Highams Park Estate, IG8

Estate in/near Highams Park, existed between 1947 and 1961

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Estate · Highams Park · IG8 ·
November
14
2021

The Highams Park Estate was an estate of 176 prefabs which existed between 1947 and 1961.

In 1947 Walthamstow Council erected prefab homes in Highams Park - some of the layout of the roads is still visible in the park. These were erected to address the local post-war shortage of homes after bombing.

Three years earlier, the Churchill coalition government introduced the Housing (Temporary Accommodation) Act to provide temporary houses - there was an anticipated shortfall of 200 000 homes. The proposal was to address the shortfall by building some 500 000 pre-fabricated houses in the London County Council area with a planned lifetime of ten years and completed within five years. These houses became popularly known as ’prefabs’. They were furthermore nicknamed Palaces for the People.

At the end of the war, the new Labour government of Clement Attlee agreed to deliver 300 000 units within a decade - there was a budget of £150 million to achieve this. It was soon found that the pre-fabricated units were even dearer to build than conventional houses. Soon into the 1950s, the LCC abandoned the prefab concept in favour of bricks and mortar. Nationwide, only 156 000 prefabs were delivered.

The exact design of the prefabricated houses was left to the various manufacturers but the standard came to be that a prefab would have a small entrance hall, two bedrooms, a toilet and a bath and a kitchen. Prefab had to have a minimum floor space size of 635 square feet and had to be a maximum of 7.5 feet wide to allow them to be transported by road.

The Ministry of Works specified that all designs needed a ’service unit’: a combined back-to-back kitchen and bathroom. The bathroom included a flushing toilet and a bath with hot water taps. The kitchen would have a refrigerator, built-in oven and Baxi water heater. The prefabs had coal fires - also a back boiler for central heating and the supply of hot water. All prefabs under the housing act arrived decorated in magnolia, with gloss-green on wood surfaces, door trimmings and skirting boards.

The Highams Park Estate prefabs had their own gardens and sometimes a shed with a corrugated roof. The first winter on the Estate was that of 1947 - one of the coldest winters on record in London. This made for a notable first year.

The estate became quite a tight-knit community for those who lived there and lasted for 13 years. Most of the residents were young families - a contemporary estimate put the total number of school-age children on the estate as over 200.

There were 18 named roads on the estate: Coopersale Avenue, Coopersale Close, Fishers Avenue, Fishers Close, Miller's End, Miller's Close, Navestock Road, Stanford Road, Stapleford Avenue, Stapleford Central, Stapleford Crescent, Stapleford End, Stapleford Path, Stapleford Road, Troubridge Avenue, Troubridge Road, Warrens Avenue and Warrens Road.

The former Community Hall (and Sunday School) still survives as a community café called Humphry’s, named after an architect. This building pre-dated the Second World War - during the war it was both an air raid station and gun emplacement.

By the end of 1960 all the occupants had been re-housed. Before demolition in 1961, the Highams Residents Association lobbied the Council to have the area re-instated as a park.




Main source: Walthamstow Memories 2021
Further citations and sources


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Comment
Alison   
Added: 26 Jun 2022 18:20 GMT   

On the dole in north London
When I worked at the dole office in Medina Road in the 1980s, "Archway" meant the social security offices which were in Archway Tower at the top of the Holloway Road. By all accounts it was a nightmare location for staff and claimants alike. This was when Margaret Thatcher’s government forced unemployment to rise to over 3 million (to keep wages down) and computerised records where still a thing of the future. Our job went from ensuring that unemployed people got the right sort and amount of benefits at the right time, to stopping as many people as possible from getting any sort of benefit at all. Britain changed irrevocably during this period and has never really recovered. We lost the "all in it together" frame of mind that had been born during the second world war and became the dog-eat-dog society where 1% have 95% of the wealth and many people can’t afford to feed their children. For me, the word Archway symbolises the land of lost content.

