Hurlingham House, W2

Block in/near Paddington

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(51.5199367 -0.1849777, 51.519 -0.184) 
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Block · Paddington · W2 ·
FEBRUARY
23
2001

Hurlingham House is sited on Westbourne Terrace Road.





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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:44 GMT   

The world’s first underground train
The very first underground train left Paddington on the new Metropolitan Railway bound for Farringdon Street.

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Lived here
Brenda Jackson   
Added: 13 Aug 2017 21:39 GMT   

83 Pembroke Road
My Gt Gt grandparents lived at 83 Pembroke Road before it became Granville Road, They were married in 1874, John Tarrant and Maryann Tarrant nee Williamson.

Her brother George Samuel Williamson lived at 95 Pembroke Road with his wife Emily and children in the 1881 Census

Apparently the extended family also lived for many years in Alpha Place, Canterbury Road, Peel Road,

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The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 14:30 GMT   

Kilburn Park - opened 1915
Kilburn Park station was opened at the height of the First World War

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PETER FAIRCLOUGH   
Added: 10 May 2021 14:46 GMT   

We once lived here
My family resided at number 53 Brindley Street Paddington.
My grandparents George and Elizabeth Jenkinson (ne Fowler) had four children with my Mother Olive Fairclough (ne Jenkinson) being born in the house on 30/09/1935.
She died on 29/04/2021 aged 85 being the last surviving of the four siblings

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Lived here
David Jones-Parry   
Added: 7 Sep 2017 12:13 GMT   

Mcgregor Road, W11 (1938 - 1957)
I was born n bred at 25 Mc Gregor Rd in 1938 and lived there until I joined the Royal Navy in 1957. It was a very interesting time what with air raid shelters,bombed houses,water tanks all sorts of areas for little boys to collect scrap and sell them on.no questions asked.A very happy boyhood -from there we could visit most areas of London by bus and tube and we did.

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Lived here
Robert Burns   
Added: 5 Jan 2023 17:46 GMT   

1 Abourne Street
My mother, and my Aunt and my Aunt’s family lived at number 1 Abourne Street.
I remember visitingn my aunt Win Housego, and the Housego family there. If I remember correctly virtually opposite number 1, onthe corner was the Lord Amberley pub.

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The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 14:49 GMT   

A bit of a lift....
Kilburn Park was the first station to be designed around escalators, rather than lifts.

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charlie evans   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 18:51 GMT   

apollo pub 1950s
Ted Lengthorne was the landlord of the apollo in the 1950s. A local called darkie broom who lived at number 5 lancaster road used to be the potman,I remember being in the appollo at a street party that was moved inside the pub because of rain for the queens coronation . Not sure how long the lengthornes had the pub but remember teds daughter julie being landlady in the early 1970,s

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Born here
Ron Shepherd   
Added: 18 Sep 2021 17:28 GMT   

More Wisdom
Norman Joseph Wisdom was born in St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington, West London.

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Fumblina   
Added: 26 Dec 2022 18:59 GMT   

Detailed history of Red Lion
I’m not the author but this blog by Dick Weindling and Marianne Colloms has loads of really clear information about the history of the Red Lion which people might appreciate.


Source: ‘Professor Morris’ and the Red Lion, Kilburn

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ANON   
Added: 20 Jul 2022 13:36 GMT   

The Square & Ashmore park
The Square and Ashmore park was the place to be 2000-2005. Those were the greatest times on the estate. everyday people were playing out. the park was full of kids just being kids and having fun, now everyone is grown up and only bump into eachother when heading to the shops or work. I miss the good days( Im 25yrs old as im writing this)

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

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Christine D Elliott   
Added: 20 Mar 2023 15:52 GMT   

The Blute Family
My grandparents, Frederick William Blute & Alice Elizabeth Blute nee: Warnham lived at 89 Blockhouse Street Deptford from around 1917.They had six children. 1. Alice Maragret Blute (my mother) 2. Frederick William Blute 3. Charles Adrian Blute 4. Violet Lillian Blute 5. Donald Blute 6. Stanley Vincent Blute (Lived 15 months). I lived there with my family from 1954 (Birth) until 1965 when we were re-housed for regeneration to the area.
I attended Ilderton Road School.
Very happy memories of that time.

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Pearl Foster   
Added: 20 Mar 2023 12:22 GMT   

Dukes Place, EC3A
Until his death in 1767, Daniel Nunes de Lara worked from his home in Dukes Street as a Pastry Cook. It was not until much later the street was renamed Dukes Place. Daniel and his family attended the nearby Bevis Marks synagogue for Sephardic Jews. The Ashkenazi Great Synagogue was established in Duke Street, which meant Daniel’s business perfectly situated for his occupation as it allowed him to cater for both congregations.

