Finsbury Pavement, EC2M

Road in/near Moorgate, existing between 1527 and now

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Road · Moorgate · EC2M ·
October
12
2020

Finsbury Pavement was the first pavement of firm ground north of the marshy Moorfields.

The name of Finsbury Pavement was formerly Moor Fields Pavement. The Finsbury part of the name derives from lying within the historic manor of Finsbury which became the Metropolitan Borough of Finsbury in 1900.

The area was first drained in 1527. In the early 19th century, the southern end of the street was renamed Moorgate by the City of London. The name change marked the City boundary but subsequent boundary changes put the street back into the City of London.

By 1761, the Islington turnpike trust built City Road, to meet Finsbury Pavement from the City. Finsbury Pavement formed an early terminus for coach traffic from the north and in turn the street became the terminus for tramways running from Islington.

Batty & Co established a condiments manufactory in 1825 here. The company later established a large manufacturing plant in Peckham, which became the United Kingdom’s first manufacturing base of HJ Heinz in 1905.


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


The Underground Map   
Added: 20 Sep 2020 13:01 GMT   

Pepys starts diary
On 1 January 1659, Samuel Pepys started his famous daily diary and maintained it for ten years. The diary has become perhaps the most extensive source of information on this critical period of English history. Pepys never considered that his diary would be read by others. The original diary consisted of six volumes written in Shelton shorthand, which he had learned as an undergraduate on scholarship at Magdalene College, Cambridge. This shorthand was introduced in 1626, and was the same system Isaac Newton used when writing.

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Lived here
Katharina Logan   
Added: 9 Aug 2022 19:01 GMT   

Ely place existed in name in 1857
On 7th July 1857 John James Chase and Mary Ann Weekes were married at St John the Baptist Hoxton, he of full age and she a minor. Both parties list their place of residence as Ely Place, yet according to other information, this street was not named until 1861. He was a bricklayer, she had no occupation listed, but both were literate and able to sign their names on their marriage certificate.

Source: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSF7-Q9Y7?cc=3734475

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Graham O’Connell   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 10:24 GMT   

Lloyd & Sons, Tin Box Manufacturers (1859 - 1982)
A Lloyd & Sons occupied the wharf (now known as Lloyds Wharf, Mill Street) from the mid 19th Century to the late 20th Century. Best known for making tin boxes they also produced a range of things from petrol canisters to collecting tins. They won a notorious libel case in 1915 when a local councillor criticised the working conditions which, in fairness, weren’t great. There was a major fire here in 1929 but the company survived at least until 1982 and probably a year or two after that.

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Marion James   
Added: 12 Mar 2021 17:43 GMT   

26 Edith Street Haggerston
On Monday 11th October 1880 Charlotte Alice Haynes was born at 26 Edith Street Haggerston the home address of her parents her father Francis Haynes a Gilder by trade and her mother Charlotte Alice Haynes and her two older siblings Francis & George who all welcomed the new born baby girl into the world as they lived in part of the small Victorian terraced house which was shared by another family had an outlook view onto the world of the Imperial Gas Works site - a very grey drab reality of the life they were living as an East End working class family - 26 Edith Street no longer stands in 2021 - the small rundown polluted terrace houses of Edith Street are long since gone along with the Gas Companies buildings to be replaced with green open parkland that is popular in 21st century by the trendy residents of today - Charlotte Alice Haynes (1880-1973) is the wife of my Great Grand Uncle Henry Pickett (1878-1930) As I research my family history I slowly begin to understand the life my descendants had to live and the hardships that they went through to survive - London is my home and there are many areas of this great city I find many of my descendants living working and dying in - I am yet to find the golden chalice! But in all truthfulness my family history is so much more than hobby its an understanding of who I am as I gather their stories. Did Charlotte Alice Pickett nee Haynes go on to live a wonderful life - no I do not think so as she became a widow in 1930 worked in a canteen and never remarried living her life in and around Haggerston & Hackney until her death in 1973 with her final resting place at Manor Park Cemetery - I think Charlotte most likely excepted her lot in life like many women from her day, having been born in the Victorian era where the woman had less choice and standing in society, which is a sad state of affairs - So I will endeavour to write about Charlotte and the many other women in my family history to give them the voice of a life they so richly deserve to be recorded !

