Thames Embankment

Wikipedia article in/near Westminster, existing until now

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Wikipedia article · Westminster · ·
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thames_Embankment

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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Dec 2020 00:24 GMT   

Othello takes a bow
On 1 November 1604, William Shakespeare’s tragedy Othello was presented for the first time, at The Palace of Whitehall. The palace was the main residence of the English monarchs in London from 1530 until 1698. Seven years to the day, Shakespeare’s romantic comedy The Tempest was also presented for the first time, and also at the Palace of Whitehall.

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Linda Webb   
Added: 27 Sep 2021 05:51 GMT   

Hungerford Stairs
In 1794 my ancestor, George Webb, Clay Pipe Maker, lived in Hungerford Stairs, Strand. Source: Wakefields Merchant & Tradesmens General Directory London Westminster 1794

Source: Hungerford Stairs

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TUM   
Added: 27 Aug 2022 10:22 GMT   

The Underground Map
Michael Faraday successfully demonstrated the first electrical transformer at the Royal Institute, London.

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Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 07:17 GMT   

Smithy in Longacre
John Burris 1802-1848 Listed 1841 census as Burroughs was a blacksmith, address just given as Longacre.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

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Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 19:47 GMT   

Millions Of Rats In Busy London
The Daily Mail on 14 April 1903 reported "MILLIONS OF RATS IN BUSY LONDON"

A rat plague, unprecedented in the annals of London, has broken out on the north side of the Strand. The streets principally infested are Catherine street, Drury lane, Blackmore street, Clare Market and Russell street. Something akin to a reign of terror prevails among the inhabitants after nightfall. Women refuse to pass along Blackmore street and the lower parts of Stanhope street after dusk, for droves of rats perambulate the roadways and pavements, and may be seen running along the window ledges of the empty houses awaiting demolition by the County Council in the Strand to Holborn improvement scheme.

The rats, indeed, have appeared in almost-incredible numbers. "There are millions of them," said one shopkeeper, and his statement was supported by other residents. The unwelcome visitors have been evicted from their old haunts by the County Council housebreakers, and are now busily in search of new homes. The Gaiety Restaurant has been the greatest sufferer. Rats have invaded the premises in such force that the managers have had to close the large dining room on the first floor and the grill rooms on the ground floor and in the basement. Those three spacious halls which have witnessed many as semblages of theatre-goers are now qui:e deserted. Behind the wainscot of the bandstand in the grillroom is a large mound of linen shreds. This represents 1728 serviettes carried theee by the rats.

In the bar the removal of a panel disclosed the astonishing fact that the rats have dragged for a distance of seven or eight yards some thirty or forty beer and wine bottles and stacked them in such a fashion as to make comfortable sleeping places. Mr Williams. the manager of the restaurant, estimates that the rats have destroyed L200 worth of linen. Formerly the Gaiety Restaurant dined 2000 persons daily; no business whatever is now done in this direction.

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Bruce McTavish   
Added: 11 Mar 2021 11:37 GMT   

Kennington Road
Lambeth North station was opened as Kennington Road and then Westminster Bridge Road before settling on its final name. It has a wonderful Leslie Green design.

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Richard Lake   
Added: 28 Sep 2022 09:37 GMT   

Trade Union Official
John William Lake snr moved with his family to 22 De Laune Street in 1936. He was the London Branch Secretary for the Street Masons, Paviours and Road Makers Union. He had previously lived in Orange St now Copperfield St Southwark but had been forced to move because the landlord didn’t like him working from home and said it broke his lease.
John William snr died in 1940. His son John William Lake jnr also became a stone mason and at the end of World War two he was responsible for the engraving of the dates of WW2 onto the Cenotaph in Whitehall.

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Jessie Doring   
Added: 22 Feb 2021 04:33 GMT   

Tisbury Court Jazz Bar
Jazz Bar opened in Tisbury Court by 2 Australians. Situated in underground basement. Can not remember how long it opened for.

