Princess Mary House, SW1P

Block in/near Westminster

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Block · Westminster · SW1P ·
FEBRUARY
23
2001

Princess Mary House is located on Vincent Street.





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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Dec 2020 00:24 GMT   

Othello takes a bow
On 1 November 1604, William Shakespeare’s tragedy Othello was presented for the first time, at The Palace of Whitehall. The palace was the main residence of the English monarchs in London from 1530 until 1698. Seven years to the day, Shakespeare’s romantic comedy The Tempest was also presented for the first time, and also at the Palace of Whitehall.

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Emma Seif   
Added: 25 Jan 2022 19:06 GMT   

Birth of the Bluestocking Society
In about 1750, Elizabeth Montagu began hosting literary breakfasts in her home at 23 (now 31) Hill Street. These are considered the first meetings of the Bluestocking society.

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Comment
Linda Webb   
Added: 27 Sep 2021 05:51 GMT   

Hungerford Stairs
In 1794 my ancestor, George Webb, Clay Pipe Maker, lived in Hungerford Stairs, Strand. Source: Wakefields Merchant & Tradesmens General Directory London Westminster 1794

Source: Hungerford Stairs

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TUM   
Added: 27 Aug 2022 10:22 GMT   

The Underground Map
Michael Faraday successfully demonstrated the first electrical transformer at the Royal Institute, London.

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Bruce McTavish   
Added: 11 Mar 2021 11:37 GMT   

Kennington Road
Lambeth North station was opened as Kennington Road and then Westminster Bridge Road before settling on its final name. It has a wonderful Leslie Green design.

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Scott Hatton   
Added: 30 Jan 2023 11:28 GMT   

The Beatles on a London rooftop
The Beatles’ rooftop concert took place on the rooftop of the Apple Corps building in London. It was their final public performance as a band and was unannounced, attracting a crowd of onlookers. The concert lasted for 42 minutes and included nine songs. The concert is remembered as a seminal moment in the history of rock music and remains one of the most famous rock performances of all time.

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Lived here
Brian J MacIntyre   
Added: 8 Jan 2023 17:27 GMT   

Malcolm Davey at Raleigh House, Dolphin Square
My former partner, actor Malcolm Davey, lived at Raleigh House, Dolphin Square, for many years until his death. He was a wonderful human being and an even better friend. A somewhat underrated actor, but loved by many, including myself. I miss you terribly, Malcolm. Here’s to you and to History, our favourite subject.
Love Always - Brian J MacIntyre
Minnesota, USA

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Comment
Pauline jones   
Added: 16 Oct 2017 19:04 GMT   

Bessborough Place, SW1V
I grew up in bessborough place at the back of our house and Grosvenor road and bessborough gardens was a fantastic playground called trinity mews it had a paddling pool sandpit football area and various things to climb on, such as a train , slide also as Wendy house. There were plants surrounding this wonderful play area, two playground attendants ,also a shelter for when it rained. The children were constantly told off by the playground keepers for touching the plants or kicking the ball out of the permitted area, there was hopscotch as well, all these play items were brick apart from the slide. Pollock was the centre of my universe and I felt sorry and still do for anyone not being born there. To this day I miss it and constantly look for images of the streets around there, my sister and me often go back to take a clumped of our beloved London. The stucco houses were a feature and the backs of the houses enabled parents to see thier children playing.

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Robert smitherman   
Added: 23 Aug 2017 11:01 GMT   

Saunders Street, SE11
I was born in a prefab on Saunders street SE11 in the 60’s, when I lived there, the road consisted of a few prefab houses, the road originally ran from Lollard street all the way thru to Fitzalan street. I went back there to have a look back in the early 90’s but all that is left of the road is about 20m of road and the road sign.

