Parchment House, EC1V

Block in/near Clerkenwell .

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(51.52385 -0.0997005, 51.523 -0.099) 
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Block · Clerkenwell · EC1V ·
FEBRUARY
23
2001
Parchment House is located on Northburgh Street.





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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

Comment
Sandra Field   
Added: 15 Apr 2023 16:15 GMT   

Removal Order
Removal order from Shoreditch to Holborn, Jane Emma Hall, Single, 21 Pregnant. Born about 21 years since in Masons place in the parish of St Lukes.

Source:
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Comment
Jeff Owen   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 16:18 GMT   

Owen’s School
Owen Street is the site of Owen’s Boys’ School. The last school was built in 1881 and was demolished in the early 1990s to make way for the development which stand there today. It was a “Direct Grant” grammar school and was founded in 1613 by Dame Alice Owen. What is now “Owen’s Fields” was the playground between the old school and the new girls’ school (known then as “Dames Alice Owen’s School” or simply “DAOS”). The boys’ school had the top two floors of that building for their science labs. The school moved to Potters Bar in Hertfordshire in 1971 and is now one of the top State comprehensive schools in the country. The old building remained in use as an accountancy college and taxi-drivers’ “knowledge” school until it was demolished. The new building is now part of City and Islington College. Owen’s was a fine school. I should know because I attended there from 1961 to 1968.

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Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 19:47 GMT   

Millions Of Rats In Busy London
The Daily Mail on 14 April 1903 reported "MILLIONS OF RATS IN BUSY LONDON"

A rat plague, unprecedented in the annals of London, has broken out on the north side of the Strand. The streets principally infested are Catherine street, Drury lane, Blackmore street, Clare Market and Russell street. Something akin to a reign of terror prevails among the inhabitants after nightfall. Women refuse to pass along Blackmore street and the lower parts of Stanhope street after dusk, for droves of rats perambulate the roadways and pavements, and may be seen running along the window ledges of the empty houses awaiting demolition by the County Council in the Strand to Holborn improvement scheme.

The rats, indeed, have appeared in almost-incredible numbers. "There are millions of them," said one shopkeeper, and his statement was supported by other residents. The unwelcome visitors have been evicted from their old haunts by the County Council housebreakers, and are now busily in search of new homes. The Gaiety Restaurant has been the greatest sufferer. Rats have invaded the premises in such force that the managers have had to close the large dining room on the first floor and the grill rooms on the ground floor and in the basement. Those three spacious halls which have witnessed many as semblages of theatre-goers are now qui:e deserted. Behind the wainscot of the bandstand in the grillroom is a large mound of linen shreds. This represents 1728 serviettes carried theee by the rats.

In the bar the removal of a panel disclosed the astonishing fact that the rats have dragged for a distance of seven or eight yards some thirty or forty beer and wine bottles and stacked them in such a fashion as to make comfortable sleeping places. Mr Williams. the manager of the restaurant, estimates that the rats have destroyed L200 worth of linen. Formerly the Gaiety Restaurant dined 2000 persons daily; no business whatever is now done in this direction.

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Born here
Bernard Miller   
Added: 12 Apr 2022 17:36 GMT   

My mother and her sister were born at 9 Windsor Terrace
My mother, Millie Haring (later Miller) and her sister Yetta Haring (later Freedman) were born here in 1922 and 1923. With their parents and older brother and sister, they lived in two rooms until they moved to Stoke Newington in 1929. She always said there were six rooms, six families, a shared sink on the first floor landing and a toilet in the backyard.

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Comment
Steven Shepherd   
Added: 4 Feb 2021 14:20 GMT   

Our House
I and my three brothers were born at 178 Pitfield Street. All of my Mothers Family (ADAMS) Lived in the area. There was an area behind the house where the Hoxton Stall holders would keep the barrows. The house was classed as a slum but was a large house with a basement. The basement had 2 rooms that must have been unchanged for many years it contained a ’copper’ used to boil and clean clothes and bedlinen and a large ’range’ a cast iron coal/log fired oven. Coal was delivered through a ’coal hole’ in the street which dropped through to the basement. The front of the house used to be a shop but unused while we lived there. I have many more happy memories of the house too many to put here.

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Comment
Mike   
Added: 28 Feb 2023 18:09 GMT   

6 Elia Street
When I was young I lived in 6 Elia Street. At the end of the garden there was a garage owned by Initial Laundries which ran from an access in Quick Street all the way up to the back of our garden. The fire exit to the garage was a window leading into our garden. 6 Elia Street was owned by Initial Laundry.

