Inglebert Street, EC1R

Road in/near Finsbury

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(51.52991 -0.10969, 51.529 -0.109) 
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Road · Finsbury · EC1R ·
August
9
2017

Inglebert Street is a road in the EC1R postcode area





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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 07:17 GMT   

Smithy in Longacre
John Burris 1802-1848 Listed 1841 census as Burroughs was a blacksmith, address just given as Longacre.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

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Reg Carr   
Added: 10 Feb 2021 12:11 GMT   

Campbellite Meeting
In 1848 the Campbellites (Disciples of Christ) met in Elstree Street, where their congregation was presided over by a pastor named John Black. Their appointed evangelist at the time was called David King, who later became the Editor of the British Millennial Harbinger. The meeting room was visited in July 1848 by Dr John Thomas, who spoke there twice on his two-year ’mission’ to Britain.

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Jeff Owen   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 16:18 GMT   

Owen’s School
Owen Street is the site of Owen’s Boys’ School. The last school was built in 1881 and was demolished in the early 1990s to make way for the development which stand there today. It was a “Direct Grant” grammar school and was founded in 1613 by Dame Alice Owen. What is now “Owen’s Fields” was the playground between the old school and the new girls’ school (known then as “Dames Alice Owen’s School” or simply “DAOS”). The boys’ school had the top two floors of that building for their science labs. The school moved to Potters Bar in Hertfordshire in 1971 and is now one of the top State comprehensive schools in the country. The old building remained in use as an accountancy college and taxi-drivers’ “knowledge” school until it was demolished. The new building is now part of City and Islington College. Owen’s was a fine school. I should know because I attended there from 1961 to 1968.

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Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 19:47 GMT   

Millions Of Rats In Busy London
The Daily Mail on 14 April 1903 reported "MILLIONS OF RATS IN BUSY LONDON"

A rat plague, unprecedented in the annals of London, has broken out on the north side of the Strand. The streets principally infested are Catherine street, Drury lane, Blackmore street, Clare Market and Russell street. Something akin to a reign of terror prevails among the inhabitants after nightfall. Women refuse to pass along Blackmore street and the lower parts of Stanhope street after dusk, for droves of rats perambulate the roadways and pavements, and may be seen running along the window ledges of the empty houses awaiting demolition by the County Council in the Strand to Holborn improvement scheme.

The rats, indeed, have appeared in almost-incredible numbers. "There are millions of them," said one shopkeeper, and his statement was supported by other residents. The unwelcome visitors have been evicted from their old haunts by the County Council housebreakers, and are now busily in search of new homes. The Gaiety Restaurant has been the greatest sufferer. Rats have invaded the premises in such force that the managers have had to close the large dining room on the first floor and the grill rooms on the ground floor and in the basement. Those three spacious halls which have witnessed many as semblages of theatre-goers are now qui:e deserted. Behind the wainscot of the bandstand in the grillroom is a large mound of linen shreds. This represents 1728 serviettes carried theee by the rats.

In the bar the removal of a panel disclosed the astonishing fact that the rats have dragged for a distance of seven or eight yards some thirty or forty beer and wine bottles and stacked them in such a fashion as to make comfortable sleeping places. Mr Williams. the manager of the restaurant, estimates that the rats have destroyed L200 worth of linen. Formerly the Gaiety Restaurant dined 2000 persons daily; no business whatever is now done in this direction.

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Carol   
Added: 7 May 2021 18:44 GMT   

Nan
My nan lily,her sister Elizabeth and their parents Elizabeth and William lived here in1911

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Born here
Bernard Miller   
Added: 12 Apr 2022 17:36 GMT   

My mother and her sister were born at 9 Windsor Terrace
My mother, Millie Haring (later Miller) and her sister Yetta Haring (later Freedman) were born here in 1922 and 1923. With their parents and older brother and sister, they lived in two rooms until they moved to Stoke Newington in 1929. She always said there were six rooms, six families, a shared sink on the first floor landing and a toilet in the backyard.