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Dr Paul Flewers   
Added: 9 Mar 2023 18:12 GMT   

Some Brief Notes on Hawthorne Close / Hawthorne Street
My great-grandparents lived in the last house on the south side of Hawthorne Street, no 13, and my grandmother Alice Knopp and her brothers and sisters grew up there. Alice Knopp married Charles Flewers, from nearby Hayling Road, and moved to Richmond, Surrey, where I was born. Leonard Knopp married Esther Gutenberg and lived there until the street was demolished in the mid-1960s, moving on to Tottenham. Uncle Len worked in the fur trade, then ran a pet shop in, I think, the Kingsland Road.

From the back garden, one could see the almshouses in the Balls Pond Road. There was an ink factory at the end of the street, which I recall as rather malodorous.

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KJH   
Added: 7 Mar 2023 17:14 GMT   

Andover Road, N7 (1939 - 1957)
My aunt, Doris nee Curtis (aka Jo) and her husband John Hawkins (aka Jack) ran a small general stores at 92 Andover Road (N7). I have found details in the 1939 register but don’t know how long before that it was opened.He died in 1957. In the 1939 register he is noted as being an ARP warden for Islington warden

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Added: 2 Mar 2023 13:50 GMT   

The Queens Head
Queens Head demolished and a NISA supermarket and flats built in its place.

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Mike   
Added: 28 Feb 2023 18:09 GMT   

6 Elia Street
When I was young I lived in 6 Elia Street. At the end of the garden there was a garage owned by Initial Laundries which ran from an access in Quick Street all the way up to the back of our garden. The fire exit to the garage was a window leading into our garden. 6 Elia Street was owned by Initial Laundry.

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Fumblina   
Added: 21 Feb 2023 11:39 GMT   

Error on 1800 map numbering for John Street
The 1800 map of Whitfield Street (17 zoom) has an error in the numbering shown on the map. The houses are numbered up the right hand side of John Street and Upper John Street to #47 and then are numbered down the left hand side until #81 BUT then continue from 52-61 instead of 82-91.

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P Cash   
Added: 19 Feb 2023 08:03 GMT   

Occupants of 19-29 Woburn Place
The Industrial Tribunals (later changed to Employment Tribunals) moved (from its former location on Ebury Bridge Road to 19-29 Woburn Place sometime in the late 1980s (I believe).

19-29 Woburn Place had nine floors in total (one in the basement and two in its mansard roof and most of the building was occupied by the Tribunals

The ’Head Office’ of the tribunals, occupied space on the 7th, 6th and 2nd floors, whilst one of the largest of the regional offices (London North but later called London Central) occupied space in the basement, ground and first floor.

The expansive ground floor entrance had white marble flooring and a security desk. Behind (on evey floor) lay a square (& uncluttered) lobby space, which was flanked on either side by lifts. On the rear side was an elegant staircase, with white marble steps, brass inlays and a shiny brass handrail which spiralled around an open well. Both staircase, stairwell and lifts ran the full height of the building. On all floors from 1st upwards, staff toilets were tucked on either side of the staircase (behind the lifts).

Basement Floor - Tribunal hearing rooms, dormant files store and secure basement space for Head Office. Public toilets.

Geound Floor - The ’post’ roon sat next to the entrance in the northern side, the rest of which was occupied by the private offices of the full time Tribunal judiciary. Thw largest office belonged to the Regional Chair and was situated on the far corner (overlooking Tavistock Square) The secretary to the Regional Chair occupied a small office next door.
The south side of this floor was occupied by the large open plan General Office for the administration, a staff kitchen & rest room and the private offices of the Regional Secretary (office manager) and their deputy.

First Dloor - Tribunal hearing rooms; separate public waiting rooms for Applicants & Respondents; two small rooms used by Counsel (on a ’whoever arrives first’ bases) and a small private rest room for use by tribunal lay members.

Second Floor - Tribunal Hearing Rooms; Tribunal Head Office - HR & Estate Depts & other tennants.

Third Floor - other tennants

Fourth Floor - other tennants

Fifth Floor - Other Tennants except for a large non-smoking room for staff, (which overlooked Tavistock Sqaure). It was seldom used, as a result of lacking any facities aside from a meagre collection of unwanted’ tatty seating. Next to it, (overlooking Tavistock Place) was a staff canteen.

Sixth Floor - Other tennants mostly except for a few offices on the northern side occupied by tribunal Head Office - IT Dept.

