Met Building, W1T

Block in/near Tottenham Court Road

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(51.5187903 -0.1330955, 51.518 -0.133) 
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Block · Tottenham Court Road · W1T ·
FEBRUARY
23
2001

Met Building is a block on Percy Street.





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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Dec 2020 00:24 GMT   

Othello takes a bow
On 1 November 1604, William Shakespeare’s tragedy Othello was presented for the first time, at The Palace of Whitehall. The palace was the main residence of the English monarchs in London from 1530 until 1698. Seven years to the day, Shakespeare’s romantic comedy The Tempest was also presented for the first time, and also at the Palace of Whitehall.

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Emma Seif   
Added: 25 Jan 2022 19:06 GMT   

Birth of the Bluestocking Society
In about 1750, Elizabeth Montagu began hosting literary breakfasts in her home at 23 (now 31) Hill Street. These are considered the first meetings of the Bluestocking society.

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Comment
Linda Webb   
Added: 27 Sep 2021 05:51 GMT   

Hungerford Stairs
In 1794 my ancestor, George Webb, Clay Pipe Maker, lived in Hungerford Stairs, Strand. Source: Wakefields Merchant & Tradesmens General Directory London Westminster 1794

Source: Hungerford Stairs

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Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 21 Feb 2023 11:39 GMT   

Error on 1800 map numbering for John Street
The 1800 map of Whitfield Street (17 zoom) has an error in the numbering shown on the map. The houses are numbered up the right hand side of John Street and Upper John Street to #47 and then are numbered down the left hand side until #81 BUT then continue from 52-61 instead of 82-91.

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TUM   
Added: 27 Aug 2022 10:22 GMT   

The Underground Map
Michael Faraday successfully demonstrated the first electrical transformer at the Royal Institute, London.

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Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 07:17 GMT   

Smithy in Longacre
John Burris 1802-1848 Listed 1841 census as Burroughs was a blacksmith, address just given as Longacre.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

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Reg Carr   
Added: 10 Feb 2021 12:11 GMT   

Campbellite Meeting
In 1848 the Campbellites (Disciples of Christ) met in Elstree Street, where their congregation was presided over by a pastor named John Black. Their appointed evangelist at the time was called David King, who later became the Editor of the British Millennial Harbinger. The meeting room was visited in July 1848 by Dr John Thomas, who spoke there twice on his two-year ’mission’ to Britain.

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Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 19:47 GMT   

Millions Of Rats In Busy London
The Daily Mail on 14 April 1903 reported "MILLIONS OF RATS IN BUSY LONDON"

A rat plague, unprecedented in the annals of London, has broken out on the north side of the Strand. The streets principally infested are Catherine street, Drury lane, Blackmore street, Clare Market and Russell street. Something akin to a reign of terror prevails among the inhabitants after nightfall. Women refuse to pass along Blackmore street and the lower parts of Stanhope street after dusk, for droves of rats perambulate the roadways and pavements, and may be seen running along the window ledges of the empty houses awaiting demolition by the County Council in the Strand to Holborn improvement scheme.

The rats, indeed, have appeared in almost-incredible numbers. "There are millions of them," said one shopkeeper, and his statement was supported by other residents. The unwelcome visitors have been evicted from their old haunts by the County Council housebreakers, and are now busily in search of new homes. The Gaiety Restaurant has been the greatest sufferer. Rats have invaded the premises in such force that the managers have had to close the large dining room on the first floor and the grill rooms on the ground floor and in the basement. Those three spacious halls which have witnessed many as semblages of theatre-goers are now qui:e deserted. Behind the wainscot of the bandstand in the grillroom is a large mound of linen shreds. This represents 1728 serviettes carried theee by the rats.

In the bar the removal of a panel disclosed the astonishing fact that the rats have dragged for a distance of seven or eight yards some thirty or forty beer and wine bottles and stacked them in such a fashion as to make comfortable sleeping places. Mr Williams. the manager of the restaurant, estimates that the rats have destroyed L200 worth of linen. Formerly the Gaiety Restaurant dined 2000 persons daily; no business whatever is now done in this direction.

