Petworth Street, SW11

Road in/near Battersea, existing between the 1890s and now

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Road · Battersea · SW11 ·
August
11
2021

Petworth Street was laid out in the late nineteenth century linking two bridge approaches - Albert Bridge Road and Battersea Bridge Road.

In 1771 a bridge across the River Thames at Battersea had been built, but it was not until the construction of Chelsea Bridge in 1851-58 by Thomas Page and the opening of new railway lines, that development was galvanised south of the River Thames.

Meanwhile, by the middle of the nineteenth century, the marshy area known as the Battersea Fields had become an undesirable pleasure ground, where the Red House Tavern was notorious for illegal racing, drinking and gambling. London’s population was expanding rapidly, the industrial revolution was causing increasing pollution and epidemics and slums were the major concerns of the day. By this time, public parks were being recognised as the lungs of the city and part of the solution to overcrowding and illness.

In 1843 Thomas Cubitt and the Vicar of St Mary’s Battersea, the Honourable Reverend Robert Eden proposed a large public park on Battersea Fields allocating 200 acres for a park and 100 acres for the building of villas. On 8 October 1845 an application was made to Parliament for a Bill to form a public park of 330 acres. The Act was passed in 1846 and £200,000 was promised for the purchase of the land. The responsibility for controlling the development of the land came under Her Majesty’s Commissioners of Works and Public Buildings (Office of Works). Sir James Pennethorne was at that time the architect to the Office of Works and the plans were therefore drawn up by him.

Battersea Park was laid out by Sir James Pennethorne and John Gibson during 1855-57, at a cost of £80,000 (excluding the £230,000 acquisition cost), and opened by Queen Victoria in 1858.

In 1873 Albert Bridge was designed and built by R. M. Ordish as a cable-stayed bridge but was modified by Sir Joseph Bazalgette between 1884-1887 who incorporated elements of a suspension bridge.

Land around the park remained undeveloped until the end of the nineteenth century. In 1845 Sir James Pennethorne drew up plans for the layout of the surrounding streets. The streets included Albert Bridge Road, which was constructed on the alignment of the pre-existing Surrey Lane; the re-alignment and re-naming of Prince of Wales Drive; and an ambitious new street: Victoria Road (now Queenstown
Road) linking Chelsea Bridge with Clapham Park.




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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

Comment
Peter H Davies   
Added: 17 Jun 2021 09:33 GMT   

Ethelburga Estate
The Ethelburga Estate - named after Ethelburga Road - was an LCC development dating between 1963’65. According to the Wikipedia, it has a "pleasant knitting together of a series of internal squares". I have to add that it’s extremely dull :)

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Reply
Lived here
   
Added: 1 May 2021 16:46 GMT   

Cheyne Place, SW3
Frances Faviell, author of the Blitz memoir, "A Chelsea Concerto", lived at 33, Cheyne Place, which was destroyed by a bomb. She survived, with her husband and unborn baby.

Reply
Born here
Joyce Taylor   
Added: 5 Apr 2021 21:05 GMT   

Lavender Road, SW11
MyFather and Grand father lived at 100 Lavender Road many years .I was born here.

Reply

Lynette beardwood   
Added: 29 Nov 2022 20:53 GMT   

Spy’s Club
Topham’s Hotel at 24-28 Ebury Street was called the Ebury Court Hotel. Its first proprietor was a Mrs Topham. In WW2 it was a favourite watering hole for the various intelligence organisations based in the Pimlico area. The first woman infiltrated into France in 1942, FANY Yvonne Rudellat, was recruited by the Special Operations Executive while working there. She died in Bergen Belsen in April 1945.

Reply

LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Born here
   
Added: 27 Mar 2023 18:28 GMT   

Nower Hill, HA5
lo

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 26 Mar 2023 14:50 GMT   

Albert Mews
It is not a gargoyle over the entrance arch to Albert Mews, it is a likeness of Prince Albert himself.

Reply
Comment
Christine D Elliott   
Added: 20 Mar 2023 15:52 GMT   

The Blute Family
My grandparents, Frederick William Blute & Alice Elizabeth Blute nee: Warnham lived at 89 Blockhouse Street Deptford from around 1917.They had six children. 1. Alice Maragret Blute (my mother) 2. Frederick William Blute 3. Charles Adrian Blute 4. Violet Lillian Blute 5. Donald Blute 6. Stanley Vincent Blute (Lived 15 months). I lived there with my family from 1954 (Birth) until 1965 when we were re-housed for regeneration to the area.
I attended Ilderton Road School.
Very happy memories of that time.

