Lyric Hammersmith

Theatre in/near Hammersmith, existing between 1888 and now

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Theatre · Hammersmith · W6 ·
JUNE
22
2022

The Lyric Theatre (Lyric Hammersmith) is a theatre off King Street, Hammersmith.

The Lyric Theatre was originally a music hall established in 1888 on Bradmore Grove. Its success led it to being rebuilt and enlarged on the same site twice in 1890 and 1895. The 1895 reopening, as The New Lyric Opera House and designed by theatrical architect Frank Matcham, was accompanied by an address by the actress Lillie Langtry.

In 1966 the theatre was due to be closed and demolished but a successful campaign to save it led to the auditorium being dismantled and reinstalled piece by piece within a modern shell on its current site on King Street a short distance from the former location. The relocated theatre opened in 1979.




Main source: Wikipedia
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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

Comment
Joan Clarke   
Added: 2 Feb 2021 10:54 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens
My late aunt Ivy Clarke (nee Burridge) lived with her whole family at 19 Avondale Park Gardens, according to the 1911 census and she was still there in 1937.What was it like in those days, I wonder, if the housing was only built in 1920?


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Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:17 GMT   

TV comes to Olympia
Over 7000 people queued to see the first high definition television pictures on sets at the Olympia Radio Show. The pictures were transmitted by the BBC from Alexandra Palace, introduced by Leslie Mitchell, their first announcer.

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Comment
ken gaston   
Added: 16 Jan 2021 11:04 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens
My grandmother Hilda Baker and a large family lived in number 18 . It was a close community and that reflected in the coronation celebration held on the central green . I grew up in that square and went to school at Sirdar Road then St. Clements it was a great place to grow up with a local park and we would also trek to Holland Park or Kensington Gardens .Even then the area was considered deprived and a kindergarden for criminals . My generation were the first to escape to the new towns and became the overspill from London to get decent housing and living standards .

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Comment
Jonathan Penner   
Added: 11 Sep 2021 16:03 GMT   

Pennard Road, W12
My wife and I, young Canadians, lodged at 65 (?) Pennard Road with a fellow named Clive and his girlfriend, Melanie, for about 6 months in 1985. We loved the area and found it extremely convenient.

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john ormandy   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 17:48 GMT   

Mary Place Workhouse
There was a lady called Ivy who lived in the corner she use to come out an tell us kids off for climbing over the fence to play football on the green. Those were the days.

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john ormandy   
Added: 14 Mar 2021 18:59 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens, W11
We moved to number 6 in 1950 an family still live there now. I think i remember a family name of Larter living in the house you mention also living in the Gdns were names Prior, Cannon, Parsons Clives at number 26 who i went to school with.


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Brian Lucas   
Added: 15 Mar 2021 16:02 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens, W11
I also lived here at No. 15 1854 then move to No. 23 The Lucas Family

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john ormandy   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 17:21 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens, W11
Remember the Lucas family think the eldest was about same age as me cant remember his name though seem to rember had several younger sisters may have been twins!!

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john ormandy   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 18:02 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens, W11
Went to that coranation party with my two younger brothers who both went to St Clements along with Alan Mullery the footballer. I went to St James before moving on to St Johns along with Alan who lived in Mary Place where we were both in the same class.

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Lived here
   
Added: 19 Jun 2022 16:58 GMT   

Runcorn Place, W11
Runcorn place

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

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danny currie   
Added: 30 Nov 2022 18:39 GMT   

dads yard
ron currie had a car breaking yard in millers yard back in the 60s good old days

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Lynette beardwood   
Added: 29 Nov 2022 20:53 GMT   

Spy’s Club
Topham’s Hotel at 24-28 Ebury Street was called the Ebury Court Hotel. Its first proprietor was a Mrs Topham. In WW2 it was a favourite watering hole for the various intelligence organisations based in the Pimlico area. The first woman infiltrated into France in 1942, FANY Yvonne Rudellat, was recruited by the Special Operations Executive while working there. She died in Bergen Belsen in April 1945.

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Born here
   
Added: 16 Nov 2022 12:39 GMT   

The Pearce family lived in Gardnor Road
The Pearce family moved into Gardnor Road around 1900 after living in Fairfax walk, my Great grandfather, wife and there children are recorded living in number 4 Gardnor road in the 1911 census, yet I have been told my grand father was born in number 4 in 1902, generations of the Pearce continue living in number 4 as well other houses in the road up until the 1980’s

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Lived here
Phil Stubbington   
Added: 14 Nov 2022 16:28 GMT   