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Comment
MCNALLY    
Added: 17 May 2021 09:42 GMT   

Blackfriars (1959 - 1965)
I lived in Upper Ground from 1959 to 1964 I was 6 years old my parents Vince and Kitty run the Pub The Angel on the corner of Upper Ground and Bodies Bridge. I remember the ceiling of the cellar was very low and almost stretched the length of Bodies Bridge. The underground trains run directly underneath the pub. If you were down in the cellar when a train was coming it was quite frightening

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Reply
Tom   
Added: 21 May 2021 23:07 GMT   

Blackfriars
What is, or was, Bodies Bridge?

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Comment
   
Added: 21 Apr 2021 16:21 GMT   

Liverpool Street
the Bishopsgate station has existed since 1840 as a passenger station, but does not appear in the site’s cartography. Evidently, the 1860 map is in fact much earlier than that date.

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Comment
   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 14:31 GMT   

correction
Chaucer did not write Pilgrims Progress. His stories were called the Canterbury Tales

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Comment
Lena    
Added: 18 Mar 2021 13:08 GMT   

White Conduit Street, N1
My mum, Rosina Wade of the Wade and Hannam family in the area of Chapel Street and Parkfield Street, bought her first “costume” at S Cohen’s in White Conduit Street. Would have probably been about 1936 or thereabouts. She said that he was a small man but an expert tailor. I hope that Islington Council preserve the shop front as it’s a piece of history of the area. Mum used to get her high heel shoes from an Italian shoe shop in Chapel Street. She had size 2 feet and they would let her know when a new consignment of size 2 shoes were in. I think she was a very good customer. She worked at Killingbacks artificial flower maker in Northampton Square and later at the Halifax bombers factory north of Edgware where she was a riveter.

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STEPHEN ARTHUR JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:12 GMT   

Lynedoch Street, E2
my father Arthur Jackson was born in lynedoch street in 1929 and lived with mm grandparents and siblings, until they were relocated to Pamela house Haggerston rd when the street was to be demolished

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Added: 3 Jun 2021 15:50 GMT   

All Bar One
The capitalisation is wrong

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Comment
Jack Wilson   
Added: 21 Jun 2022 21:40 GMT   

Penfold Printers
I am seeking the location of Penfold Printers Offices in Dt Albans place - probably about 1870 or so

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Reply
Erin   
Added: 2 May 2022 01:33 GMT   

Windsor Terrace, N1
hello

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT


Sue   
Added: 24 Sep 2023 19:09 GMT   

Meyrick Rd
My family - Roe - lived in poverty at 158 Meyrick Rd in the 1920s, moving to 18 Lavender Terrace in 1935. They also lived in York Rd at one point. Alf, Nell (Ellen), plus children John, Ellen (Did), Gladys, Joyce & various lodgers. Alf worked for the railway (LMS).

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Born here
Michael   
Added: 20 Sep 2023 21:10 GMT   

Momentous Birth!
I was born in the upstairs front room of 28 Tyrrell Avenue in August 1938. I was a breach birth and quite heavy ( poor Mum!). My parents moved to that end of terrace house from another rental in St Mary Cray where my three year older brother had been born in 1935. The estate was quite new in 1938 and all the properties were rented. My Father was a Postman. I grew up at no 28 all through WWII and later went to Little Dansington School

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Mike Levy   
Added: 19 Sep 2023 18:10 GMT   

Bombing of Arbour Square in the Blitz
On the night of September 7, 1940. Hyman Lubosky (age 35), his wife Fay (or Fanny)(age 32) and their son Martin (age 17 months) died at 11 Arbour Square. They are buried together in Rainham Jewish Cemetery. Their grave stones read: "Killed by enemy action"

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Lady Townshend   
Added: 8 Sep 2023 16:02 GMT   

Tenant at Westbourne (1807 - 1811)
I think that the 3rd Marquess Townshend - at that time Lord Chartley - was a tenant living either at Westbourne Manor or at Bridge House. He undertook considerable building work there as well as creating gardens. I am trying to trace which house it was. Any ideas gratefully received

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Alex Britton   
Added: 30 Aug 2023 10:43 GMT   

Late opening
The tracks through Roding Valley were opened on 1 May 1903 by the Great Eastern Railway (GER) on its Woodford to Ilford line (the Fairlop Loop).

