Hickman’s Folly, SE1

Road in/near Queen’s Park, existed between the 1750s and 1931

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July
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2021

Hickman’s Folly was a very old Bermondsey street which disappeared as the Dickens Estate was built.

11247
Hickman’s Folly ran parallel and south of Wolseley Street and said to have been built on the site of a tannery. At one time it ran from Dockhead to George Row where it crossed the open River Neckinger by a bridge over Folly Ditch.

The street was part of Jacob’s Island. This ’island’ was probably created between 1660 and 1680 in the first 20 years of the reign of Charles II, when the tidal ditches surrounding and intersecting the island were dug. The ditch was supplied with water by the River Neckinger whose tidal mouth which had been formed into St Saviour's ("Savory") Dock, soon enclosed on three sides by warehouses. The oldest houses and their ’crazy wooden galleries’ dated from this period. Hickman’s Folly can be seen on the 1750s Rocque map marked as ’The Folly’ but most likely dates from before then.

Jacob’s Island became a densely built-up area of factories, tanneries, warehouses and mills. Houses, shops, small workshops and workers’ tenements were built between them.

Many houses owed curious features to their position over ditches, which served both as water supply and sewer. The ditches provided open space to build galleries for access with overhanging sleeping chambers and privies. Jacob’s Island got its ’island’ status from the main ditch - muddy Folly Ditch, once called Mill Pond - which surrounded it. Folly Ditch was six to eight feet deep and fifteen to twenty wide depending on the tide. ’The Rookeries of London’ by Thomas Beames noted in 1852: "Wooden galleries and sleeping rooms at the back of houses, which overhang the dark flood and are built on piles. Little rickety bridges span the ditches which were the common sewer for drinking and washing water [and excrement]."

Jacobs Island was especially known for tanneries and their associated stench. Tanning required animal hides to be soaked in urine and then kneaded with ’dung water’ - made from dog faeces, collected from the streets by ’dung gatherers’, usually children.


Folly Ditch circa 1860. Watercolour by J.L. Stewart (1829-1911) (click to enlarge)

Jacob’s Island by the 19th century developed a reputation as one of the worst slums in London and was popularised by the Charles Dickens novel ’Oliver Twist’. The principal villain of the book, Bill Sikes, dies in the mud of Folly Ditch.

A writer in the ’Morning Chronicle’ in 1849 described ’A Visit to the Cholera Districts of Bermondsey’:

"Out of the 12,800 deaths which, within the last three months, have arisen from cholera, 6,500 have occurred on the southern shores of the Thames ... Here stands, as it were, the very capital of cholera, the Jessore of London - Jacob’s Island, a patch of ground insulated by the common sewer. Spared by the fire of London, the houses and comforts of the people in this loathsome place have scarcely known any improvement since that time. The place is a century behind even the low and squalid districts that surround it.

On entering the precincts of the pest island, the air has literally the smell of a graveyard, and a feeling of nausea and heaviness comes over any one unaccustomed to imbibe the musty atmosphere. It is not only the nose, but the stomach, that tells how heavily the air is loaded with sulphuretted hydrogen; and as soon as you cross one of the crazy and rotting bridges over the reeking ditch, you know, as surely as if you had chemically tested it, by the black colour of what was once the white-lead paint upon the door-posts and window-sills, that the air is thickly charged with this deadly gas. The heavy bubbles which now and then rise up in the water show you whence at least a portion of the mephitic compound comes, while the open doorless privies that hang over the water side on one of the banks, and the dark streaks of filth down the walls where the drains from each house discharge themselves into the ditch on the opposite side, tell you how the pollution of the ditch is supplied.

Continuing our course we reached "The Folly," another street so narrow that the names and trades of the shopmen were painted on boards that stretched, across the street, from the roof of their own house to that of their neighbour’s. We were here stopped by our companion in front of a house "to let." The building was as narrow and as unlike a human habitation as the wooden houses in a child’s box of toys. "In this house," said our friend, "when the scarlet fever was raging in the neighbourhood, the barber who was living here suffered fearfully from it; and no sooner did the man get well of this than he was seized with typhus, and scarcely had he recovered from the first attack than he was struck down a second time with the same terrible disease. Since then he has lost his child with cholera, and at this moment his wife is in the workhouse suffering from the same affliction. The only wonder is that they are not all dead, for as the man sat at his meals in his small shop, if he put his hand against the wall behind him, it would be covered with the soil of his neighbour’s privy, sopping through the wall. At the back of the house was an open sewer, and the privies were full to the seat."