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Comment
Jack Wilson   
Added: 21 Jun 2022 21:40 GMT   

Penfold Printers
I am seeking the location of Penfold Printers Offices in Dt Albans place - probably about 1870 or so

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Lived here
   
Added: 19 Jun 2022 16:58 GMT   

Runcorn Place, W11
Runcorn place

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Comment
   
Added: 30 May 2022 19:03 GMT   

The Three Magpies
Row of houses (centre) was on Heathrow Rd....Ben’s Cafe shack ( foreground ) and the Three Magpies pub (far right) were on the Bath Rd

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Comment
Watts   
Added: 17 May 2022 20:29 GMT   

Baeethoven St School, also an Annex for Paddington College of FE.
In the early 70’s I took a two year science course at Paddington CFE. The science classes were held on weekday evenings at Beethoven Street school, overseen by chemistry teacher, Mr Tattershall.

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Added: 25 Apr 2022 22:11 GMT   

Southover, N12
Everyone knows Central Woodside is the place to be. Ever since kdog moved from finchtown, Woodside has been thriving.

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Born here
Bernard Miller   
Added: 12 Apr 2022 17:36 GMT   

My mother and her sister were born at 9 Windsor Terrace
My mother, Millie Haring (later Miller) and her sister Yetta Haring (later Freedman) were born here in 1922 and 1923. With their parents and older brother and sister, they lived in two rooms until they moved to Stoke Newington in 1929. She always said there were six rooms, six families, a shared sink on the first floor landing and a toilet in the backyard.

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Brian Lynch   
Added: 10 Apr 2022 13:38 GMT   

Staples Mattress Factory
An architect’s design of the Staples Mattress Factory
An image found on the website of Dalzell’s Beds, in Armagh Northern Ireland.

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Highams Park Estate, IG8 The Highams Park Estate was an estate of 176 prefabs which existed between 1947 and 1961.