But the station was not opened until 3 February 1936 by the London and North Eastern Railway (LNER, successor to the GER).

Source: Roding Valley tube station - Wikipedia

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Comment
Kevin Pont   
Added: 30 Aug 2023 09:52 GMT   

Shhh....
Roding Valley is the quietest tube station, each year transporting the same number of passengers as Waterloo does in one day.

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Kevin Pont   
Added: 30 Aug 2023 09:47 GMT   

The connection with Bletchley Park
The code-breaking computer used at Bletchley Park was built in Dollis Hill.

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Comment
Kevin Pont   
Added: 29 Aug 2023 15:25 GMT   

The deepest station
At 58m below ground, Hampstead is as deep as Nelson’s Column is tall.

Source: Hampstead tube station - Wikipedia

Reply


NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Clerkenwell Preceptory The following is a list of monastic houses in Greater London, England.
Clerkenwell Priory Clerkenwell Priory was a priory of the Monastic Order of the Knights Hospitallers of St John of Jerusalem, located in Clerkenwell, London.
Golden Lane Estate, EC1Y The Golden Lane Housing Estate is a 1950s council housing complex in the City of London.
Hicks Hall Hicks Hall (1611 - 1778) was a building in St John Street, Clerkenwell.
Maison Novelli Maison Novelli was a restaurant in Clerkenwell, Central London, located opposite the Old Session House.
Marx Memorial Library The Marx Memorial Library in London holds more than 43,000 books, pamphlets and newspapers on Marxism, Scientific Socialism and Working class history.
Middlesex Sessions House The Former Middlesex Session(s) House or the Old Sessions House is a large building on Clerkenwell Green.
Museum of the Order of St John The Museum of the Order of St John in Clerkenwell, London, tells the story of the Venerable Order of Saint John.
St James’s Church, Clerkenwell St James Church, Clerkenwell, is an Anglican parish church.
St John Clerkenwell St John Clerkenwell is a former parish church in Clerkenwell, now used as the chapel of the modern Order of St John.

