Truckles Wine Bar

Pub/bar in/near Bloomsbury

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(51.51857 -0.12409, 51.518 -0.124) 
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Pub/bar · Bloomsbury · WC1A ·
JUNE
21
2018

This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.

If you know the current status of this business, please comment.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence

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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
Bruce McTavish   
Added: 11 Mar 2021 11:37 GMT   

Kennington Road
Lambeth North station was opened as Kennington Road and then Westminster Bridge Road before settling on its final name. It has a wonderful Leslie Green design.

Reply

Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 19:47 GMT   

Millions Of Rats In Busy London
The Daily Mail on 14 April 1903 reported "MILLIONS OF RATS IN BUSY LONDON"

A rat plague, unprecedented in the annals of London, has broken out on the north side of the Strand. The streets principally infested are Catherine street, Drury lane, Blackmore street, Clare Market and Russell street. Something akin to a reign of terror prevails among the inhabitants after nightfall. Women refuse to pass along Blackmore street and the lower parts of Stanhope street after dusk, for droves of rats perambulate the roadways and pavements, and may be seen running along the window ledges of the empty houses awaiting demolition by the County Council in the Strand to Holborn improvement scheme.

The rats, indeed, have appeared in almost-incredible numbers. "There are millions of them," said one shopkeeper, and his statement was supported by other residents. The unwelcome visitors have been evicted from their old haunts by the County Council housebreakers, and are now busily in search of new homes. The Gaiety Restaurant has been the greatest sufferer. Rats have invaded the premises in such force that the managers have had to close the large dining room on the first floor and the grill rooms on the ground floor and in the basement. Those three spacious halls which have witnessed many as semblages of theatre-goers are now qui:e deserted. Behind the wainscot of the bandstand in the grillroom is a large mound of linen shreds. This represents 1728 serviettes carried theee by the rats.

In the bar the removal of a panel disclosed the astonishing fact that the rats have dragged for a distance of seven or eight yards some thirty or forty beer and wine bottles and stacked them in such a fashion as to make comfortable sleeping places. Mr Williams. the manager of the restaurant, estimates that the rats have destroyed L200 worth of linen. Formerly the Gaiety Restaurant dined 2000 persons daily; no business whatever is now done in this direction.

Reply
Comment
Linda Webb   
Added: 27 Sep 2021 05:51 GMT   

Hungerford Stairs
In 1794 my ancestor, George Webb, Clay Pipe Maker, lived in Hungerford Stairs, Strand. Source: Wakefields Merchant & Tradesmens General Directory London Westminster 1794

Source: Hungerford Stairs

Reply
Lived here
Richard Roques   
Added: 21 Jan 2021 16:53 GMT   

Buckingham Street residents
Here in Buckingham Street lived Samuel Pepys the diarist, Charles Dickens and Rudyard Kipling

Reply
Lived here
Julian    
Added: 23 Mar 2021 10:11 GMT   

Dennis Potter
Author Dennis Potter lived in Collingwood House in the 1970’s

Reply
Comment
Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

Reply
Comment
Jessie Doring   
Added: 22 Feb 2021 04:33 GMT   

Tisbury Court Jazz Bar
Jazz Bar opened in Tisbury Court by 2 Australians. Situated in underground basement. Can not remember how long it opened for.

Reply
Comment
Lena    
Added: 18 Mar 2021 13:08 GMT   

White Conduit Street, N1
My mum, Rosina Wade of the Wade and Hannam family in the area of Chapel Street and Parkfield Street, bought her first “costume” at S Cohen’s in White Conduit Street. Would have probably been about 1936 or thereabouts. She said that he was a small man but an expert tailor. I hope that Islington Council preserve the shop front as it’s a piece of history of the area. Mum used to get her high heel shoes from an Italian shoe shop in Chapel Street. She had size 2 feet and they would let her know when a new consignment of size 2 shoes were in. I think she was a very good customer. She worked at Killingbacks artificial flower maker in Northampton Square and later at the Halifax bombers factory north of Edgware where she was a riveter.