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Barry J. Page   
Added: 27 Jul 2022 19:41 GMT   

Highbury Corner V1 Explosion
Grandma described the V1 explosion at Highbury Corner on many occasions. She was working in the scullery when the flying bomb landed. The blast shattered all the windows in the block of flats and blew off the bolt on her front door. As she looked out the front room window, people in various states of injury and shock were making their way along Highbury Station Road. One man in particular, who was bleeding profusely from glass shard wounds to his neck, insisted in getting home to see if his family was all right. Others were less fortunate. Len, the local newsagent, comforted a man, who had lost both legs caused by the blast, until the victim succumbed to his injuries. The entire area was ravaged and following are statistics. The flying bomb landed during lunch hour (12:46 p.m.) on June 27th 1944. 26 people lost their lives, 84 were seriously injured and 71 slightly injured.

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Mike   
Added: 28 Feb 2023 18:09 GMT   

6 Elia Street
When I was young I lived in 6 Elia Street. At the end of the garden there was a garage owned by Initial Laundries which ran from an access in Quick Street all the way up to the back of our garden. The fire exit to the garage was a window leading into our garden. 6 Elia Street was owned by Initial Laundry.

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MCNALLY    
Added: 17 May 2021 09:42 GMT   

Blackfriars (1959 - 1965)
I lived in Upper Ground from 1959 to 1964 I was 6 years old my parents Vince and Kitty run the Pub The Angel on the corner of Upper Ground and Bodies Bridge. I remember the ceiling of the cellar was very low and almost stretched the length of Bodies Bridge. The underground trains run directly underneath the pub. If you were down in the cellar when a train was coming it was quite frightening

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Tom   
Added: 21 May 2021 23:07 GMT   

Blackfriars
What is, or was, Bodies Bridge?

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Lena    
Added: 18 Mar 2021 13:08 GMT   

White Conduit Street, N1
My mum, Rosina Wade of the Wade and Hannam family in the area of Chapel Street and Parkfield Street, bought her first “costume” at S Cohen’s in White Conduit Street. Would have probably been about 1936 or thereabouts. She said that he was a small man but an expert tailor. I hope that Islington Council preserve the shop front as it’s a piece of history of the area. Mum used to get her high heel shoes from an Italian shoe shop in Chapel Street. She had size 2 feet and they would let her know when a new consignment of size 2 shoes were in. I think she was a very good customer. She worked at Killingbacks artificial flower maker in Northampton Square and later at the Halifax bombers factory north of Edgware where she was a riveter.

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Jack Wilson   
Added: 21 Jun 2022 21:40 GMT   

Penfold Printers
I am seeking the location of Penfold Printers Offices in Dt Albans place - probably about 1870 or so

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Erin   
Added: 2 May 2022 01:33 GMT   

Windsor Terrace, N1
hello

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P Cash   
Added: 19 Feb 2023 08:03 GMT   

Occupants of 19-29 Woburn Place
The Industrial Tribunals (later changed to Employment Tribunals) moved (from its former location on Ebury Bridge Road to 19-29 Woburn Place sometime in the late 1980s (I believe).

19-29 Woburn Place had nine floors in total (one in the basement and two in its mansard roof and most of the building was occupied by the Tribunals

The ’Head Office’ of the tribunals, occupied space on the 7th, 6th and 2nd floors, whilst one of the largest of the regional offices (London North but later called London Central) occupied space in the basement, ground and first floor.

The expansive ground floor entrance had white marble flooring and a security desk. Behind (on evey floor) lay a square (& uncluttered) lobby space, which was flanked on either side by lifts. On the rear side was an elegant staircase, with white marble steps, brass inlays and a shiny brass handrail which spiralled around an open well. Both staircase, stairwell and lifts ran the full height of the building. On all floors from 1st upwards, staff toilets were tucked on either side of the staircase (behind the lifts).

Basement Floor - Tribunal hearing rooms, dormant files store and secure basement space for Head Office. Public toilets.

Geound Floor - The ’post’ roon sat next to the entrance in the northern side, the rest of which was occupied by the private offices of the full time Tribunal judiciary. Thw largest office belonged to the Regional Chair and was situated on the far corner (overlooking Tavistock Square) The secretary to the Regional Chair occupied a small office next door.
The south side of this floor was occupied by the large open plan General Office for the administration, a staff kitchen & rest room and the private offices of the Regional Secretary (office manager) and their deputy.

First Dloor - Tribunal hearing rooms; separate public waiting rooms for Applicants & Respondents; two small rooms used by Counsel (on a ’whoever arrives first’ bases) and a small private rest room for use by tribunal lay members.

Second Floor - Tribunal Hearing Rooms; Tribunal Head Office - HR & Estate Depts & other tennants.

