Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
New Burlington Street, W1B New Burlington Street is a road in the W1B postcode area
North Audley House, W1K North Audley House is a building on North Audley Street.
North Audley Street, W1K North Audley Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
North Row, W1K North Row is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Old Burlington Street, W1J Old Burlington Street connects Burlington Gardens and Clifford Street.
Old Cavendish Street, W1 Old Cavendish Street is a road in the W1 postcode area
Orchard Court, W1H Orchard Court can be found on Portman Square.
Orchard Street, W1H Orchard Street is one of the streets of London in the W1H postal area.
Orchard Street, W1U Orchard Street is a road in the W1K postcode area
Oxford Circus Avenue, W1F Oxford Circus Avenue exists on a lot of London maps but doesn’t exist.
Oxford Circus House, W1D Oxford Circus House is sited on Oxford Street.
Oxford Circus, W1B Oxford Circus was originally called Regent Circus.
Oxford Street, W1K Oxford Street is Europe’s busiest shopping street, with around half a million daily visitors, and as of 2012 had approximately 300 shops.
Oxford Street, W1S Oxford Street is England’s most famous and popular shopping street.
Palladium House, W1B Palladium House is a grade II listed (in 1981) Art Deco office building located on the corner of Great Marlborough Street and Argyll Street.
Palladium House, W1F Palladium House is a block on Argyll Street.
Park House, W1K Park House is a block on Park Street.
Park Street, W1K Park Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Parliament House, W1C Parliament House is a block on North Row.
Picton Place, W1C Picton Place connects Duke Street with James Street.
Portland House, W1W Portland House is a block on Great Portland Street.
Portman Mews South, W1H Portman Mews South is one of the streets of London in the W1H postal area.
Princes Street, W1B Princes Street is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Providence Court, W1K Providence Court is north of Grosvenor Square.
Queen Anne Mews, W1G Queen Anne Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
Queen Anne Street, W1G Queen Anne Street is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
Red Place, W1K Red Place is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Regent Place, W1B Regent Place is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Regent Street, W1B Regent Street dates from the 1810s and was named after the Prince Regent, later George IV.
Renoir House, W1S Renoir House is a block on New Bond Street.
RNS House, W1G RNS House is a block on Welbeck Street.
Robert Adam Street, W1H Robert Adam Street was renamed from Adam Street in 1938, itself renamed from Adam Street East in 1876.
Roxburghe House, W1B Roxburghe House is sited on Regent Street.
Savile Row, W1S Savile Row is known worldwide for gentlemen’s tailoring.
Sedley Place, W1K Sedley Place is a road in the W1K postcode area
Sedley Place, W1S Sedley Place is one of the streets of London in the W1C postal area.
Seymour Mews, W1H Seymour Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1H postal area.
Shepherds Place, W1K Shepherds Place is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
South Molton Lane, W1K South Molton Lane is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
South Molton Street, W1K South Molton Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Spanish Place, W1U Spanish Place is one of the streets of London in the W1U postal area.
St Anselm’s Place, W1K St Anselm’s Place lies behind Bond Street station.
St Christophers House, W1U Residential block
St Christophers Place, W1U St Christophers Place is one of the streets of London in the W1U postal area.
St George Street, W1S St George Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
St Georges House, W1S St Georges House can be found on Hanover Square.
St Georges Square, W1S St Georges Square is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
Stratford Place, W1C Stratford Place is one of the streets of London in the W1C postal area.
Sutherland House, W1F Sutherland House is a block on Argyll Street.
Swallow Place, W1B Swallow Place is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Swan House, W1C Swan House is a block on Stratford Place.
Tanzania House, W1C Tanzania House is a block on Stratford Place.
Tenterden Street, W1S Tenterden Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Thayer Street, W1U Thayer Street is one of the streets of London in the W1U postal area.
The Garden House, W1K The Garden House is a block on Mount Row.
The White House, W1W The White House can be found on Mortimer Street.
Three Kings’ Yard, W1K This is a street in the W1K postcode area
Time & Life Building, W1J Time & Life Building is a block on Bruton Street.
Upper Brook Street, W1K Upper Brook Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Vere Street, W1G Vere Street is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
Vogue House, W1S Vogue House is a block on Hanover Square.
Weighhouse Street, W1K Weighhouse Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Welbeck House, W1U Welbeck House is a block on Wigmore Street.
Welbeck Street, W1G Welbeck Street has historically been associated with the medical profession.
Welbeck Way, W1G Welbeck Way is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
West End House, W1D West End House is a block on Hill’s Place.
West One Shopping Centre, W1C West One Shopping Centre is one of the streets of London in the W1C postal area.
Western House, W1F Western House is a block on Argyll Street.
Wigmore Place, W1U Wigmore Place is one of the streets of London in the W1U postal area.
Wigmore Street, W1H Wigmore Street is one of the streets of London in the W1H postal area.
Wigmore Street, W1U Wigmore Street is one of the streets of London in the W1U postal area.
Wimpole Street, W1G Wimpole Street is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
Woodstock Street, W1S Woodstock Street is one of the streets of London in the W1C postal area.