Reply

The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Dec 2020 00:24 GMT   

Othello takes a bow
On 1 November 1604, William Shakespeare’s tragedy Othello was presented for the first time, at The Palace of Whitehall. The palace was the main residence of the English monarchs in London from 1530 until 1698. Seven years to the day, Shakespeare’s romantic comedy The Tempest was also presented for the first time, and also at the Palace of Whitehall.

Reply
Comment
Jeff Owen   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 16:18 GMT   

Owen’s School
Owen Street is the site of Owen’s Boys’ School. The last school was built in 1881 and was demolished in the early 1990s to make way for the development which stand there today. It was a “Direct Grant” grammar school and was founded in 1613 by Dame Alice Owen. What is now “Owen’s Fields” was the playground between the old school and the new girls’ school (known then as “Dames Alice Owen’s School” or simply “DAOS”). The boys’ school had the top two floors of that building for their science labs. The school moved to Potters Bar in Hertfordshire in 1971 and is now one of the top State comprehensive schools in the country. The old building remained in use as an accountancy college and taxi-drivers’ “knowledge” school until it was demolished. The new building is now part of City and Islington College. Owen’s was a fine school. I should know because I attended there from 1961 to 1968.

Reply

Reg Carr   
Added: 10 Feb 2021 12:11 GMT   

Campbellite Meeting
In 1848 the Campbellites (Disciples of Christ) met in Elstree Street, where their congregation was presided over by a pastor named John Black. Their appointed evangelist at the time was called David King, who later became the Editor of the British Millennial Harbinger. The meeting room was visited in July 1848 by Dr John Thomas, who spoke there twice on his two-year ’mission’ to Britain.

Reply
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
roger morris   
Added: 16 Oct 2021 08:50 GMT   

Atherton Road, IG5 (1958 - 1980)
I moved to Atherton road in 1958 until 1980 from Finsbury Park. My father purchased the house from his brother Sydney Morris. My father continued to live there until his death in 1997, my mother having died in 1988.
I attended The Glade Primary School in Atherton Road from sept 1958 until 1964 when I went to Beal School. Have fond memories of the area and friends who lived at no2 (Michael Clark)and no11 (Brian Skelly)

Reply
Lived here
margaret clark   
Added: 15 Oct 2021 22:23 GMT   

Margaret’s address when she married in 1938
^, Josepine House, Stepney is the address of my mother on her marriage certificate 1938. Her name was Margaret Irene Clark. Her father Basil Clark was a warehouse grocer.

Reply
Comment
Martin Eaton    
Added: 14 Oct 2021 03:56 GMT   

Boundary Estate
Sunbury, Taplow House.

Reply
Comment
Simon Chalton   
Added: 10 Oct 2021 21:52 GMT   

Duppas Hill Terrace 1963- 74
I’m 62 yrs old now but between the years 1963 and 1975 I lived at number 23 Duppas Hill Terrace. I had an absolutely idyllic childhood there and it broke my heart when the council ordered us out of our home to build the Ellis Davd flats there.The very large house overlooked the fire station and we used to watch them practice putting out fires in the blue tower which I believe is still there.
I’m asking for your help because I cannot find anything on the internet or anywhere else (pictures, history of the house, who lived there) and I have been searching for many, many years now.
Have you any idea where I might find any specific details or photos of Duppas Hill Terrace, number 23 and down the hill to where the subway was built. To this day it saddens me to know they knocked down this house, my extended family lived at the next house down which I think was number 25 and my best school friend John Childs the next and last house down at number 27.
I miss those years so terribly and to coin a quote it seems they just disappeared like "tears in rain".
Please, if you know of anywhere that might be able to help me in any way possible, would you be kind enough to get back to me. I would be eternally grateful.
With the greatest of hope and thanks,
Simon Harlow-Chalton.


