Bridge Walk, EC4V

Road in/near River Thames

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(51.50953 -0.09854, 51.509 -0.098) 
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Road · River Thames · EC4V ·
October
8
2017

Bridge Walk is a road in the SE8 postcode area





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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


The Underground Map   
Added: 20 Sep 2020 13:01 GMT   

Pepys starts diary
On 1 January 1659, Samuel Pepys started his famous daily diary and maintained it for ten years. The diary has become perhaps the most extensive source of information on this critical period of English history. Pepys never considered that his diary would be read by others. The original diary consisted of six volumes written in Shelton shorthand, which he had learned as an undergraduate on scholarship at Magdalene College, Cambridge. This shorthand was introduced in 1626, and was the same system Isaac Newton used when writing.

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Bruce McTavish   
Added: 11 Mar 2021 11:37 GMT   

Kennington Road
Lambeth North station was opened as Kennington Road and then Westminster Bridge Road before settling on its final name. It has a wonderful Leslie Green design.

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MCNALLY    
Added: 17 May 2021 09:42 GMT   

Blackfriars (1959 - 1965)
I lived in Upper Ground from 1959 to 1964 I was 6 years old my parents Vince and Kitty run the Pub The Angel on the corner of Upper Ground and Bodies Bridge. I remember the ceiling of the cellar was very low and almost stretched the length of Bodies Bridge. The underground trains run directly underneath the pub. If you were down in the cellar when a train was coming it was quite frightening

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Johnshort   
Added: 7 Oct 2017 21:07 GMT   

Hurley Road, SE11
There were stables in the road mid way - also Danny reading had a coal delivery lorry.

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Robert smitherman   
Added: 23 Aug 2017 11:01 GMT   

Saunders Street, SE11
I was born in a prefab on Saunders street SE11 in the 60’s, when I lived there, the road consisted of a few prefab houses, the road originally ran from Lollard street all the way thru to Fitzalan street. I went back there to have a look back in the early 90’s but all that is left of the road is about 20m of road and the road sign.

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Tom   
Added: 21 May 2021 23:07 GMT   

Blackfriars
What is, or was, Bodies Bridge?

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Comment
   
Added: 21 Apr 2021 16:21 GMT   

Liverpool Street
the Bishopsgate station has existed since 1840 as a passenger station, but does not appear in the site’s cartography. Evidently, the 1860 map is in fact much earlier than that date.

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Comment
   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 14:31 GMT   

correction
Chaucer did not write Pilgrims Progress. His stories were called the Canterbury Tales

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Born here
sam   
Added: 31 Dec 2021 00:54 GMT   

Burdett Street, SE1
I was on 2nd July 1952, in Burdett chambers (which is also known as Burdett buildings)on Burdett street

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Added: 3 Jun 2021 15:50 GMT   

All Bar One
The capitalisation is wrong

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

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danny currie   
Added: 30 Nov 2022 18:39 GMT   

dads yard
ron currie had a car breaking yard in millers yard back in the 60s good old days

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Lynette beardwood   
Added: 29 Nov 2022 20:53 GMT   

Spy’s Club
Topham’s Hotel at 24-28 Ebury Street was called the Ebury Court Hotel. Its first proprietor was a Mrs Topham. In WW2 it was a favourite watering hole for the various intelligence organisations based in the Pimlico area. The first woman infiltrated into France in 1942, FANY Yvonne Rudellat, was recruited by the Special Operations Executive while working there. She died in Bergen Belsen in April 1945.

