Finsbury

Suburb, existing until now

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Suburb · Finsbury · EC1 ·
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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 07:17 GMT   

Smithy in Longacre
John Burris 1802-1848 Listed 1841 census as Burroughs was a blacksmith, address just given as Longacre.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

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Jeff Owen   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 16:18 GMT   

Owen’s School
Owen Street is the site of Owen’s Boys’ School. The last school was built in 1881 and was demolished in the early 1990s to make way for the development which stand there today. It was a “Direct Grant” grammar school and was founded in 1613 by Dame Alice Owen. What is now “Owen’s Fields” was the playground between the old school and the new girls’ school (known then as “Dames Alice Owen’s School” or simply “DAOS”). The boys’ school had the top two floors of that building for their science labs. The school moved to Potters Bar in Hertfordshire in 1971 and is now one of the top State comprehensive schools in the country. The old building remained in use as an accountancy college and taxi-drivers’ “knowledge” school until it was demolished. The new building is now part of City and Islington College. Owen’s was a fine school. I should know because I attended there from 1961 to 1968.

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Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 19:47 GMT   

Millions Of Rats In Busy London
The Daily Mail on 14 April 1903 reported "MILLIONS OF RATS IN BUSY LONDON"

A rat plague, unprecedented in the annals of London, has broken out on the north side of the Strand. The streets principally infested are Catherine street, Drury lane, Blackmore street, Clare Market and Russell street. Something akin to a reign of terror prevails among the inhabitants after nightfall. Women refuse to pass along Blackmore street and the lower parts of Stanhope street after dusk, for droves of rats perambulate the roadways and pavements, and may be seen running along the window ledges of the empty houses awaiting demolition by the County Council in the Strand to Holborn improvement scheme.

The rats, indeed, have appeared in almost-incredible numbers. "There are millions of them," said one shopkeeper, and his statement was supported by other residents. The unwelcome visitors have been evicted from their old haunts by the County Council housebreakers, and are now busily in search of new homes. The Gaiety Restaurant has been the greatest sufferer. Rats have invaded the premises in such force that the managers have had to close the large dining room on the first floor and the grill rooms on the ground floor and in the basement. Those three spacious halls which have witnessed many as semblages of theatre-goers are now qui:e deserted. Behind the wainscot of the bandstand in the grillroom is a large mound of linen shreds. This represents 1728 serviettes carried theee by the rats.

In the bar the removal of a panel disclosed the astonishing fact that the rats have dragged for a distance of seven or eight yards some thirty or forty beer and wine bottles and stacked them in such a fashion as to make comfortable sleeping places. Mr Williams. the manager of the restaurant, estimates that the rats have destroyed L200 worth of linen. Formerly the Gaiety Restaurant dined 2000 persons daily; no business whatever is now done in this direction.

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Carol   
Added: 7 May 2021 18:44 GMT   

Nan
My nan lily,her sister Elizabeth and their parents Elizabeth and William lived here in1911

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Born here
Bernard Miller   
Added: 12 Apr 2022 17:36 GMT   

My mother and her sister were born at 9 Windsor Terrace
My mother, Millie Haring (later Miller) and her sister Yetta Haring (later Freedman) were born here in 1922 and 1923. With their parents and older brother and sister, they lived in two rooms until they moved to Stoke Newington in 1929. She always said there were six rooms, six families, a shared sink on the first floor landing and a toilet in the backyard.

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Barry J. Page   
Added: 27 Jul 2022 19:41 GMT   

Highbury Corner V1 Explosion
Grandma described the V1 explosion at Highbury Corner on many occasions. She was working in the scullery when the flying bomb landed. The blast shattered all the windows in the block of flats and blew off the bolt on her front door. As she looked out the front room window, people in various states of injury and shock were making their way along Highbury Station Road. One man in particular, who was bleeding profusely from glass shard wounds to his neck, insisted in getting home to see if his family was all right. Others were less fortunate. Len, the local newsagent, comforted a man, who had lost both legs caused by the blast, until the victim succumbed to his injuries. The entire area was ravaged and following are statistics. The flying bomb landed during lunch hour (12:46 p.m.) on June 27th 1944. 26 people lost their lives, 84 were seriously injured and 71 slightly injured.