Reply

Pearl Foster   
Added: 20 Mar 2023 12:22 GMT   

Dukes Place, EC3A
Until his death in 1767, Daniel Nunes de Lara worked from his home in Dukes Street as a Pastry Cook. It was not until much later the street was renamed Dukes Place. Daniel and his family attended the nearby Bevis Marks synagogue for Sephardic Jews. The Ashkenazi Great Synagogue was established in Duke Street, which meant Daniel’s business perfectly situated for his occupation as it allowed him to cater for both congregations.

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Comment
Dr Paul Flewers   
Added: 9 Mar 2023 18:12 GMT   

Some Brief Notes on Hawthorne Close / Hawthorne Street
My great-grandparents lived in the last house on the south side of Hawthorne Street, no 13, and my grandmother Alice Knopp and her brothers and sisters grew up there. Alice Knopp married Charles Flewers, from nearby Hayling Road, and moved to Richmond, Surrey, where I was born. Leonard Knopp married Esther Gutenberg and lived there until the street was demolished in the mid-1960s, moving on to Tottenham. Uncle Len worked in the fur trade, then ran a pet shop in, I think, the Kingsland Road.

From the back garden, one could see the almshouses in the Balls Pond Road. There was an ink factory at the end of the street, which I recall as rather malodorous.

Reply

KJH   
Added: 7 Mar 2023 17:14 GMT   

Andover Road, N7 (1939 - 1957)
My aunt, Doris nee Curtis (aka Jo) and her husband John Hawkins (aka Jack) ran a small general stores at 92 Andover Road (N7). I have found details in the 1939 register but don’t know how long before that it was opened.He died in 1957. In the 1939 register he is noted as being an ARP warden for Islington warden

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Added: 2 Mar 2023 13:50 GMT   

The Queens Head
Queens Head demolished and a NISA supermarket and flats built in its place.

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Comment
Mike   
Added: 28 Feb 2023 18:09 GMT   

6 Elia Street
When I was young I lived in 6 Elia Street. At the end of the garden there was a garage owned by Initial Laundries which ran from an access in Quick Street all the way up to the back of our garden. The fire exit to the garage was a window leading into our garden. 6 Elia Street was owned by Initial Laundry.

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V:0

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
The Prince Albert Originally called the Albert Tavern, the Prince Albert public house is a three storey building dating from 1866-68.