Edith Street was well situated for the new public transport of two railway stations in 1880 :- Haggerston Railway Station opened in 1867 & Cambridge Heath Railway Station opened in 1872


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Jeff Owen   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 16:18 GMT   

Owen’s School
Owen Street is the site of Owen’s Boys’ School. The last school was built in 1881 and was demolished in the early 1990s to make way for the development which stand there today. It was a “Direct Grant” grammar school and was founded in 1613 by Dame Alice Owen. What is now “Owen’s Fields” was the playground between the old school and the new girls’ school (known then as “Dames Alice Owen’s School” or simply “DAOS”). The boys’ school had the top two floors of that building for their science labs. The school moved to Potters Bar in Hertfordshire in 1971 and is now one of the top State comprehensive schools in the country. The old building remained in use as an accountancy college and taxi-drivers’ “knowledge” school until it was demolished. The new building is now part of City and Islington College. Owen’s was a fine school. I should know because I attended there from 1961 to 1968.

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Born here
Bernard Miller   
Added: 12 Apr 2022 17:36 GMT   

My mother and her sister were born at 9 Windsor Terrace
My mother, Millie Haring (later Miller) and her sister Yetta Haring (later Freedman) were born here in 1922 and 1923. With their parents and older brother and sister, they lived in two rooms until they moved to Stoke Newington in 1929. She always said there were six rooms, six families, a shared sink on the first floor landing and a toilet in the backyard.

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Born here
jack stevens   
Added: 26 Sep 2021 13:38 GMT   

Mothers birth place
Number 5 Whites Row which was built in around 1736 and still standing was the premises my now 93 year old mother was born in, her name at birth was Hilda Evelyne Shaw,

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Lived here
margaret clark   
Added: 15 Oct 2021 22:23 GMT   

Margaret’s address when she married in 1938
^, Josepine House, Stepney is the address of my mother on her marriage certificate 1938. Her name was Margaret Irene Clark. Her father Basil Clark was a warehouse grocer.

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Comment
   
Added: 6 Nov 2021 15:03 GMT   

Old Nichol Street, E2
Information about my grandfather’s tobacconist shop

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Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 15:19 GMT   

Bus makes a leap
A number 78 double-decker bus driven by Albert Gunter was forced to jump an accidentally opening Tower Bridge.

He was awarded a £10 bonus.

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Steven Shepherd   
Added: 4 Feb 2021 14:20 GMT   

Our House
I and my three brothers were born at 178 Pitfield Street. All of my Mothers Family (ADAMS) Lived in the area. There was an area behind the house where the Hoxton Stall holders would keep the barrows. The house was classed as a slum but was a large house with a basement. The basement had 2 rooms that must have been unchanged for many years it contained a ’copper’ used to boil and clean clothes and bedlinen and a large ’range’ a cast iron coal/log fired oven. Coal was delivered through a ’coal hole’ in the street which dropped through to the basement. The front of the house used to be a shop but unused while we lived there. I have many more happy memories of the house too many to put here.

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MCNALLY    
Added: 17 May 2021 09:42 GMT   

Blackfriars (1959 - 1965)
I lived in Upper Ground from 1959 to 1964 I was 6 years old my parents Vince and Kitty run the Pub The Angel on the corner of Upper Ground and Bodies Bridge. I remember the ceiling of the cellar was very low and almost stretched the length of Bodies Bridge. The underground trains run directly underneath the pub. If you were down in the cellar when a train was coming it was quite frightening

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Martin Eaton    
Added: 14 Oct 2021 03:56 GMT   

Boundary Estate
Sunbury, Taplow House.

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STEPHEN JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:25 GMT   

Fellows Court, E2
my family moved into the tower block 13th floor (maisonette), in 1967 after our street Lenthall rd e8 was demolished, we were one of the first families in the new block. A number of families from our street were rehoused in this and the adjoining flats. Inside toilet and central heating, all very modern at the time, plus eventually a tarmac football pitch in the grounds,(the cage), with a goal painted by the kids on the brick wall of the railway.