NEARBY STREETS
28375, EC1R Sekforde Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Abacus House, EC1R Abacus House can be found on Gloucester Way.
Agdon Street, EC1V Agdon Street was originally called Woods Close.
Albemarle Way, EC1M Albemarle Way was named after Elizabeth, Dowager Duchess of Albermarle, who lived at Newcastle House nearby in the 18th century.
Albion Place, EC1M Albion Place was formerly George Court.
Alders Court, EC1Y Ball Court, EC1 was renamed as Alders Court, EC1 in 1936.
Alleyn House, EC1Y Alleyn House is a block on Chequer Street.
Amias House, EC1V Amias House is a building on Central Street.
Amias Place, EC1Y Amias Place was formerly George Yard.
Anchor House, EC1V Anchor House is located on Old Street.
Anchor Yard, EC1Y Anchor Yard is named after a former inn here of this name.
Argus House, EC1V Argus House is a block on St John Street.
Ashby Street, EC1V Ashby Street was named after local landowners who had a seat at Castle Ashby, Northamptonshire.
Aylesbury Street, EC1V Aylesbury Street - after the earl of Aylesbury who owned a house near here in the 17th century.
Bale’s Court, EC1M Bale’s Court was a small courtyard off White Horse Alley.
Baltic Street East, EC1Y Baltic Street East was built by a timber merchant around 1810 who named local streets after trade-related activities.
Baltic Street West, EC1Y Baltic Street is split into east and west halves.
Banner House, EC1Y Banner House is a block on Banner Street.
Banner Street, EC1Y Banner Street was named after the Banner family, late 18th century landowners in the area.
Barbican Court, EC1A Barbican Court was bombed during the Second World War.
Barbican, EC2Y Before becoming part of Beech Street, a road called Barbican had its own presence.
Barnabas House, EC1V Barnabas House is sited on Central Street.
Bartholomew Square, EC1V This is a street in the EC1V postcode area
Basterfield House, EC1Y Basterfield House is located on Unnamed Road.
Bastwick Street, EC1V Bastwick Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Beech Street, EC2Y Beech Street is the western extension of Chiswell Street.
Ben Jonson House, EC1Y Ben Jonson House is sited on Golden Lane.
Ben Jonson House, EC2Y Ben Jonson House is a block on Golden Lane.
Benjamin Street, EC1M Benjamin Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Berkeley Court, EC1M Berkeley Court ran south out of Berkley Street (now Briset Street).
Berry Place, EC1V Berry Place and Berry Street were named after Thomas Berry, local early 19th century landowner.
Berry Street, EC1M Berry Place and Berry Street were named after Thomas Berry, local early 19th century landowner.
Blake Tower, EC2Y Blake Tower is located on Fann Street.
Boundary House, EC1M Boundary House is a block on Charterhouse Street.
Bowater House, EC1Y Bowater House is sited on Fann Street.
Bowling Green Lane, EC1R Bowling Green Lane connects Farringdon Road with Northampton Road.
Brackley Street, EC2Y Brackley Street was named after Viscount Brackley - the title given to the eldest sons of the Earl of Bridgewater who owned a townhouse on Bridgewater Square.
Breton House, EC2Y Breton House is a block on Golden Lane.
Brewery Square, EC1V Brewery Square is a square surrounded by modern buildings in Clerkenwell.
Brewhouse Yard, EC1V Brewhouse Yard is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Bridgewater Square, EC1Y Bridgewater Square is an historic square near to the Barbican.
Briset Street, EC1M Briset Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Britton Street, EC1M Britton Street was named after Thomas Britten, a 17th century coalman.
Broad Yard, EC1M Broad Yard is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Bryer Court, EC2Y Bryer Court is a block on Bridgewater Square
Burnhill House, EC1V Burnhill House is a block on Norman Street.
Carthusian Street, EC1A Carthusian Street is a road in the EC1A postcode area
Centenary Building, EC1R Centenary Building is a block on Spencer Street.
Central Street, EC1V Central Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Challoner House, EC1R Challoner House is a building on Clerkenwell Close.
Charles Townsend House, EC1R Charles Townsend House is a block on Finsbury Estate.
Charterhouse Buildings, EC1A Charterhouse Buildings is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Charterhouse Mews, EC1A Charterhouse Mews is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Charterhouse Square, EC1M Charterhouse Square is the largest courtyard associated with London Charterhouse, mostly formed of Tudor and Stuart architecture restored after the Blitz.
Cherry Tree Walk, EC1Y Cherry Tree Walk is a road in the EC1Y postcode area
City Walk Apartments, EC1V City Walk Apartments is sited on Seward Street.
Clerkenwell Close, EC1R Clerkenwell Close is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Clerkenwell Green, EC1M Clerkenwell Green is the street named after the historical green.
Clerkenwell House, EC1R Clerkenwell House is a block on Clerkenwell Green.
Clerkenwell Road, EC1M Clerkenwell Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
College Building, EC1R College Building is a block on Northampton Square.
Comice Apartments, EC1V Comice Apartments is a building on Pear Tree Street.
Compton Street, EC1V Compton Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Cornwell House, EC1M Cornwell House is a block on Clerkenwell Green.
Corporation Row, EC1R Corporation Row is a road in the EC1R postcode area
Cowcross Street, EC1M Cowcross Street links Farringdon station with Charterhouse Street.
Crayle House, EC1V Crayle House is sited on Cyrus Street.
Crescent House, EC1M Crescent House is sited on Goswell Road.
Crescent Row, EC1Y Crescent Row is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Cripplegate Street, EC1Y Cripplegate Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Cromwell Tower, EC2Y Cromwell Tower is a block on Silk Street.
Crown House, EC1M Crown House is a building on Goswell Road.
Crozier Court, EC1M Abbot’s Place, NW6
Cullum Welch House, EC1M Cullum Welch House is a block on Golden Lane.
Cuthbert Harrowing House, EC1Y Cuthbert Harrowing House is a block on Fann Street.
Cyrus House, EC1V Cyrus House is located on Cyrus Street.