After major cholera outbreaks in 1849 and 1854, the open ditches of Jacob’s Island were filled in. Also by the 1850s, the area had become separated from the Thames by a long row of large warehouses and industrial units on the river.

Hickman’s Folly was cleared in the late 1860s as part of a slum clearance initiative and by the 1870s, the London City Mission observed: "The foul ditch no longer pollutes the air ... Part of London Street, the whole of Little London Street, part of Mill Street, beside houses in Jacob Street and Hickman’s Folly, have been demolished. In most of these places warehouses have taken the place of dwelling-houses. The revolting fact of many of the inhabitants of the district having no other water to drink than that which they procured from the filthy ditches is also a thing of the past. Most of the houses are now supplied with good water, and the streets are very well paved. Indeed, so great is the change for the better in the external appearance of the district generally, that a person who had not seen it since the improvements would now scarcely recognise it."

A huge fire, which raged for two weeks had, by the time of the clearance, already destroyed most of the old houses in Hickman’s Folly and London Street (now Wolseley Street) and by 1875 those buildings that survived the fire had been cleared away. Victorian warehouses and tenement blocks were built in their place.

The very first blocks of the Dickens Estate were built after 1929 and this swept away Hickman’s Folly. Dombey House (with 28 flats), Oliver House (34 flats) and Pickwick House (52 flats). By the end of 1931, 31 flats at Copperfield House had joined them.




Main source: Edith’s Streets
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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 15:05 GMT   

A plague on all your houses
Aldgate station is built directly on top of a vast plague pit, where thousands of bodies are apparently buried. No-one knows quite how many.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 21 Apr 2021 16:21 GMT   

Liverpool Street
the Bishopsgate station has existed since 1840 as a passenger station, but does not appear in the site’s cartography. Evidently, the 1860 map is in fact much earlier than that date.

Reply
Comment
Tricia   
Added: 27 Apr 2021 12:05 GMT   

St George in the East Church
This Church was opened in 1729, designed by Hawksmore. Inside destroyed by incendrie bomb 16th April 1941. Rebuilt inside and finished in 1964. The building remained open most of the time in a temporary prefab.

Reply
Lived here
KJ   
Added: 11 Apr 2021 12:34 GMT   

Family
1900’s Cranmer family lived here at 105 (changed to 185 when road was re-numbered)
James Cranmer wife Louisa ( b.Logan)
They had 3 children one being my grandparent William (Bill) CRANMER married to grandmother “Nancy” He used to go to
Glengall Tavern in Bird in Bush Rd ,now been converted to flats.

Reply

Graham O’Connell   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 10:24 GMT   

Lloyd & Sons, Tin Box Manufacturers (1859 - 1982)
A Lloyd & Sons occupied the wharf (now known as Lloyds Wharf, Mill Street) from the mid 19th Century to the late 20th Century. Best known for making tin boxes they also produced a range of things from petrol canisters to collecting tins. They won a notorious libel case in 1915 when a local councillor criticised the working conditions which, in fairness, weren’t great. There was a major fire here in 1929 but the company survived at least until 1982 and probably a year or two after that.

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The Underground Map   
Added: 20 Sep 2020 13:01 GMT   

Pepys starts diary
On 1 January 1659, Samuel Pepys started his famous daily diary and maintained it for ten years. The diary has become perhaps the most extensive source of information on this critical period of English history. Pepys never considered that his diary would be read by others. The original diary consisted of six volumes written in Shelton shorthand, which he had learned as an undergraduate on scholarship at Magdalene College, Cambridge. This shorthand was introduced in 1626, and was the same system Isaac Newton used when writing.

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fariba   
Added: 28 Jun 2021 00:48 GMT   

Tower Bridge Business Complex, S
need for my coursework

Source: university

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Comment
   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 16:58 GMT   

Prefabs!
The "post-war detached houses" mentioned in the description were "prefabs" - self-contained single-storey pre-fabricated dwellings. Demolition of houses on the part that became Senegal Fields was complete by 1964 or 1965.