NEARBY STREETS
Albany Mansions, SW11 Albany Mansions is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Albert Bridge Road, SW11 Albert Bridge Road is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Albion Riverside, SW11 Albion Riverside is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Anerley Street, SW11 Anerley Street has taken two forms over its history - recently running north-south but previously east-west.
Anhalt Road, SW11 Anhalt Road is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Ashurst Street, SW11 Ashurst Street disappeared post-war.
Balfern Street, SW11 Balfern Street is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Banbury Street, SW11 Banbury Street is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Battersea Bridge Road, SW11 The laying out of Battersea Bridge Road took place in several phases between the 1770s and 1850s.
Battersea High Street, SW11 Battersea High Street is anything but the high street of Battersea.
Battersea Park Road, SW11 Battersea Park Road is one of the main roads of the area, connecting Battersea and the suburbs to its east.
Beechmore Road, SW11 Beechmore Road is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Berry House, SW11 Berry House is a block on Anerley Street.
Blomfield Court, SW11 Blomfield Court is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Bolingbroke Road, SW11 Bolingbroke Road was Bolingbroke Terrace until 1887.
Bolingbroke Walk, SW11 Bolingbroke Road became Bolingbroke Walk in 1937.
Bridge Lane, SW11 Bridge Lane is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Brynmaer Road, SW11 Brynmaer Road is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Bullen Street, SW11 Bullen Street is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Cambridge Mansions, SW11 Cambridge Mansions is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Cambridge Road, SW11 Cambridge Road is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Carriage Drive West, SW11 Carriage Drive West is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Castle Street, SW11 Castle Lane was marked on the 1860 map as a small country lane.
Castlemaine Tower, SW11 Castlemaine Tower is a block on Culvert Road.
Chatham Street, SW11 Like the surrounding roads, Chatham Street was built in 1863.
Colestown Street, SW11 This is a street in the SW11 postcode area
Condray Place, SW11 Condray Place is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Condray Street, SW11 Frances Street was renamed Condray Street in 1937.
Cottage Place, SW11 Cottage Place appears on 1900 mapping.
Culvert House, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Culvert Road, SW11 Culvert Road dates from the 1860s.
Dovedale Studios, SW11 Dovedale Studios is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Dyson Building, SW11 Dyson Building is a building on Howie Street.
Edna Street, SW11 Edna Street is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Elcho Street, SW11 Elcho Street is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Ethelburga Street, SW11 Ethelburga Street was named after Saint Æthelburh (Ethelburga), founder and first Abbess of Barking.
Ford’s Place, SW11 Ford’s Place - a meandering little road - appears on 1900 mapping.
Foxmore Street, SW11 Foxmore Street is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Gaitskell Court, SW11 Gaitskell Court is located on Shuttleworth Road.
Goulden House, SW11 Goulden House is a block on Bullen Street.
Granfield Street, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Great Eastern Wharf, SW11 Great Eastern Wharf is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Harleton Street, SW11 Harleton Street was called Harley Street before 1937.
Henning Street, SW11 Henning Street is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Henty Close, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Hester Road, SW11 Hester Road is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Howie Street, SW11 Howie Street is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Hyde Lane, SW11 Hyde Lane is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Inworth Street, SW11 Inworth Street is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Inworth Walk, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Juer Street, SW11 Juer Street is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Kassala Road, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Kersley Mews, SW11 Kersley Mews is a rare survival of a local mews and built to serve the residents of Foxmore Street and Kersley Street.
Kersley Street, SW11 Kersley Street is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Kingswater Place, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Latchmere Street, SW11 Latchmere Street is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Maskelyne Close, SW11 Maskelyne Close is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Mckiernan Court, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Merryfield Court, SW11 Merryfield Court is located on Battersea Park Road.
Morgan’s Walk, SW11 Morgan’s Walk incorporated Little Europa Street (Little Europa Place) after 1936.
Octavia Street, SW11 Octavia Street is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Old School House, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Orbel Street, SW11 Orbel Street is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Orkney Street, SW11 Orkney Street was built by Edward Pain in 1863.
Park South, SW11 Park South is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Parkgate Road, SW11 Parkgate Road is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Parkham Street, SW11 Parkham Street is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Paveley Drive, SW11 Paveley Drive is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Peverel Street, SW11 Peverel Street ran west from Spencer Street.
Prince Of Wales Drive, SW11 Prince Of Wales Drive is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Radstock Street, SW11 Radstock Street is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Randall Close, SW11 Randall Close is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Ransomes Dock Business Centre, SW11 Ransomes Dock Business Centre is a block on Parkgate Road.
Ransomes Dock, SW11 Ransomes Dock is a development in Battersea.
Rosenau Crescent, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Rosenau Road, SW11 Rosenau Road was named after Schloss Rosenau, the birthplace and boyhood home of Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, who became the consort of Queen Victoria.
Roydon Close, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Rutherford House, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Scholey Street, SW11 Scholey Street was Hart Street until 1937.
Searles Close, SW11 Searles Close is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Shuttleworth Road, SW11 Castle Street became Shuttleworth Road in 1937.
Soudan Road, SW11 Soudan Road is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Spicer Street, SW11 Spicer Street was laid out in 1853.
St James Court, SW11 St James Court is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
St Mary Le Park Court, SW11 St Mary Le Park Court is a block on Albert Bridge Road.
Stanmer Street, SW11 Stanmer Street is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Surrey Lane, SW11 Surrey Lane is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Terrace Walk, SW11 Maple Leaf Walk is a walkway within Battersea Park.
The Lanterns, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Thorney Crescent, SW11 Thorney Crescent is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Trott Street, SW11 Trott Street connects Battersea High Street with Shuttleworth Road.
Ursula Street, SW11 Ursula Street is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Watford Close, SW11 Watford Close is a small street on the Ethelburga Estate.
Wendle Square, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Westbridge Road, SW11 Wetbridge Road was previously called Bridge Road West and before that King Street.
Whistlers Avenue, SW11 Whistlers Avenue is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Winders Road, SW11 Winders Road runs from Shuttleworth Road to Battersea Park Road.
Worfield Street, SW11 Worfield Street runs north from Rosenau Road towards Parkgate Road.

NEARBY PUBS
The Prince Albert Originally called the Albert Tavern, the Prince Albert public house is a three storey building dating from 1866-68.


