Lea Bridge Farm

Farm in/near Lea Bridge, existed between the 1750s or before and 1904

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Farm · Lea Bridge · E10 ·
August
14
2022

Lea Bridge Farm (Leabridge Farm) was originally in the middle of Leyton Marsh.

The farm was half a mile east of the River Lea and a shorter distance west of the Dagenham Brook.

Lea Bridge Farm had originally been called Black Marsh Farm. The River Lea floodplain was fertile but difficult to cross. A local archaeological report identified ’very dark grey sandy clay’. There were two ancient routes - the Black Path and another track from Marsh Lane, used by commoners sending cattle to the marsh Lammas lands for summer grazing.

A third track, the forerunner of the turnpike, reached Black Bridge over Dagenham Brook, near to the later site of the Hare and Hounds Pub.

When the Lea Bridge turnpike road across Leyton Marsh was opened in 1757, its four mile marker was situated opposite the farm gateway. This had prompted the name change.

The crops of Lea Bridge Farm included potatoes, hay and osiers for basket making. There were also plant nurseries. From the mid-19th century, the farm also arranged the dyeing of silk yarn by former East End silk workers.

In 1840, the nearby railway opened, with a station at Lea Bridge. Thirteen years later, the East London Waterworks built an aqueduct to move extracted water from the River Lea at Coppermill to the Essex Filter Beds. This aqueduct is now filled in and used as a cycle and footpath. These were joined by a gas works.

From the 1890s there were further residential and industrial developments to the north and east of Lea Bridge Farm. Its role as one of the last areas of agriculture in Leyton ceased in 1904.

An industrial estate that once stood at 97 Lea Bridge Road on the site was demolished in 2016 and replaced by three white tower blocks.

N.B. This material has been collated from discoveries by local historian Claire Weiss with artwork kindly provided by Lindsay Topping.



Main source: Waltham Forest Echo
Further citations and sources


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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Lea Bridge Lea Bridge is a district spanning an area between the London boroughs of Hackney and Waltham Forest.
Lea Bridge Farm Lea Bridge Farm (Leabridge Farm) was originally in the middle of Leyton Marsh.

NEARBY STREETS
Argall Avenue, E10 Argall Avenue is one of the streets of London in the E10 postal area.
Argall Way, E10 Argall Way is a road in the E10 postcode area
Beck Square, E10 Beck Square was developed as part of the Motion Estate.
Belvedere Road, E10 Belvedere Road is a road in the E10 postcode area
Bloxhall Road, E10 Bloxhall Road is one of the streets of London in the E10 postal area.
Blyth Road, E17 Blyth Road is a road in the E17 postcode area
Bridge Road, E17 Bridge Road is a road in the E17 postcode area
Burwell Road, E10 Burwell Road is one of the streets of London in the E10 postal area.
Clementina Road, E10 Clementina Road is one of the streets of London in the E10 postal area.
Connaught Close, E10 Connaught Close is one of the streets of London in the E10 postal area.
Dagenham Road, E10 Dagenham Road is a road in the E10 postcode area
Dorma Trading Park, E10 Dorma Trading Park is a road in the E10 postcode area
Elm Park Road, E10 Elm Park Road is a cul-de-sac leading southeast off Lea Bridge Road.
Fairways Business Park, E10 Fairways Business Park is one of the streets of London in the E10 postal area.
Flempton Road, E10 Flempton Road is one of the streets of London in the E10 postal area.
Harris Street, E17 Harris Street is a road in the E17 postcode area
Hemstall Lane, E10 Hemstall Lane was described in 1630 as a ’chase lane’, leading west from the junction of Markhouse Lane (now Markhouse Road).
Heybridge Way, E17 Heybridge Way is one of the streets of London in the E10 postal area.
Hibbert Road, E17 Hibbert Road is one of the streets of London in the E17 postal area.
Hitcham Road, E10 Hitcham Road is a road in the E10 postcode area
Hitcham Road, E17 Hitcham Road is one of the streets of London in the E17 postal area.
Kettlebaston Road, E10 Kettlebaston Road is one of the streets of London in the E10 postal area.
Lammas Road, E10 Lammas Road is one of the streets of London in the E10 postal area.
Lea Bridge Gardens, E10 A bungalow town of 69 shacks, with wells and earth closets, sprang up in the 1880s at Lea Bridge Gardens.
Lea Bridge Industrial Estate, E10 An industrial area within the E10 postcode
Lea Valley Business Park, E10 Lea Valley Business Park is a business park near to Lea Bridge.
Liden Close, E17 Liden Close is a road in the E17 postcode area
Morieux Road, E10 Morieux Road is a road in the E10 postcode area
Motion, E10 The Motion is a 2010s development next to Lea Bridge station.
Norton Road, E10 Norton Road is one of the streets of London in the E10 postal area.
Nursery Place, E10 Nursery Place ran alongside Pamplin’s nursery.
Overton Road, E10 Overton Road is one of the streets of London in the E10 postal area.
Period Works, E10 Period Works is an industrial location near to Lea Bridge.
Perth Road, E10 Perth Road runs southeast from Lea Bridge Road.
Rigg Approach, E10 Rigg Approach is one of the streets of London in the E10 postal area.
Roxwell Trading Park, E10 Roxwell Trading Park lies within the E10 postcode.
Sanderstead Road, E10 Sanderstead Road is one of the streets of London in the E10 postal area.
Seymour Road, E10 Seymour Road is one of the streets of London in the E10 postal area.
St Helen’s Place, E10 St Helen’s Place is a road in the E10 postcode area
St. Helens Place, E10 A street within the E10 postcode
Staffa Road, E10 Staffa Road is one of the streets of London in the E10 postal area.
Sybourn Street, E17 Sybourn Street is one of the streets of London in the E17 postal area.
Viking Place, E10 Viking Place is a road in the E10 postcode area
Wellington Road, E10 Wellington Road is one of the streets of London in the E10 postal area.

NEARBY PUBS


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Lea Bridge

Lea Bridge is a district spanning an area between the London boroughs of Hackney and Waltham Forest.

It is named for a timber bridge built across the River Lea in 1745 which formed the dividing line between Middlesex and Essex. The road leading to it became known as Lea Bridge Road, with a tollhouse at the Middlesex bank. The bridge was rebuilt in 1821 and tolls continued to be levied until 1872.

Lea Bridge gives access to the lower reaches of the extensive Lee Valley Park. To the south are the Hackney Marshes, and to the north the Walthamstow Marshes.

The old Middlesex Filter Beds have been converted into a nature reserve, and on the Leyton side the Essex Filter Beds are now a reserve for birds. Next to the south side of the bridge are two pubs: ’The Princess of Wales’ and ’The Ship Aground’.

Lea Bridge station opened on 15 September 1840 by the Northern and Eastern Railway as Lea Bridge Road and is thought to be the earliest example of a station having its building on a railway bridge, with staircases down to the platforms.

The station closed on 8 July 1985 but after service changes, reopened in May 2016.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Clapping people
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In the neighbourhood...

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The Black Path through South Millfields (c.1905)
Credit: Hackney Archives
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