NEARBY STREETS
Abbotts Crescent, E4 Abbotts Crescent is one of the streets of London in the E4 postal area.
Advent Court, IG8 Advent Court is a residential black.
Amanda Court, E4 Amanda Court is on Falmouth Avenue.
Beechwood Drive, IG8 Beechwood Drive is a road in the IG8 postcode area
Belmont Close, IG8 Belmont Close lies off Falmouth Avenue.
Birches Lodge, IG8 A street within the IG8 postcode
Brookhouse Gardens, E4 Brookhouse Gardens is one of the streets of London in the E4 postal area.
Chingford Lane, IG8 Chingford Lane is a road in the IG8 postcode area
Churchill Lodge, IG8 A street within the IG8 postcode
Clivedon Road, E4 Clivedon Road is a road in the E4 postcode area
Coopersale Avenue, IG8 One of a series of roads containing prefabs on the Highams Park Estate
Coopersale Close, IG8 One of a series of roads containing prefabs on the Highams Park Estate
Cowell Lodge, IG8 A street within the IG8 postcode
Crealock Grove, IG8 Crealock Grove is named after Malcolm Crealock, a director of the Warner Estate and Law Land Building Department.
Elm Grove, IG8 Elm Grove is a road in the IG8 postcode area
Elm Terrace, IG8 A street within the IG8 postcode
Falmouth Avenue, E4 Falmouth Avenue is one of the streets of London in the E4 postal area.
Falmouth Avenue, E4 Falmouth Avenue is a road in the IG8 postcode area
Fishers Avenue, IG8 One of a series of roads containing prefabs on the Highams Park Estate
Fishers Close, IG8 One of a series of roads containing prefabs on the Highams Park Estate
Forest Glade, E4 Forest Glade is one of the streets of London in the E4 postal area.
Gordon Avenue, E4 Gordon Avenue is one of the streets of London in the E4 postal area.
Hatchwood Close, IG8 A street within the IG8 postcode
Henrys Avenue, IG8 Henrys Avenue - or Henry’s Avenue - is a 1930-built road named after Sir Henry Warner.
Keynsham Avenue, IG8 Keynsham Avenue - until 1897, landower Courtenay Warner owned an estate near Keynsham in Somerset.
Lichfield Road, IG8 Lichfield Road is a northern extension of Montalt Road.
Marion Grove, IG8 Marion Grove dates from 1936 but the origins of this name are unknown.
Mason Road, IG8 Mason Road marks the local Warner family’s involvement in Freemasonry.
Mill Broke Mews, IG8 A street within the IG8 postcode
Mill Houses, IG8 A street within the IG8 postcode
Mill Lane, IG8 Mill Lane is a road in the IG8 postcode area
Millbroke Mews, IG8 Millbroke Mews is a road in the IG8 postcode area
Miller’s Close, IG8 One of a series of roads containing prefabs on the Highams Park Estate
Miller’s End, IG8 One of a series of roads containing prefabs on the Highams Park Estate
Montalt Road, IG8 Montalt Road was first laid out by The Warner Company in 1897.
Navestock Road, IG8 One of a series of roads containing prefabs on the Highams Park Estate
Nesta Road, IG8 Nesta Road is named after the Hon. Nesta Douglas-Pennant who married Edward Warner in 1920.
Nightingale Avenue, E4 Nightingale Avenue is a road in the E4 postcode area
Payzes Gardens, IG8 A street within the IG8 postcode
Savill Row, IG8 Savill Row is a road in the IG8 postcode area
Sheldon House, E4 Sheldon House stands on Falmouth Avenue.
Sheredan Road, E4 Sheredan Road is one of the streets of London in the E4 postal area.
St Leonard’s Avenue, E4 St Leonard’s Avenue lies off Handsworth Avenue.
Stanford Road, IG8 One of a series of roads containing prefabs on the Highams Park Estate
Stapleford Avenue, IG8 One of a series of roads containing prefabs on the Highams Park Estate
Stapleford Central, IG8 One of a series of roads containing prefabs on the Highams Park Estate
Stapleford Crescent, IG8 One of a series of roads containing prefabs on the Highams Park Estate
Stapleford End, IG8 One of a series of roads containing prefabs on the Highams Park Estate
Stapleford Path, E4 One of a series of roads containing prefabs on the Highams Park Estate
Stapleford Road, E4 One of a series of roads containing prefabs on the Highams Park Estate
Sunnydene Avenue, E4 Sunnydene Avenue is one of the streets of London in the E4 postal area.
Sunset Avenue, IG8 Sunset Avenue is a road in the IG8 postcode area
Tamworth Avenue, IG8 Tamworth Avenue, now a cul-de-sac, formerly provided access into the Highams Park prefab estate.
The Charter Road, IG8 The Charter Road was built in 1930.
Troubridge Avenue, IG8 One of a series of roads containing prefabs on the Highams Park Estate
Troubridge Road, IG8 One of a series of roads containing prefabs on the Highams Park Estate
Warrens Avenue, IG8 One of a series of roads containing prefabs on the Highams Park Estate
Warrens Road, IG8 One of a series of roads containing prefabs on the Highams Park Estate
Wood Lane, IG8 Wood Lane runs parallel with Chingford Lane.

NEARBY PUBS
The Rose & Crown This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Highams Park

Highams Park is situated between Walthamstow and Chingford.

The Highams Park area was previously known as ‘The Sale’ - this name appeared on maps from 1641. Another local name was Hale End, site of the later Halex factory.

The whole area lay within the manor of Hecham - meaning high home - existing already in 1066.

In 1768 Anthony Bacon built Higham House (also known as Highams) to William Newton’s design. It was altered again in the 1780s.

In the 1790s, the grounds, including a summer house built with stones from old London Bridge, were redesigned to include a lake fed by the River Ching. The summer house was demolished in 1831.