NEARBY PUBS
Coach & Horses The Coach & Horses is at the top of Bruton Lane.
Cock Tavern The Cock Tavern is on Great Portland Street.


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Bond Street

Where the rich go shopping

Bond Street is a major shopping street in the West End of London that runs north-south through Mayfair between Oxford Street and Piccadilly. It has been a fashionable shopping street since the 18th century and is currently the home of many high price fashion shops. The southern section is known as Old Bond Street, and the northern section, which is rather more than half the total length, is known as New Bond Street. This distinction, however, is not generally made in everyday usage. It is one of the most expensive strips of real estate in the world.

Bond Street takes its name from Sir Thomas Bond, the head of a syndicate of developers who purchased a Piccadilly mansion called Clarendon House from Christopher Monck, 2nd Duke of Albemarle in 1683 and proceeded to demolish the house and develop the area. They also built nearby Dover Street and Albemarle Street. At that time the house backed onto open fields and the development of the various estates in Mayfair was just getting underway. Development moved predominantly from south to north, which accounts for the southern part of the street being 'Old' Bond Street, and the Northern half being 'New' Bond Street - the latter was added in a second phase 40 years later.

At one time Bond Street was best known for top end art dealers and antique shops, clustered around the London office of Sotheby’s auction house, which has been in Bond Street for over a hundred years. A few of these remain, but most of the shops are now occupied by fashion boutiques, including branches of most of the leading premium priced designer brands in the world. There are also a few miscellaneous upmarket shops such as jewellers. The street features an unusual statue of Winston Churchill and Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who are portrayed sitting on a park bench in conversation.

In 2010, Bond Street was Europe's most expensive retail location.

Bond Street is a square on the British Monopoly board, the same colour as Regent and Oxford Street.

Bond Street tube station lies near the top end of New Bond Street at the junction with Oxford Street. The entrance to the station is inside a shopping arcade on Oxford Street. The station was first opened on 24 September 1900 by the Central London Railway, three months after the first stations on the Central Line opened.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Credit: Stable Diffusion
TUM image id: 1675076090
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Engraving of the Hanover Square Rooms in Hanover Square. For a century this was the principal concert venue in London.
Credit: Wiki Commons
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A Friday Evening Discourse at the Royal Institution; Sir James Dewar on Liquid Hydrogen (1904)
Credit: Henry Jamyn Brooks
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Street view of St George’s Hanover Square (1787). An aquatint, by T. Malton.
Credit: British Library
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Hedonism Wines, Davies Street (2022)
Credit: Simon Gunzinger
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41 and 42 Dover Street, Mayfair (2022)
Credit: Wiki Commons/No Swan So Fine
Licence: CC BY 2.0


View South of Hallam Street, near Weymouth House (2008)
Credit: Wiki Commons/Portlandvillage
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Jason Court W1
Credit: The Underground Map
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Oxford Street, 1935
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Picton Place, W1 was formerly Gray Street as can be seen on a ’ghost sign’ on the corner
Credit: Simon Gunzinger
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Slow going for snow-bound traffic in Oxford Street (1931)
Credit: Douglas Miller
Licence: CC BY 2.0


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