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MCNALLY    
Added: 17 May 2021 09:42 GMT   

Blackfriars (1959 - 1965)
I lived in Upper Ground from 1959 to 1964 I was 6 years old my parents Vince and Kitty run the Pub The Angel on the corner of Upper Ground and Bodies Bridge. I remember the ceiling of the cellar was very low and almost stretched the length of Bodies Bridge. The underground trains run directly underneath the pub. If you were down in the cellar when a train was coming it was quite frightening

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Tom   
Added: 21 May 2021 23:07 GMT   

Blackfriars
What is, or was, Bodies Bridge?

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Lena    
Added: 18 Mar 2021 13:08 GMT   

White Conduit Street, N1
My mum, Rosina Wade of the Wade and Hannam family in the area of Chapel Street and Parkfield Street, bought her first “costume” at S Cohen’s in White Conduit Street. Would have probably been about 1936 or thereabouts. She said that he was a small man but an expert tailor. I hope that Islington Council preserve the shop front as it’s a piece of history of the area. Mum used to get her high heel shoes from an Italian shoe shop in Chapel Street. She had size 2 feet and they would let her know when a new consignment of size 2 shoes were in. I think she was a very good customer. She worked at Killingbacks artificial flower maker in Northampton Square and later at the Halifax bombers factory north of Edgware where she was a riveter.

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Jack Wilson   
Added: 21 Jun 2022 21:40 GMT   

Penfold Printers
I am seeking the location of Penfold Printers Offices in Dt Albans place - probably about 1870 or so

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Erin   
Added: 2 May 2022 01:33 GMT   

Windsor Terrace, N1
hello

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT


Scott Hatton   
Added: 30 Jan 2023 11:28 GMT   

The Beatles on a London rooftop
The Beatles’ rooftop concert took place on the rooftop of the Apple Corps building in London. It was their final public performance as a band and was unannounced, attracting a crowd of onlookers. The concert lasted for 42 minutes and included nine songs. The concert is remembered as a seminal moment in the history of rock music and remains one of the most famous rock performances of all time.

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Michael Upham   
Added: 16 Jan 2023 21:16 GMT   

Bala Place, SE16
My grandfather was born at 2 Bala Place.

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Added: 15 Jan 2023 09:49 GMT   

The Bombing of Nant Street WW2
My uncle with his young son and baby daughter were killed in the bombing of Nant Street in WW2. His wife had gone to be with her mother whilst the bombing of the area was taking place, and so survived. Cannot imagine how she felt when she returned to see her home flattened and to be told of the death of her husband and children.


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Lived here
Brian J MacIntyre   
Added: 8 Jan 2023 17:27 GMT   

Malcolm Davey at Raleigh House, Dolphin Square
My former partner, actor Malcolm Davey, lived at Raleigh House, Dolphin Square, for many years until his death. He was a wonderful human being and an even better friend. A somewhat underrated actor, but loved by many, including myself. I miss you terribly, Malcolm. Here’s to you and to History, our favourite subject.
Love Always - Brian J MacIntyre
Minnesota, USA

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Lived here
Robert Burns   
Added: 5 Jan 2023 17:46 GMT   

1 Abourne Street
My mother, and my Aunt and my Aunt’s family lived at number 1 Abourne Street.
I remember visitingn my aunt Win Housego, and the Housego family there. If I remember correctly virtually opposite number 1, onthe corner was the Lord Amberley pub.

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Comment
   
Added: 30 Dec 2022 21:41 GMT   

Southam Street, W10
do any one remember J&A DEMOLITON at harrow rd kensal green my dad work for them in a aec 6 wheel tipper got a photo of him in it

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Fumblina   
Added: 26 Dec 2022 18:59 GMT   

Detailed history of Red Lion
I’m not the author but this blog by Dick Weindling and Marianne Colloms has loads of really clear information about the history of the Red Lion which people might appreciate.


Source: ‘Professor Morris’ and the Red Lion, Kilburn

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BG   
Added: 20 Dec 2022 02:58 GMT   

Lancing Street, NW1
LANCING STREET

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Spa Green Estate, EC1R The Spa Green Estate is a post-war realisation of a 1930s plan for social regeneration through Modernist architecture.