In 1849, Highams became the property of Edward Warner. Parcels of the estate started to be sold for development but the real spur to housing was the arrival in 1873 of Highams Park railway station. This was opened to the west of the Highams estate. Immediately around the station, the land was developed.

A few years later, in 1891, Edward Warner’s son, Courtenay Warner, formed Warner Estate Ltd to manage the manor house. In a piece of ‘mission creep’, the Warner Company sprung from this in 1897 with a plan to build high-quality terraces of good workmanship. The Warner Company was jointly owned by Warner Estate Ltd. and Law Land Ltd. In 1898, Law Land’s building department undertook the building development. Once built, this new area gained the name Highams Park.

Within a few years, the Corporation of London had bought land around Highams to retain as public land and open space. In 1891, they acquired a further thirty acres from the estate, including the lake - purchased for £6000. This was added to Epping Forest.

The Warner Company began to develop the grounds of Highams in 1897 - 24 houses were built in Montalt Road, and more in the "Warner style" were built in Chingford Lane, using the same architectural designs as Walthamstow’s Warner Estate.

The Halex factory was built on Larkshall Road - a major local employer from 1897 onwards (until 1971). It produced a variety of plastic goods and the company had a virtual monopoly manufacturing table tennis balls. The factory was knocked down in the early 1970s with its site replaced by new smaller industrial buildings. A blue plaque from the ’Plastics Historical Society’ can be seen on Jubilee Avenue marking the spot of Kalex.

There was a second phase of Warner development. More new roads were constructed in the early 1930s.

Houses on the estate were comparatively expensive for the early 1930s - the cheapest home was £1000. Subsequently there was a lack of demand and cheaper houses were then developed in the northwest corner of the estate - this phase was known as the Montalt Estate.

The curious name of The Charter Road came about because of an exchange of land between Essex County Council and Warner. Because the council refused to contribute to the road’s cost, a strip of land was retained by the Warner Company.

In 1934, Sir Edward Warner sold the remaining undeveloped parts of the estate (between Montalt Road and Henry’s Avenue) to Walthamstow, with the intention to keep it as open space.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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In the neighbourhood...

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The Highams Park Estate was an estate of 176 prefabs which existed between 1947 and 1961. All 20 roads on the estate were dug up and Highams Park itself restored.
Credit: Walthamstow Memories
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Highams Park Estate was an estate of 176 prefabs which existed between 1947 and 1961. All 20 roads on the estate were dug up and Highams Park itself restored.
Credit: Walthamstow Memories
Licence: CC BY 2.0


A typical post-war prefab, coloured in magnolia and green
Credit: Wiki Commons/Rudi Winter
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Highams Park Estate was an estate of 176 prefabs which existed between 1947 and 1961. All 20 roads on the estate were dug up and Highams Park itself restored.
Credit: Walthamstow Memories
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Highams Park Estate was an estate of 176 prefabs which existed between 1947 and 1961. All 20 roads on the estate were dug up and Highams Park itself restored.
Credit: Walthamstow Memories
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Highams Park Estate was an estate of 176 prefabs which existed between 1947 and 1961. All 20 roads on the estate were dug up and Highams Park itself restored.
Credit: Walthamstow Memories
Licence: CC BY 2.0


A view of The Charter Road from the green between it and Henry’s Avenue (2021) The view shows semi-detached houses in the Highams Estate
Credit: Wiki Commons/Regvarney75
Licence: CC BY 2.0


View down Henry’s Avenue (taken in 2021) showing the architecture typical of the Highams Estate
Credit: Wiki Commons/Regvarney75
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Highams Park Estate was an estate of 176 prefabs which existed between 1947 and 1961. All 20 roads on the estate were dug up and Highams Park itself restored.
Credit: Walthamstow Memories
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Highams Park Estate was an estate of 176 prefabs which existed between 1947 and 1961. All 20 roads on the estate were dug up and Highams Park itself restored.
Credit: Walthamstow Memories
Licence: CC BY 2.0


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