Reply
Comment
Linda Webb   
Added: 27 Sep 2021 05:51 GMT   

Hungerford Stairs
In 1794 my ancestor, George Webb, Clay Pipe Maker, lived in Hungerford Stairs, Strand. Source: Wakefields Merchant & Tradesmens General Directory London Westminster 1794

Source: Hungerford Stairs

Reply
Born here
jack stevens   
Added: 26 Sep 2021 13:38 GMT   

Mothers birth place
Number 5 Whites Row which was built in around 1736 and still standing was the premises my now 93 year old mother was born in, her name at birth was Hilda Evelyne Shaw,

Reply
Born here
Ron Shepherd   
Added: 18 Sep 2021 17:28 GMT   

More Wisdom
Norman Joseph Wisdom was born in St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington, West London.

Reply
Comment
Jonathan Penner   
Added: 11 Sep 2021 16:03 GMT   

Pennard Road, W12
My wife and I, young Canadians, lodged at 65 (?) Pennard Road with a fellow named Clive and his girlfriend, Melanie, for about 6 months in 1985. We loved the area and found it extremely convenient.

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
British Museum British Museum was a station on the Central line, located in Holborn and taking its name from the nearby British Museum in Great Russell Street.
St Giles St Giles is a district of central London, at the southern tip of the London Borough of Camden.
Weston’s Music Hall Weston’s Music Hall was a music hall and theatre that opened in 1857. In 1906, the theatre became known as the Holborn Empire.