Source: Prefabs in the United Kingdom - Wikipedia

Reply

   
Added: 3 Jun 2021 15:50 GMT   

All Bar One
The capitalisation is wrong

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Born here
Ron Shepherd   
Added: 18 Sep 2021 17:28 GMT   

More Wisdom
Norman Joseph Wisdom was born in St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington, West London.

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Comment
Jonathan Penner   
Added: 11 Sep 2021 16:03 GMT   

Pennard Road, W12
My wife and I, young Canadians, lodged at 65 (?) Pennard Road with a fellow named Clive and his girlfriend, Melanie, for about 6 months in 1985. We loved the area and found it extremely convenient.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 16:58 GMT   

Prefabs!
The "post-war detached houses" mentioned in the description were "prefabs" - self-contained single-storey pre-fabricated dwellings. Demolition of houses on the part that became Senegal Fields was complete by 1964 or 1965.

Source: Prefabs in the United Kingdom - Wikipedia

Reply
Comment
Matthew Moggridge ([email protected])   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 10:38 GMT   

Lord Chatham’s Ride (does it even exist?)
Just to say that I cycled from my home in Sanderstead to Knockholt Pound at the weekend hoping to ride Lord Chatham’s Ride, but could I find it? No. I rode up Chevening Lane, just past the Three Horseshoes pub and when I reached the end of the road there was a gate and a sign reading "Private, No Entry". I assumed this was the back entrance to Chevening House, country retreat of the Foreign Secretary, and that Lord Chatham’s Ride was inside the grounds. At least that’s what I’m assuming as I ended up following a footpath that led me into some woods with loads of rooted pathways, all very annoying. Does Lord Chatham’s Ride exist and if so, can I ride it, or is it within the grounds of Chevening House and, therefore, out of bounds? Here’s an account of my weekend ride with images, see URL below.

Source: No Visible Lycra: Lord Chatham’s ride: a big disappointmen

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Comment
norma brown   
Added: 20 Aug 2021 21:12 GMT   

my grandparents lived there as well as 2 further generations
my home

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Comment
Ruth   
Added: 6 Aug 2021 13:31 GMT   

Cheltenham Road, SE15
Harris Girls’ Academy, in Homestall Road, just off Cheltenham Road, was formerly Waverley School. Before that it was built as Honor Oak Girls’ Grammar School. It was also the South London Emergency School during WW2,taking girls from various schools in the vicinity, including those returning from being evacuated.

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Comment
Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

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Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 09:12 GMT   

Dunloe Avenue, N17
I was born in 1951,my grandparents lived at 5 Dunloe Avenue.I had photos of the coronation decorations in the area for 1953.The houses were rented out by Rowleys,their ’workers yard’ was at the top of Dunloe Avenue.The house was fairly big 3 bedroom with bath and toilet upstairs,and kitchenette downstairs -a fairly big garden.My Grandmother died 1980 and the house was taken back to be rented again

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Bermondsey The name Bermondsey first appears in a letter from Pope Constantine (708-715), in which he grants privileges to a monastery at ’Vermundesei’, then in the hands of the abbot of Medeshamstede, as Peterborough was known at the time.
Bridge House Built around 1705 and demolished in 1950, Bridge House in George Row was once surrounded by the Jacob’s Island rookery.
Turk’s Head The Turk’s Head was one of two Wapping pubs of the same name.