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Lived here
Richard Roques   
Added: 21 Jan 2021 16:53 GMT   

Buckingham Street residents
Here in Buckingham Street lived Samuel Pepys the diarist, Charles Dickens and Rudyard Kipling

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Comment
Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

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Born here
sam   
Added: 31 Dec 2021 00:54 GMT   

Burdett Street, SE1
I was on 2nd July 1952, in Burdett chambers (which is also known as Burdett buildings)on Burdett street

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Lynette beardwood   
Added: 29 Nov 2022 20:53 GMT   

Spy’s Club
Topham’s Hotel at 24-28 Ebury Street was called the Ebury Court Hotel. Its first proprietor was a Mrs Topham. In WW2 it was a favourite watering hole for the various intelligence organisations based in the Pimlico area. The first woman infiltrated into France in 1942, FANY Yvonne Rudellat, was recruited by the Special Operations Executive while working there. She died in Bergen Belsen in April 1945.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT


Scott Hatton   
Added: 30 Jan 2023 11:28 GMT   

The Beatles on a London rooftop
The Beatles’ rooftop concert took place on the rooftop of the Apple Corps building in London. It was their final public performance as a band and was unannounced, attracting a crowd of onlookers. The concert lasted for 42 minutes and included nine songs. The concert is remembered as a seminal moment in the history of rock music and remains one of the most famous rock performances of all time.

Reply

Michael Upham   
Added: 16 Jan 2023 21:16 GMT   

Bala Place, SE16
My grandfather was born at 2 Bala Place.

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Added: 15 Jan 2023 09:49 GMT   

The Bombing of Nant Street WW2
My uncle with his young son and baby daughter were killed in the bombing of Nant Street in WW2. His wife had gone to be with her mother whilst the bombing of the area was taking place, and so survived. Cannot imagine how she felt when she returned to see her home flattened and to be told of the death of her husband and children.


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Lived here
Brian J MacIntyre   
Added: 8 Jan 2023 17:27 GMT   

Malcolm Davey at Raleigh House, Dolphin Square
My former partner, actor Malcolm Davey, lived at Raleigh House, Dolphin Square, for many years until his death. He was a wonderful human being and an even better friend. A somewhat underrated actor, but loved by many, including myself. I miss you terribly, Malcolm. Here’s to you and to History, our favourite subject.
Love Always - Brian J MacIntyre
Minnesota, USA

Reply
Lived here
Robert Burns   
Added: 5 Jan 2023 17:46 GMT   

1 Abourne Street
My mother, and my Aunt and my Aunt’s family lived at number 1 Abourne Street.
I remember visitingn my aunt Win Housego, and the Housego family there. If I remember correctly virtually opposite number 1, onthe corner was the Lord Amberley pub.

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Comment
   
Added: 30 Dec 2022 21:41 GMT   

Southam Street, W10
do any one remember J&A DEMOLITON at harrow rd kensal green my dad work for them in a aec 6 wheel tipper got a photo of him in it

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Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 26 Dec 2022 18:59 GMT   

Detailed history of Red Lion
I’m not the author but this blog by Dick Weindling and Marianne Colloms has loads of really clear information about the history of the Red Lion which people might appreciate.


Source: ‘Professor Morris’ and the Red Lion, Kilburn

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BG   
Added: 20 Dec 2022 02:58 GMT   

Lancing Street, NW1
LANCING STREET

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Chelsea College of Art and Design Chelsea College of Arts is a constituent college of the University of the Arts London.
Lillington Gardens Lillington Gardens is an estate in the Pimlico area, constructed in phases between 1961 and 1980.
Pimlico Pimlico is known for its garden squares and Regency architecture.
St James the Less St James the Less is an Anglican church built by George Edmund Street in the Gothic Revival style.
St Mary’s Church, Vincent Square St Mary’s was established in 1837 and closed in 1923.
Tothill Fields Bridewell Tothill Fields Bridewell (also known as Tothill Fields Prison and Westminster Bridewell) was a prison located in Westminster between 1618 and 1884.
Westminster Under School Westminster Under School is an independent school and preparatory school for boys aged 7 to 13 and is attached to Westminster School.