Cyrus Street, EC1V Cyrus Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Dallington Street, EC1V Dallington Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Davina House, EC1V Davina House is a block on Goswell Road.
Defoe House, EC2Y Defoe House is a block on Beech Street.
Denmark House, EC1M Denmark House is a block on Cowcross Street.
Domingo Street, EC1Y Domingo Street links Old Street with Baltic Street East.
Dunstan House, EC1N Dunstan House is a block on St Cross Street.
Eagle Court, EC1M Eagle Court is a courtyard situated off of Benjamin Street.
Earnshaw House, EC1V Earnshaw House is a block on Percival Street.
East Central House, EC1V East Central House is a block on Lever Street.
Errol Street, EC1Y Errol Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Fann Street, EC1Y Fann Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Farringdon Lane, EC1R Farringdon Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Farringdon Road, EC1V Farringdon Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Faulkners Alley, EC1M Faulkners Alley is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Fleet House, EC1R Fleet House is sited on Clerkenwell Road.
Florin Court, EC1A Florin Court is a classic Art Deco building in Clerkenwell.
Fortune House, EC1Y Fortune House is a block on Fortune Street.
Fortune Street, EC1Y Fortune Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Galway Street, EC1V Galway Street was named for the Earl of Galway.
Garrett Street, EC1Y Garrett Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Gastigny House, EC1V Gastigny House is a block on Lever Street.
Gate House, EC1M Residential block
Gee Street, EC1V Gee Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Glasshouse Yard, EC2Y Glasshouse Yard is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Gloucester Building, EC1R Gloucester Building is a block on Whiskin Street.
Gloucester Way, EC1R Gloucester Way is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Golden Lane, EC1Y Golden Lane connects Old Street and Beech Street.
Goswell Place Building, EC1R Goswell Place Building is located on Ashby Street.
Goswell Place, EC1V Goswell Place lies off Goswell Street.
Goswell Road, EC1V Goswell Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Goswell Road, EC1Y Goswell Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Great Arthur House, EC1Y Great Arthur House is a building on Fann Street.
Great Sutton Street, EC1M Great Sutton Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Greenhill House, EC1M Greenhill House is a block on Cowcross Street.
Greenhills Rents, EC1A Greenhills Rents is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Grimthorpe House, EC1V Grimthorpe House is a building on Agdon Street.
Harella House, EC1V Harella House is a building on Goswell Road.
Harold Laski House, EC1V Harold Laski House is a block on Percival Street.
Hatfield House, EC1M Hatfield House is a block on Baltic Street West.
Hatfield House, EC1Y Hatfield House is a block on Baltic Street West.
Hayne Street, EC1A Hayne Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Haywards Place, EC1V Haywards Place is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Helmet Row, EC1V Helmet Row is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Honduras Street, EC1Y Honduras Street dates from the 1810s.
Hooper House, EC1R Hooper House is a block on Clerkenwell Close.
Infinity House, EC1 Infinity House is located on Britton Street.
Invicta House, EC1Y Invicta House is a block on Banner Street.
Ironmonger Row, EC1V Ironmonger Row is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Italia Conti House, EC1M Italia Conti House can be found on Goswell Road.
Jerusalem Passage, EC1M Jerusalem Passage was named for an old public house, St John of Jerusalem, which stood at the northeast corner until 1760.
Joseph Close, EC1R Joseph Close is a road in the N4 postcode area
Joseph Rotblat Building, EC1A Joseph Rotblat Building is a building on Glasshouse Yard.
Joseph Trotter Close, EC1R Joseph Trotter Close is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
King Square, EC1V King Square is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Kingsway Place, EC1R Kingsway Place is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Kirby Street, EC1N Kirby Street was named for Christopher Hatton’s Kirby House in Northamptonshire.
Klaco House, EC1M Klaco House is a block on St John’s Lane.
Klamath House, EC1R Klamath House is a block on Clerkenwell Green.
Lagonier House, EC1V Lagonier House is located on Ironmonger Row.
Lauderdale Tower, EC2Y Lauderdale Tower is the westernmost tower in the Barbican, facing onto Lauderdale Place.
Leo Yard, EC1V Leo Yard is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Lever Street, EC1V Lever Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Liberty House, EC1V Liberty House can be found on St John Street.
Lindsey House, EC1M Lindsey House can be found on Charterhouse Street.
Lizard Street, EC1V Lizard Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Malta Street, EC1V This is a street in the EC1V postcode area
Marylebone House, EC1M Marylebone House is a block on St John Street.
Memel Street, EC1Y Memel Street was built over the site of a former brewery in the 1810s.
Meredith Street, EC1R Meredith Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Michael Cliffe House, EC1R Michael Cliffe House is a block on Gloucester Way.
Mitchell Street, EC1V Mitchell Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Murton Street, EC1V Murton Street dates from about 1829.
Myddelton Building, EC1R Myddelton Building is located on Goswell Road.
Myddelton Street, EC1R Myddelton Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Newington Close, EC1R This is a street in the EC1R postcode area
Norman Street, EC1V Norman Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Northampton Square, EC1V Northampton Square is a square between Finsbury and Clerkenwell, located between Goswell Road and St John Street.
Northburgh House, EC1V Northburgh House is a building on Northburgh Street.
Northburgh Street, EC1M Northburgh Street in the EC1V postcode is a western extension of the main part of the street.
Orchard Building, EC1V Orchard Building is a block on Pear Tree Street.
Paramount Building, EC1V Paramount Building is a block on St John Street.