THE STREETS OF FINSBURY
Abacus House, EC1R Abacus House can be found on Gloucester Way.
Acton Street, WC1X Acton Street is found on the east side of Gray’s Inn Road and connects it with King’s Cross Road.
Ampton Place, WC1X Ampton Place was previously called Frederick Place.
Ampton Street, WC1X Ampton Street was named after its builder, the 3rd Lord Calthorpe who owned land at Ampton, Suffolk.
Amwell Street, EC1R Amwell Street is called after the nearby New River, which starts at Amwell, Hertfordshire.
Arlington Way, EC1R Arlington Way was called Arlington Street before 1936.
Ashby Street, EC1V Ashby Street was named after local landowners who had a seat at Castle Ashby, Northamptonshire.
Attneave Street, EC1R Attneave Street is thought to be named after a local builder in the 1890s called Attneave.
Berry Place, EC1V Berry Place is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Brownlow Mews, WC1N Brownlow Mews is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Calthorpe Street, WC1X Calthorpe Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Charles Rowan House, EC1R Charles Rowan House is a building on Amwell Street.
Charles Rowan House, WC1X Charles Rowan House can be found on Margery Street.
Charles Townsend House, EC1R Charles Townsend House is a block on Finsbury Estate.
College Building, EC1R College Building is a block on Northampton Square.
Corporation Row, EC1R Corporation Row is a road in the EC1R postcode area
Cubitt Street, WC1X Cubitt Street was formerly called Arthur Street.
Easton Street, WC1X Easton Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Exmouth House, EC1R Exmouth House is a block on Pine Street.
Exmouth Market, EC1R Exmouth Market, formerly Exmouth Street, is semi-pedestrianised - the location of an outdoor street market.
Fernsbury Street, WC1X Fernsbury Street is a turning off of Margery Street.
Fleet Square, WC1X Fleet Square is a road in the WC1X postcode area
Frances Gardner House, WC1X Frances Gardner House is a block on Cubitt Street.
Frederick Street, WC1X Frederick Street is a road in the WC1X postcode area
Friend Street, EC1V Friend Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Gloucester Way, EC1R Gloucester Way is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Gough Street, WC1X Gough Street is a road in the WC1X postcode area
Granville Square, WC1X Granville Square is a road in the WC1X postcode area
Granville Street, WC1X Granville Street is a road in the WC1X postcode area
Grays Inn Road, WC1X Grays Inn Road is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Great Percy Street, WC1X Great Percy Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Guildhall North Wing, SE1 Guildhall North Wing is a location in London.
Gwynne House, WC1X Gwynne House is a block on Lloyd Baker Street.
Hardwick Street, EC1R Hardwick Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Hermit Street, EC1V Hermit Street links Friend Street with Rawstorne Street.
Inglebert Street, EC1R Inglebert Street is a road in the EC1R postcode area
Joseph Close, EC1R Joseph Close is a road in the N4 postcode area
Joseph Trotter Close, EC1R Joseph Trotter Close is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
King’s Cross Road, WC1X This is a street in the WC1X postcode area
Kingsway Place, EC1R Kingsway Place is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Langton Close, WC1X Langton Close is a road in the WC1X postcode area
Lloyd Baker Street, WC1X Lloyd Baker Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Lloyd Square, WC1X Lloyd Square is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Lloyd Street, WC1X Lloyd Street is a road in the WC1X postcode area
Lloyds Row, EC1R Lloyds Row is a road in the EC1R postcode area
Margery Street, WC1X Margery Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Mecklenburgh Square, WC1N Mecklenburgh Square was originally laid out by S P Cockerell.
Meredith Street, EC1R Meredith Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Merlin Street, EC1R Merlin Street runs west off Amwell Street.
Mount Pleasant, EC1R Mount Pleasant gained its ironic name in the 1730s after locals had begun to dump refuse there.
Mount Plesant, EC1R Mount Plesant is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Myddelton Passage, EC1R Myddelton Passage is an alleyway with an interesting story
Myddelton Square, EC1R Myddelton Square is named after Sir Hugh Myddelton (1560–1631), the founder of the New River Company, who developed the square.
Myddelton Street, EC1R Myddelton Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Naoroji Street, WC1X Naoroji Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Newington Close, EC1R This is a street in the EC1R postcode area
Northampton Road, EC1R Northampton Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Northampton Square, EC1V Northampton Square is a square between Finsbury and Clerkenwell, located between Goswell Road and St John Street.
Owen’s Row, EC1V Owen’s Row is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Paget Street, EC1V Paget Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Pakenham Street, WC1X Pakenham Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Percival Street, EC1V Percival Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Percy Circus, WC1X Percy Circus was once referred to as "one of the most delightful bits of town planning in London".
Phoenix Place, EC3N Phoenix Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Phoenix Place, WC1X Phoenix Place is a location in London.
PO Box 4, EC3N Phoenix Place is a road in the EC3N postcode area
PO Box 4, WC1X The Kings Cross Baptist Church is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Prideaux Place, WC1X Prideaux Place is a road in the WC1X postcode area
Rawstorne Place, EC1V Rawstorne Place is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Rawstorne Street, EC1V Rawstorne Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
River Street, EC1R River Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Rosebery Avenue, EC1R Rosebery Avenue was opened by the 5th Earl of Rosebery.
Rosebery House, EC1R Residential block
Rosebery Square, EC1R Rosebery Square is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Rosoman Place, EC1R Rosoman Place is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Rosoman Street, EC1R Rosoman Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Sans Works, EC1R Sans Works is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Sebastian Street, EC1V Sebastian Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Sidmouth Street, WC1X Sidmouth Street is a road in the WC1X postcode area
Skinner Street, EC1R Skinner Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Spafield Street, EC1R Spafield Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Spencer Street, EC1V Spencer Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
St Helena Street, WC1X St Helena Street connects Naoroji Street and Fernsbury Street.
St John Street, EC1V The northern section of St John Street was confusingly, before the 20th century, named Saint John Street Road.
Swinton Street, WC1X Swinton Street was named after the two Swinton brothers.
Tompion Street, EC1V Tompion Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Tysoe Street, EC1R Tysoe Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Vernon Rise, WC1X Vernon Rise is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Vernon Square, WC1X Vernon Square is a road in the WC1X postcode area
Wells Square, WC1X Wells Square is a road in the WC1X postcode area
Wharton Street, WC1X Wharton Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Wilmington Square, WC1X Wilmington Square is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Wren Street, WC1X Wren Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1Xpostal area.
Wyclif Street, EC1V Wyclif Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Wynyatt Street, EC1V Wynyatt Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Yardley Street, WC1X Yardley Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.