NEARBY STREETS
Adeline Place, WC1B Adeline Place was named after Adeline Marie Russell.
Africa House, WC2A Residential block
Arne Street, WC2E Arne Street was named after the 18th century composer Thomas Arne, who was born near here.
Bainbridge Street, WC2H Bainbridge Street takes its name from Henry Bainbridge, a local resident in the 17th century.
Barbon Close, WC1N Barbon Close is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Barter Street, WC1A Barter Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Bayley Street, WC1B Bayley Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1B postal area.
Bedford Avenue, WC1B Bedford Avenue is one of the streets of London in the WC1B postal area.
Bedford Place, WC1B Bedford Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1B postal area.
Bedford Row, WC1R Bedford Row runs between Theobalds Road and Sandland Street.
Bedford Square, WC1B Bedford Square was designed as a unified architectural composition in 1775-6 by Thomas Leverton.
Betterton Street, WC2E Betterton Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Bloomsbury Place, WC1B The name of Bloomsbury Place is derived from William Blemund.
Bloomsbury Square, WC1A The 4th Earl of Southampton was granted a building license for the construction of Bloomsbury Square in 1661.
Bloomsbury Street, WC1A Bloomsbury Street runs from Gower Street in the north to the junction of New Oxford Street and Shaftesbury Avenue in the south.
Bloomsbury Way, WC1A Bloomsbury Way is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Boswell Street, WC1N Boswell Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Bristol House, WC1B Residential block
Bucknall Street, WC2H Bucknall Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Bury Place, WC1A Bury Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Castlewood House, WC1A Residential block
Catton Street, WC2B Catton Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1R postal area.
Centre Point, WC2H Centre Point is a controversial 1960s-built tower block.
Chenies Street, WC1E Chenies Street takes its name from the Buckinghamshire village where since 1556 members of the Russell family have been buried.
Cockpit Yard, WC1X Cockpit Yard leads off Northington Street.
Coptic Street, WC2H Coptic Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Cosmo Place, WC1B Cosmo Place is a road in the WC1B postcode area
Dane Street, WC1R Dane Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1R postal area.
Denmark Place, WC2H Denmark Place is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Denmark Place, WC2H Denmark Place was an alleyway one block north of Denmark Street.
Denmark Street, WC2H Denmark Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Dombey Street, WC1N Dombey Street is a road in the WC1N postcode area
Dryden Street, WC2B Dryden Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Dudley Court, WC2H Dudley Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Dyott Street, WC1A Dyott Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Eagle Street, WC1R Eagle Street runs parallel to High Holborn, one block north.
Earnshaw Street, WC2H Earnshaw Street was at first called Arthur Street.
Emerald Street, WC1N Emerald Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Endell Street, WC2H Endell Street, originally known as Belton Street, is a street that runs from High Holborn in the north to Long Acre and Bow Street in the south.
Falconberg Court, W1D Falconberg Court is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Falconberg Mews, W1D Falconberg Mews runs off of Sutton Row.
Field Court, WC1R Field Court is one of the streets of London in the WC1R postal area.
Fisher Street, WC1R Fisher Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1R postal area.
Flichcroft Street, WC2H Flichcroft Street is a road in the WC2H postcode area
Flitcroft Street, WC2H Flitcroft Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Galen Place, WC1A Galen Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Gate Street, WC2A Gate Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Gilbert Place, WC1A Gilbert Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Gloucester Road, WC1N Gloucester Road is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Goslett Yard, W1D Goslett Yard is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Goslett Yard, W1D Goslett Yard is a road in the W1D postcode area
Grape Street, WC2H Grape Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Great James Street, WC1N Great James Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Great Ormond Street, WC1N Great Ormond Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Great Queen Street, WC2B Great Queen Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2B postal area.
Great Russell Street, WC1A Great Russell Street commemorates the marriage of the daughter of the 4th Earl of Southampton to William Russell in 1669.
Great Russell Street, WC1B Great Russell Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1B postal area.
Guilford Street, WC1B Guilford Street is a road in the WC1B postcode area
Hanway Street, W1D Hanway Street was named after Major John Hanway.
Hanway Street, W1T Hanway Street is a location in London.
High Holborn, WC1V High Holborn was part of the old road from Newgate and the Tower to the gallows at Tyburn.
High Holborn, WC2B High Holborn is a road which is the highest point in the City of London - 22 metres above sea level.
High Holborn, WC2B High Holborn is a road in the WC2A postcode area
Johns Mews, WC1N Johns Mews is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Keeley Street, WC2B Keeley Street has a dual history
Keppel Street, WC1E Keppel Street links Store Street and Gower Street in the west to Malet Street in the east.
Kingsgate Est, WC1B A street within the WC1B postcode
Kingsgate Street, WC1R Kingsgate Street ran from High Holborn to Theobald’s Road.
Kingsway, WC2A Kingsway is one of the streets of London in the WC2B postal area.
Kingsway, WC2B This is a street in the WC2A postcode area
Kirk Street, WC1N Kirk Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Lamb’s Conduit Passage, WC1R This is a street in the WC1R postcode area
Lamb’s Conduit Street, WC1N This is a street in the WC1N postcode area
Lamb’s Mews, WC1N Lamb’s Mews is a road in the N1 postcode area
Lincoln’s Inn Fields, WC2A Lincoln’s Inn Fields is the largest public square in London, laid out in the 1630s under the initiative of the speculative builder William Newton.
Lion Court, WC1R Lion Court is one of the streets of London in the WC1V postal area.
Little Russel Street, WC1A Little Russel Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Little Russell Street, WC1A Little Russell Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Little Turnstile, WC2A Little Turnstile is one of the streets of London in the WC1V postal area.