NEARBY STREETS
Admiral House, SW1P Admiral House is sited on Willow Place.
Anchor Court, SW1V Anchor Court can be found on Vauxhall Bridge Road.
Arneway Street, SW1P Arneway Street is named for Thomas Arneway, former benefactor to the Westminster parish poor.
Artillery House, SW1P Artillery House is a block on Artillery Row.
Artillery Place, SW1P Artillery Place was named after a former nearby artillery practice ground which stood here in the 19th century.
Ashley Gardens, SW1P Ashley Gardens is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Asquith House, SW1P Asquith House is a block on Monck Street.
Astral House, SW1P Astral House is sited on Regency Place.
Atterbury Street, SW1P Atterbury Street is named after Francis Atterbury, Dean of Westminster in 1713.
Aubrey Beadsley House, SW1 Aubrey Beadsley House is a block on Vauxhall Bridge Road.
Bennett’s Yard, SW1P Bennett’s Yard is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Bessborough Gardens, SW1V Bessborough Gardens is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Bessborough Mews, SW1V Bessborough Mews was situated behind Bessborough Street.
Bessborough Street, SW1V Bessborough Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Bloomburg Street, SW1V Bloomburg Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Brunswick Court, SW1P Brunswick Court is a block on Montaigne Close.
Carey Place, SW1V Carey Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Causton Street, SW1P Causton Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Chadwick Street, SW1P Chadwick Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Chapter Chambers, SW1P Chapter Chambers is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Chapter Street, SW1P Chapter Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Charlwood House, SW1 Charlwood House is a block on Lillington Gardens Estate.
Charlwood Place, SW1V Charlwood Place is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Cleland House, SW1P Cleland House can be found on John Islip Street.
Clergy House, SW1 Clergy House is located on Stillington Street.
Cobbold Court, SW1P Cobbold Court is a block on Elverton Street.
Coburg Close, SW1P Coburg Close is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Cranbrook House, SW1P Cranbrook House is a block on Horseferry Road.
Dalkeith Court, SW1P Dalkeith Court is located on Dalkeith Court.
Dean Abbott House, SW1P Dean Abbott House is sited on Regency Street.
Dean Bradley House, SW1P Dean Bradley House is a building on Horseferry Road.
Dean Bradley Street, SW1P George Granville Bradley was Dean of Westminster Abbey from 1881.
Dean Ryle Street, SW1P Dean Ryle Street was named after Herbert Edward Ryle.
Dean Stanley Street, SW1P Dean Stanley Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Dean Trench Street, SW1P Dean Trench Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Douglas Street, SW1P Douglas Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Drummond Gate, SW1V Drummond Gate is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Duke House, SW1P Duke House is a block on Vincent Street.
Earle House, SW1P Earle House is located on Montaigne Close.
Egerton House, SW1V Residential block
Elizabeth Court, SW1P Elizabeth Court is a block on Elizabeth Court.
Elverton Street, SW1P Elverton Street is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Emery Hill Street, SW1P Emery Hill Street is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Erasmus Street, SW1P Erasmus Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Esterbrooke Street, SW1P Esterbrooke Street is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Exbury House, SW1V Exbury House is a block on Rampayne Street.
Fairchild House, SW1 Fairchild House is a block on Charlwood Street.
Francis House, SW1P Francis House is sited on Francis Street.
Francis Street, SW1P Francis Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Garden Terrace, SW1V Garden Terrace is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Gayfere Street, SW1P Gayfere Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
George Eliot House, SW1 George Eliot House is a block on Vauxhall Bridge Road.
Gladstone Court, SW1P Gladstone Court is a block on Montaigne Close.
Gordon House, SW1P Residential block
Great Minster House, SW1P Great Minster House is a block on Horse Ferry Road.
Greencoat House, SW1P Greencoat House is a block on Francis Street.
Greencoat Place, SW1P Greencoat Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Greycoat Gardens, SW1P Greycoat Gardens is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Greycoat Place, SW1P Greycoat Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Greycoat Street, SW1P Greycoat Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Greycote Place, SW1P Greycote Place is a location in London.
Hatherley Street, SW1V Hatherley Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Henry Wise House, SW1 Henry Wise House is a block on Vauxhall Bridge Road.
Herrick Street, SW1P Herrick Street is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Hide Place, SW1P Hide Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Hide Tower, SW1P Hide Tower is a building on Regency Street.
Hopkinson House, SW1P Hopkinson House is sited on Osbert Street.
Horseferry House, SW1P Horseferry House is sited on Horseferry Road.
Horseferry Road, SW1P Horseferry Road is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Howick Place, SW1P Howick Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Jessel House, SW1P Jessel House is a block on Page Street.
John Islip Street, SW1P John Islip Street commemorates the Abbot of Westminster between 1500 and 1532.
Joseph Conrad House, SW1V Joseph Conrad House is located on Tachbrook Street.
Lewcos House, SW1P Lewcos House is a block on Regency Street.
Lidhammer Court, SW1V Lidhammer Court is a block on Bessborough Gardens.
Little Cloisters, SW1P Little Cloisters is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
London Scottish House, SW1P London Scottish House is a block on Horseferry Road.