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The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 15:05 GMT   

A plague on all your houses
Aldgate station is built directly on top of a vast plague pit, where thousands of bodies are apparently buried. No-one knows quite how many.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

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Richard Lake   
Added: 28 Sep 2022 09:37 GMT   

Trade Union Official
John William Lake snr moved with his family to 22 De Laune Street in 1936. He was the London Branch Secretary for the Street Masons, Paviours and Road Makers Union. He had previously lived in Orange St now Copperfield St Southwark but had been forced to move because the landlord didn’t like him working from home and said it broke his lease.
John William snr died in 1940. His son John William Lake jnr also became a stone mason and at the end of World War two he was responsible for the engraving of the dates of WW2 onto the Cenotaph in Whitehall.

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Lived here
Julie   
Added: 22 Sep 2022 18:30 GMT   

Well Walk, NW3 (1817 - 1818)
The home of Benthy, the Postman, with whom poet John Keats and his brother Tom lodged from early 1817 to Dec., 1818. They occupied the first floor up. Here Tom died Dec. 1, 1818. It was next door to the Welles Tavern then called ’The Green Man’."

From collected papers and photos re: No. 1 Well Walk at the library of Harvard University.

Source: No. 1, Well Walk, Hampstead. | HOLLIS for

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Comment
   
Added: 4 Sep 2022 15:42 GMT   

Superman 2
I worked here in 1977. The scene in the prison laundry in Superman 2 was filmed here.

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TUM   
Added: 27 Aug 2022 10:22 GMT   

The Underground Map
Michael Faraday successfully demonstrated the first electrical transformer at the Royal Institute, London.

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Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 15:19 GMT   

Bus makes a leap
A number 78 double-decker bus driven by Albert Gunter was forced to jump an accidentally opening Tower Bridge.

He was awarded a £10 bonus.

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Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:44 GMT   

The world’s first underground train
The very first underground train left Paddington on the new Metropolitan Railway bound for Farringdon Street.

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Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:41 GMT   

Baker Street
Baker Street station opened on the Metropolitan Railway - the world’s first underground line.

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Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:17 GMT   

TV comes to Olympia
Over 7000 people queued to see the first high definition television pictures on sets at the Olympia Radio Show. The pictures were transmitted by the BBC from Alexandra Palace, introduced by Leslie Mitchell, their first announcer.

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Bishopsgate, EC2M Bishopsgate was originally the entry point for travellers coming from the north east into London.
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Fann Street, EC1Y Fann Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
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Finsbury Circus Gardens, EC2M Finsbury Circus Gardens is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
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Fore Street, EC2Y Fore Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
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Hearn Street, EC2A Hearn Street is a road in the EC2A postcode area
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Lackington Street, EC2M Lackington Street is a road in the EC2A postcode area
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Sun Street, EC2M Sun Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Telegraph Street, EC2R Telegraph Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2R postal area.
The Arcade, EC2A The Arcade is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
The Broadgate Tower, EC2A A street within the EC2A postcode
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Warwick Yard, EC1Y Warwick Yard is a road in the EC1Y postcode area
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Whitecross Street, EC1Y Whitecross Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Willoughby Highwalk, EC2Y Willoughby Highwalk is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Wilson Street, EC2A Wilson Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Wilson Street, EC2M Wilson Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Wood Street, EC2V Wood Street was originally the main north–south route through the Roman Fort, discovered after Second World War bombing.
Wood Street, EC2Y The northern section Wood Street lies between London Wall and the Barbican.
Wormwood Street, EC2N Wormwood Street refers to the wormwood plant which used to grow on the London Wall and in other areas of wasteland in the City.
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Worship Street, EC2A Worship Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.

NEARBY PUBS
Addiscombe Line This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
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The Kings Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Lord Aberconway This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Rack & Tenter This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Railway Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Red Lion This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Telegraph This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Windmill This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Unknown as yet This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
We Are Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Wood Street Bar and Restaurant This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


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Moorgate

Moorgate was a postern in the London Wall originally built by the Romans.

It was turned into a gate in the 15th century. Though the gate was demolished in 1762, the name survives as a major street in the City of London. The street connects the City to Islington and Hackney, and was constructed around 1846 as one of the new approaches to London Bridge.

The name Moorgate derives from the surrounding area of Moorfields, which was one of the last pieces of open land in the City. Today this region is a financial centre, and is home to several investment banks. The street also showcases historic and contemporary office buildings.