Pardon Street, EC1V Pardon Street was named after Pardon Chapel, founded in the wake of the Black Death in 1348.
Parkes Building, EC1R Parkes Building is a building on Sebastian Street.
Partridge House, EC1V Partridge House is a block on Malta Street.
Passing Alley, EC1M Passing Alley is a road in the EC1M postcode area
Paton Street, EC1V Paton Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Patrick Coman House, EC1R Patrick Coman House is a block on Meredith Street.
Peabody Tower, EC1Y Peabody Tower is a block on Golden Lane.
Pear Tree Street, EC1V Pear Tree Street connects Central Street and Goswell Road.
Penny Bank Chambers, EC1M Penny Bank Chambers is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Percival Street, EC1V Percival Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Peter’s Lane, EC1M Peter’s Lane is named after the church which once stood close to the Cross Keys tavern.
Pickax Street, EC2Y Pickax Street once ran from Long Lane to Goswell Road (which before 1864 was called Goswell Street).
Plough Court, EC2Y Plough Court was renamed as part of Barbican in 1939.
Priestley House, EC1V Priestley House is a block on Old Street.
Priory House, EC1R Priory House is located on Sans Walk.
Radnor Street, EC1V Radnor Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Red Cross Street, EC2Y Red Cross Street once ran to the junction of Beech Street and Golden Lane.
Roby House, EC1V Roby House is sited on Mitchell Street.
Roscoe Street, EC1Y Roscoe Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Rosoman Place, EC1R Rosoman Place is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Sabian House, EC1M Sabian House is sited on Cowcross Street.
Saffron Hill, EC1N Saffron Hill’s name derives the time that it was part of an estate on which saffron grew.
Saffron House, EC1N Saffron House is a block on Saffron Hill.
Saint John Street, EC1M This is a street in the EC1M postcode area
Sans Walk, EC1R Sans Walk was named after Edward Sans in 1893, who was then the oldest member of the local parish vestry.
Sans Works, EC1R Sans Works is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Saunderson House, EC1A Saunderson House is a block on Long Lane.
Scotswood Street, EC1R Scotswood Street is a road in the EC1R postcode area
Sebastian House, EC1V Sebastian House is sited on Sebastian Street.
Sebastian Street, EC1V Sebastian Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Sekforde Court, EC1R Sekforde Court is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Seward Street, EC1V Seward Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1V postal area.
Shakespeare Tower, EC2Y Shakespeare Tower can be found on Beech Street.
Skinner Street, EC1R Skinner Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Smokehouse Yard, EC1M Smokehouse Yard is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Social Sciences Building, EC1R Social Sciences Building is a block on Myddleton Street.
St Cross Street, EC1N St Cross Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1N postal area.
St Jamess Walk, EC1R St Jamess Walk is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
St John Street, EC1V St John Street runs from Finsbury to Farringdon.
St John Street, EC1V The northern section of St John Street was confusingly, before the 20th century, named Saint John Street Road.
St John’s Square, EC1M St John’s Square, south of Clerkenwell Road, is in the EC1M postal area.
St John’s Square, EC1M St John’s Square is split into two sections, north and south of Clerkenwell Road.
St Johns House, EC1M Residential block
St Johns Lane, EC1M St Johns Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
St Johns Path, EC1M St Johns Path is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
St Johns Place, EC1M St Johns Place is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
St John’s Gate, EC1M St John’s Gate is a small named section of road leading to the gate of the same name.
St Mary’s Tower, EC1Y St Mary’s Tower is a block on Fortune Street.
Stanley Cohen House, EC1Y Stanley Cohen House is a block on Golden Lane.
Sutton Lane, EC1M Sutton Lane is a road in the EC1M postcode area
Sutton Road, EC1M Sutton Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
Sycamore Street, EC1Y Sycamore Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Telescope House, EC1M Telescope House is a block on Farringdon Road.
Telfer House, EC1V Telfer House is a block on Lever Street.
The Charterhouse, EC1M Residential block
The Horseshoe Path, EC1R The Horseshoe Path runs around the back of the Horseshoe pub.
The Old Sessions House, EC1R The Old Sessions House is a block on Farringdon Lane.
The Print House, EC1R The Print House is a block on Aylesbury Street.
The Red House, EC1V The Red House is a block on Clerkenwell Road.
Therese House, EC1M Therese House is a block on Glasshouse Yard.
Tilney Court, EC1Y Tilney Court lies off of Old Street.
Timber Street, EC1Y Timber Street was formerly called Norway Street.
Tompion House, EC1V Tompion House is located on Cyrus Street.
Tompion Street, EC1V Tompion Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Turnmill Street, EC1 Turnmill Street appears in the works of Shakespeare.
Turnpike House, EC1V Turnpike House is a building on King Square.
University Building, EC1R University Building is a block on Spencer Street.
Warwick House, EC1M Warwick House is a block on Cowcross Street.
Warwick Yard, EC1Y Warwick Yard is a road in the EC1Y postcode area
Waterloo Street, EC1V Waterloo Street once ran from Lever Street to Radnor Street.
Wenlake House, EC1V Wenlake House is a block on Old Street.
White Horse Alley, EC1M White Horse Alley, until after the Second World War, led north off Cowcross Street.
Whitecross Street, EC1Y Whitecross Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Woodbridge Street, EC1R Woodbridge Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1R postal area.
Wyclif House, EC1V Wyclif House is a block on St John Street.
Wyclif Street, EC1V Wyclif Street is a road in the EC1V postcode area
Young’s Buildings, EC1Y Young’s Buildings was named after Francis Young, a local 18th century property owner
Zeppelin Building, EC1M Zeppelin Building is a block on Farringdon Road.
Ziggurat Building, EC1N Ziggurat Building can be found on Saffron Hill.
Zinc House, EC1M Zinc House is a block on Cowcross Street.