Longleat House, SW1V Longleat House is a block on Garden Terrace.
Lord North Street, SW1P Lord North Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Marsham Street, SW1P Marsham Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Medway House, SW1P Medway House is a building on Horseferry Road.
Medway Street, SW1P Medway Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Middlesex House, SW1 Middlesex House is located on Causton Street.
Middleton House, SW1 Middleton House is a block on Causton Street.
Middleton House, SW1P Middleton House is located on Regency Street.
Millbank Tower, SW1P Millbank Tower is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Millbank, SW1P Millbank was the beginning of a riverside walk from Westminster Abbey to Chelsea.
Monck Street, SW1P Monck Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Moreton Place, SW1V Moreton Place is a road in the SW1 postcode area
Moreton Street, SW1V Moreton Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Moreton Terrace Mews North, SW1V This mews lies behind Moreton Terrace.
Moreton Terrace Mews, SW1V The former Moreton Terrace Mews was split into two in 1964.
Morgan House, SW1 Morgan House can be found on Vauxhall Bridge Road.
Mulberry House, SW1P Mulberry House can be found on Dean Trench Street.
Neile House, SW1P Neile House is a block on Montaigne Close.
Neville House, SW1 Neville House can be found on Page Street.
New Palace Yard, SW1P New Palace Yard was built by William II (William Rufus).
Nobel House, SW1P Nobel House is sited on Smith Square.
Noel Coward House, SW1 Noel Coward House is a building on Vauxhall Bridge Road.
Norfolk House, SW1P Norfolk House is located on Page Street.
North Court, SW1 North Court is a block on Great Peter Street.
North Court, SW1P North Court is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Norton House, SW1P Norton House is a block on Arneway Street.
Octavia House, SW1P Octavia House is a block on Medway Street.
Old Palace Yard, SW1P Old Palace Yard lies between the Palace of Westminster and Westminster Abbey.
Ormond House, SW1P Ormond House is sited on Arneway Street.
Page Street, SW1P Page Street runs from Regency Street in the west to the junction of John Islip Street and Dean Ryle Street in the east.
Pearce House, SW1 Pearce House is a block on Causton Street.
Peel House, SW1 Peel House is a block on Causton Street.
Pelham House, SW1P Pelham House is sited on Monck Street.
Ponsonby Place, SW1V Ponsonby Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Ponsonby Terrace, SW1V Ponsonby Terrace is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Probyn House, SW1P Probyn House is a block on Page Street.
Rampayne Street, SW1V Rampayne Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Regency House, SW1P Regency House is a block on Regency Place.
Regency Place, SW1P Regency Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Regency Street, SW1P Regency Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Ridley House, SW1P Ridley House is a block on Monck Street.
Riverside Walk, SW1P Riverside Walk skirts the gardens of the same name.
Rochester Row, SW1P Rochester Row was home to the Bishop of Rochester in 1666.
Rochester Street, SW1P Rochester Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Romney Street, SW1P Romney Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Rutherford Street, SW1P Rutherford Street is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Schomberg House, SW1P Schomberg House is sited on Page Street.
ShortTerm Rental Apartments, SW1 ShortTerm Rental Apartments is a block on Vauxhall Bridge Road.
Smith Square, SW1P Smith Square was originally developed by Sir James Smith around 1726.
St Vincents Centre, SW1P St Vincents Centre is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Stewart House, SW1P Stewart House is a block on Erasmus Street.
Stillington Street, SW1P Stillington Street is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Stubbs House, SW1P Stubbs House is a block on Erasmus Street.
Tachbrook Street, SW1V Tachbrook Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Thames House, SW1P Thames House is a block on Millbank.
The Courthouse, SW1P The Courthouse is a block on Horseferry Road.
The Fry Building, SW1P The Fry Building is located on Horseferry Road.
Thirleby Road, SW1P Thirleby Road is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Thorndike House, SW1 Thorndike House is a block on Vauxhall Bridge Road.
Thorndike Street, SW1V Thorndike Street is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Thorney Street, SW1P Thorney Street is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Transport House, SW1P Transport House can be found on Dean Bradley Street.
Tufton Court, SW1 Tufton Court can be found on Tufton Street.
Tufton Street, SW1P Tufton Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Udall Street, SW1V Udall Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
United House, SW1P United House is a block on Francis Street.
Upper Fore Street, SE1 Upper Fore Street was a street of various factories and manufacturing premises.
Vauxhall Bridge Road, SW1V Vauxhall Bridge Road is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Victoria Chambers, SW1P Victoria Chambers is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Vincent House, SW1P Vincent House is sited on Hide Place.
Vincent Square, SW1P Vincent Square is a large grass-covered square which provides playing fields for Westminster School, which owns it.
Vincent Street, SW1P Vincent Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Walcott Street, SW1P Walcott Street was named after Reverend MEC Walcott, curate of the St Margaret’s, Westminster in the 1840s.
Westminster House, SW1P Westminster House is sited on Millbank.
Williams House, SW1P Williams House is sited on Montaigne Close.
Willow Place, SW1P Willow Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Windsor Place, SW1P Windsor Place connects Francis Street with Greencoat Place.