NEARBY STREETS
Abbey Gardens, SE1 Abbey Gardens is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Abbey Street, SE1 Abbey Street takes its name from Bermondsey Abbey which was situated between Bermondsey Square, Grange Walk and Long Walk.
Apollo Business Park, SE16 Apollo Business Park is a location in London.
Arabella Street, SE16 Arabella Street runs off of Old Jamaica Road.
Arc House, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Attilburgh House, SE1 Residential block
Bakery Street, SE1 A street within the SE16 postcode
Bermondsey Wall East, SE16 Bermondsey Wall East is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Bermondsey Wall West, SE16 Bermondsey Wall West is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Bevington Path, SE1 Bevington Path is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Bevington Street, SE16 Bevington Street was named after Samuel Bourne Bevington, the first mayor in 1900 of the new Bermondsey Borough Council.
Boss Street, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Bridewain Street, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Butlers & Colonial Wharf, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Butlers Colonial Wharf, SE1 Butlers Colonial Wharf is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Butlers Wharf Building, SE1 Butlers Wharf Building is a location in London.
Butlers Wharf, SE1 Butlers Wharf is a location in London.
Canvas House, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Cardamom Building, SE1 Cardamom Building is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Chambers Street, SE16 Chambers Street is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Cinnamon Wharf, Cinnamon Wharf lies within the postcode.
Collingwood House, SE16 Collingwood House is a location in London.
Commercial Pier Wharf, SE1 Commercial Pier Wharf is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Copper Row, SE1 Copper Row is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Copperfield House, SE1 Copperfield House, like much of the Dickens Estate, is named after a fictional character.
Curlew Street, SE1 Curlew Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Dartle Court, SE16 Dartle Court is a location in London.
Devon Mansions, SE1 Devon Mansions is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Dockhead, SE1 Dockhead is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Dombey House, SE16 Dombey House was one of the first blocks built on the Dickens Estate.
Druid Street, SE1 Druid Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Duchess Walk, SE1 Duchess Walk is a location in London.
East Lane, SE16 A street within the postcode
Emba Street, SE16 Emba Street is a location in London.
Enid Street, SE16 Enid Street is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Fair Street, SE1 Fair Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Farncombe Street, SE16 Farncombe Street is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Fendall Street, SE1 Fendall Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Flockton Street, SE16 The route that Flockton Street follows dates from before the eighteenth century.
Fountain Green Square, SE16 Fountain Green Square is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Frean Street, SE16 Frean Street runs up to the South Eastern main line railway in Bermondsey.
Freda Street, SE16 Freda Street runs off of Marine Street.
Fuschia Court, E1W Fuschia Court is a residential block in Wapping.
Gainsford Street, SE1 Gainsford Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Gainsforoad Street, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Gedling Place, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
George Row, SE16 George Row is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Gillison Walk, SE16 Gillison Walk is a location in London.
Grange Walk, SE1 Grange Walk is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Grange Walk, SE16 Grange Walk is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Haven Way, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Hermitage Court, E1W Hermitage Court is one of the streets of London in the E1W postal area.
Hobbs Court, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Horselydown Lane, SE1 Horselydown Lane is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
India House, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Jacob Street, SE1 Jacob Street is named after Jacob’s Island, the infamous area which preceded it.
Jamaica Road, SE1 Jamaica Road is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Jamaica Road, SE16 Jamaica Road is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Janeway Street, SE16 Janeway Street is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
John Felton Road, SE16 John Felton Road is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
John Roll Way, SE16 John Roll Way is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Keetons Road, SE16 Keetons Road is a location in London.
Kimmins Court, SE16 Kimmins Court is a block in Arabella Street.
Knighten Street, E1W Knighten Street follows the line of the former Russell’s Buildings.
Lafone Street, SE1 Lafone Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Limasol Street, SE16 A street within the SE16 postcode
Little London Court, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Llewellyn Street, SE16 Llewellyn Street is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Lloyds Wharf, SE1 Lloyds Wharf is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Luna House, SE16 Luna House is a block in Bermondsey.
Maggie Blake’s Cause, SE1 Maggie Blake’s Cause is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Maguire Street, SE1 Maguire Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Maltby Street, SE1 Maltby Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Marigold Street, SE16 Marigold Street is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Marine Street, SE16 A street within the SE16 postcode
Mill Street, SE1 Mill Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Millennium Square, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Millstream Road, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Neckinger Estate, SE16 A street within the SE16 postcode
Neckinger Mills, SE1 Neckinger Mills is a location in London.
Neckinger Street, SE1 Neckinger Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Neckinger, SE16 Neckinger is a road in the SE16 postcode area
New Concordia Wharf, SE1 New Concordia Wharf is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Old Jamaica Business Estate, SE16 Old Jamaica Business Estate is a location in London.
Old Jamaica Road Business Estate, SE16 Old Jamaica Road Business Estate is a commercial estate.
Old Jamaica Road, SE16 Old Jamaica Road is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Parker Building, SE16 The Parker Building lies on Freda Street.
Parkers Row, SE1 Parkers Row is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Perryn Road, SE16 Perryn Road is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Phoenix Wharf Road, SE1 Phoenix Wharf Road is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Pickwick House, SE16 Residential block
Pier Head, E1W Pier Head is one of the streets of London in the E1W postal area.
Providence Square, SE1 Providence Square is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Queen Elizabeth Street, SE1 Queen Elizabeth Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Raven Wharf, SE1 Raven Wharf is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Riley Road, SE1 Riley Road is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Rope Walk, SE1 Rope Walk is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Scott Lidgett Crescent, SE16 Scott Lidgett Crescent is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Scotts Sufferance Wharfmill Street, SE1 Scotts Sufferance Wharfmill Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Shad Thames, SE1 Shad Thames is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Smith’s Place, E1W Smith’s Place appears on maps of Wapping between 1750 and 1900.
Springalls Wharf Apartments, SE16 Springalls Wharf Apartments is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
St Saviours Estate, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
St. James’s Road, SE16 St. James’s Road is a long Bermondsey street running south from Jamaica Road.
St. Saviours Estate, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Stanworth Street, SE1 Stanworth Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Sugar Lane, SE16 Sugar Lane is a location in London.
Sun Passage, SE16 A street within the SE16 postcode
Sweeney Crescent, SE1 Sweeney Crescent is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Tanner Street, SE1 Tanner Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Tapley House, SE1 Tapley House was one of the first buildings of the Dickens Estate.
The Circle, SE1 The Circle is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
The Globe Rope Walk, SE1 The Globe Rope Walk is a road in the E14 postcode area
The Grange, SE1 The Grange is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
The Queens Walk, SE1 The Queens Walk is a location in London.
Thetford House, SE1 Residential block
Three Oak Lane, SE1 Three Oak Lane is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Thurland Road, SE16 Thurland Road is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Thurland Street, SE16 Thurland Street is a location in London.
Toussaint Walk, SE16 Toussaint Walk is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Tower Bridge Court, SE1 Tower Bridge Court is a block next to its namesake in Southwark.
Tower Bridge Piazza, SE1 Tower Bridge Piazza is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Tower Bridge, SE1 Tower Bridge is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Tower Workshops, SE1 Tower Workshops is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Tranton Road, SE16 Tranton Road is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Unity Wharf, SE1 Unity Wharf is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Vogans Mill, SE1 Vogans Mill is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Wade House, SE1 Residential block
Wade House, SE1 Wade House is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Waterside Close, SE16 Waterside Close is a road in the SE16 postcode area
Wilson Grove, SE16 Wilson Grove is one of the streets of London in the SE16 postal area.
Wolseley Street, SE1 Wolseley Street was formerly called London Street.
Woodmill Close, SE16 Woodmill Close is a road in the SW15 postcode area
Woodmill Street, SE16 A street within the SE1 postcode
Zanzibar Court, E1W Zanzibar Court lies along Wapping High Street.