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Scott Hatton   
Added: 30 Jan 2023 11:28 GMT   

The Beatles on a London rooftop
The Beatles’ rooftop concert took place on the rooftop of the Apple Corps building in London. It was their final public performance as a band and was unannounced, attracting a crowd of onlookers. The concert lasted for 42 minutes and included nine songs. The concert is remembered as a seminal moment in the history of rock music and remains one of the most famous rock performances of all time.

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Lived here
Julian    
Added: 23 Mar 2021 10:11 GMT   

Dennis Potter
Author Dennis Potter lived in Collingwood House in the 1970’s

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Comment
Jessie Doring   
Added: 22 Feb 2021 04:33 GMT   

Tisbury Court Jazz Bar
Jazz Bar opened in Tisbury Court by 2 Australians. Situated in underground basement. Can not remember how long it opened for.

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Lived here
Richard Roques   
Added: 21 Jan 2021 16:53 GMT   

Buckingham Street residents
Here in Buckingham Street lived Samuel Pepys the diarist, Charles Dickens and Rudyard Kipling

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Justin Russ   
Added: 15 Feb 2021 20:25 GMT   

Binney Street, W1K
Binney St was previously named Thomas Street before the 1950’s. Before the 1840’s (approx.) it was named Bird St both above and below Oxford St.

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Comment
Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

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BG   
Added: 20 Dec 2022 02:58 GMT   

Lancing Street, NW1
LANCING STREET

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

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Loraine Brocklehurst    
Added: 24 May 2023 14:00 GMT   

Holcombe Road, N17
I lived at 23Holcombe Rd. with my parents, Grandfather , Aunt and Uncle in 1954. My Aunt and Uncle lived there until it was demolished. I’m not sure what year that was as we emigrated to Canada.

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Jen Williams   
Added: 20 May 2023 17:27 GMT   

Corfield Street, E2
My mother was born in 193 Corfield Street in 1920.Her father was a policeman.

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sofia   
Added: 19 May 2023 08:57 GMT   

43 MELLITUS STREET
43 MELLITUS STREET

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Added: 17 May 2023 11:50 GMT   

Milson Road (1908 - 1954)
My grandparents and great grandparents and great great grandparents the Manley family lived at 33 Milson Road from 1908 to 1935. My grandad was born at 33 Milson Road. His parents George and Grace had all four of their chidren there. When his father Edward died his mother moved to 67 Milson in 1935 Road and lived there until 1954 (records found so far, it may be longer). Before that they lived in the Porten Road. I wonder if there is anyone that used to know them? My grandad was Charles ’Ted’ Manley, his parents were called George and Grace and George’s parents were called Edward and Bessie. George worked in a garage and Edward was a hairdresser.

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Lived here
   
Added: 16 Apr 2023 15:55 GMT   

Rendlesham Road, E5
I lived at 14 Rendlesham Road in the 1940s and 50s. The house belonged to my grandfather James Grosvenor who bought it in the 1920s for £200.I had a brother who lived in property until 1956 when he married. Local families were the paisleys, the Jenners and the family of Christopher Gable.

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Comment
Sandra Field   
Added: 15 Apr 2023 16:15 GMT   

Removal Order
Removal order from Shoreditch to Holborn, Jane Emma Hall, Single, 21 Pregnant. Born about 21 years since in Masons place in the parish of St Lukes.

Source:
Sign up


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Comment
Sue Germain   
Added: 10 Apr 2023 08:35 GMT   

Southwood Road, SE9
My great great grandfather lived in Time Villa, Southwood Rd around 1901. He owned several coffee houses in Whitechapel and in South London, including New Time Coffee House so either his house was named after the coffee house or vice versa.