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Pauline jones   
Added: 16 Oct 2017 19:04 GMT   

Bessborough Place, SW1V
I grew up in bessborough place at the back of our house and Grosvenor road and bessborough gardens was a fantastic playground called trinity mews it had a paddling pool sandpit football area and various things to climb on, such as a train , slide also as Wendy house. There were plants surrounding this wonderful play area, two playground attendants ,also a shelter for when it rained. The children were constantly told off by the playground keepers for touching the plants or kicking the ball out of the permitted area, there was hopscotch as well, all these play items were brick apart from the slide. Pollock was the centre of my universe and I felt sorry and still do for anyone not being born there. To this day I miss it and constantly look for images of the streets around there, my sister and me often go back to take a clumped of our beloved London. The stucco houses were a feature and the backs of the houses enabled parents to see thier children playing.

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Johnshort   
Added: 7 Oct 2017 21:07 GMT   

Hurley Road, SE11
There were stables in the road mid way - also Danny reading had a coal delivery lorry.

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Robert smitherman   
Added: 23 Aug 2017 11:01 GMT   

Saunders Street, SE11
I was born in a prefab on Saunders street SE11 in the 60’s, when I lived there, the road consisted of a few prefab houses, the road originally ran from Lollard street all the way thru to Fitzalan street. I went back there to have a look back in the early 90’s but all that is left of the road is about 20m of road and the road sign.

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Lived here
Richard Roques   
Added: 21 Jan 2021 16:53 GMT   

Buckingham Street residents
Here in Buckingham Street lived Samuel Pepys the diarist, Charles Dickens and Rudyard Kipling

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Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

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Born here
sam   
Added: 31 Dec 2021 00:54 GMT   

Burdett Street, SE1
I was on 2nd July 1952, in Burdett chambers (which is also known as Burdett buildings)on Burdett street

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

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Richard Lake   
Added: 28 Sep 2022 09:37 GMT   

Trade Union Official
John William Lake snr moved with his family to 22 De Laune Street in 1936. He was the London Branch Secretary for the Street Masons, Paviours and Road Makers Union. He had previously lived in Orange St now Copperfield St Southwark but had been forced to move because the landlord didn’t like him working from home and said it broke his lease.
John William snr died in 1940. His son John William Lake jnr also became a stone mason and at the end of World War two he was responsible for the engraving of the dates of WW2 onto the Cenotaph in Whitehall.

Reply
Lived here
Julie   
Added: 22 Sep 2022 18:30 GMT   

Well Walk, NW3 (1817 - 1818)
The home of Benthy, the Postman, with whom poet John Keats and his brother Tom lodged from early 1817 to Dec., 1818. They occupied the first floor up. Here Tom died Dec. 1, 1818. It was next door to the Welles Tavern then called ’The Green Man’."

From collected papers and photos re: No. 1 Well Walk at the library of Harvard University.

Source: No. 1, Well Walk, Hampstead. | HOLLIS for

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Comment
   
Added: 4 Sep 2022 15:42 GMT   

Superman 2
I worked here in 1977. The scene in the prison laundry in Superman 2 was filmed here.

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TUM   
Added: 27 Aug 2022 10:22 GMT   

The Underground Map
Michael Faraday successfully demonstrated the first electrical transformer at the Royal Institute, London.

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Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 15:19 GMT   

Bus makes a leap
A number 78 double-decker bus driven by Albert Gunter was forced to jump an accidentally opening Tower Bridge.

He was awarded a £10 bonus.

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Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:44 GMT   

The world’s first underground train
The very first underground train left Paddington on the new Metropolitan Railway bound for Farringdon Street.

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Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:41 GMT   

Baker Street
Baker Street station opened on the Metropolitan Railway - the world’s first underground line.

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Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:17 GMT   

TV comes to Olympia
Over 7000 people queued to see the first high definition television pictures on sets at the Olympia Radio Show. The pictures were transmitted by the BBC from Alexandra Palace, introduced by Leslie Mitchell, their first announcer.

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Florence Nightingale Museum The Florence Nightingale Museum is located at St Thomas’ Hospital, which faces the Palace of Westminster across the River Thames.
Garden Museum The first museum in the world dedicated to the history of gardening.
Westminster Abbey Westminster Abbey, formally titled the Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, is one of the world’s greatest churches.