NEARBY PUBS

Hat and Feathers At the corner of Clerkenwell Road and Goswell Road sits the Hat and Feathers pub.
The Castle The Castle is the only pub in England that, alongside its pub sign, is permitted to display the three balls of a pawnbroker.


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Clerkenwell

Clerkenwell was once known as London’s Little Italy because of the large number of Italians living in the area from the 1850s until the 1960s.

Clerkenwell took its name from the Clerks’ Well in Farringdon Lane. In the Middle Ages, the London Parish clerks performed annual mystery plays there, based on biblical themes. Part of the well remains visible, incorporated into a 1980s building called Well Court.

In the 17th century South Clerkenwell became a fashionable place of residence. Oliver Cromwell owned a house on Clerkenwell Close, just off the Green. Several aristocrats had houses there, most notably the Duke of Northumberland, as did people such as Erasmus Smith.

Before Clerkenwell became a built-up area, it had a reputation as a resort a short walk out of the city, where Londoners could disport themselves at its spas, of which there were several, based on natural chalybeate springs, tea gardens and theatres. The present day Sadler’s Wells has survived as heir to this tradition.

Clerkenwell was also the location of three prisons: the Clerkenwell Bridewell, Coldbath Fields Prison (later Clerkenwell Gaol) and the New Prison, later the Clerkenwell House of Detention, notorious as the scene of the Clerkenwell Outrage in 1867, an attempted prison break by Fenians who killed many in the tenement houses on Corporation Row in trying to blow a hole in the prison wall.

The Industrial Revolution changed the area greatly. It became a centre for breweries, distilleries and the printing industry. It gained a special reputation for the making of clocks and watches, which activity once employed many people from around the area. Flourishing craft workshops still carry on some of the traditional trades, such as jewellery-making. Clerkenwell is home to Witherby’s, Europe’s oldest printing company.

After the Second World War, Clerkenwell suffered from industrial decline and many of the premises occupied by the engineering, printing publishing and meat and food trades (the last mostly around Smithfield) fell empty. Several acclaimed council housing estates were commissioned by Finsbury Borough Council. Modernist architect and Russian émigré Berthold Lubetkin’s listed Spa Green Estate, constructed 1943–1950, has recently been restored. The Finsbury Estate, constructed in 1968 to the designs of Joseph Emberton includes flats, since altered and re-clad.

A general revival and gentrification process began in the 1980s, and the area is now known for loft-living in some of the former industrial buildings. It also has young professionals, nightclubs and restaurants and is home to many professional offices as an overspill for the nearby City of London and West End.