Macklin Street, WC2B Macklin Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2B postal area.
Malet Street, WC1E Sir Edward Malet was married to Lady Ermyntrude Sackville Russell, daughter of Francis Russell who owned much of the surrounding area.
Manette Street, W1D Manette Street in Soho is named after the character from Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities.
Montague Place, WC1E Montague Place was developed in the decade after 1800.
Montague Street, WC1B Montague Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1B postal area.
Morwell Street, WC1B Morwell Street is a road in the WC1B postcode area
Museum Street, WC1A Museum Street is so-named since it approaches the main entrance of the British Museum.
New Compton Street, WC2H New Compton Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
New North Street, WC1N New North Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
New Oxford Street, WC1A New Oxford Street was built in 1840 to ease congestion in St Giles High Street.
New Oxford Street, WC2H New Oxford Street is a road in the WC2H postcode area
Newton Street, WC1V Newton Street is named for Isaac Newton, scientist and mathematician.
Old Glocester Street, WC1N Old Glocester Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Old Gloucester Street, WC1N Old Gloucester Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Old Glouster Street, WC1N Old Glouster Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Orange Street, WC1R Orange Street disappeared from the map to be replaced by St Martin’s College of Art (now Central Saint Martins).
Orde Hall Street, WC1N Orde Hall Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Ormond Close, WC1N Ormond Close is a road in the WC1N postcode area
Parker Mews, WC2B Parker Mews is one of the streets of London in the WC2B postal area.
Parker Street, WC2B Parker Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2B postal area.
Pied Bull Court, WC1A Pied Bull Court is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Pied Bull Yard, WC1A Pied Bull Yard is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Portsmouth Street, WC2A Portsmouth Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Portugal Street, WC2A Portugal Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Powis Place, WC1N Powis Place is a road in the WC1N postcode area
Princeton Street, WC1R Princeton Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1R postal area.
Procter Street, WC1V Procter Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1V postal area.
Proctor Street, WC1V Proctor Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1V postal area.
Queen Annes Square, WC1N Queen Annes Square is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Queen Square, WC1N Queen Square was laid out by speculator Nicholas Barbon.
Raymond Buildings, WC1R Raymond Buildings is one of the streets of London in the WC1R postal area.
Red Lion Square, WC1R Red Lion Square was built from the late 1680s by speculator Nicholas Barbon.
Red Lion Street, WC1R Red Lion Street connects High Holborn with Theobalds Road.
Richbell Place, WC1N Richbell Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Ridgmount Street, WC1E Ridgmount Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1E postal area.
Rugby Chambers, WC1N Rugby Chambers is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Rugby Street, WC1N Rugby Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1N postal area.
Russell Square, WC1B Russell Square is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Russell Square, WC1B Russell Square was laid out from 1800 by James Burton following the demolition of Bedford House, which originally stood on the site surrounded by gardens and fields.
Sandland Street, WC1R Sandland Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1R postal area.
Sardinia House, WC2A Residential block
Sardinia Street, WC2A Sardinia Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Sardinia Street, WC2B Sardinia Street, formerly Duke Street, was a street that ran from Prince’s Street in the south to the western side of Lincoln’s Inn Fields in the north.
Shaftesbury Avenue, WC2H Shaftesbury Avenue was named after Anthony Ashley Cooper, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury, Victorian politician and philanthropist.
Sheffield Street, WC2A Sheffield Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Shelton Street, WC2E Shelton Street is a road in the WC2B postcode area
Shorts Gardens, WC2H Shorts Gardens is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Sicilian Avenue, WC1V Sicilian Avenue is a shopping parade that diagonally runs in between Southampton Row and Bloomsbury Way.
Sounding Alley, WC2H Sounding Alley is a road in the E3 postcode area
Southampton Place, WC1A Southampton Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Southampton Row, WC1B Southampton Row is one of the streets of London in the WC1B postal area.
Southampton Row, WC1V Southampton Row is a road in the WC1V postcode area
St Giles High Street, WC2H St Giles High Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
St Giles High Street, WC2H St Giles High Street is the former high street of St Giles.
St Giles Square, WC2H St Giles Square is a modern piazza-style development.
St. Giles Square, WC2H St. Giles Square is a location in London.
Stedham Place, WC2H Stedham Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Store Street, WC1E Store Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1E postal area.
Streatham Street, WC1A Streatham Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Stukeley Street, WC2B Stukeley Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2B postal area.
Sutton Row, W1D Sutton Row has existed since 1681.
Theobald’s Road, WC1N Theobald’s Road is a road in the WC1R postcode area
Theobalds Road, WC1N Theobalds Road is one of the streets of London in the WC1X postal area.
Thornhaugh Street, WC1B Thornhaugh Street is a street in London
Thornhaugh Street, WC1H Thornhaugh Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Torrington Square, WC1H Torrington Square was originally laid out as part of the Bedford Estate development in 1821-25, named after the father-in-law of the 6th Duke of Bedford.
Tybalds Close, WC1N Tybalds Close is a location in London.
Verulam Buildings, WC1R Verulam Buildings is one of the streets of London in the WC1R postal area.
Victoria House, WC1B Residential block
West Central Street, WC2H West Central Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Whetstone Park, WC2A Whetstone Park is a road in the WC2A postcode area
Wild Court, WC2B Wild Court leads west from the Kingsway.
Wild Street, WC2B Wild Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2B postal area.
Willoughby Street, WC1B Willoughby Street was formerly known as both Vine Street and Wooburn Street.
Yorkshire Grey Yard, WC1V Yorkshire Grey Yard lies off of Eagle Street, WC1