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David Gleeson   
Added: 7 Apr 2023 22:19 GMT   

MBE from Campbell Bunk (1897 - 1971)
Walter Smith born at 43 Campbell Bunk was awarded the MBE in january honours list in 1971. A local councillor for services to the public.

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Adam and Eve Inn The Adam and Eve was an inn on Oxford Street.
Fairyland During the period leading up to and during the First World War, 92 Tottenham Court Road was the location of a shooting range called Fairyland.
Scala Theatre Scala Theatre was a theatre in London, sited on Charlotte Street, off Tottenham Court Road. The first theatre on the site opened in 1772, and was demolished in 1969, after being destroyed by fire.
St Giles St Giles is a district of central London, at the southern tip of the London Borough of Camden.

NEARBY STREETS
Aberdeen Mews, W1F Aberdeen Mews was situated off Ramillies Place.
Adam and Eve Court, W1D The court was named for the nearby Adam and Eve tavern.
Adeline Place, WC1B Adeline Place was named after Adeline Marie Russell.
Alfred Mews, WC1E Alfred Mews is situated off Tottenham Court Road, running behind the gardens of North Crescent.
Alfred Place, WC1E Alfred Place was built in 1806 by a Marylebone stonemason called John Waddilove who named it after his son Alfred.
Ampersand Building, W1F Ampersand Building is sited on Wardour Street.
Andrew Borde Street, W1D Andrew Borde Street was situated opposite the end of Sutton Row and under the Centre Point development.
Arthur Stanley House, W1T Arthur Stanley House is located on Tottenham Street.
Artist House, WC1A Artist House is sited on Little Russell Street.
Artists House, W1D Artists House is a block on Manette Street.
Bainbridge Street, WC2H Bainbridge Street takes its name from Henry Bainbridge, a local resident in the 17th century.
Balfour House, W1W Balfour House is a block on Great Titchfield Street.
Bayley Street, WC1B Bayley Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1B postal area.
Bedford Avenue, WC1B Bedford Avenue is one of the streets of London in the WC1B postal area.
Bedford Court Mansions, WC1B Bedford Court Mansions is a block on Adeline Place.
Bedford Square, WC1B Bedford Square was designed as a unified architectural composition in 1775-6 by Thomas Leverton.
Belmont House, W1W Belmont House is a block on Candover Street.
Berners Mews, W1T Berners Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Berners Place, W1T Berners Place is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Berners Street, W1D William Berners completed building in 1763 what is today Berners Street.
Berners Street, W1D Berners Street runs from the junction of Oxford Street and Wardour Street to join up with Mortimer Street and the former Middlesex Hospital.
Bird Street, W1T Bird Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Bloomsbury House, WC1B Bloomsbury House is a block on Bedford Square.
Bloomsbury Street, WC1A Bloomsbury Street runs from Gower Street in the north to the junction of New Oxford Street and Shaftesbury Avenue in the south.
Bourlet Close, W1W Bourlet Close is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Bromley Place, W1T Bromley Place is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Brook House, WC1E Brook House is a block on Torrington Place.
BT Tower, W1W The BT Tower is a communications tower, previously known as the GPO Tower, the Post Office Tower and the Telecom Tower.
Bucknall Street, WC2H Bucknall Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Bywell Place, W1W Bywell Place is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Candover Street, W1W Candover Street is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Capper Street, WC1E Capper Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1E postal area.
Carlisle Street, W1D Carlisle Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Carlisle Walk, W1D Carlisle Walk is a road in the E8 postcode area
Castlewood House, WC1A Residential block
Centre Point, WC2H Centre Point is a controversial 1960s-built tower block.
Century House, W1D Century House is a block on Oxford Street.
Charlotte Mews, W1T Charlotte Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Charlotte Place, W1T Charlotte Place is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Charlotte Street, W1T Charlotte Street was laid out in the mid 18th century on open fields.
Chenies Mews, WC1E Chenies Mews is a road in the WC1E postcode area
Chenies Street, WC1E Chenies Street takes its name from the Buckinghamshire village where since 1556 members of the Russell family have been buried.
Chitty Street, W1T Chitty Street runs between Charlotte Street and Whitfield Street.
Cleveland Street, W1T Cleveland Street is a location in London.
Cleveland Street, W1W Cleveland Street maybe dates from before 1632 when its name was recorded as Wrastling Lane.
Clipstone Mews, W1T Clipstone Mews is a road in the W1T postcode area
Coach Road, W1T Coach Road is a road in the NW1 postcode area
College Court, W1D College Court is a building on Berners Street.
Collingwood House, W1W Residential block
Colville Place, W1T Colville Place is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Congress House, WC1B Congress House can be found on Great Russell Street.
Conway Mews, W1T Conway Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Coptic Street, WC2H Coptic Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Denmark Place, WC2H Denmark Place was an alleyway one block north of Denmark Street.
Denmark Street, WC2H Denmark Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Dyott Street, WC1A Dyott Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Earnshaw Street, WC2H Earnshaw Street was at first called Arthur Street.
East Street, W1T East Street is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Eastcastle Street, W1D Eastcastle Street was originally called Castle Street East.