Numbers 60 to 70 (1901 - 1939)
A builder, Robert Maeers (1842-1919), applied to build six houses on plots 134 to 139 on the Lincoln House Estate on 5 October 1901. He received approval on 8 October 1901. These would become numbers 60 to 70 Rodenhurst Road (60 is plot 139). Robert Maeers was born in Northleigh, Devon. In 1901 he was living in 118 Elms Road with his wife Georgina, nee Bagwell. They had four children, Allan, Edwin, Alice, and Harriet, born between 1863 and 1873.
Alice Maeers was married to John Rawlins. Harriet Maeers was married to William Street.
Three of the six houses first appear on the electoral register in 1904:
Daniel Mescal “Ferncroft”
William Francis Street “Hillsboro”
Henry Elkin “Montrose”

By the 1905 electoral register all six are occupied:

Daniel Mescal “St Senans”
Henry Robert Honeywood “Grasmere”
John Rawlins “Iveydene”
William Francis Street “Hillsboro”
Walter Ernest Manning “St Hilda”
Henry Elkin “Montrose”

By 1906 house numbers replace names:

Daniel Mescal 70
Henry Robert Honeywood 68
John Rawlins 66
William Francis Street 64
Walter Ernest Manning 62
Henry Elkin 60

It’s not clear whether number 70 changed from “Ferncroft” to “St Senans” or possibly Daniel Mescal moved houses.

In any event, it can be seen that Robert Maeers’ two daughters are living in numbers 64 and 66, with, according to local information, an interconnecting door. In the 1911 census William Street is shown as a banker’s clerk. John Rawlins is a chartering clerk in shipping. Robert Maeers and his wife are also living at this address, Robert being shown as a retired builder.

By 1939 all the houses are in different ownership except number 60, where the Elkins are still in residence.


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Comment
stephen garraway   
Added: 13 Nov 2022 13:56 GMT   

Martin Street, Latimer Road
I was born at St Charlottes and lived at 14, Martin Street, Latimer Road W10 until I was 4 years old when we moved to the east end. It was my Nan Grant’s House and she was the widow of George Frederick Grant. She had two sons, George and Frederick, and one daughter, my mother Margaret Patricia.
The downstairs flat where we lived had two floors, the basement and the ground floor. The upper two floors were rented to a Scot and his family, the Smiths. He had red hair. The lights and cooker were gas and there was one cold tap over a Belfast sink. A tin bath hung on the wall. The toilet was outside in the yard. This was concreted over and faced the the rear of the opposite terraces. All the yards were segregated by high brick walls. The basement had the a "best" room with a large , dark fireplace with two painted metal Alsation ornaments and it was very dark, cold and little used.
The street lights were gas and a man came round twice daily to turn them on and off using a large pole with a hook and a lighted torch on the end. I remember men coming round the streets with carts selling hot chestnuts and muffins and also the hurdy gurdy man with his instrument and a monkey in a red jacket. I also remember the first time I saw a black man and my mother pulling me away from him. He had a Trilby and pale Mackintosh so he must of been one of the first of the Windrush people. I seem to recall he had a thin moustache.
Uncle George had a small delivery lorry but mum lost touch with him and his family. Uncle Fred went to Peabody Buildings near ST.Pauls.
My Nan was moved to a maisonette in White City around 1966, and couldn’t cope with electric lights, cookers and heating and she lost all of her neighbourhood friends. Within six months she had extreme dementia and died in a horrible ward in Tooting Bec hospital a year or so later. An awful way to end her life, being moved out of her lifelong neighbourhood even though it was slums.

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Comment
   
Added: 31 Oct 2022 18:47 GMT   

Memories
I lived at 7 Conder Street in a prefab from roughly 1965 to 1971 approx - happy memories- sad to see it is no more ?

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Eve Glover   
Added: 22 Oct 2022 09:28 GMT   

Shenley Road
Shenley Road is the main street in Borehamwood where the Job Centre and Blue Arrow were located

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Comment
Richard Lake   
Added: 28 Sep 2022 09:37 GMT   

Trade Union Official
John William Lake snr moved with his family to 22 De Laune Street in 1936. He was the London Branch Secretary for the Street Masons, Paviours and Road Makers Union. He had previously lived in Orange St now Copperfield St Southwark but had been forced to move because the landlord didn’t like him working from home and said it broke his lease.
John William snr died in 1940. His son John William Lake jnr also became a stone mason and at the end of World War two he was responsible for the engraving of the dates of WW2 onto the Cenotaph in Whitehall.

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Corona Theatre School Corona Theatre School was for a time also known as the Ravenscourt Theatre School.
Hammersmith Hammersmith is a district in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham, approximately eight kilometres west of Charing Cross on the north bank of the River Thames.
Lyric Hammersmith The Lyric Theatre (Lyric Hammersmith) is a theatre off King Street, Hammersmith.
Sacred Heart High School Sacred Heart High School is a Roman Catholic girls secondary school in Hammersmith.
St Paul’s Girls’ School St Paul’s Girls’ School is an independent school which accepts students between the ages of 10 and 19.