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Born here
   
Added: 16 Nov 2022 12:39 GMT   

The Pearce family lived in Gardnor Road
The Pearce family moved into Gardnor Road around 1900 after living in Fairfax walk, my Great grandfather, wife and there children are recorded living in number 4 Gardnor road in the 1911 census, yet I have been told my grand father was born in number 4 in 1902, generations of the Pearce continue living in number 4 as well other houses in the road up until the 1980’s

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Born here
   
Added: 16 Nov 2022 12:38 GMT   

The Pearce family lived in Gardnor Road
The Pearce family moved into Gardnor Road around 1900 after living in Fairfax walk, my Great grandfather, wife and there children are recorded living in number 4 Gardnor road in the 1911 census, yet I have been told my grand father was born in number 4 in 1902, generations of the Pearce continue living in number 4 as well other houses in the road up until the 1980’s

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Lived here
Phil Stubbington   
Added: 14 Nov 2022 16:28 GMT   

Numbers 60 to 70 (1901 - 1939)
A builder, Robert Maeers (1842-1919), applied to build six houses on plots 134 to 139 on the Lincoln House Estate on 5 October 1901. He received approval on 8 October 1901. These would become numbers 60 to 70 Rodenhurst Road (60 is plot 139). Robert Maeers was born in Northleigh, Devon. In 1901 he was living in 118 Elms Road with his wife Georgina, nee Bagwell. They had four children, Allan, Edwin, Alice, and Harriet, born between 1863 and 1873.
Alice Maeers was married to John Rawlins. Harriet Maeers was married to William Street.
Three of the six houses first appear on the electoral register in 1904:
Daniel Mescal “Ferncroft”
William Francis Street “Hillsboro”
Henry Elkin “Montrose”

By the 1905 electoral register all six are occupied:

Daniel Mescal “St Senans”
Henry Robert Honeywood “Grasmere”
John Rawlins “Iveydene”
William Francis Street “Hillsboro”
Walter Ernest Manning “St Hilda”
Henry Elkin “Montrose”

By 1906 house numbers replace names:

Daniel Mescal 70
Henry Robert Honeywood 68
John Rawlins 66
William Francis Street 64
Walter Ernest Manning 62
Henry Elkin 60

It’s not clear whether number 70 changed from “Ferncroft” to “St Senans” or possibly Daniel Mescal moved houses.

In any event, it can be seen that Robert Maeers’ two daughters are living in numbers 64 and 66, with, according to local information, an interconnecting door. In the 1911 census William Street is shown as a banker’s clerk. John Rawlins is a chartering clerk in shipping. Robert Maeers and his wife are also living at this address, Robert being shown as a retired builder.

By 1939 all the houses are in different ownership except number 60, where the Elkins are still in residence.


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stephen garraway   
Added: 13 Nov 2022 13:56 GMT   

Martin Street, Latimer Road
I was born at St Charlottes and lived at 14, Martin Street, Latimer Road W10 until I was 4 years old when we moved to the east end. It was my Nan Grant’s House and she was the widow of George Frederick Grant. She had two sons, George and Frederick, and one daughter, my mother Margaret Patricia.
The downstairs flat where we lived had two floors, the basement and the ground floor. The upper two floors were rented to a Scot and his family, the Smiths. He had red hair. The lights and cooker were gas and there was one cold tap over a Belfast sink. A tin bath hung on the wall. The toilet was outside in the yard. This was concreted over and faced the the rear of the opposite terraces. All the yards were segregated by high brick walls. The basement had the a "best" room with a large , dark fireplace with two painted metal Alsation ornaments and it was very dark, cold and little used.
The street lights were gas and a man came round twice daily to turn them on and off using a large pole with a hook and a lighted torch on the end. I remember men coming round the streets with carts selling hot chestnuts and muffins and also the hurdy gurdy man with his instrument and a monkey in a red jacket. I also remember the first time I saw a black man and my mother pulling me away from him. He had a Trilby and pale Mackintosh so he must of been one of the first of the Windrush people. I seem to recall he had a thin moustache.
Uncle George had a small delivery lorry but mum lost touch with him and his family. Uncle Fred went to Peabody Buildings near ST.Pauls.
My Nan was moved to a maisonette in White City around 1966, and couldn’t cope with electric lights, cookers and heating and she lost all of her neighbourhood friends. Within six months she had extreme dementia and died in a horrible ward in Tooting Bec hospital a year or so later. An awful way to end her life, being moved out of her lifelong neighbourhood even though it was slums.

