Gard Street, EC1V

An area which may have existed since the nineteenth century or before- in the area buildings are mainly post-war

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(51.52891 -0.09891, 51.528 -0.098) 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Road · Clerkenwell · EC1V ·
August
12
2017

Gard Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area





CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
MCNALLY    
Added: 17 May 2021 09:42 GMT   

Blackfriars (1959 - 1965)
I lived in Upper Ground from 1959 to 1964 I was 6 years old my parents Vince and Kitty run the Pub The Angel on the corner of Upper Ground and Bodies Bridge. I remember the ceiling of the cellar was very low and almost stretched the length of Bodies Bridge. The underground trains run directly underneath the pub. If you were down in the cellar when a train was coming it was quite frightening

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Tom   
Added: 21 May 2021 23:07 GMT   

Blackfriars
What is, or was, Bodies Bridge?

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Comment
   
Added: 21 Apr 2021 16:21 GMT   

Liverpool Street
the Bishopsgate station has existed since 1840 as a passenger station, but does not appear in the site’s cartography. Evidently, the 1860 map is in fact much earlier than that date.

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The Underground Map   
Added: 20 Sep 2020 13:01 GMT   

Pepys starts diary
On 1 January 1659, Samuel Pepys started his famous daily diary and maintained it for ten years. The diary has become perhaps the most extensive source of information on this critical period of English history. Pepys never considered that his diary would be read by others. The original diary consisted of six volumes written in Shelton shorthand, which he had learned as an undergraduate on scholarship at Magdalene College, Cambridge. This shorthand was introduced in 1626, and was the same system Isaac Newton used when writing.

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Comment
Steven Shepherd   
Added: 4 Feb 2021 14:20 GMT   

Our House
I and my three brothers were born at 178 Pitfield Street. All of my Mothers Family (ADAMS) Lived in the area. There was an area behind the house where the Hoxton Stall holders would keep the barrows. The house was classed as a slum but was a large house with a basement. The basement had 2 rooms that must have been unchanged for many years it contained a ’copper’ used to boil and clean clothes and bedlinen and a large ’range’ a cast iron coal/log fired oven. Coal was delivered through a ’coal hole’ in the street which dropped through to the basement. The front of the house used to be a shop but unused while we lived there. I have many more happy memories of the house too many to put here.

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Comment
Lena    
Added: 18 Mar 2021 13:08 GMT   

White Conduit Street, N1
My mum, Rosina Wade of the Wade and Hannam family in the area of Chapel Street and Parkfield Street, bought her first “costume” at S Cohen’s in White Conduit Street. Would have probably been about 1936 or thereabouts. She said that he was a small man but an expert tailor. I hope that Islington Council preserve the shop front as it’s a piece of history of the area. Mum used to get her high heel shoes from an Italian shoe shop in Chapel Street. She had size 2 feet and they would let her know when a new consignment of size 2 shoes were in. I think she was a very good customer. She worked at Killingbacks artificial flower maker in Northampton Square and later at the Halifax bombers factory north of Edgware where she was a riveter.

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Comment
Jeff Owen   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 16:18 GMT   

Owen’s School
Owen Street is the site of Owen’s Boys’ School. The last school was built in 1881 and was demolished in the early 1990s to make way for the development which stand there today. It was a “Direct Grant” grammar school and was founded in 1613 by Dame Alice Owen. What is now “Owen’s Fields” was the playground between the old school and the new girls’ school (known then as “Dames Alice Owen’s School” or simply “DAOS”). The boys’ school had the top two floors of that building for their science labs. The school moved to Potters Bar in Hertfordshire in 1971 and is now one of the top State comprehensive schools in the country. The old building remained in use as an accountancy college and taxi-drivers’ “knowledge” school until it was demolished. The new building is now part of City and Islington College. Owen’s was a fine school. I should know because I attended there from 1961 to 1968.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Born here
Ron Shepherd   
Added: 18 Sep 2021 17:28 GMT   

More Wisdom
Norman Joseph Wisdom was born in St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington, West London.

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Comment
Jonathan Penner   
Added: 11 Sep 2021 16:03 GMT   

Pennard Road, W12
My wife and I, young Canadians, lodged at 65 (?) Pennard Road with a fellow named Clive and his girlfriend, Melanie, for about 6 months in 1985. We loved the area and found it extremely convenient.

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Comment
   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 16:58 GMT   

Prefabs!
The "post-war detached houses" mentioned in the description were "prefabs" - self-contained single-storey pre-fabricated dwellings. Demolition of houses on the part that became Senegal Fields was complete by 1964 or 1965.