Eastcastle Street, W1T The portion of Eastcastle Street to the east of Wells Street originally belonged to the Berners Estate.
Elisa Court, W1T Elisa Court is a block on Chitty Street.
Endeavour House, WC2H Endeavour House is a block on Shaftesbury Avenue.
Evelyn House, W1W Evelyn House is a block on New Cavendish Street.
Evelyn Yard, W1T Evelyn Yard is a road in the W1T postcode area
Faber Building, WC1H Faber Building is a block on Russell Square.
Fairgate House, WC1A Fairgate House is a block on New Oxford Street.
Falconberg Court, W1D Falconberg Court is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Falconberg Mews, W1D Falconberg Mews runs off of Sutton Row.
First Floor, W1T First Floor is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Fitzroy Mews, W1T Fitzroy Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Fitzroy Street, W1T Fitzroy Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Flichcroft Street, WC2H Flichcroft Street is a road in the WC2H postcode area
Flitcroft Street, WC2H Flitcroft Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Foley Street, W1W Foley Street is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Gilbert Place, WC1A Gilbert Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Goodge Place, W1T Goodge Place is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Goodge Street, W1T Goodge Street was named after John Goodge a carpenter who along with his two nephews developed Crab Tree Fields to form Goodge Street in 1740.
Gordon Mansions, WC1E Gordon Mansions is one of the streets of London in the WC1E postal area.
Goslett Yard, W1D Goslett Yard is a road in the W1D postcode area
Grape Street, WC2H Grape Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Great Castle Street, W1W Great Castle Street was one of the main streets of the Harley Estate.
Great Chapel Street, W1D Great Chapel Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Great Titchfield Street, W1W Great Titchfield Street is one of the streets of London in the W1 postal area.
Gresse Street, W1T Gresse Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Hanson Street, W1W Hanson Street is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Hanway Place, W1D Hanway Place is named for Major John Hanway.
Hanway Street, W1D Hanway Street was named after Major John Hanway.
Highlight House, W1W Highlight House is a block on Margaret Street.
Highwood House, W1W Highwood House can be found on New Cavendish Street.
Hills Place, W1F Hills Place is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Holden House, W1 Holden House is sited on Oxford Street.
Hollen Street, W1F Hollen Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Howland Street, W1T Howland Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Huntley Street, WC1E Huntley Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1E postal area.
Isis House, WC1A Isis House is a building on New Oxford Street.
Jubilee House, W1 Jubilee House is located on Oxford Street.
Julian House, W1T Julian House is a building on Windmill Street.
Kent House, W1W Kent House is a block on Market place.
Keppel Street, WC1E Keppel Street links Store Street and Gower Street in the west to Malet Street in the east.
Khiara House, W1D Khiara House can be found on Poland Street.
King Regent’s House, W1T King Regent’s House is a building on Fitzroy Street.
Kirkman House, W1T Kirkman House is a building on Whitfield Street.
Leverton House, WC1B Leverton House is a block on Bedford Square.
Lison House, W1F Lison House is a block on Wardour Street.
Little Portland Street, W1W Little Portland Street is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Malet Street, WC1E Sir Edward Malet was married to Lady Ermyntrude Sackville Russell, daughter of Francis Russell who owned much of the surrounding area.
Maple Street, W1T Maple Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Mappin House, W1 Mappin House is a block on Winsley Street.
Margaret Court, W1W Margaret Court is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Margaret Street, W1W Margaret Street is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Market Place, W1W Market Place is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Marylebone Passage, W1W Marylebone Passage is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Maxclif House, W1T Maxclif House is a block on Tottenham Street.
Middlesex House, W1T Middlesex House is sited on Cleveland Street.
Minehead House, W1W Minehead House is a building on Hanson Street.
Minerva House, WC1E Minerva House is a block on North Crescent.
Montague Place, WC1E Montague Place was developed in the decade after 1800.
Montague Street, WC1B Montague Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1B postal area.
Mortimer Street, W1T Mortimer Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Mortimer Street, W1T A street within the W1W postcode
Mortimer Street, W1W Mortimer Street is one of the streets of London in the W1 postal area.
Morwell Street, WC1B Morwell Street is a road in the WC1B postcode area
Mottram House, W1T Mottram House is located on Whitfield Street.
Museum House, WC1A Museum House is a block on Museum Street.
Museum Street, WC1A Museum Street is so-named since it approaches the main entrance of the British Museum.
Nassau Street, W1W Nassau Street is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Network Building, W1T Network Building is a block on Tottenham Court Road.
New Compton Street, WC2H New Compton Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
New Oxford Street, WC2H New Oxford Street is a road in the WC2H postcode area
Newlands House, W1T Newlands House is sited on Berners Street.
Newman House, W1T Newman House can be found on Newman Street.