THE PUBS OF FINSBURY


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We now have 549 completed street histories and 46951 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS




LOCAL PHOTOS
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Smithfield Market
TUM image id: 1620388545
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The Angel, Islington (c.1890)
TUM image id: 1557162442
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
The third Grand Theatre, Islington (1903). This was built on the site of the former Philharmonic Hall and two previous Grand Theatres
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Islington Horse and Cattle market at the turn of the twentieth century.
Licence:


A line of children hold hands as they walk along the middle of White Conduit Street towards the junction with Chapel Market in Islington.
Credit: John Gay/Historic England
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Grand Theatre, Islington High Street (1903)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Angel, Islington (c.1890)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Saint John’s Gate, Clerkenwell, the main gateway to the Priory of Saint John of Jerusalem. The church was founded in the 12th century by Jordan de Briset, a Norman knight. Prior Docwra completed the gatehouse shown in this photograph in 1504. The gateway served as the main entry to the Priory, which was the center of the Order of St John of Jerusalem (the Knights Hospitallers).
Credit: Henry Dixon (1880)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Sadler House on the Spa Green Estate from Rosebery Avenue (2011) The ’organic’ connection between old and new buildings intended by architect Berthold Lubetkin at Spa Green.
Credit: Wiki Commons/Grantham9
Licence: CC BY 2.0


White Conduit House, and the conduit head from which it was named, 1827
Credit: Robert Chambers (1832)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Mount Pleasant Sorting Office on the north-east corner of Farringdon Road (1910). The present building is on the site of the Coldbath Fields Prison where the punishments were particularly cruel in that they were not only long and physically hard but also pointless. The pub at the back used to open at 9am to serve postal workers.
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Chapel Market from the east (1898). Chapel Market is a daily street market, located on a street of the same name near Angel. It sells fruit, vegetables and fish, as well as bargain household goods and cheap clothes. It is open every day except Monday, operating in the mornings only on Thursday and Sunday. Many of the patrons are local, and food and wares for sale are primarily for daily use.
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