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Comment
   
Added: 31 Oct 2022 18:47 GMT   

Memories
I lived at 7 Conder Street in a prefab from roughly 1965 to 1971 approx - happy memories- sad to see it is no more ?

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Eve Glover   
Added: 22 Oct 2022 09:28 GMT   

Shenley Road
Shenley Road is the main street in Borehamwood where the Job Centre and Blue Arrow were located

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
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City Thameslink City Thameslink is a central London railway station within the City of London, with entrances on Ludgate Hill and Holborn Viaduct.
Holy Trinity the Less Holy Trinity the Less was a parish church, destroyed in the Great Fire of London.
Mermaid Tavern The Mermaid Tavern was a notable tavern during the Elizabethan era.
St Augustine Watling Street St Augustine, Watling Street was an Anglican church which stood just to the east of St Paul’s Cathedral.
St Gregory by St Paul’s St Gregory’s by St Paul’s was a parish church in the Castle Baynard ward of the City of London.
St James Garlickhythe James Garlickhythe is a Church of England parish church in Vintry ward of the City of London, nicknamed "˜Wren’s lantern" owing to its profusion of windows.
St Mary Magdalen Old Fish Street Mary Magdalen Old Fish Street was a church in Castle Baynard ward of the City of London, located on the corner of Old Fish Street and Old Change, on land now covered by post-War development.
St Mary Mounthaw St Mary Mounthaw or Mounthaut was a parish church in Old Fish Street Hill.
St Mary Somerset St. Mary Somerset was a church in the City of London first recorded in the twelfth century. Destroyed in the Great Fire, it was one of the 51 churches rebuilt by the office of Sir Christopher Wren.
St Mary-le-Bow St Mary-le-Bow is an historic church rebuilt after the Great Fire of 1666 by Sir Christopher Wren. According to tradition a true Cockney must be born within earshot of the sound of Bow Bells.
St Matthew Friday Street St. Matthew Friday Street was a church in the City of London located on Friday Street, off Cheapside.
St Michael Queenhithe St. Michael Queenhithe was a church in the City of London located in what is now Upper Thames Street.
St Mildred, Bread Street The church of St Mildred, Bread Street, stood on the east side of Bread Street in the Bread Street Ward of the City of London.
St Nicholas Cole Abbey St. Nicholas Cole Abbey is a church in the City of London located on what is now Queen Victoria Street.
St Peter, Paul’s Wharf St Peter, Paul’s Wharf, was a parish church in the City of London.
St Peter, Westcheap St Peter, Westcheap, sometimes known simply as ’St Peter Cheap’, was a parish church in the City of London.
St. Mary Magdalen, Milk Street St. Mary Magdalen, Milk Street, was a parish church in the City of London, England. It was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666 and not rebuilt.