NEARBY PUBS


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Westminster

Westminster - heart of government.

While the underground station dates from 1868, Westminster itself is almost as old as London itself. It has a large concentration of London’s historic and prestigious landmarks and visitor attractions, including the Palace of Westminster, Buckingham Palace, Westminster Abbey and Westminster Cathedral.

Historically part of the parish of St Margaret in the City and Liberty of Westminster and the county of Middlesex, the name Westminster was the ancient description for the area around Westminster Abbey – the West Minster, or monastery church, that gave the area its name – which has been the seat of the government of England (and later the British government) for almost a thousand years.

Westminster is the location of the Palace of Westminster, a UNESCO World Heritage Site which houses the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

The area has been the seat of the government of England for almost a thousand years. Westminster is thus often used as a metonym for Parliament and the political community of the United Kingdom generally. The civil service is similarly referred to by the area it inhabits, Whitehall, and Westminster is consequently also used in reference to the ’Westminster System’, the parliamentary model of democratic government that has evolved in the United Kingdom.

The historic core of Westminster is the former Thorney Island on which Westminster Abbey was built. The Abbey became the traditional venue of the coronation of the kings and queens of England. The nearby Palace of Westminster came to be the principal royal residence after the Norman conquest of England in 1066, and later housed the developing Parliament and law courts of England. It can be said that London thus has developed two distinct focal points: an economic one in the City of London; and a political and cultural one in Westminster, where the Royal Court had its home. This division is still very apparent today.

The monarchy later moved to the Palace of Whitehall a little towards the north-east. The law courts have since moved to the Royal Courts of Justice, close to the border of the City of London.

The Westminster area formed part of the City and Liberty of Westminster and the county of Middlesex. The ancient parish was St Margaret; after 1727 split into the parishes of St Margaret and St John. The area around Westminster Abbey formed the extra-parochial Close of the Collegiate Church of St Peter surrounded by—but not part of—either parish. Until 1900 the local authority was the combined vestry of St Margaret and St John (also known as the Westminster District Board of Works from 1855 to 1887), which was based at Westminster City Hall on Caxton Street from 1883. The Liberty of Westminster, governed by the Westminster Court of Burgesses, also included St Martin in the Fields and several other parishes and places. Westminster had its own quarter sessions, but the Middlesex sessions also had jurisdiction. The area was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London in 1889 and the local government of Westminster was reformed in 1900 when the court of burgesses and parish vestries were abolished, to be replaced with a metropolitan borough council. The council was given city status, allowing it to be known as Westminster City Council.