Third Floor - other tennants

Fourth Floor - other tennants

Fifth Floor - Other Tennants except for a large non-smoking room for staff, (which overlooked Tavistock Sqaure). It was seldom used, as a result of lacking any facities aside from a meagre collection of unwanted’ tatty seating. Next to it, (overlooking Tavistock Place) was a staff canteen.

Sixth Floor - Other tennants mostly except for a few offices on the northern side occupied by tribunal Head Office - IT Dept.

Seventh Floor - Other tenants in the northern side. The southern (front) side held the private offices of several senior managers (Secretariat, IT & Finance), private office of the Chief Accuntant; an office for two private secretaries and a stationary cupboard. On the rear side was a small kitchen; the private office of the Chief Executive and the private office of the President of the Tribunals for England & Wales. (From 1995 onwards, this became a conference room as the President was based elsewhere. The far end of this side contained an open plan office for Head Office staff - Secretariat, Finance & HR (staff training team) depts.

Eighth Floor - other tennants.


The Employment Tribunals (Regional & Head Offices) relocated to Vitory House, Kingsway in April 2005.






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John   
Added: 29 Mar 2023 17:31 GMT   

Auction of the paper stock of Janssen and Roberts
A broadside advertisement reads: "By auction, to be sold on Thursday next being the 16th of this present July, the remainder of the stock in partnership between Janssen and Roberts, at their late dwelling-house in Dean’s Court, the south side of St. Pauls, consisting of Genoa papers according to the particulars underneath." The date in the ESTC record is purely speculative; July 16th was a Thursday in many years during the 18th century; 1750 is only one possibility. Extensive searching has found no other record of the partners or the auction.


Source: ESTC - Search Results

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Born here
   
Added: 27 Mar 2023 18:28 GMT   

Nower Hill, HA5
lo

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Added: 26 Mar 2023 14:50 GMT   

Albert Mews
It is not a gargoyle over the entrance arch to Albert Mews, it is a likeness of Prince Albert himself.

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Christine D Elliott   
Added: 20 Mar 2023 15:52 GMT   

The Blute Family
My grandparents, Frederick William Blute & Alice Elizabeth Blute nee: Warnham lived at 89 Blockhouse Street Deptford from around 1917.They had six children. 1. Alice Maragret Blute (my mother) 2. Frederick William Blute 3. Charles Adrian Blute 4. Violet Lillian Blute 5. Donald Blute 6. Stanley Vincent Blute (Lived 15 months). I lived there with my family from 1954 (Birth) until 1965 when we were re-housed for regeneration to the area.
I attended Ilderton Road School.
Very happy memories of that time.

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Pearl Foster   
Added: 20 Mar 2023 12:22 GMT   

Dukes Place, EC3A
Until his death in 1767, Daniel Nunes de Lara worked from his home in Dukes Street as a Pastry Cook. It was not until much later the street was renamed Dukes Place. Daniel and his family attended the nearby Bevis Marks synagogue for Sephardic Jews. The Ashkenazi Great Synagogue was established in Duke Street, which meant Daniel’s business perfectly situated for his occupation as it allowed him to cater for both congregations.

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Dr Paul Flewers   
Added: 9 Mar 2023 18:12 GMT   

Some Brief Notes on Hawthorne Close / Hawthorne Street
My great-grandparents lived in the last house on the south side of Hawthorne Street, no 13, and my grandmother Alice Knopp and her brothers and sisters grew up there. Alice Knopp married Charles Flewers, from nearby Hayling Road, and moved to Richmond, Surrey, where I was born. Leonard Knopp married Esther Gutenberg and lived there until the street was demolished in the mid-1960s, moving on to Tottenham. Uncle Len worked in the fur trade, then ran a pet shop in, I think, the Kingsland Road.

From the back garden, one could see the almshouses in the Balls Pond Road. There was an ink factory at the end of the street, which I recall as rather malodorous.

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KJH   
Added: 7 Mar 2023 17:14 GMT   

Andover Road, N7 (1939 - 1957)
My aunt, Doris nee Curtis (aka Jo) and her husband John Hawkins (aka Jack) ran a small general stores at 92 Andover Road (N7). I have found details in the 1939 register but don’t know how long before that it was opened.He died in 1957. In the 1939 register he is noted as being an ARP warden for Islington warden

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Added: 2 Mar 2023 13:50 GMT   

The Queens Head
Queens Head demolished and a NISA supermarket and flats built in its place.