NEARBY PUBS
All Bar One This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
All Bar One Holborn This is a bar which was still existing in 2018.
Apartment 58 This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Bloomsbury Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
George Birkbeck Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Hercules Pillar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Hudsons House This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Museum Inn/Astor Museum This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Museum Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
My Old Dutch This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Night and Day Bar Imperial Hotel This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Philomena’s This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Pillars Of Hercules This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Princess Louise This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Secrets This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Sway This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Angel This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Bountiful Cow This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The College Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Crown This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Dolphin This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Enterprise This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The London Cocktail Club This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Montague on the Gardens This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Old Crown This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Old Nick This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Old Red Lion This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Perseverance This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Plough This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Polish Bar (Na Zdrowie) This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Queens Larder This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Rugby Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Ship Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Square Pig This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Sun This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Swan This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Tottenham This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Troy Club This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
White Hart This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Bloomsbury

Bloomsbury is an area of the London Borough of Camden, in central London, between Euston Road and Holborn, developed by the Russell family in the 17th and 18th centuries into a fashionable residential area.

The earliest record of what would become Bloomsbury is the 1086 Domesday Book, which records that the area had vineyards and ’wood for 100 pigs’. But it is not until 1201 that the name Bloomsbury is first noted, when William de Blemond, a Norman landowner, acquired the land.

The name Bloomsbury is a development from Blemondisberi – the bury, or manor, of Blemond. An 1878 publication, Old and New London: Volume 4, mentions the idea that the area was named after a village called Lomesbury which formerly stood where Bloomsbury Square is now, though this piece of folk etymology is now discredited.

At the end of the 14th century Edward III acquired Blemond’s manor, and passed it on to the Carthusian monks of the London Charterhouse, who kept the area mostly rural.

In the 16th century, with the Dissolution of the Monasteries, Henry VIII took the land back into the possession of the Crown, and granted it to Thomas Wriothesley, 1st Earl of Southampton.

In the early 1660s, the Earl of Southampton constructed what eventually became Bloomsbury Square. The area was laid out mainly in the 18th century, largely by landowners such as Wriothesley Russell, 3rd Duke of Bedford, who built Bloomsbury Market, which opened in 1730. The major development of the squares that we see today started in about 1800 when Francis Russell, 5th Duke of Bedford removed Bedford House and developed the land to the north with Russell Square as its centrepiece.

Historically, Bloomsbury is associated with the arts, education, and medicine. The area gives its name to the Bloomsbury Group of artists, the most famous of whom was Virginia Woolf, who met in private homes in the area in the early 1900s, and to the lesser known Bloomsbury Gang of Whigs formed in 1765 by John Russell, 4th Duke of Bedford.

The publisher Faber & Faber used to be located in Queen Square, though at the time T. S. Eliot was editor the offices were in Tavistock Square. The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood was founded in John Millais’s parents’ house on Gower Street in 1848.

The Bloomsbury Festival was launched in 2006 when local resident Roma Backhouse was commissioned to mark the re-opening of the Brunswick Centre, a residential and shopping area.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Transmission
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Waterloo Bridge on an 1810 map.
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Tottenham Court Road (1927)
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Cromer Street
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In the neighbourhood...

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Tottenham Court Road (1927)
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The Royal Opera House, Bow Street frontage, with the statue of Dame Ninette de Valois in the foreground
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British Museum station
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Centre Point, a controversial building in New Oxford Street comprising a 34-storey tower (2005) Constructed from 1963 to 1966, it was one of the first skyscrapers in London, and as of 2009 was the city’s joint 27th-tallest building. It stood empty from the time of its completion until 1975. In 2015 it was converted from office space to luxury flats.
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View of Seven Dials, looking up Little Earl Street - now part of Earlham Street - in 1896
Old London postcard
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Endell Street towards Long Acre, 2015
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Newport Court streetsign
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Red Lion Street c. 1900, looking north to Javens Chambers and Clerkenwell Road
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Cab shelter, Russell Square
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Shaftesbury Avenue from Piccadilly Circus in 1949
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