The underground station was opened as Westminster Bridge on 24 December 1868 by the steam-operated Metropolitan District Railway (MDR) (now the District line) when the railway opened the first section of its line from South Kensington. It was originally the eastern terminus of the MDR and the station cutting ended at a concrete wall buffered by timber sleepers. The approach to the station from the west runs in cut and cover tunnel under the roadway of Broad Sanctuary and diagonally under Parliament Square. In Broad Sanctuary the tunnel is close to Westminster Abbey and St Margaret’s church and care was required to avoid undermining their foundations when excavating in the poor ground found there.

The station was completely rebuilt to incorporate new deep-level platforms for the Jubilee line when it was extended to the London Docklands in the 1990s. During the works, the level of the sub-surface platforms was lowered to enable ground level access to Portcullis House. This was achieved in small increments carried out when the line was closed at night.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Broadway SW1
TUM image id: 1530117235
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Recruiting Sergeants (1877) "The most prominent figure in the accompanying photograph, standing with his back to the Abbey, and nearest to the kerb stone, is that of Sergeant Ison, who is always looked upon with more than ordinary curiosity as the representative of the 6th Dragoon Guards, or Carbineers - a regiment which of late has been chiefly distinguished for having included in its ranks no less a person than Sir Roger Tichborne himself! To the right we have the representatives of two heavy regiments, Sergeant Titswell, of the 5th Dragoon Guards, and Sergeant Badcock, of the 2nd Dragoons, or Scots Greys; the latter is leaning against the corner of the public-house. Close to him may be recognized the features of Sergeant Bilton, of the Royal Engineers, while Sergeant Minett, of the 14th Hussars, turns his head towards Sergeant McGilney, of the 6th Dragoons, or Enniskillen, whose stalwart frame occupies the foreground. This group would not, however, have been complete without giving a glimpse at Mr. Cox, the policeman, to whose discretion and pacific interference may be attributed the order which is generally preserved even under the most trying circumstances at the Mitre and Dove." From ’Street Life in London’ by John Thomson and Adolphe Smith
Credit: John Thomson and Adolphe Smith
TUM image id: 1637601129
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In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
The Lillington Gardens estate
Credit: Ewan Munro
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Westminster Abbey with a procession of Knights of the Bath (1749)
Credit: Canaletto
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Victoria coach station’s temporary base, 1929, where the Tachbrook Estate is now. The King’s Scholar Pond sewer is on the left.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Broadway SW1
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Pulford Street being demolished
Credit: Peabody Trust
Licence: CC BY 2.0


"The Thames from Millbank", oil on canvas, Richard Redgrave (1804-1888), created around 1836. The scene depicted is around the year 1815.
Credit: Richard Redgrave/Victoria and Albert Museum
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Monet’s ’Le Parlement, soleil couchant,’ (The Houses of Parliament, at Sunset) (1900) Claude Monet painted a series of impressionist oil paintings of the Palace of Westminster, home of the British Parliament, in the autumn of 1899 and the early months of 1900 and 1901 during stays in London. All of the series’ paintings share the same viewpoint from Monet’s window or a terrace at St Thomas’ Hospital overlooking the Thames. By the time of the Houses of Parliament series, Monet had abandoned his earlier practice of completing a painting on the spot in front of the motif. He carried on refining the images back home in Giverny, France, and sent to London for photographs to help in this. This caused some adverse reaction, but Monet’s reply was that his means of creating a work was his own business and it was up to the viewer to judge the final result.
Credit: Claude Monet
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Building Westminster Bridge (1744) Westminster Bridge was constructed between 1738 and 1750. Richard Wilson’s view of the bridge under construction can be dated to around September 1744. It was at this time that the timber framework supporting the arch immediately to the left of the central span was dismantled - an operation clearly visible in Wilson’s picture. The painting also shows the first stages of construction of the two arches to the right of the central arch, work which had begun that summer. The balustrade surmounting the central arch, although visible in Wilson’s picture, was not completed until the summer of 1745, suggesting that the artist had access to detailed plans or even the designer’s model for the bridge. Wilson’s view is taken from the Westminster side of the river, from Parliament Stairs, looking east towards the city of London and the dome of St Paul’s cathedral, visible on the horizon between the incomplete section of the bridge and the Lambeth shore.
Credit: Richard Wilson/Tate Britain
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