Seventh Floor - Other tenants in the northern side. The southern (front) side held the private offices of several senior managers (Secretariat, IT & Finance), private office of the Chief Accuntant; an office for two private secretaries and a stationary cupboard. On the rear side was a small kitchen; the private office of the Chief Executive and the private office of the President of the Tribunals for England & Wales. (From 1995 onwards, this became a conference room as the President was based elsewhere. The far end of this side contained an open plan office for Head Office staff - Secretariat, Finance & HR (staff training team) depts.

Eighth Floor - other tennants.


The Employment Tribunals (Regional & Head Offices) relocated to Vitory House, Kingsway in April 2005.






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V:1

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Bishop’s Bridge Bishop’s Bridge, sometimes known as Paddington Bridge, is a road bridge which carries Bishop’s Bridge Road across the rail approaches to Paddington station
Bridge House Canal side house in Westbourne Park
Desborough Lodge Desborough Lodge was a house which was one of five grand houses in the village of Westbourne Green.
Kilburn Aqueduct Some way from the area now called Kilburn, the Kilburn Aqueduct of the Grand Union Canal spanned the River Westbourne.
Paddington The first underground railway station in the world ran from Paddington on 10 January 1863 as the terminus of the Metropolitan Railway’s route from Farringdon.
Red Lion Bridge Harrow Road once spanned the River Westbourne at this point.
River Westbourne The Westbourne is one of the lost rivers of London.
Royal Oak Royal Oak is a station on the Hammersmith and City Line, between Westbourne Park and Paddington stations, and is the least used station on the Hammersmith and City line.
Spotted Dog The Spotted Dog public house was one of the earliest buildings in Westbourne Green.
Warwick Avenue Warwick Avenue is an area, street and a Bakerloo Line tube station near Little Venice.
Westbourne Farm Westbourne Farm - an old farm with a theatrical connection.
Westbourne Green The story of the building of a suburb.
Westbourne House Two hundred years ago, the biggest house hereabouts...
Westbourne Lodge Westbourne Lodge appeared in one of the earliest photographs in London.
Westbourne Manor The Manor of Westbourne