NEARBY STREETS
Addle Hill, EC4V Addle Hill, formerly Addle Street, originally ran from Upper Thames Street from Carter Lane.
Amen Corner, EC4M Originally called Amen Lane, this short path forms the approach road to Amen Court.
Anchor Terrace, SE1 Anchor Terrace is a large symmetrical building on the east side of Southwark Bridge Road, situated very close to the River Thames.
Ave Maria Lane, EC4M Ave Maria Lane is the southern extension of Warwick Lane, between Amen Corner and Ludgate Hill.
Bankside Lofts, SE1 Bankside Lofts is a block in Southwark.
Bankside, SE1 Bankside is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Basing Lane, EC4M Basing Lane ran west from Bow Lane to Bread Street.
Bear Gardens, SE1 Bear Gardens is the site of a medieval pleasure ground.
Bear Lane, SE1 Bear Lane is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Benbow House, SE1 Benbow House is a block on New Globe Walk
Black Friars Lane, EC4V Black Friars Lane was known as Water Lane until 1940.
Blackfriars Lane, EC4V Blackfriars Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Blackfriars Underpass, EC4V Blackfriars Underpass is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Bow Churchyard, EC2V Bow Churchyard is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
Bow Lane, EC4M Bow Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
Bread Street, EC4M Bread Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
Broken Wharf, EC4V Broken Wharf is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Burgon Street, EC4V Burgon Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Cannon Street, EC4M This is a street in the EC4M postcode area
Canvey Street, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Cardinal Cap Alley, SE1 Cardinal Cap Alley is an alley in Bankside.
Carter Lane, EC4M Carter Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
Carter Lane, EC4V Carter Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Chancel Street, SE1 Chancel Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Cheapside, EC2V Cheapside is a street in the City of London, the historic and modern financial centre of London.
Church Entry, EC4V Church Entry is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Creed Court, EC4M Creed Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
Creed Lane, EC4V Creed Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Deans Court, EC4V Deans Court is directly opposite the south west corner of St Paul’s Cathedral, on the south side of St Paul’s Churchyard.
Distaff Lane, EC4V Distaff Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Emerson Street, SE1 Emerson Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Europoint House, SW8 Europoint House is a location in London.
Falcon Point Piazza, SE1 Falcon Point Piazza is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Friday Street, EC4V Friday Street is a small street in the City of London.
Garlick Hill, EC4N Garlick Hill is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Gatehouse Square, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Godliman Street, EC4M Godliman Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Great Guildford Business Square, SE1 Great Guildford Business Square is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Groveland Court, EC4M Groveland Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
Heath Lodge, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
High Timber Street, EC4V High Timber Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Holland Street, SE1 Today’s Holland Street was originally part of a street called Gravel Lane.
Hopton Street, SE1 Hopton Street was known as Green Walk until the late nineteenth century.
Ireland Yard, EC4V Ireland Yard is an alleyway leading off of Playhouse Yard.
Knightrider Court, EC4V Knightrider Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Knightrider Street, EC4V Knightrider Street was supposedly a route that knights would take from the Tower of London to Smithfield, where jousts were held.
Lambeth Hill, EC4V Lambeth Hill is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Lavington Street, SE1 Lavington Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Little Trinity Lane, EC4V Little Trinity Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Lockesley Square, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Ludgate Broadway, EC4M Ludgate Broadway is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Ludgate Hill, EC4M Ludgate Hill is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
Ludgate Square, EC4M Ludgate Square is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
Maiden Lane, SE1 Maiden Lane is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Marlborough Gardens, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Millennium Bridge, EC4V Millennium Bridge is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
New Change, EC4M New Change is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
New Globe Walk, SE1 New Globe Walk is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
O’Meara Street, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Old Change Court, EC4V Old Change Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
Pageantmaster Court, EC4M Pageantmaster Court was Ludgate Court and renamed in the summer of 1993.
Park Street, SE1 Park Street runs one block south of Bankside.
Paternoster Row, EC4M Paternoster Row is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
Paternoster Square, EC4M Paternoster Square is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
Paul’s Walk, EC4V Paul’s Walk is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Perkins Square, SE1 Perkins Square is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Peter’s Hill, EC4V Peter’s Hill is the northern access to the Millennium Bridge.
Pilgrim Street, EC4V Pilgrim Street connects New Bridge Street with Ludgate Hill.
Playhouse Yard, EC4V Playhouse Yard is named after the Blackfriars theatre which stood here in Shakespeare’s time and where his play’s were performed.
Porter Street, SE1 Porter Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Price’s Street, SE1 Price’s Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Priory Court, EC4M Priory Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Puddle Dock, EC4V Puddle Dock is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Quadrant Court, EC4M A street within the EC4M postcode
Quadrant Court, EC4M A street within the EC4M postcode
Queen Victoria Street, EC4V Queen Victoria Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4N postal area.
Queen Victoria Street, EC4V Queen Victoria Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Queenhithe, EC4V Queenhithe is a small and ancient ward of the City of London, situated by the River Thames and a minor street.
Rose Alley, SE1 Rose Alley is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Rose Street, EC4M Rose Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
Southwalk Street, SE1 Southwalk Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Southwark Bridge, EC4V Southwark Bridge is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Southwark Bridge, SE1 This is a street in the EC4R postcode area
Southwark Street, SE1 Southwark Street is a major street just south of the River Thames. It runs between Blackfriars Road to the west and Borough High Street to the east.
St Andrews Hill, EC4V St Andrews Hill is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
St Paul’s Churchyard, EC4M By the beginning of the sixteenth century, St. Paul’s Churchyard was the chief centre of the book trade, not only for London, but for the whole country.
Stationers Hall Court, EC4M Stationers Hall Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
Stew Lane, EC4V Stew Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Sumner Street, SE1 Sumner Street runs from Great Guildford Street to Southwark Bridge Road.
The Blue Fin Building, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
The Terrace, SE1 The Terrace is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Thrale Street, SE1 Thrale Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Three Barrels Walk, EC4V Three Barrels Walk is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Trig Lane, EC4V A street within the EC4V postcode
Upper Cheapside Passage, EC2V A street within the EC2V postcode
Upper Thames Street, EC4V Upper Thames Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Wardrobe Place, EC4V Wardrobe Place is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Watling Street, EC4M Watling Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
White Lion Hill, EC4V White Lion Hill is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Zoar Street, SE1 Zoar Street is named after the former Zoar Chapel here, named for the Biblical Zoara.