NEARBY STREETS
Abbey Orchard Street, SW1P Abbey Orchard Street was the heart of a former slum area.
Abingdon Street, SW1P Abingdon Street has linked Old Palace Yard and Millbank since at least 1593.
Albert Embankment, SE1 Albert Embankment was reclaimed from the Lambeth foreshore.
Arneway Street, SW1P Arneway Street is named for Thomas Arneway, former benefactor to the Westminster parish poor.
Barton Street, SW1P Barton Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Bennett’s Yard, SW1P Bennett’s Yard is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Broad Sanctuary, SW1P Broad Sanctuary is a road in the SW1H postcode area
Chubb Court, SW1P Chubb Court is a road in the SW20 postcode area
Church Street, SE1 Church Street is an old name for the street leading to Lambeth Bridge.
Cowley Street, SW1P Cowley Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Dalkeith Court, SW1P Dalkeith Court is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Dartmouth Street, SW1H Dartmouth Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1H postal area.
Dean Bradley House, SW1P Dean Bradley House is a building on Horseferry Road
Dean Bradley Street, SW1P George Granville Bradley was Dean of Westminster Abbey from 1881.
Dean Farrar Street, SW1H Frederic William Farrar was a canon of Westminster Abbey.
Dean Ryle Street, SW1P Dean Ryle Street was named after Herbert Edward Ryle.
Dean Stanley Street, SW1P Dean Stanley Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Dean Trench Street, SW1P Dean Trench Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Deans Yard, SW1P Dean’s Yard comprises most of the precincts of the former monastery of Westminster, not occupied by the Abbey buildings.
Fellmongers Path, SE1 Fellmongers Path is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Gayfere Street, SW1P Gayfere Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Great College Street, SW1P Great College Street borders the south side of Westminster School.
Great Peter Street, SW1P Great Peter Street bears the name of the patron saint of Westminster Abbey.
Great Smith Street, SW1P Great Smith Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Horseferry Road, SW1P Horseferry Road is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
John Islip Street, SW1P John Islip Street commemorates the Abbot of Westminster between 1500 and 1532.
Lambeth Bridge, SE1 Lambeth Bridge is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Lambeth Bridge, SW1P Lambeth Bridge is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Lambeth High Street, SE1 Lambeth High Street runs southwards from St Mary’s church, Lambeth to join Black Prince Road.
Lambeth Palace Road, SE1 Lambeth Palace Road is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Little Cloisters, SW1P Little Cloisters is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Little College Street, SW1P Little College Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Little Deans Yard, SW1P Little Deans Yard is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Lord North Street, SW1P Lord North Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Lower Fore Street, SE1 Lower Fore Street existed on the Lambeth foreshore until the arrival of Albert Embankment.
Marsham Street, SW1P Marsham Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Matthew Parker Street, SW1H The Most Reverend Matthew Parker was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1559 until 1575.
Medway Street, SW1P Medway Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Millbank, SW1P Millbank was the beginning of a riverside walk from Westminster Abbey to Chelsea.
Monck Street, SW1P Monck Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
New Palace Yard, SW1P New Palace Yard was built by William II (William Rufus).
Newport Street, SE11 Newport Street is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Norfolk Row, SE1 Norfolk Row is a road in the SE1 postcode area
North Court, SW1P North Court is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Old Palace Yard, SW1P Old Palace Yard lies between the Palace of Westminster and Westminster Abbey.
Old Paradise Street, SE1 Old Paradise Street is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Old Paradise Street, SE1 Old Paradise Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Old Pye Street, SW1P Old Pye Street gets its name from Sir Robert Pye, member of parliament for Westminster in the time of Charles I.
Page Street, SW1P Page Street runs from Regency Street in the west to the junction of John Islip Street and Dean Ryle Street in the east.
Parker Street, SW1H Before being renamed to Matthew Parker Street, old Parker Street was a Westminster slum.
Parliament View Apartments, SE1 Parliament View Apartments is a block on Albert Embankment
Pratt Walk, SE1 Pratt Walk is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Pratt Walk, SE1 Pratt Walk is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Price’s Court, SW1P A street within the SW1P postcode
Regency Place, SW1P Regency Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Romney Street, SW1P Romney Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Smith Square, SW1P Smith Square was originally developed by Sir James Smith around 1726.
St Anns Street, SW1P St Anns Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
St Vincents Centre, SW1P St Vincents Centre is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
St. Margaret Street, SW1P St Margaret Street is the road immediately outside Westminster Hall.
Storey’s Gate, SW1H Abraham Storey, one of Wren’s master-masons, built Storey’s Gate that now commemorates his name.
The Sanctuary, SW1P The Sanctuary is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
The Terrace, SW1P The Terrace is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Thorney Street, SW1P Thorney Street is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Three Colts Corner, E1 Three Colts Corner is a road in the E2 postcode area
Three Colts Lane, E1 Three Colts Lane is a road in the E1 postcode area
Tothill Street, SW1H Tothill Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1H postal area.
Tufton Street, SW1P Tufton Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Victoria Chambers, SW1P Victoria Chambers is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Victoria Street, SW1P Victoria Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1H postal area.
Vincent Street, SW1P Vincent Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Westminster Central Hall, SW1H Westminster Central Hall is one of the streets of London in the SW1H postal area.
Westminster Mansions, SW1P Westminster Mansions is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Whitgift House, SE11 Residential block
Whitgift Street, SE1 Whitgift Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Whitgift Street, SE11 Whitgift Street is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.