NEARBY STREETS
Albion Mews, W6 Albion Mews is a street in Hammersmith.
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Argyle Place, W6 Argyle Place is a street in Hammersmith.
Ashcroft Square, W6 Ashcroft Square is a street in Hammersmith.
Aspen Gardens, W6 Aspen Gardens serves the blocks of the Aspen Gardens Estate.
Atwood Road, W6 Atwood Road is a street in Hammersmith.
Banim Street, W6 Banim Street is a street in Hammersmith.
Beadon Road, W6 Beadon Road runs down to the Hammersmith and City Line station in central Hameersmith.
Biscay Road, W6 Biscay Road is in Fulham
Black’s Road, W6 This is a street in the W6 postcode area
Blades Court, W6 Blades Court is a street in Hammersmith.
Bradmore Park Road, W6 Bradmore Park Road is a street in Hammersmith.
Bridge Avenue, W6 Bridge Avenue is a street in Hammersmith.
Bridge View, W6 Bridge View is a street in Hammersmith.
Broadway Chambers, W6 Broadway Chambers is a street in Hammersmith.
Broadway Shopping Centre, W6 Broadway Shopping Centre is a street in Hammersmith.
Brook Green, W6 Brook Green runs both side of the green of the same name.
Bute Gardens, W6 Bute Gardens is a street in Hammersmith.
Butterwick, W6 Butterwick is a road in the W6 postcode area
Cambridge Court, W6 Cambridge Court is a street in Hammersmith.
Cambridge Grove, W6 Cambridge Grove was previously called Cambridge Road.
Cambridge House, W6 Residential block
Chalk Hill Road, W6 Chalk Hill Road is a road in the W6 postcode area
Charlotte House, W6 Charlotte House is one of a number of local blocks named after female members of the British Royal Family.
Dimes Place, W6 Dimes Place is a street in Hammersmith.
Down Place, W6 Down Place is a street in Hammersmith.
Felgate Mews, W6 Felgate Mews is a street in Hammersmith.
Fulham Palace Road, W6 Fulham Palace Road is a street in Hammersmith.
Furber Street, W6 Furber Street is a road in the W6 postcode area
Galena Road, W6 Galena Road is a street in Hammersmith.
Glemthorne Mews, W6 Glemthorne Mews is a street in Hammersmith.
Glenthorne Mews, W6 Glenthorne Mews is a street in Hammersmith.
Glenthorne Road, W6 Glenthorne Road is a major thoroughfare in Hammersmith.
Hammersmith Bridge Road, W6 Hammersmith Bridge Road is a street in Hammersmith.
Hammersmith Broadway, W6 Hammersmith Broadway is a major transport node and also the name of a shopping centre.
Hammersmith Flyover, W6 The Hammersmith flyover is an elevated roadway which carries the A4 arterial road over the central Hammersmith gyratory system.
Hammersmith Road, W6 Hammersmith Road is a street in Hammersmith.
Holcombe Street, W6 Holcombe Street is a street in Hammersmith.
Kilmarsh Road, W6 Kilmarsh Road is a street in Hammersmith.
King Street Cloisters, W6 King Street Cloisters is a street in Hammersmith.
King Street, W6 King Street is a street in Hammersmith.
Kings Mall, W6 Kings Mall is a street in Hammersmith.
Lamington Street, W6 Lamington Street is a street in Hammersmith.
Lower Mall, W6 Lower Mall is a street in Hammersmith.
Luxemburg Gardens, W6 Luxemburg Gardens is a street in Hammersmith.
Lyric Square, W6 This is a street in the W6 postcode area
Macbeth Street, W6 Macbeth Street is a street in Hammersmith.
Mall Road, W6 Mall Road is a street in Hammersmith.
Mercers Place, W6 Mercers Place is a road in the W6 postcode area
Metropolitan Station Arcade, W6 Metropolitan Station Arcade is a row of shops connected to the Hammersmith & City/Circle Line station in Hammersmith.
Overstone Road, W6 Overstone Road is a street in Hammersmith.
Perrers Road, W6 Perrers Road is a street in Hammersmith.
Queen Caroline Street, W6 Caroline of Brunswick, wife of George IV, lived and died in nearby Brandenburg House.
Raynham Road, W6 Raynham Road is a street in Hammersmith.
Redmore Road, W6 Redmore Road is a street in Hammersmith.
Riverside Gardens, W6 Riverside Gardens is a street in Hammersmith.
Rowan Road, W6 Rowan Road is a street in Hammersmith.
Rutland Grove, W6 Rutland Grove is a road in the W6 postcode area
Ship Lane, W6 Ship Lane was formerly known as Bridge Street.
Shortlands, W6 Shortlands commemorates a local field name, first mentioned in the reign of Henry V.
Southerton Road, W6 Southerton Road is a street in Hammersmith.
Studland Street, W6 Studland Street is a street in Hammersmith.
Sussex Place, W6 Sussex Place is a road in the W6 postcode area
Tabor Road, W6 Tabor Road is a street in Hammersmith.
The Arches, W6 The Arches is a street in Hammersmith.
The Square, W6 The Square is a road in the W6 postcode area
Trafalgar Street, W6 Trafalgar Street was a small street in Hammersmith, off Aspen Place.
Wellington Walk, W6 Wellington Walk was a former street of Hammersmith.
Wolverton Gardens, W6 Wolverton Gardens is a street in Hammersmith.
Worlidge Street, W6 Worlidge Street is a street in Hammersmith.
Yeldham Road, W6 Yeldham Road is a location in Fulham
York House, W6 A street within the W6 postcode