The earliest descriptions of Moorgate date from the early 15th century. Located between Bishopsgate and Cripplegate and leading to a moor known as Moorfields, it was not one of the larger or more important of the city gates.

When Moorgate was demolished with all the other London city wall gates in 1761/2, the resulting stone was sold for £166 to the City of London Corporation to support the starlings of the newly widened centre arch of the London Bridge.

The Moorfields were one of the last pieces of open land in the City of London. The fields were divided into three areas: the Moorfields proper, just inside the City boundaries, north of Bethlem Royal Hospital (also known as Bedlam, Europe's oldest psychiatric hospital), and Middle and Upper Moorfields (both also open fields) to the north. Much of Moorfields was developed in 1777 and turned into present day Finsbury Circus.

The London Dispensary for curing diseases of the Eye and Ear was founded on the Moorfields in 1805, and evolved to become the present Moorfields Eye Hospital, which is now located on City Road and is close to Old Street station.

Moorfields was the site of the first hydrogen balloon flight in England, when Italian Vincenzo Lunardi took off on the afternoon of 15 September 1784. Lunardi flew in a hydrogen balloon from the area of the Honourable Artillery Company near Moorfields (where it still is to this day, occupying a site next to City Road).

Moorgate is also the birthplace of John Keats, one of the principal poets in the English Romantic movement. Keats was born in 1795 in the Swan and Hoop Inn at 199 Moorgate, where his father was an ostler.

Moorgate station was opened by the Metropolitan Railway in December 1865 when they extended their original route between Paddington and Farringdon.

The Northern line platforms were opened by the City & South London Railway (C&SLR) as Moorgate Street in February 1900 and formed the northern terminus of its services from Stockwell south of the River Thames. The line was extended to Angel the following year.

The Northern City Line to Moorgate was opened by the Great Northern & City Railway in February 1904 offering a service to Finsbury Park. The route was constructed in tube tunnels, but they were constructed at a diameter capable of accommodating main line trains (in contrast to the majority of London tube tunels which are much smaller). However the planned through services to the Great Northern Railway's main line were never implemented, and the route remained a simple short route between Moorgate and Finsbury Park, later cut back to run between Moorgate and Drayton Park only due to Victoria Line construction in the 1960s.

Moorgate station is remembered for the Moorgate tube crash of 1975. In the incident, a train terminating at the station failed to stop and crashed into a brick wall, and 43 people were killed. This resulted in systems being installed on the Underground which automatically stop trains at dead-ends, which have become known as Moorgate control.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Bank station
Credit: IG/steven.maddison
TUM image id: 1653840363
Licence: CC BY 2.0
St Lukes Hospital for Lunatics, London
TUM image id: 1554045418
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
"Cheapside and Bow Church" engraved by W. Albutt (1837) First published in The History of London: Illustrated by Views in London and Westminster. Steel engraved print after a picture by T.H. Shepherd.
Credit: W. Albutt
Licence: CC BY 2.0


St Lukes Hospital for Lunatics, London
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The gravestone of English poet William Blake in Bunhill Fields Burial Ground
Credit: https://careergappers.com/
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Mass grave for plague victims, Holywell Mount (1665) Holywell Mount is the source of the River Walbrook. Today it lies underneath Luke Street in Shoreditch but, then in open land, was used as a plague pit in 1665.
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Shepherd’s Place archway (c. 1810), and Tenter Street (c. 1820) in 1909
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Shown on many older maps as Dashwood Walk, in the 17th century Alderman’s Walk was a passageway leading to the large house and gardens of Sir Frances Dashwood. The poet John Keats was christened at nearby St Botolph’s church in 1795
Credit: https://careergappers.com
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Coffee house sign
Licence: CC BY 2.0


A 1950s (or earlier?) City of London street sign from Change Alley, EC3.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Widely known as the ’Agas map’, Civitas Londinum is a bird’s-eye view of London first printed from woodblocks in about 1561. The map offers a richly detailed view both of the buildings and streets of the city and of its environment. No copies survive from 1561, but a modified version was printed in 1633.
Credit: City of London Archives
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"Cheapside and Bow Church" engraved by W. Albutt (1837) First published in The History of London: Illustrated by Views in London and Westminster. Steel engraved print after a picture by T.H. Shepherd.
Credit: W. Albutt
Licence: CC BY 2.0


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