NEARBY PUBS
The Windmill This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Click here to explore another London street
We now have 506 completed street histories and 46994 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS


Westminster

Westminster - heart of government.

While the underground station dates from 1868, Westminster itself is almost as old as London itself. It has a large concentration of London’s historic and prestigious landmarks and visitor attractions, including the Palace of Westminster, Buckingham Palace, Westminster Abbey and Westminster Cathedral.

Historically part of the parish of St Margaret in the City and Liberty of Westminster and the county of Middlesex, the name Westminster was the ancient description for the area around Westminster Abbey – the West Minster, or monastery church, that gave the area its name – which has been the seat of the government of England (and later the British government) for almost a thousand years.

Westminster is the location of the Palace of Westminster, a UNESCO World Heritage Site which houses the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

The area has been the seat of the government of England for almost a thousand years. Westminster is thus often used as a metonym for Parliament and the political community of the United Kingdom generally. The civil service is similarly referred to by the area it inhabits, Whitehall, and Westminster is consequently also used in reference to the ’Westminster System’, the parliamentary model of democratic government that has evolved in the United Kingdom.

The historic core of Westminster is the former Thorney Island on which Westminster Abbey was built. The Abbey became the traditional venue of the coronation of the kings and queens of England. The nearby Palace of Westminster came to be the principal royal residence after the Norman conquest of England in 1066, and later housed the developing Parliament and law courts of England. It can be said that London thus has developed two distinct focal points: an economic one in the City of London; and a political and cultural one in Westminster, where the Royal Court had its home. This division is still very apparent today.

The monarchy later moved to the Palace of Whitehall a little towards the north-east. The law courts have since moved to the Royal Courts of Justice, close to the border of the City of London.

The Westminster area formed part of the City and Liberty of Westminster and the county of Middlesex. The ancient parish was St Margaret; after 1727 split into the parishes of St Margaret and St John. The area around Westminster Abbey formed the extra-parochial Close of the Collegiate Church of St Peter surrounded by—but not part of—either parish. Until 1900 the local authority was the combined vestry of St Margaret and St John (also known as the Westminster District Board of Works from 1855 to 1887), which was based at Westminster City Hall on Caxton Street from 1883. The Liberty of Westminster, governed by the Westminster Court of Burgesses, also included St Martin in the Fields and several other parishes and places. Westminster had its own quarter sessions, but the Middlesex sessions also had jurisdiction. The area was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London in 1889 and the local government of Westminster was reformed in 1900 when the court of burgesses and parish vestries were abolished, to be replaced with a metropolitan borough council. The council was given city status, allowing it to be known as Westminster City Council.