NEARBY STREETS
Abourne Street, W9 Before the Second World War, Abourne Street had been called Netley Street.
Africa House, W2 Africa House is a block on Blomfield Villas.
Aldsworth Close, W9 Aldsworth Close is a pale buff brick terrace.
Alexander Mews, W2 Alexander Mews is a street in Paddington.
Alexander Street, W2 Alexander Street was built in 1853 by Alexander Hall of Watergate House, Sussex.
Amberley Mews, W9 Amberley Mews starred as Tom Riley’s home in the 1950 movie "The Blue Lamp".
Amberley Road, W2 Amberley Road was formerly lined by canalside wharves.
Arthur Court, W2 Arthur Court is at the north-west end of Queensway.
Aubrey House, W2 Aubrey House is a block on Maida Avenue.
Barnwood Close, W9 Barnwood Close replaced a set of canal-side industrial buildings.
Bishop’s Bridge Road, W2 Bishop’s Bridge Road, now a main thoroughfare, began life as a footpath.
Blomfield Mews, W2 Blomfield Mews is a road in the W2 postcode area
Blomfield Road, W2 Blomfield Road is the road running beside the canal on the Little Venice side.
Blomfield Villas, W2 Blomfield Villas is a road in the W2 postcode area
Bourne Terrace, W2 Bourne Terrace is part of the Warwick Estate in Paddington and has 38 properties.
Brecon House, W2 Brecon House is a block on Cleveland Terrace.
Brewers Court, W2 Brewers’ Court was finished in 1976.
Bridgewater House, W2 Bridgewater House is a building on Cleveland Terrace.
Brinklow House, W2 Brinklow House is a block on Torquay Street.
Bristol Gardens, W9 Bristol Gardens is an extension southeastwards of Shirland Road.
Brunel House, W2 Brunel House is a block on Westbourne Terrace.
Burdett Mews, W2 Burdett Mews is a street in Paddington.
Caernarvon House, W2 The 1955-built Caernarvon House is on the Hallfield Estate.
Canalside Walk, W2 Canalside Walk is a location in London.
Celbridge Mews, W2 Celbridge Mews is a street in Paddington.
Charfield Court, W9 Charfield Court is part of the 1972 Amberley Estate.
Chichester Road, W2 Chichester Road is a road in the W2 postcode area
Cirencester Street, W2 Cirencester Street came about in the 1860s but was shortened when the Warwick Estate was built.
Clarendon Crescent, W2 Clarendon Crescent was said to be the longest road in London without a turning.
Clearwell Drive, W9 Clearwell Drive is a newer street, roughly built over the line of the former Amberley Mews.
Cleveland Terrace, W2 Cleveland Terrace is a street in Paddington.
Clifton Villas, W9 Clifton Villas is a street in Maida Vale.
Delamere Terrace, W2 Delamere Terrace runs beside the Grand Union Canal towpath.
Desborough Close, W2 Desborough Close was named after Desborough House which was demolished in the 19th century.
Douglas House, W2 Douglas House is a block on Maida Avenue.
Downfield Close, W9 Downfield Close is a street in Maida Vale.
Dudley Street, W2 Dudley Street is a road in the W2 postcode area
Eastbourne Mews, W2 Eastbourne Mews is a road in the W2 postcode area
Eastbourne Terrace, W2 Eastbourne Terrace is a street in Paddington.
Ellwood Court, W9 Ellwood Court is a two-storey block.
Elsie Lane Court, W2 Elsie Lane Court is a block on Elsie Lane Court.
Enterprise House, W2 Enterprise House is located on Westbourne Terrace.
Gaydon House, W2 Gaydon House is a 21-storey block containing 125 dwellings.
George Lowe Court, W2 George Lowe Court is a block on George Lowe Court.
Gloucester Gardens, W2 Gloucester Gardens is a road in the W2 postcode area
Harrow Road, W2 Harrow Road is one of the main arterial roads of London, leading northwest out of the capital.
Hatherley Court, W2 Hatherley Court is a 1930s block.
Hatherley Grove, W2 Hatherley Grove is a street in Paddington.
Holy Trinity House, W2 Holy Trinity House is a building on Orsett Terrace.
Howley Place, W2 Howley Place is a road in the W2 postcode area
John Aird Court, W2 John Aird Court can be found on John Aird Court.
Kingdom Street, W2 Kingdom Street is a road in the W2 postcode area
Lampard House, W2 Lampard House can be found on Maida Avenue.
Leo Court, W2 Leo Court is a block on St Mary’s Terrace.
Lord Hills Road, W2 Lord Hill’s Road was at first called Ranelagh Road.
Macmillan House, W2 Residential block
Maida Avenue, W2 Maida Avenue is a street in Paddington.
Newton Road, W2 William Kinnaird Jenkins laid out Newton Road in 1846.
Oldbury House, W2 Oldbury House is a shopping parade along the Harrow Road with accommodation above, part of the Warwick Estate development.
Orsett Mews, W2 Orsett Mews is a road in the W2 postcode area
Orsett Terrace, W2 Orsett Terrace combined with Orsett Place to form one street in Paddington.
Park Place Villas, W2 Park Place Villas is a street in Paddington.
Pickering Mews, W2 Pickering Mews is a street in Paddington.
Pickering Place, W2 Pickering Place eventually became the northern section of Queensway.
Pickering Terrace, W2 Pickering Terrace was later part of Porchester Road.
Porchester Road, W2 Porchester Road has existed under a series of names since at least the 1750s.
Porchester Square, W2 Begun in 1850 and completed between 1855 and 1858, Porchester Square was one of the last areas of Bayswater to be built.
Porchester Terrace North, W2 Porchester Terrace North is a road in the W2 postcode area
Porteus Road, W2 Porteus Road is a road in the W2 postcode area
Princethorpe House, W2 Princethorpe House is a block on Woodchester Square.
Ralph Court, W2 Ralph Court backed Peter’s Court in Porchester Road.
Randolph Road, W9 Randolph Road is a road in the W9 postcode area
Ranelagh Bridge, W2 Ranelagh Bridge is a road in the W2 postcode area
Rowington Close, W2 Rowington Close probably dates from 1962.
Senior Street, W2 Senior Street has a long history of over 150 years.
Sheldon Square, W2 Sheldon Square is a street in Paddington.
St Marys Mansions, W2 St Marys Mansions is a street in Paddington.
St Marys Terrace, W2 St Marys Terrace is a street in Paddington.
Swanleys, W2 Swanleys was built east of St Stephen’s Church in 1978.
The Battleship Building, W2 The Battleship Building is a block on Harrow Road.
The Colonnades, W2 The Colonnades is in Porchester Square.
The Toll House, W2 The Toll House is a block on Delamere Terrace.
Torquay Street, W2 Torquay Street underwent name changes and building changes.
Trinity Court, W2 Trinity Court is a block on Gloucester Terrace.
Warwick Avenue, W2 Warwick Avenue is split between the W2 and W9 postcodes.
Warwick Avenue, W9 Warwick Road was named in 1840, later to become Warwick Avenue.
Warwick Crescent, W2 Warwick Crescent lies along a southern edge of the Little Venice Pool.
Warwick Place, W9 Warwick Place is a street in Maida Vale.
Westbourne Court, W2 Westbourne Court stood at the corner of Orsett Terrace and Westbourne Terrace by 1938.
Westbourne Gardens, W2 Westbourne Gardens is a street in Paddington.
Westbourne Grove Terrace, W2 Runs north from Westbourne Grove.
Westbourne Park Road, W2 Houses at the Paddington end of Westbourne Park Road date from the 1850s.
Westbourne Park Villas, W2 Westbourne Park Villas is a street in Paddington.
Westbourne Terrace Mews, W2 Westbourne Terrace Mews is a road in the W2 postcode area
Westbourne Terrace Road, W2 Westbourne Terrace Road is a street in Paddington.
Westbourne Terrace, W2 Westbourne Terrace was an idea of George Gutch the builder.
Westway, W2 At its opening, Westway was the largest continuous concrete structure in Britain.
Wilmcote House, W2 Wilmcote House is sited on Woodchester Square.
Woodchester Square, W2 Woodchester Square is a street in Paddington.
Woodchester Street, W2 Woodchester Street disappeared from the map in 1961.