NEARBY PUBS
Blue Anchor The Blue Anchor is an iconic pub on the banks of the river Thames at Hammersmith.
Duke of Edinburgh The Duke of Edinburgh was located at 52 Queen Caroline Street, Hammersmith.
Queen’s Head The Queens Head is a pub on Brook Green.
Royal Sussex Arms The Royal Sussex Arms stood at 26 Hammersmith Broadway.
Six Bells The Six Bells was open between 1826 and about 1959.
Stonemasons Arms, W6 The Stonemasons Arms lies on the corner of Glenthorne Road and Cambridge Grove.
The Cannon The Cannon was situated at 80 Queen Caroline Street, Hammersmith.
The Distillers Arms The Distillers Arms marks the boundary between Hammersmith and Fulham.
The Rutland Arms The Rutland Arms lies along the River Thames at Hammersmith.


Click here to explore another London street
We now have 526 completed street histories and 46974 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS


Hammersmith

Hammersmith is a district in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham, approximately eight kilometres west of Charing Cross on the north bank of the River Thames.

One of west London’s key transport hubs and commercial and employment centres, and home to several multinational company offices, Hammersmith is focused on the two London Underground stations, a bus station and as an important road network node.

Hammersmith’s pedestrianised riverside is popular for its many pubs, its excellent views of the river and the annual Oxford-Cambridge Boat Race which passes by.

The area has provided a location for several TV programmes - for instance, The Flying Squad were Hammersmith-based in the 1970s TV series The Sweeney.

Hammersmith is served by two tube stations, one is the western terminus of the Hammersmith & City Line, the other by the Piccadilly and District Lines. Both are called Hammersmith. The latter tube station is part of a larger office, retail and transport development, locally known as The Broadway after its large encompassing roundabout.

The present Hammersmith & City station is situated on Beadon Road and opened on 1 December 1868, replacing the original station slightly north of here which opened on 13 June 1864 when the line extension was built from Paddington. The Circle line has served Hammersmith since 13 December 2009.

The Piccadilly and District line station was opened on 9 September 1874 by the Metropolitan District Railway (now the District Line) as the western terminus of the railway when it was extended from Earl’s Court.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Shepherd's Bush Road, W6
TUM image id: 1488542121
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New Blue Hall Cinema
TUM image id: 1517664264
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In the neighbourhood...

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Shepherd's Bush Road, W6
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Margaret House - an original section of the Caroline Estate built in the early twentieth-century. The London County Council extended the estate in 1953. In the background, you can see a tall red-brick building with prominent chimneys. This was another housing estate, which was owned and run by the Peabody Trust. Previously, the site had been home to the Convent of the Good Shepherd, which closed in 1920.
Credit: London Metropolitan Archives
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Six Bells in Queen Caroline Street. Carnforth Lodge to its left was the headquarters of the Hammersmith and Fulham District Nursing Association.
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Sacred Heart High School, Hammersmith (2013)
Credit: Wiki Commons/Chmee2
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The junction of Glenthorne Road and Cambridge Road (now Cambridge Grove), 1909 The driver of the 133 tram is adjusting the rear indicator blind ready for the journey to Kew Bridge.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Rifle in 1913. On the next corner can be seen the Distillers Arms which marked the boundary between Hammersmith and Fulham.
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King’s Theatre, Hammersmith Road, October 1903 The 3000-seat theatre opened on 26 December 1902 with a production of Cinderella. It was a popular venue but had to close in 1955. After a subsequent period as a TV studio, it was demolished in 1963.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Royal Sussex Arms, Hammersmith Broadway (1908) The Broadway Electric Theatre, seen to the right, offered "animated singing pictures". Both pub and cinema lasted only until 1911.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Cannon, 80 Queen Caroline Street, Hammersmith (1906)
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The Duke of Edinburgh, on the corner of Queen Caroline Street and Worlidge Street, Hammersmith (1920)
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