The underground station was opened as Westminster Bridge on 24 December 1868 by the steam-operated Metropolitan District Railway (MDR) (now the District line) when the railway opened the first section of its line from South Kensington. It was originally the eastern terminus of the MDR and the station cutting ended at a concrete wall buffered by timber sleepers. The approach to the station from the west runs in cut and cover tunnel under the roadway of Broad Sanctuary and diagonally under Parliament Square. In Broad Sanctuary the tunnel is close to Westminster Abbey and St Margaret’s church and care was required to avoid undermining their foundations when excavating in the poor ground found there.

The station was completely rebuilt to incorporate new deep-level platforms for the Jubilee line when it was extended to the London Docklands in the 1990s. During the works, the level of the sub-surface platforms was lowered to enable ground level access to Portcullis House. This was achieved in small increments carried out when the line was closed at night.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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William Shakespeare
TUM image id: 1509551019
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Broadway SW1
TUM image id: 1530117235
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In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Overflow of the Thames at Lambeth Stairs on Tuesday 29 January 1850. Lambeth Stairs was near to Lambeth Palace. Poor river wall maintenance meant that the area was flooded whenever there was an unusually high tide.
Credit: Illustrated London News
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The Sea Life London Aquarium is located on the ground floor of County Hall on the South Bank of the River Thames, near the London Eye. It opened in March 1997 as the London Aquarium and hosts about one million visitors each year.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Westminster Abbey with a procession of Knights of the Bath (1749)
Credit: Canaletto
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Parliament Square (1980) Parliament Square features a large open green area in the centre with trees to its west, and it contains twelve political statues of statesmen and other notable individuals.
Credit: Wiki Commons/Misterweiss
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Richmond Terrace, built in 1822 on the site of Richmond House, destroyed by fire in 1791. The Government building completed in 1987 known as 79 Whitehall is immediately behind Richmond Terrace, with an entrance from Whitehall, formerly the entrance to Richmond House Mews.
Credit: Wiki Commons/Stephen Richards
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Westminster Bridge and the Palace of Westminster (2016). The current bridge was designed by Thomas Page and opened on 24 May 1862. With a length of 820 feet and a width of 85 feet, it is a seven-arch, cast-iron bridge with Gothic detailing by Charles Barry - the architect of the Palace of Westminster.
Credit: Wiki Commons/Martin Dunst
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Lower Fore Street, a narrow cobblestoned street in Lambeth, pictured in 1865. Fore Street is shown on John Roque’s map of 1746. It ran alongside the river between Vauxhall Gardens and Lambeth Palace.
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Recruiting Sergeants (1877) "The most prominent figure in the accompanying photograph, standing with his back to the Abbey, and nearest to the kerb stone, is that of Sergeant Ison, who is always looked upon with more than ordinary curiosity as the representative of the 6th Dragoon Guards, or Carbineers - a regiment which of late has been chiefly distinguished for having included in its ranks no less a person than Sir Roger Tichborne himself! To the right we have the representatives of two heavy regiments, Sergeant Titswell, of the 5th Dragoon Guards, and Sergeant Badcock, of the 2nd Dragoons, or Scots Greys; the latter is leaning against the corner of the public-house. Close to him may be recognized the features of Sergeant Bilton, of the Royal Engineers, while Sergeant Minett, of the 14th Hussars, turns his head towards Sergeant McGilney, of the 6th Dragoons, or Enniskillen, whose stalwart frame occupies the foreground. This group would not, however, have been complete without giving a glimpse at Mr. Cox, the policeman, to whose discretion and pacific interference may be attributed the order which is generally preserved even under the most trying circumstances at the Mitre and Dove." From ’Street Life in London’ by John Thomson and Adolphe Smith
Credit: John Thomson and Adolphe Smith
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Church Street (1866)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Upper Fore Street, Lambeth (1860s)
Credit: William Strudwick (1834-1910)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


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