Newman Passage, W1T Newman Passage is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Newman Street, W1T Newman Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Nicolas Cooper House, WC1E Nicolas Cooper House is a block on Chenies Street.
Noel Street, W1F Noel Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
North Crescent, WC1E North Crescent is one of the streets of London in the WC1E postal area.
Ogle Street, W1W Ogle Street is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Oxford Circus Avenue, W1F Oxford Circus Avenue exists on a lot of London maps but doesn’t exist.
Oxford Street, W1F Oxford Street is the main shopping street of London.
Paramount House, W1F Paramount House can be found on Wardour Street.
Parnell House, WC1 Parnell House is a block on Streatham Street.
Parnell House, WC1A Parnell House is a block on Streatham Street.
Percy Street, WC1B Percy Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Phillips House, W1T Phillips House is a block on Goodge Street.
Poland Street, W1D Poland Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Portland House, W1W Portland House is a block on Great Portland Street.
Princess House, W1D Residential block
Putney House, W1 Putney House is a block on Great Titchfield Street.
Putney House, W1W Putney House is a block on Great Titchfield Street.
Queen’s Yard, W1T Queen’s Yard is a road in the W1T postcode area
Ramillies House, W1F Ramillies House is sited on Ramillies Street.
Ramillies Place, W1D Ramillies Place is a short street situated off the southern side of Oxford Street.
Ramillies Street, W1F Ramillies Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Rathbone Place, W1T Rathbone Place honours Captain Rathbone who was the builder of the road and properties thereon from 1718 onwards.
Rathbone Square, W1T Rathbone Square is a location in London.
Rathbone Street, W1T Rathbone Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Ridgmount Gardens, WC1E Ridgmount Gardens is one of the streets of London in the WC1E postal area.
Ridgmount Street, WC1E Ridgmount Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1E postal area.
Roberts Engineering Building, WC1E Roberts Engineering Building is sited on Torrington Place.
Ruskin House, WC1A Ruskin House is a block on Museum Street.
Russell Square, WC1B Russell Square was laid out from 1800 by James Burton following the demolition of Bedford House, which originally stood on the site surrounded by gardens and fields.
Salt Yard, W1T A street within the W1T postcode
Scala Street, W1T Scala Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Sheraton Street, W1D Sheraton Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Shropshire House, WC1E Shropshire House is a block on Capper Street.
Soho Place, Soho Place lies within the postcode.
Soho Square, W1D In its early years, Soho Square was one of the most fashionable places to live in London.
Soho Street, W1D Soho Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Sounding Alley, WC2H Sounding Alley is a road in the E3 postcode area
St George’s House, W1T St George’s House is a block on Wells Street.
St George’s House, WC1A St George’s House is a block on Coptic Street.
St Giles High Street, WC2H St Giles High Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
St Giles Square, WC2H St Giles Square is a modern piazza-style development.
Stedham Place, WC2H Stedham Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Stephen Mews, W1T Stephen Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Stephen Street, W1T Stephen Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Stewart House, WC1B Stewart House can be found on Russell Square.
Store Street, WC1E Store Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1E postal area.
Streatham Street, WC1A Streatham Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Sutton Row, W1D Sutton Row has existed since 1681.
The White House, W1W The White House can be found on Mortimer Street.
Third Floor, WC1E Third Floor is one of the streets of London in the WC1E postal area.
Thornhaugh Street, WC1B Thornhaugh Street is a street in London
Torrington Place, WC1E Torrington Place was developed by James Sim in partnership with his two sons.
Torrington Square, WC1H Torrington Square was originally laid out as part of the Bedford Estate development in 1821-25.
Tottenham Court Road, W1T Tottenham Court Road is a major road running from the junction of Oxford Street and Charing Cross Road, north to Euston Road - a distance of about three-quarters of a mile.
Tottenham Mews, W1T Tottenham Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Tottenham Street, W1T Tottenham Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Union Street, W1W The easternmost section of Riding House Street was previously known as Union Street.
United Kingdom House, W1D United Kingdom House is a block on Great Titchfield Street.
Waverley House, W1F Waverley House is a block on Noel Street.
Wells Mews, W1W Wells Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Wells Street, W1D Wells Street - ’Welses Lane’ - is first recorded in 1692.
West Central Street, WC2H West Central Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
West End House, W1D West End House is a block on Hill’s Place.
West One House, W1T West One House is a block on Wells Street.
West One House, W1W West One House is a block on Bourlet Close.
Western House, W1F Western House is a block on Argyll Street.
Willoughby Street, WC1B Willoughby Street was formerly known as both Vine Street and Wooburn Street.
Windmill Street, W1T Windmill Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Winsley Street, W1D Winsley Street is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Winsley Street, W1D Winsley Street is a road in the W1D postcode area
Woodford House, W1 Woodford House is a block on Great Titchfield Street.
Woolverstone House, W1T Woolverstone House is a block on Berners Street.
York House, W1T York House is sited on Berners Street.