Source: Prefabs in the United Kingdom - Wikipedia

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Comment
Matthew Moggridge ([email protected])   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 10:38 GMT   

Lord Chatham’s Ride (does it even exist?)
Just to say that I cycled from my home in Sanderstead to Knockholt Pound at the weekend hoping to ride Lord Chatham’s Ride, but could I find it? No. I rode up Chevening Lane, just past the Three Horseshoes pub and when I reached the end of the road there was a gate and a sign reading "Private, No Entry". I assumed this was the back entrance to Chevening House, country retreat of the Foreign Secretary, and that Lord Chatham’s Ride was inside the grounds. At least that’s what I’m assuming as I ended up following a footpath that led me into some woods with loads of rooted pathways, all very annoying. Does Lord Chatham’s Ride exist and if so, can I ride it, or is it within the grounds of Chevening House and, therefore, out of bounds? Here’s an account of my weekend ride with images, see URL below.

Source: No Visible Lycra: Lord Chatham’s ride: a big disappointmen

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Comment
norma brown   
Added: 20 Aug 2021 21:12 GMT   

my grandparents lived there as well as 2 further generations
my home

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Ruth   
Added: 6 Aug 2021 13:31 GMT   

Cheltenham Road, SE15
Harris Girls’ Academy, in Homestall Road, just off Cheltenham Road, was formerly Waverley School. Before that it was built as Honor Oak Girls’ Grammar School. It was also the South London Emergency School during WW2,taking girls from various schools in the vicinity, including those returning from being evacuated.

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Comment
Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

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Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 09:12 GMT   

Dunloe Avenue, N17
I was born in 1951,my grandparents lived at 5 Dunloe Avenue.I had photos of the coronation decorations in the area for 1953.The houses were rented out by Rowleys,their ’workers yard’ was at the top of Dunloe Avenue.The house was fairly big 3 bedroom with bath and toilet upstairs,and kitchenette downstairs -a fairly big garden.My Grandmother died 1980 and the house was taken back to be rented again

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Philharmonic Hall The Philharmonic Hall was a major music hall throughout the 1860s and early 1870s.

NEARBY STREETS
Agdon Street, EC1V Agdon Street was originally called Woods Close.
Alford Place, N1 Alford Place is a road in the N1 postcode area
Angel Gate, EC1V Angel Gate is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Angel Square, EC1V Angel Square is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Arlington Way, EC1R Arlington Way was called Arlington Street before 1936.
Ashby Street, EC1V Ashby Street was named after local landowners who had a seat at Castle Ashby, Northamptonshire.
Bartholomew Square, EC1V This is a street in the EC1V postcode area
Bath Street, EC1V Bath Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Berry Place, EC1V Berry Place is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Bletchley Street, N1 Bletchley Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Bollinder Place, EC1V Bollinder Place lies along City Road.
Boreas Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Central Street, EC1V Central Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
City Forum, EC1V City Forum is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
City Garden Row, N1 City Garden Row is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
City Road, EC1V City Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Compton Street, EC1V Compton Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Coombs Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Corporation Row, EC1R Corporation Row is a road in the EC1R postcode area
Cyrus Street, EC1V Cyrus Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Davina House, EC1V Residential block
Dingley Road, EC1V Dingley Road is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Elia Mews, EC1V Elia Mews is a road in the N1 postcode area
Elia Street, N1 Elia Street was named for local poet, Charles Lamb.
Falcon Court, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Farringdon Road, EC1V Farringdon Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Finsbury Estate, EC1R Finsbury Estate is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Friend Street, EC1V Friend Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Galway Street, EC1V Galway Street was named for the Earl of Galway.
Gambier House, EC1V Residential block
Gloucester Way, EC1R Gloucester Way is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Goswell Road, EC1V Goswell Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Graham Street, N1 Graham Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Grand Junction Wharf, N1 Grand Junction Wharf is a road in the N1 postcode area
Grimthorpe House, EC1V Residential block
Hall Street, EC1V Hall Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Haverstock Place, EC1V A street within the N1 postcode
Haverstock Street, EC1V Haverstock Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Helmet Row, EC1V Helmet Row is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Ironmonger Row, EC1V Ironmonger Row is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Joseph Close, EC1R Joseph Close is a road in the N4 postcode area
Joseph Trotter Close, EC1R Joseph Trotter Close is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
King Square, EC1V King Square is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Leo Yard, EC1V Leo Yard is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Lever Street, EC1V Lever Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Lizard Street, EC1V Lizard Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Lloyds Row, EC1R Lloyds Row is a road in the EC1R postcode area
Macclesfield Road, EC1V Macclesfield Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Malta Street, EC1V This is a street in the EC1V postcode area
Manningford Close, EC1V Manningford Close is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Masons Place, EC1V Masons Place is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Meredith Street, EC1R Meredith Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Micawber Street, N1 Micawber Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Mitchell Street, EC1V Mitchell Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Mora Street, EC1V Mora Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Moreland Street, EC1V Moreland Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Murton Street, EC1V Murton Street dates from about 1829.
Myddelton Street, EC1R Myddelton Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Napier Grove, N1 Napier Grove is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Nelson Place, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Nelson Terrace, EC1V Nelson Terrace is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Newington Close, EC1R This is a street in the EC1R postcode area
Norman Street, EC1V Norman Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Northampton Square, EC1V Northampton Square is a square between Finsbury and Clerkenwell, located between Goswell Road and St John Street.
Oakley Crescent, EC1V Oakley Crescent is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Owen Street, EC1V Owen Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Owen’s Row, EC1V Owen’s Row is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Paget Street, EC1V Paget Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Paper Mill Buildings, EC1V A street within the N1 postcode
Paton Street, EC1V Paton Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Pear Tree Street, EC1V Pear Tree Street connects Central Street and Goswell Road.
Percival Street, EC1V Percival Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Peregrine House, EC1V Residential block
Pickfords Wharf, N1 Pickfords Wharf is a road in the N1 postcode area
Prestwood Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Quick Street Mews, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Quick Street, N1 Quick Street is named for the favourite comedian of King George III, John Quick.
Radnor Street, EC1V Radnor Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Rawstorne Place, EC1V Rawstorne Place is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Rawstorne Street, EC1V Rawstorne Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Remington Road, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Remington Street, EC1V Remington Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Rocliffe Street, N1 Rocliffe Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Sebastian Street, EC1V Sebastian Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Sekforde Court, EC1R Sekforde Court is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Seward Street, EC1V Seward Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Shaftesbury Street, N1 Shaftesbury Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Shepardess Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Shepards Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Sheperdess Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Shepherdess Building, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Shepherdess Walk, N1 Shepherdess Walk is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Sidney Grove, EC1V Sidney Grove is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Skinner Street, EC1R Skinner Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Spencer Street, EC1V Spencer Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
St John Street, EC1V The northern section of St John Street was confusingly, before the 20th century, named Saint John Street Road.
Sturt Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Sudeley Street, N1 Sudeley Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Taplow Street, N1 Taplow Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Theseus Walk, N1 Theseus Walk is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Thoresby Street, N1 Thoresby Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Tilney Court, EC1Y Tilney Court lies off of Old Street.
Tompion House, EC1V Residential block
Tompion Street, EC1V Tompion Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Torrens Street, EC1V Torrens Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Torrens Street, EC1V Torrens Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Underwood Row, N1 Underwood Row is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Underwood Street, N1 Underwood Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Union Wharf, N1 Union Wharf is a block on Wenlock Road.
Vincent Terrace, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Wakley Street, EC1V Wakley Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Waterloo Street, EC1V Waterloo Street once ran from Lever Street to Radnor Street.
Waterside 44-48, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Waterside, N1 Waterside is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Wellesley Terrace, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Wenlock Building, N1 The Wenlock Building is a canal-side development on Wharf Road.
Wenlock Mews, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Wenlock Road, N1 Wenlock Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Wharf Road, N1 Wharf Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Windsor Terrace, N1 Windsor Terrace is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Wyclif Street, EC1V Wyclif Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Wynyatt Street, EC1V Wynyatt Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.