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Mike   
Added: 28 Feb 2023 18:09 GMT   

6 Elia Street
When I was young I lived in 6 Elia Street. At the end of the garden there was a garage owned by Initial Laundries which ran from an access in Quick Street all the way up to the back of our garden. The fire exit to the garage was a window leading into our garden. 6 Elia Street was owned by Initial Laundry.

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V:3

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Philharmonic Hall The Philharmonic Hall was a major music hall throughout the 1860s and early 1870s.
Spa Green Estate, EC1R The Spa Green Estate is a post-war realisation of a 1930s plan for social regeneration through Modernist architecture.
White Conduit Street (1950s) A line of children hold hands as they walk along the middle of White Conduit Street towards the junction with Chapel Market in Islington in the 1950s.

NEARBY STREETS
Abacus House, EC1R Abacus House can be found on Gloucester Way.
Affleck Street, N1 Affleck Street was built by a Mr A. Attneave in 1884.
Albert House, WC1X Albert House is a block on King’s Cross Road.
Ampton Place, WC1X Ampton Place was previously called Frederick Place.
Ampton Street, WC1X Ampton Street was named after its builder, the 3rd Lord Calthorpe who owned land at Ampton, Suffolk.
Amwell Street, EC1R Amwell Street is called after the nearby New River, which starts at Amwell, Hertfordshire.
Angel Arcade, EC1V Angel Arcade is named, along with many ’Angel’ streets of the area, after the famous pub.
Angel Building, EC1V Angel Building is a block on St John Street.
Angel Corner House, N1 Angel Corner House is located on Islington High Street.
Angel House, N1 Angel House is a block on Pentonville Road.
Angel Mews, N1 Angel Mews is an ancient side street in Islington.
Angel Square, EC1V Angel Square is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Arlington House, EC1R Arlington House is located on Arlington Way.
Arlington Way, EC1R Arlington Way was called Arlington Street before 1936.
Asman House, N1 Asman House is a block on Colebrooke Row.
Attneave Street, EC1R Attneave Street is thought to be named after a local builder in the 1890s called Attneave.
Baron Street, N1 Baron Street is named after Joseph Barron, landlord of the White Lion inn during the late eighteenth century.
Benyon House, EC1R Benyon House is sited on Myddelton Passage.
Bethany House, WC1X Bethany House is a block on Lloyd Square.
Bradleys Close, N1 Bradleys Close is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Cable House, WC1X Cable House is a block on Great Percy Street.
Calshot Street, N1 Calshot Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Centenary Building, EC1R Centenary Building is a block on Spencer Street.
Chadwell Street, EC1R Chadwell Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Chalbury Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Chapel Market, N1 Chapel Market is a daily street market in Islington.
Chapel Place, N1 Chapel Place lies off the north side of Chapel Market towards Liverpool Road.
Charles Rowan House, EC1R Charles Rowan House is a building on Amwell Street.
Charles Rowan House, WC1X Charles Rowan House can be found on Margery Street.
Charles Townsend House, EC1R Charles Townsend House is a block on Finsbury Estate.
Claremont Close, EC1R Claremont Close is a road in the EC1R postcode area
Claremont Square, N1 Claremont Square is a square and reservoir on Pentonville Road.
Claremont Street, EC1R A street within the N1 postcode
College Building, EC1R College Building is a block on Northampton Square.
Collier Street, N1 Collier Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Cruikshank Street, WC1X Cruikshank Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Cubitt Street, WC1X Cubitt Street was formerly called Arthur Street.
Cumming Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Cynthia Street, N1 Cynthia Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Dalby House, EC1V Dalby House is a block on City Road.
Derby Lodge, WC1X Derby Lodge is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Dinwiddy House, N1 Dinwiddy House is a block on Pentonville Road.
Donegal Street, N1 Donegal Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Drysdale Building, EC1R Drysdale Building can be found on Spencer Street.
Duncan Street, N1 Duncan Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Duncan Terrace, N1 Duncan Terrace is named after Admiral Duncan the commander of the Naval Fleet at the Battle of Camperdown against the Dutch in 1797.
Easton Street, WC1X Easton Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Edward House, EC1V Edward House is a block on Wakley Street.
Elia Mews, EC1V Elia Mews is a road in the N1 postcode area
Elia Street, N1 Elia Street was named for local poet, Charles Lamb.
Fernsbury Street, WC1X Fernsbury Street is a turning off of Margery Street.
Fleet Square, WC1X Fleet Square is a road in the WC1X postcode area
Foxcroft House, N1 Foxcroft House is a block on Pentonville Road.
Frances Gardner House, WC1X Frances Gardner House is a block on Cubitt Street.