NEARBY PUBS

Adam and Eve Inn The Adam and Eve was an inn on Oxford Street.
Bricklayers Arms The Bricklayers Arms is on Gresse Street.
Coach And Horses The Coach and Horses pub has been on Great Marlborough Street since the mid-18th century.
Newman Arms The Newman Arms has been a Fitzrovia fixture for centuries.


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Tottenham Court Road

Tottenham Court Road runs from St Giles’ Circus (the junction of Oxford Street and Charing Cross Road) north to Euston Road.

The south end of the road is close to the British Museum and to Centre Point, the West End’s tallest building. There are a number of buildings belonging to University College London along the road, and University College Hospital is at the north end of the road at the intersection with Euston Road.

The area through which the road is built is mentioned in the Domesday Book as belonging to the Dean and Chapter of St Paul’s Cathedral. In the time of Henry III (1216–1272), a manor house slightly north-west of what is now the corner of Tottenham Court Road and Oxford Street belonged to one William de Tottenhall. In about the 15th century, the area was known variously as Totten, Totham, or Totting Hall. After changing hands several times, the manor was leased for 99 years to Queen Elizabeth, when it came popularly to be called Tottenham Court. In the next century, it appears to have become the property of the Fitzroys, who built Fitzroy Square on a part of the manor estate towards the end of the 18th century.