NEARBY PUBS
Bavarian Beerhouse This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Block Brewery Limited This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Bourne & Hollingsworth Buildings This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Charles Lamb The Charles Lamb is a pub on Elia Street.
Old Red Lion This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Star Space This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Angel This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Blacksmith & The Toffeemaker This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Eagle This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Harlequin This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Old Ivy House This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Peasant This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Shakespeare’s Head This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
William IV This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Queen’s Park

Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen’s Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen’s Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen’s Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen’s Park ’proper’ formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen’s Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen’s Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett’s wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen’s Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queen’s Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen’s Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen’s Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen’s Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR.


LOCAL PHOTOS
St Lukes Hospital for Lunatics, London
TUM image id: 1554045418
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Angel, Islington (c.1890)
TUM image id: 1557162442
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

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The third Grand Theatre, Islington (1903). This was built on the site of the former Philharmonic Hall and two previous Grand Theatres
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Islington Horse and Cattle market at the turn of the twentieth century.
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The Angel, Islington (c.1890)
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Saint John’s Gate, Clerkenwell, the main gateway to the Priory of Saint John of Jerusalem. The church was founded in the 12th century by Jordan de Briset, a Norman knight. Prior Docwra completed the gatehouse shown in this photograph in 1504. The gateway served as the main entry to the Priory, which was the center of the Order of St John of Jerusalem (the Knights Hospitallers).
Credit: Henry Dixon (1880)
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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The Camden Head, Islington This is a glorious old gin palace-style pub behind Upper Street, in existence since the 18th century.
Credit: Flickr/Ewan Munro
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The Royal Agricultural Hall, Islington (1861). View from Liverpool Road.
Credit: Wiki Commons
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Clerkenwell Green (1898) The water fountain shown here became public toilets.
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Great Arthur House, at the centre of the Golden Lane Estate, was the tallest residential building in Britain at the time of its construction.
Credit: Steve F/Wiki commons
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Pardon Street
Credit: The Underground Map
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Until combined in the twentieth century, St John Street was split between St John Street (south) and St John Street Road (north)
Old London postcard
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