Amongst other sectors, there is a notable concentration of design professions around Clerkenwell, and supporting industries such as high-end designer furniture showrooms.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Smithfield Market
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The Grand Theatre, Islington High Street (1903) The new Grand Theatre - the fourth theatre on the site - was opened on 26 December 1900 with a production of the pantomime ’Robinson Crusoe’. The Huddersfield Daily reported the next day: "Nearing the end of the first performance of ’Robinson Crusoe’ at the Grand Theatre, Islington, on Wednesday, a fire broke out. From all parts of the house an alarm was raised. All present rose to their feet as large pieces of inflammable material were seen dropping from flies. The fire-proof curtain was promptly lowered, and the band struck up the National Anthem. The actors and actresses crowded into the stage boxes. Mr. Jones, playing ’Friday,’ clambered on to the stage from the front and appealed to the audience not to rush for the doors as there was no danger. Then Mr. Charles Townley, the author, came forward explaining that the management, owing to the electric installations not being completed, had used gas batten, and one of the sky borders had unfortunately caught fire. The officials had shown their efficiency by the celerity with which the fire had been extinguished. This is the fourth fire that has occurred at this theatre, and Wednesday’s was the first performance given since the building was gutted some few months back." Thankfully the fire was quickly put out and the performance continued, and the Theatre would go on to stage pantomime, drama, and variety productions until it was renamed the Islington Empire in 1908.
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Amen Court, EC4M
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Licence: CC BY 2.0
Holborn Viaduct from Farringdon Street, c. 1910 The building of Farringdon Street is considered one of the greatest urban engineering achievements of the 19th century. It was one of the first engineered multi-lane roads, and also buried the River Fleet in a system of underground tunnels, solving one of London’s most daunting sanitary problems. Its construction also included the building of the world’s first stretch of underground railway, a branch of the Metropolitan Railway that later became part of the London Underground running beneath Farringdon Road from King’s Cross St. Pancras into the City at Farringdon. The construction of Farringdon Street also necessitated the removal of the Fleet Market that had been built in 1736 above the course of the River Fleet, which is now London’s largest subterranean river. North of the market was Hockley-in-the-Hole (around Ray Street Bridge), an area notorious for bear-baiting and similar activities.
Credit: Bishopsgate Institute
TUM image id: 1686139066
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In the neighbourhood...

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Smithfield Market
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Saint John’s Gate, Clerkenwell, the main gateway to the Priory of Saint John of Jerusalem. The church was founded in the 12th century by Jordan de Briset, a Norman knight. Prior Docwra completed the gatehouse shown in this photograph in 1504. The gateway served as the main entry to the Priory, which was the center of the Order of St John of Jerusalem (the Knights Hospitallers).
Credit: Henry Dixon (1880)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Sadler House on the Spa Green Estate from Rosebery Avenue (2011) The ’organic’ connection between old and new buildings intended by architect Berthold Lubetkin at Spa Green.
Credit: Wiki Commons/Grantham9
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At the corner of Clerkenwell Road and Goswell Road sits the Hat and Feathers. It was built on the site of an earlier tavern around 1860 for owner James Leask. It was designed by William Finch Hill who specialised in music halls and pubs.
Credit: Ewan Munro
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Clerkenwell Green (1898) The water fountain shown here became public toilets.
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View of Cloth Fair in 1884 showing the side entrance to St Bartholomew’s Priory, Smithfield.
Credit: John Crowther
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Florin Court, Charterhouse Square (2008) The building was used as Whitehaven Mansions, the fictional London residence of Agatha Christie’s character Hercule Poirot, in the LWT television series Agatha Christie’s Poirot (1989–2013)
Credit: Flickr/conrad1967/
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Great Arthur House, at the centre of the Golden Lane Estate, was the tallest residential building in Britain at the time of its construction.
Credit: Steve F/Wiki commons
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Jewin Street looking east toward Red Cross Street (1920) Tubbs & Son sign outside premises and their posters in the window. It is probably Number 38, sometime home of the City of London Photographic Stores (1901) and Belprex Ltd (1927) The Fire Station at the end was built after the 1897 fire. Unsurprisingly the street name derives from an ancient Jewish burial ground. Jewin Street was widened after the 1897 fire.
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Pardon Street
Credit: The Underground Map
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