Frearson House, N1 Frearson House is a block on Weston Rise.
Frederick Street, WC1X Frederick Street is a road in the WC1X postcode area
Friend Street, EC1V Friend Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Gloucester Building, EC1R Gloucester Building is a block on Whiskin Street.
Gloucester Way, EC1R Gloucester Way is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Godson Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Grant Street, N1 The present Grant Street is the remnant of Warren Street, an L-shaped road running between Chapel Market and White Conduit Street, renamed Grant Street in 1936.
Granville Square, WC1X Granville Square is a road in the WC1X postcode area
Granville Street, WC1X Granville Street is a road in the WC1X postcode area
Great Percy Street, WC1X Great Percy Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Green Man Tower, EC1V Green Man Tower can be found on Goswell Road.
Greenwood House, EC1R Greenwood House is a block on Rosebery Avenue.
Grendon House, N1 Grendon House is located on Collier Street.
Gwynne House, WC1X Gwynne House is a block on Lloyd Baker Street.
Hardwick Street, EC1R Hardwick Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Harvest Lodge, N1 Harvest Lodge a plain brick, four-storey block of flats was built in 1962.
Hayward House, N1 Hayward House is a four-storey block of flats immediately north of St Silas’s Church.
Hermes Street, N1 Hermes Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Hermit Street, EC1V Hermit Street links Friend Street with Rawstorne Street.
Hill House Apartments, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Holford Mews, WC1X Holford Mews is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Holford Street, WC1X Holford Street is a road in the WC1X postcode area
Holford Yard, WC1X Holford Yard is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Hurst House, N1 Hurst House can be found on Weston Rise.
Hydra Building, EC1R Hydra Building is a block on Hardwick Street.
Islington High Street, N1 Islington High Street is part of the main road through Islington at Angel.
James Lighthill House, WC1X James Lighthill House is a block on Penton Rise.
James’s Gardens, N1 James’s Gardens was established in the 1810s.
Joseph Close, EC1R Joseph Close is a road in the N4 postcode area
Joseph Trotter Close, EC1R Joseph Trotter Close is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
King’s Cross Road, WC1X This is a street in the WC1X postcode area
Kingsway Place, EC1R Kingsway Place is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Lloyd Baker Street, WC1X Lloyd Baker Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Lloyd House, WC1X Lloyd House is located on Lloyd Street.
Lloyd Square, WC1X Lloyd Square is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Lloyd Street, WC1X Lloyd Street is a road in the WC1X postcode area
Lloyds Row, EC1R Lloyds Row is a road in the EC1R postcode area
Lorenzo Street, N1 Lorenzo Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Malta Street, EC1V This is a street in the EC1V postcode area
Manningford Close, EC1V Manningford Close is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Margery Street, WC1X Margery Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Maynard House, N1 Maynard House is located on Penton Street.
McBeath House, EC1V McBeath House is a block on Goswell Road.
Meredith Street, EC1R Meredith Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Merlin Street, EC1R Merlin Street runs west off Amwell Street.
Michael Cliffe House, EC1R Michael Cliffe House is a block on Gloucester Way.
Midway House, EC1V Midway House is a block on Spencer Street.
Moorgreen House, EC1V Moorgreen House is a block on Earlstoke Street.
Myddelton Passage, EC1R Myddelton Passage is an alleyway with an interesting story
Myddelton Square, EC1R Myddelton Square is named after Sir Hugh Myddelton (1560–1631), the founder of the New River Company, who developed the square.
Myddelton Street, EC1R Myddelton Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Naoroji Street, WC1X Naoroji Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Newington Close, EC1R This is a street in the EC1R postcode area
Noble House, N1 Noble House is sited on Islington High Street.
Northampton Square, EC1V Northampton Square is a square between Finsbury and Clerkenwell, located between Goswell Road and St John Street.
Northeast Place, N1 Northeast Place matched the adjacent Northwest Place.
Northwest Place, N1 Northwest Place, off Chapel Market, was formerly West Place.
Owen Street, EC1V Owen Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Owen’s Row, EC1V Owen’s Row is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Paget Street, EC1V Paget Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Patrick Coman House, EC1R Patrick Coman House is a block on Meredith Street.
Penton Grove, N1 The narrow loop of Penton Grove, now reduced to an L-shaped alley, was laid out on the site of one of the bowling greens belonging to Prospect House (Dobney’s).
Penton House, N1 Penton House is a block on Hermes Street.