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We now have 564 completed street histories and 46936 partial histories


Battersea

Battersea is an area of the London Borough of Wandsworth, England. It is an inner-city district on the south side of the River Thames.

Battersea covers quite a wide area - it spans from Fairfield in the west to Queenstown in the east. Battersea is mentioned in Anglo-Saxon times as Badrices ieg = Badric's Island.

Although in modern times it is known mostly for its wealth, Battersea remains characterised by economic inequality, with council estates being surrounded by more prosperous areas.

Battersea was an island settlement established in the river delta of the Falconbrook; a river that rises in Tooting Bec Common and flowed through south London to the River Thames.

As with many former Thames island settlements, Battersea was reclaimed by draining marshland and building culverts for streams.

Before the Industrial Revolution, much of the area was farmland, providing food for the City of London and surrounding population centres; and with particular specialisms, such as growing lavender on Lavender Hill, asparagus (sold as 'Battersea Bundles') or pig breeding on Pig Hill (later the site of the Shaftesbury Park Estate).

At the end of the 18th century, above 300 acres of land in the parish of Battersea were occupied by some 20 market gardeners, who rented from five to near 60 acres each.

Villages in the wider area - Battersea, Wandsworth, Earlsfield (hamlet of Garratt), Tooting, Balham - were isolated one from another; and throughout the second half of the second millennium, the wealthy built their country retreats in Battersea and neighbouring areas.

Industry developed eastwards along the bank of the Thames during the industrial revolution from 1750s onwards; the Thames provided water for transport, for steam engines and for water-intensive industrial processes. Bridges erected across the Thames encouraged growth; Battersea Bridge was built in 1771. Inland from the river, the rural agricultural community persisted.

Battersea was radically altered by the coming of railways. The London and Southampton Railway Company was the first to drive a railway line from east to west through Battersea, in 1838, terminating at Nine Elms at the north west tip of the area. Over the next 22 years five other lines were built, across which all trains from Waterloo Station and Victoria Station ran. An interchange station was built in 1863 towards the north west of the area, at a junction of the railway. Taking the name of a fashionable village a mile and more away, the station was named Clapham Junction.

During the latter decades of the nineteenth century Battersea had developed into a major town railway centre with two locomotive works at Nine Elms and Longhedge and three important motive power depots (Nine Elms, Stewarts Lane and Battersea) all situated within a relatively small area in the north of the district.

A population of 6000 people in 1840 was increased to 168 000 by 1910; and save for the green spaces of Battersea Park, Clapham Common, Wandsworth Common and some smaller isolated pockets, all other farmland was built over, with, from north to south, industrial buildings and vast railway sheds and sidings (much of which remain), slum housing for workers, especially north of the main east–west railway, and gradually more genteel residential terraced housing further south.

The railway station encouraged local government to site its buildings - the town hall, library, police station, court and post office in the area surrounding Clapham Junction.

All this building around the station marginalised Battersea High Street (the main street of the original village) into no more than an extension of Falcon Road.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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The Fascination of Chelsea
TUM image id: 1524258115
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Badric Road, SW11 (1950s)
TUM image id: 1647278035
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Battersea Park Road (1900). Looking east through the double railway arches, just beyond the bridges would be the later site of the modern dogs and cats home.
Old London postcard
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Coppock Close
Credit: The Underground Map
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Rowena Crescent
Credit: GoArt/The Underground Map
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Winders Road
Credit: The Underground Map
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Rosenau Road, SW11 Schloss Rosenau is a castle, formerly in Saxe-Coburg, now lying in Bavaria. Schloss Rosenau was the boyhood home of Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, who became the husband of Queen Victoria. Due to the name of nearby Albert Bridge, builders rook the opportunity to call many of the roads of this area of Battersea after connections with the Prince Consort.
Credit: The Underground Map
Licence:


Battersea Bridge, a painting by John Atkinson Grimshaw (1885)
Credit: The Maas Gallery
Licence:


Albert Bridge Road at the former end of Ethelburga Street (1958)
Credit: Gwyneth Wexler
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Zulu Mews - glimpsed through its gate
Credit: The Underground Map
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Shops on Falcon Road, Battersea (1928) "The streets were always so clean in the old days". Most likely this is a Sunday after mid day. The shops are closed but, the pub is open with a seafood stall outside. The debris is from a morning market and will be cleaned up early Monday morning - no street cleaning on a Sunday in those days...
Credit: Rex Features
Licence: CC BY 2.0


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