NEARBY PUBS
All Bar One Butler’s Wharf This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Anchor tap This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Brew by numbers This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Dean swift This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Draft house This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Kings arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Pommeler’s rest This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The gregorian This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Turk’s Head The Turk’s Head was one of two Wapping pubs of the same name.


Queen’s Park

Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen’s Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen’s Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen’s Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen’s Park ’proper’ formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen’s Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen’s Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett’s wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen’s Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queen’s Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen’s Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen’s Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen’s Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Byward Tower, 1893
TUM image id: 1556882285
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
The building with the canopy is Bridge House, George Row, Bermondsey, in 1926.
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

The Turk’s Head, Wapping High Street (1890). Sketch from ’The Art Journal’
Credit: The Art Journal
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Spa Road station was one of the first of London’s railway stations, built by the London & Greenwich Railway (later the South Eastern and Chatham railway) in 1836. Photo dates from around 1900.
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

Wolseley Buildings, Wolseley Street, Bermondsey (1926) Tenements such as these were a common feature of inner south London in the late 19th and early 20th century. Typically they had been built by private landlords, some with a philanthropic inclination.
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After starting out as a cottage industry, the blancmange manufacturers Pearce & Duff moved to Rouel Road; SE16 in 1890, to the site of a glue factory - Young & Co. The Pearce & Duff factory closed after a fire in the 1960s.
Credit: Lambeth Archives
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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Tommy Steele signing autographs in Frean Street, Bermondsey (1957) He was leaving to do the ’Six Five Special’ on TV.
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