Penton Rise, WC1X Penton Rise is a road in the WC1X postcode area
Penton Street, N1 Penton Street is a through-route leading on to the narrower Barnsbury Road which continues its line northwards into Islington.
Pentonville Road, N1 Pentonville Road connects Kings Cross and the Angel, Islington.
Percival Street, EC1V Percival Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Percy Circus, WC1X Percy Circus was once referred to as "one of the most delightful bits of town planning in London".
Pride Court, N1 Pride Court is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Prideaux House, WC1X Prideaux House can be found on Great Percy Street.
Prideaux Place, WC1X Prideaux Place is a road in the WC1X postcode area
Prospect House, N1 Prospect House is a block on Donegal Street.
Quick Street Mews, N1 Quick Street Mews lies off Quick Street.
Rawstorne Place, EC1V Rawstorne Place is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Rawstorne Street, EC1V Rawstorne Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Riceyman House, WC1X Riceyman House is a block on Lloyd Baker Street.
Risinghill Street, N1 Risinghill Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
River Street, EC1R River Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Rodney House, N1 Rodney House is sited on Donegal Street.
Rodney Street, N1 Rodney Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Rosebery Avenue, EC1R Rosebery Avenue was opened by the 5th Earl of Rosebery.
Rosebery House, EC1R Residential block
Rosebery Square, EC1R Rosebery Square is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Rosoman Place, EC1R Rosoman Place is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Rosoman Street, EC1R Rosoman Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Sadler House, EC1V Sadler House is a block on Rosebery Avenue.
Sanders House, WC1X Sanders House is a building on Great Percy Street.
Sans Works, EC1R Sans Works is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Seabrooke Place, N1 Seabrook Place once connected Angel Mews and White Lion Street.
Sidney Grove, EC1V Sidney Grove is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Social Sciences Building, EC1R Social Sciences Building is a block on Myddleton Street.
Spafield Street, EC1R Spafield Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Spencer Street, EC1V Spencer Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Spring House, WC1X Spring House is a block on Margery Street.
St Helena House, WC1X St Helena House is a block on Margery Street.
St Helena Street, WC1X St Helena Street connects Naoroji Street and Fernsbury Street.
St John Street, EC1V The northern section of St John Street was confusingly, before the 20th century, named Saint John Street Road.
St Katharine’s House, N1 St Katharine’s House is at the corner of Penton Street and the eastern stub of what had been Wynford Road until that street was cut off to its west by the large Half Moon Estate.
St Katharines House, N1 St Katharines House is a building on Barnsbury Road.
St Philip House, WC1X St Philip House is a building on Lloyd Baker Street.
Stelfox House, WC1X Stelfox House is sited on Penton Rise.
The Laboratory Building, EC1R The Laboratory Building is a block on Rosebery Avenue.
The Market Building, EC1R The Market Building is sited on Rosebery Avenue.
Tompion Street, EC1V Tompion Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Torrens Street, EC1V Torrens Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Tunbridge House, EC1R Tunbridge House is sited on St John Street.
Tunbridge House, EC1V Tunbridge House is a block on St John Street.
Tysoe Street, EC1R Tysoe Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
University Building, EC1R University Building is a block on Spencer Street.
Vernon Rise, WC1X Vernon Rise is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Vernon Square, WC1X Vernon Square is a road in the WC1X postcode area
Vincent Terrace, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Wakley Street, EC1V Wakley Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Warren Mews, N1 Warren Mews began in 1889.
Wells House, EC1R Wells House is a block on Lloyds Row.
Wells Square, WC1X Wells Square is a road in the WC1X postcode area
Weston Rise, N1 Weston Rise is a road in the N1 postcode area
Wharton Street, WC1X Wharton Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
White Conduit Street, N1 White Conduit Street was laid out and built up with houses and tenements from the mid-1790s.
White Lion Street, N1 White Lion Street is named after the former White Lion inn on Islington High Street.
Widford House, N1 Widford House is sited on Elia Mews.
Wilmington Square, WC1X Wilmington Square is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Worthington House, EC1R Worthington House is located on Myddelton Passage.
Wyclif House, EC1V Wyclif House is a block on St John Street.
Wyclif Street, EC1V Wyclif Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Wynyatt Street, EC1V Wynyatt Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Yardley Street, WC1X Yardley Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.