NEARBY PUBS
Royal Oak The Royal Oak pub gave its name to the nearby station.
Spotted Dog The Spotted Dog public house was one of the earliest buildings in Westbourne Green.


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Paddington

The first underground railway station in the world ran from Paddington on 10 January 1863 as the terminus of the Metropolitan Railway’s route from Farringdon.

The first Metropolitan station opened as Paddington (Bishop’s Road) but Paddington station, designed by the celebrated engineer, Isambard Kingdom Brunel had long been the London end of the Great Western Railway.

Paddington had been an important town west of London before it was engulfed by the metropolis. It was first a medieval parish, then a metropolitan borough and finally integrated with Westminster and Greater London in 1965. Also found in Paddington are St Mary’s Hospital (where penicillin was first discovered) and the former Paddington Green Police Station - once the most important high-security police station in the United Kingdom.

Alan Turing, the pioneer mathematician was born in Warrington Crescent.

Fictionally, Paddington Station has a display case showing Paddington Bear, a character of children’s fiction who, in the book, is first discovered at this station and hence named after it.

Paddington mainline railway station has a commuter service serving stations west of London, a mainline service to Oxford, Bristol, Bath, Taunton, Devon, Cornwall and South Wales. The Elizabeth Line now runs through, inheriting the express rail line to Heathrow Airport.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Click here to see Creative Commons images tagged with this road (if applicable)
The Bayswater Conduit in 1798.
TUM image id: 1490459429
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Bayswater Road
TUM image id: 1552860722
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Chilworth Street, W2
TUM image id: 1483806751
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Sutherland Avenue, W9
TUM image id: 1453139016
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
This photo from 6 August 1857 shows guests at the wedding at Westbourne Lodge, Paddington (Royal Oak) The wedding was of Florence Augusta Saunders, daughter of Charles Saunders, first general secretary of the Great Western Railway, with the Reverend Frederick Manners Stopford. Isambard Kingdom Brunel was amongst the guests. During the wedding, both Brunel and Saunders were able to experience trains running beside the wedding party along the railway which they had built.
Licence:


Mrs Siddons’ house at Westbourne Green c. 1800
Licence: CC BY 2.0


A GWR 4073 Class locomotive waits to depart Paddington Station, adjacent to Brunel’s cast-iron Bishop’s Bridge road bridge, in April 1962.
Credit: Wiki Commons/Ben Brooksbank
Licence:


The Royal Oak pub in Bayswater gave its name to the nearby station
Licence:


Bourne Terrace - taken from Torquay Street. On the corner of Bourne Terrace is Saws Ltd at number 264 along with various blocks which no longer exist.
Credit: Bernard Selwwyn
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Chilworth Street, W2
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Lord Hills Road at the junction with Senior Street
Credit: Historic England
Licence:


Sutherland Avenue, W9
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Little Venice (1952) This is one of a large series of London views that Stephen Bone executed from the 1930s to the 1950s. Bone liked to paint water and its reflections, and often combined this with compositions showing people going about their daily business, a combination which is the subject of this picture. A barge, hung with its owner’s washing, travels along the canal. Two children play along the banks, and a man sits on the railings overhead, enjoying the view.
Credit: Stephen Bone
Licence:


Paddington Public Baths on Queens Road (now Queensway) in 1909. Paddington’s first public baths which were built in 1874 but demolished in 1911 to be replaced by Whiteley’s new building when the store relocated from Westbourne Grove.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


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