NEARBY PUBS
Mermaid Tavern The Mermaid Tavern was a notable tavern during the Elizabethan era.


Click here to explore another London street
We now have 524 completed street histories and 46976 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS


River Thames

London’s river




LOCAL PHOTOS
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Postal area SE1
TUM image id: 1483541461
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Smithfield Market
TUM image id: 1620388545
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Hopton Street, Borough, 1977.
TUM image id: 1557142131
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
"Cheapside and Bow Church" engraved by W. Albutt (1837) First published in The History of London: Illustrated by Views in London and Westminster. Steel engraved print after a picture by T.H. Shepherd.
Credit: W. Albutt
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Walbrook Wharf is an operating freight wharf located in the City of London adjacent to Cannon Street station.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Hopton’s Almshouses, Hopton Street, Bankside (1957)
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Tate Modern viewed from Thames pleasure boat (2003)
Credit: Christine Matthews
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Southwark Street estate was opened in 1876. Originally there were 12 blocks, with 22 flats in each one. In the 1960s two blocks in the centre of the estate were demolished as part of a modernisation programme, which created a space for the construction of a children’s play area. In the 1990s a block near the estate boundary was pulled down, and some adjoining land was purchased. This enabled the building of new blocks with a frontage to Great Guildford Street, which include some shop units.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Illustration of Fleet Market
Credit: William Henry Prior
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Anchor, Bankside
Credit: IG/meolafrancesco
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Ring, Blackfriars Road, SE1 (1925) Although established as a boxing venue in 1910, the building dated from 1783 as the Surrey Congregational Chapel by the Reverend Rowland Hill - who reportedly opted for the unusual, circular design so that there would be no corners in which the devil could hide. The person responsible for overseeing the chapel’s conversion was Dick Burge, a former English middleweight champion from Cheltenham. The former place of worship was then a warehouse. Dick and his wife Bella Burge enlisted the help of local homeless people to clean out the building and transform it into a state fit for presenting boxing to the public. The Ring opened on 14 May 1910, with the Blackfriars arena soon staging events four to five times a week, and the name from the circular shape of the building. The term "boxing ring" is not derived from the name of the building, contrary to local legend, but - still from the capital - instead from the London Prize Ring Rules in 1743, which specified a small circle in the centre of the fight area where the boxers met at the start of each round. The term ’ringside seat’ dates from the 1860s.
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Amen Court, EC4M
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Anchor Terrace, SE1 A large symmetrical building on Southwark Bridge Road, Anchor Terrace was built in 1834 for senior employees of the nearby Anchor Brewery. The building was converted into luxury flats in the late 1990s.
Credit: Wiki Commons/Jwslubbock
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