Tottenham Court Road is a significant shopping street, best known for its high concentration of consumer electronics shops, which range from shops specialising in cables and computer components to those dealing in package computers and audio-video systems. Further north there are several furniture shops including Habitat and Heals.

In the 1950s and 1960s, Tottenham Court Road and a few of the adjoining streets had become a mecca for World War II surplus radio and electronics equipment. Shops such as Proops Brothers and Z & I Aero Services lined both sides of the road in those days, and thousands travelled there to buy amplifiers, radios and electronic components. There were many shops selling all kinds of electro-mechanical and radio parts. By the 1960s, they were also selling Japanese transistor radios, audio mixers, and other electronic gadgets. Many British-made valve stereos were offered too. Lisle Street, on the north side of Leicester Square, was another place where a large variety of electronic surplus was available.

Tottenham Court Road tube station, one of three stations serving the street, opened as part of the Central London Railway on 30 July 1900. The platforms are under Oxford Street west of St Giles’ Circus, and were originally connected to the ticket hall via lifts at the east end of the platforms. The original station building is in Oxford Street and was designed in common with other CLR stations by Harry Bell Measures. Much modified, it now forms part of the station entrance, and some elements of the original facade survive above the canopy. Apart from those very limited original features of the entrance, the station building otherwise together with a whole row of other elegant old buildings were demolished in 2009.

The Charing Cross, Euston & Hampstead Railway (now part of the Northern line) arrived here on 22 June 1907 but used the name Oxford Street until an interchange (linking the eastbound Central line with the southbound Northern line via the ends of the platform) was opened. The original CCE&HR station buildings were destroyed when the Centre Point tower block was built.

Tottenham Court Road is the only thoroughfare in the W1 postal district to feature the word road in its name - all the others are streets, squares, etc.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Transmission
TUM image id: 1509553463
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Get Back
Credit: Stable Diffusion
TUM image id: 1675076090
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Tottenham Court Road (1927)
TUM image id: 1556973109
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In the neighbourhood...

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Theatreland, Shaftesbury Avenue
Credit: IG/my.wandering.journey
Licence: CC BY 2.0


BT Tower The Post Office Tower - now known as the BT Tower - opened in the Fitzrovia area of central London in 1965. The tower’s main structure was 177 metres high. A further section of aerial rigging brought the total height to 191m. It was the tallest building in the UK until London’s NatWest Tower opened in 1980.
Credit: Wiki Commons
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The Prince of Wales Theatre in 1903 shortly before its demolition for the building of the Scala Theatre in 1904.
Credit: Caroline Blomfield
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Fairyland, 92 Tottenham Court Road (1905) Fairyland was an amusement arcade with a shooting range, owned and run by Henry Stanton Morley (1875-1916) during the period leading up to and during the First World War. It was closed after (unintentionally according to its owners), it was used to practice political assassinations. Notably, attempts on the life of Prime Minister Herbert Asquith (planned but not carried out) and Sir William Hutt Curzon Wyllie (carried out).
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Transmission
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Tottenham Court Road (1927)
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De Hems, 11 Macclesfield Street and the entrance to Horse & Dolphin Yard.
Credit: Colonel Warden
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The Queen’s Theatre in the West End (2011), then showing the musical "Les Misérables"
Credit: Andreas Praefcke
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Centre Point, a controversial building in New Oxford Street comprising a 34-storey tower (2005) Constructed from 1963 to 1966, it was one of the first skyscrapers in London, and as of 2009 was the city’s joint 27th-tallest building. It stood empty from the time of its completion until 1975. In 2015 it was converted from office space to luxury flats.
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View of Seven Dials, looking up Little Earl Street - now part of Earlham Street - in 1896
Old London postcard
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