NEARBY PUBS
Bushy Park The Charles Lamb is a pub on Elia Street.
The Castle The Castle stands on the corner of Pentonville Road and Baron Street.
The Joker of Penton Street The Joker of Penton Street was the Salmon and Compasses.


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Finsbury






LOCAL PHOTOS
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The Grand Theatre, Islington High Street (1903) The new Grand Theatre - the fourth theatre on the site - was opened on 26 December 1900 with a production of the pantomime ’Robinson Crusoe’. The Huddersfield Daily reported the next day: "Nearing the end of the first performance of ’Robinson Crusoe’ at the Grand Theatre, Islington, on Wednesday, a fire broke out. From all parts of the house an alarm was raised. All present rose to their feet as large pieces of inflammable material were seen dropping from flies. The fire-proof curtain was promptly lowered, and the band struck up the National Anthem. The actors and actresses crowded into the stage boxes. Mr. Jones, playing ’Friday,’ clambered on to the stage from the front and appealed to the audience not to rush for the doors as there was no danger. Then Mr. Charles Townley, the author, came forward explaining that the management, owing to the electric installations not being completed, had used gas batten, and one of the sky borders had unfortunately caught fire. The officials had shown their efficiency by the celerity with which the fire had been extinguished. This is the fourth fire that has occurred at this theatre, and Wednesday’s was the first performance given since the building was gutted some few months back." Thankfully the fire was quickly put out and the performance continued, and the Theatre would go on to stage pantomime, drama, and variety productions until it was renamed the Islington Empire in 1908.
TUM image id: 1557151038
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The Angel, Islington (c.1890)
TUM image id: 1557162442
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

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Beer in the evening
Credit: Wiki Commons
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The third Grand Theatre, Islington (1903). This was built on the site of the former Philharmonic Hall and two previous Grand Theatres
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Islington Horse and Cattle market at the turn of the twentieth century.
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A line of children hold hands as they walk along the middle of White Conduit Street towards the junction with Chapel Market in Islington.
Credit: John Gay/Historic England
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Grand Theatre, Islington High Street (1903) The new Grand Theatre - the fourth theatre on the site - was opened on 26 December 1900 with a production of the pantomime ’Robinson Crusoe’. The Huddersfield Daily reported the next day: "Nearing the end of the first performance of ’Robinson Crusoe’ at the Grand Theatre, Islington, on Wednesday, a fire broke out. From all parts of the house an alarm was raised. All present rose to their feet as large pieces of inflammable material were seen dropping from flies. The fire-proof curtain was promptly lowered, and the band struck up the National Anthem. The actors and actresses crowded into the stage boxes. Mr. Jones, playing ’Friday,’ clambered on to the stage from the front and appealed to the audience not to rush for the doors as there was no danger. Then Mr. Charles Townley, the author, came forward explaining that the management, owing to the electric installations not being completed, had used gas batten, and one of the sky borders had unfortunately caught fire. The officials had shown their efficiency by the celerity with which the fire had been extinguished. This is the fourth fire that has occurred at this theatre, and Wednesday’s was the first performance given since the building was gutted some few months back." Thankfully the fire was quickly put out and the performance continued, and the Theatre would go on to stage pantomime, drama, and variety productions until it was renamed the Islington Empire in 1908.
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The Angel, Islington (c.1890)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Sadler House on the Spa Green Estate from Rosebery Avenue (2011) The ’organic’ connection between old and new buildings intended by architect Berthold Lubetkin at Spa Green.
Credit: Wiki Commons/Grantham9
Licence: CC BY 2.0


White Conduit House, and the conduit head from which it was named, 1827
Credit: Robert Chambers (1832)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Camden Head, Islington This is a glorious old gin palace-style pub behind Upper Street, in existence since the 18th century.
Credit: Flickr/Ewan Munro
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Mount Pleasant Sorting Office on the north-east corner of Farringdon Road (1910). The present building is on the site of the Coldbath Fields Prison where the punishments were particularly cruel in that they were not only long and physically hard but also pointless. The pub at the back used to open at 9am to serve postal workers.
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